Actinobacillosis: A disease characterized by suppurative and granulomatous lesions in the respiratory tract, upper alimentary tract, skin, kidneys, joints, and other tissues. Actinobacillus lignieresii infects cattle and sheep while A. equuli infects horses and pigs.Food Inspection: Examination of foods to assure wholesome and clean products free from unsafe microbes or chemical contamination, natural or added deleterious substances, and decomposition during production, processing, packaging, etc.Anthrax: An acute infection caused by the spore-forming bacteria BACILLUS ANTHRACIS. It commonly affects hoofed animals such as sheep and goats. Infection in humans often involves the skin (cutaneous anthrax), the lungs (inhalation anthrax), or the gastrointestinal tract. Anthrax is not contagious and can be treated with antibiotics.Bacillus anthracis: A species of bacteria that causes ANTHRAX in humans and animals.Manuals as Topic: Books designed to give factual information or instructions.Meat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.Tolonium Chloride: A phenothiazine that has been used as a hemostatic, a biological stain, and a dye for wool and silk. Tolonium chloride has also been used as a diagnostic aid for oral and gastric neoplasms and in the identification of the parathyroid gland in thyroid surgery.Burial: The act or ceremony of putting a corpse into the ground or a vault, or into the sea; or the inurnment of CREMAINS.Dictionaries, MedicalTongue, FissuredGlossitis, Benign Migratory: An idiopathic disorder characterized by the loss of filiform papillae leaving reddened areas of circinate macules bound by a white band. The lesions heal, then others erupt.Tongue: A muscular organ in the mouth that is covered with pink tissue called mucosa, tiny bumps called papillae, and thousands of taste buds. The tongue is anchored to the mouth and is vital for chewing, swallowing, and for speech.Dictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Tongue Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the TONGUE.Tongue DiseasesSodium Iodide: A compound forming white, odorless deliquescent crystals and used as iodine supplement, expectorant or in its radioactive (I-131) form as an diagnostic aid, particularly for thyroid function tests.Iodides: Inorganic binary compounds of iodine or the I- ion.Animal Testing Alternatives: Procedures, such as TISSUE CULTURE TECHNIQUES; mathematical models; etc., when used or advocated for use in place of the use of animals in research or diagnostic laboratories.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Animal Welfare: The protection of animals in laboratories or other specific environments by promoting their health through better nutrition, housing, and care.Animal Experimentation: The use of animals as investigational subjects.Iodine Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of iodine that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. I atoms with atomic weights 117-139, except I 127, are radioactive iodine isotopes.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Northern IrelandIrelandEquipment Reuse: Further or repeated use of equipment, instruments, devices, or materials. It includes additional use regardless of the original intent of the producer as to disposability or durability. It does not include the repeated use of fluids or solutions.Veterinary Medicine: The medical science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in animals.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Education, Veterinary: Use for general articles concerning veterinary medical education.Diet, Sodium-Restricted: A diet which contains very little sodium chloride. It is prescribed by some for hypertension and for edematous states. (Dorland, 27th ed)Teprotide: A synthetic nonapeptide (Pyr-Trp-Pro-Arg-Pro-Gln-Ile-Pro-Pro) which is identical to the peptide from the venom of the snake, Bothrops jararaca. It inhibits kininase II and ANGIOTENSIN I and has been proposed as an antihypertensive agent.Chorda Tympani Nerve: A branch of the facial (7th cranial) nerve which passes through the middle ear and continues through the petrotympanic fissure. The chorda tympani nerve carries taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue and conveys parasympathetic efferents to the salivary glands.Saralasin: An octapeptide analog of angiotensin II (bovine) with amino acids 1 and 8 replaced with sarcosine and alanine, respectively. It is a highly specific competitive inhibitor of angiotensin II that is used in the diagnosis of HYPERTENSION.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Heart Septum: This structure includes the thin muscular atrial septum between the two HEART ATRIA, and the thick muscular ventricular septum between the two HEART VENTRICLES.Dictionaries, ChemicalSeptum of Brain: GRAY MATTER structures of the telencephalon and LIMBIC SYSTEM in the brain, but containing widely varying definitions among authors. Included here is the cortical septal area, subcortical SEPTAL NUCLEI, and the SEPTUM PELLUCIDUM.Ventricular Septum: The muscular structure separating the right and the left lower chambers (HEART VENTRICLES) of the heart. The ventricular septum consists of a very small membranous portion just beneath the AORTIC VALVE, and a large thick muscular portion consisting of three sections including the inlet septum, the trabecular septum, and the outlet septum.Septum Pellucidum: A triangular double membrane separating the anterior horns of the LATERAL VENTRICLES of the brain. It is situated in the median plane and bounded by the CORPUS CALLOSUM and the body and columns of the FORNIX (BRAIN).Hyperpituitarism: Disease of the glandular, anterior portion of the pituitary (PITUITARY GLAND, ANTERIOR) resulting in hypersecretion of ADENOHYPOPHYSEAL HORMONES such as GROWTH HORMONE; PROLACTIN; THYROTROPIN; LUTEINIZING HORMONE; FOLLICLE STIMULATING HORMONE ; and ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE. Hyperpituitarism usually is caused by a functional ADENOMA.Oxidoreductases Acting on CH-NH Group Donors: Enzymes catalyzing the dehydrogenation of secondary amines, introducing a C=N double bond as the primary reaction. In some cases this is later hydrolyzed.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Hydroxyethyl Starch Derivatives: Starches that have been chemically modified so that a percentage of OH groups are substituted with 2-hydroxyethyl ether groups.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Actinobacillus equuli: A genus of gram-negative bacteria in the genus ACTINOBACILLUS, which is pathogenic for HORSES and PIGS.Endometritis: Inflammation of the ENDOMETRIUM, usually caused by intrauterine infections. Endometritis is the most common cause of postpartum fever.Actinobacillus: A genus of PASTEURELLACEAE described as gram-negative, nonsporeforming, nonmotile, facultative anaerobes. Most members are found both as pathogens and commensal organisms in the respiratory, alimentary, and genital tracts of animals.Actinobacillus Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus ACTINOBACILLUS.Streptococcus equi: A species of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria isolated from abscesses in submaxillary glands and mucopurulent discharges of the upper respiratory tract of horses. This organism belongs to Group C streptococci with regards to antigen response and is known to cause strangles. The subspecies S. zooepidemicus is also considered a pathogen of horses.Klebsiella pneumoniae: Gram-negative, non-motile, capsulated, gas-producing rods found widely in nature and associated with urinary and respiratory infections in humans.Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A species of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria commonly isolated from clinical specimens (wound, burn, and urinary tract infections). It is also found widely distributed in soil and water. P. aeruginosa is a major agent of nosocomial infection.

An atypical case of respiratory actinobacillosis in a cow. (1/4)

A not pregnant 4-year-old Jersey cow was presented with the sudden appearance of respiratory noise, nasal discharge and moderate respiratory difficulty. Upon physical examination a snoring-like noise, extended head and neck position, exaggerated abdominal effort, bilateral nasal discharge and left prescapular lymph node enlargement were noted. Sub-occlusion of the initial portion of the respiratory tract was suspected. Radiographic and endoscopic examinations revealed a pedunculate mass on the dorsal aspect of the rhinopharynx, which was removed with endoscopically assisted electrosurgery. Histologic examination revealed a chronic pyogranulomatous inflammation with eosinophilic club-like bodies surrounding small colonies of rod-shaped bacteria. Results of histochemical staining were consistent with Actinobacillus-like bacteria and a diagnosis of respiratory actinobacillosis was reached. Surgery and antibiotic therapy were resolutive, as demonstated by an endoscopic check at the second month after surgery, even without the association of the traditional iodine cure, which is regarded as the treatment of choice for actinobacillosis.  (+info)

Species-specific multiplex PCR for the diagnosis of Brucella ovis, Actinobacillus seminis, and Histophilus somni infection in rams. (2/4)

 (+info)

Nonspecific toxicites in the mouse assay test for botulinum toxin. (3/4)

In inoculated pack experiments on Clostridium botulinum type E, unirradiated and 0.1-Mrad irradiated haddock fillets often gave nonspecific toxicities by the mouse assay test for botulinum toxin. Samples given 0.2-Mrad radiation failed to produce nonspecific reactions. Nonspecific deaths sometimes occurred within 24 hr after injection, although deaths between 24 and 48 hr were more common. The symptoms and the pattern of these deaths suggested a septicemia. Heart-blood cultured from mice showing nonspecific symptoms indicated an infectious process. Among 23 isolates from the blood, eight were identified as Proteus vulgaris, two P. morganii, one P. rettgeri, one Providence subgroup B, two Aerobacter aerogenes, one Actinobacillus, three enterococci, one Alcaligenes marshalli, and four Erysipelothrix insidiosa. The E. insidiosa, Aerobacter, Providence group, and most of the Proteus isolates were infectious for mice when injected by the intraperitoneal route. But the enterococci, Alcaligenes, and Actinobacillus isolates were not infectious and probably represent secondary invaders. The cultural characteristics of the E. insidiosa isolates conform to those described in the literature, with the exception that the four strains grew in the temperature range 50 F (10 C) to 40 F (4.4 C). Nonspecific toxicities were avoided in assays for botulinum toxin by the protection of mice with chloramphenicol and oxytetracycline.  (+info)

In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. (4/4)

The agar dilution technique was used for determination of the antibiotic susceptibilities of 57 oral isolates and 2 nonoral isolates of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Tetracycline, minocycline, and chloramphenicol inhibited more than 96% of the strains tested at a concentration of less than or equal to 2 micrograms/ml; 89% of the strains were inhibited by 2 micrograms of carbenicillin per ml. The other antimicrobial agents tested were less active. Approximately 10% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were resistant to ampicillin, erythromycin, and penicillin G at concentrations of 32 to 64 micrograms/ml. These data suggest that tetracycline and minocycline may be valuable drugs in the treatment of A. actinomycetemcomitans infections.  (+info)

Wooden Tongue in Cattle Also known as: Actinobacillosis Wooden tongue (also known as Actinobacillosis) is a well-defined disease of the soft tissues of the mouth region in adult cattle. It is caused by Actinobacillus lignieresii, part of the normal bacterial flora of the upper digestive tract.
Looking for online definition of leukocyte adherence assay test in the Medical Dictionary? leukocyte adherence assay test explanation free. What is leukocyte adherence assay test? Meaning of leukocyte adherence assay test medical term. What does leukocyte adherence assay test mean?
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Looking for laboratory doctor in Qatar? Our comprehensive directory, Tabeebak Qatar will provide you with complete information about all laboratory doctors in Qatar. To make your search about laboratory doctors in Qatar quicker and easier, you may filter by category or by keyword to suit your requirement. To expand or narrow your search, make sure to enter the right keywords or choose a specific category. A medical laboratoryor clinical laboratoryis a laboratorywhere tests are usually done on clinical specimens in order to obtain information about the health of a patient as pertaining to the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease. Clinical laboratories in Qatar are thus focused on applied science mainly on a production-like basis, as opposed to research laboratories that focus on basic science on an academic basis. Distribution of clinical laboratories in health institutions varies greatly from one place to another. For instance, for microbiology, some health facilities have a single ...
CEA has been a constant bane to me since my initial diagnosis in 2012. Preoperative CEA was 13.9. The lowest it dropped to was 3.11 when the clinic I went to used a lab that did the Siemans/Bayer assay test that had 0-3 as normal for non smokers and up to 5 for smokers. Before I switched clinics, the lab at this clinic changed assay methods and went with the Roche test. This changed the scale for what was considered normal. Depending on the lab, the new normal CEA level is anywhere from 4 to 5. Since then my blood work has been done with the Roche test which I only had one CEA test come in just below the normal limit. All my other blood work has come in between 5 to 6. This has been going on for the past 2 years.. Last year, during my normal checkup, CEA was run again and to my surprise....9.7. A retest was ordered to make sure that number was real....came back at 11. Ok. So whats going on? I had a CT with contrast done a few weeks prior to meeting up with my oncologist and having the CEA done. ...
Building on the success of MitoXpress® Xtra Oxygen Consumption Assay, Luxcel Biosciences has created and is rapidly expanding a one-stop-shop of in vitro cell-based assay tests and kits, targeting Cell Metabolism, Drug Safety and Hypoxia / Oxidative Stress for the Life Sciences market.
42 of the Chromas software package (Conor McCarthy, Southport, Australia). For all analyses, data obtained PLX3397 purchase with the forward and reverse primers were combined and aligned to the consensus sequence obtained from the BLAST GenBank database http://​www.​ncbi.​nlm.​nih.​gov/​nuccore/​166706780?​report=​genbank. Figure 1 Sequencing of the KRAS gene in DNA isolated from NSCLC tissues. (A) Wild type-(12Gly-GGT, 13Gly-GGC), (B) Mutant- (12Asp-GAT). Pyrosequencing In the pyrosequencing method for DNA sequence analysis [16, 17], inorganic phosphate released in the course of nucleotide incorporation serves as the initial substrate in a sequence of four. successive enzymatic reactions. This result in the emission of light, which functions as a signal that is proportional to the number of nucleotides incorporated. In this project, the PyroMark K-ras assay test (Biotage, Uppsala, Sweden) was used for primary amplification P005091 cost and pyrosequencing of both the 12th and ...
SUMMARY. A case of bilateral epididymitis in a young Friesland bull is described. Actino-bacillis seminis was isolated from the bulls semen. The organism proved to be identical in microscopical, cultural and biochemical characteristics to strains isolated from rams. Serum from this animal, when subjected to a complement fixation test, yielded a suspicious reaction against an antigen prepared from the isolate of a naturally infected ram with clinical epididymitis. Blood sera from two bulls in the Orange Free State gave positive and suspicious reactions respectively to the same antigen.. ...
Zeus Scientific Inc. Company Type: Parent. ZEUS Scientific is a privately held corporation that was founded in 1976. The company began producing IFA (immunofluorescence assay) test systems followed ELISA and now multiplex (AtheNA Multi-Lyte) immunoassays. New products are developed to expand the menu which allows laboratories to run an increasing number of assays with common protocols and common reagents, as well as developing new tests to more accurately diagnose patients. In 1987 ZEUS Scientific was the first company to develop, receive appropriate regulatory clearance and bring to market a serological assay to test for Lyme disease - a condition with high prevalence in the local community where ZEUS Scientific is located. ...
A device for collecting, testing and transporting a liquid specimen of urine or the like incorporates a cup or container and a cooperating lid which becomes sealed about its upper rim when the lid is mated with the specimen-containing cup. An upwardly open subchamber of defined volume, formed in the bottom wall of the cup, is sealed by engagement with a downwardly extending hollow plug portion of the lid that has a bottom wall containing a central aperture closed by a frangible sheet material seal. When initial testing is to be conducted, an elongated assay cartridge is inserted vertically downward through the hollow plug. The bottom end splits open the frangible seal and enters into the subchamber containing the defined volume of the liquid sample, which becomes totally absorbed by a pair of elongated nitrocellulose strips, along which the liquid moves by capillary action to effect the assay tests.
ANK3 NM_020987 Genes are involved in autism spectrum disorders. This gene is specific to autism and epilepsy. When a clinical correlation is discovered in a patient, a doctor should also request a Genecept Assay Test to further aid in the treatment of this patient, given most patients with ANK3 variations show adverse reactions to antipsychotics and SSRIs. Medications like Lamictal, VItamin D, N-acetylcysteine are generally well tolerated in axis 3 (ANK3) patients, given comorbid factors. The worst drugs for anyone showing ANK3 variations are antipsychotics and excessive amounts of benzodiazepines, though PRN use of benzos does not seem to be contraindicated. There is an urgent need to interpret if the increase or decrease of the expression of ANK3 by any chemical agent is either helpful or harmful, because currently too many physicans are left in the dark on which pharmaceutical agents are actually hurting people with ANK3 mutations, even if its one allele.. ...
Neogen Corporations Ketoprofen ELISA (Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay) test kit is a qualitative one-step kit designed for use as a screening device for the detection of Ketoprofen. The kit was designed for screening purposes and is intended for forensic use only.. ...
Histophilus somni is a Gram-negative bacterium and member of the Pasteurellaceae that is responsible for respiratory disease and other systemic infections in cattle. One of the bacteriums virulence factors is antigenic phase variation of its lipooligosaccharide (LOS). LOS antigenic variation may occur through variation in composition or structure of glycoses or their substitutions, such as phosphorylcholine (ChoP). However, the role of ChoP in the pathogenesis of H. somni disease has not been established. In Haemophilus influenzae ChoP on the LOS binds to platelet activating factor on epithelial cells, promoting bacterial colonization of the host upper respiratory tract. However, ChoP is not expressed in the blood as it also binds C-reactive protein, resulting in complement activation and killing of the bacteria. In order to simulate the susceptibility of calves with suppressed immunity due to stress or previous infection, calves were challenged with bovine herpes virus-1 or dexamethazone 3 ...
Histophilus somni is a Gram-negative bacterium and member of the Pasteurellaceae that is responsible for respiratory disease and other systemic infections in cattle. One of the bacteriums virulence factors is antigenic phase variation of its lipooligosaccharide (LOS). LOS antigenic variation may occur through variation in composition or structure of glycoses or their substitutions, such as phosphorylcholine (ChoP). However, the role of ChoP in the pathogenesis of H. somni disease has not been established. In Haemophilus influenzae ChoP on the LOS binds to platelet activating factor on epithelial cells, promoting bacterial colonization of the host upper respiratory tract. However, ChoP is not expressed in the blood as it also binds C-reactive protein, resulting in complement activation and killing of the bacteria. In order to simulate the susceptibility of calves with suppressed immunity due to stress or previous infection, calves were challenged with bovine herpes virus-1 or dexamethazone 3 days prior
0061]FIGS. 4-7 additional embodiments of a laminated device, wherein the top surface 22 of overlamina 20 includes additional optional features. FIG. 4 shows an embodiment similar to that shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, wherein separate openings for receiving a sample and for visualizing the assay strip are present. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 5, the openings 25, 26 for receiving a sample and for visualizing the assay strip, respectively, form a single opening. The device in the embodiment shown in FIG. 6 includes a plurality of openings 26a, 26b, for viewing different portions of the same assay strips, or of different assay strips, which is particularly advantageous when using a laminated analyte assay device for performing several assays simultaneously. In this embodiment wherein a laminated device comprises more than one assay test strip, it is contemplated that test strips can be positioned side by side, such that a test result from a first strip is visible in a first viewing window, and a test ...
Pathway modules Carbohydrate metabolism Central carbohydrate metabolism M00002 Glycolysis, core module involving three-carbon compounds [PATH:hso00010 hso01200 hso01230 hso01100 ...
emphasis and notes added]. Chicken soup has long been regarded as a remedy for symptomatic upper respiratory tract infections. As it is likely that the clinical similarity of the diverse infectious processes that can result in colds is due to a shared inflammatory response, an effect of chicken soup in mitigating inflammation could account for its attested benefits. To evaluate this, a traditional chicken soup was tested for its ability to inhibit neutrophil [white blood cells that kills germs and also cause the inflammation or "cold" symptoms when they overdo it] migration using the standard Boyden blindwell chemotaxis [movement of a cell in reaction to a chemical] chamber assay [test] with zymosan-activated serum and fMet-Leu-Phe as chemoattractants [the stuff to make the cells move]. Chicken soup significantly inhibited neutrophil migration and did so in a concentration-dependent manner. [the more soup, the more it stopped the cells from migrating] The activity was present in a ...
CARLSBAD, Calif., June 6, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Life Technologies Corporation (NASDAQ: LIFE) today announced that it has developed a custom test (assay) to accurately detect the E. coli bacterium that has killed at least 22 people and affected more than 2,100 worldwide, including four new cases reported in the United States. Shipments of the TaqMan® E. coli 0104 Detection Kit to test foods thought to be associated with the outbreak are now in Europe.. "A qPCR-based assay test is the most accurate method to detect harmful foodborne pathogens because a positive result indicates the presence of that particular strains DNA in the food sample that is being tested," said Nir Nimrodi, Head of Food Safety at Life Technologies. "It is also the fastest. While traditional laboratory testing methods can take up to 10 days for results, this test can determine the presence or absence of the European pathogen in 10 to 24 hours, depending on the sample type and size.". Life Technologies began designing the ...
... (Rapid Test Development Kits). Kit for the development of a gold nanoparticle based vertical flow rapid assay test. Detection of a specific antigen in a sample can be done in 5 minutes or less. Contains assay cartridges, buffers an
The ASTM D2892 test method is used for the distillation of stabilized crude to a final cut temperature of up to 400ºC (752ºF) Atmospheric Equivalent Temperature (AET). The crude oil is heated and separated by the distillation column into lighter products such as; gasoline, kerosene, naphtha, etc. The lighter products produced in this process are further refined in various refinery processes. This test method employs a fractionating column having an efficiency of 14 to 18 theoretical plates operated at a reflux ratio of 5:1. This test method details procedures for the production of a liquefied gas, distillate fractions, and resid of standardized quality on which analytical data can be obtained, and the determination of yields of the above fractions by mass and volume. This distillation curve corresponds to a laboratory technique, which is defined at 15/5 (15 theoretical plate column, 5:1 reflux ratio) or true boiling point (TBP ...
MP Biomedicals has a wide range of Rapid test & Immuno assay test Kits to diagnose different Cardiac markers like, serum accute phase proteins (CRP proteins) and other Cardiac proteins. These diferent cardiac markers cover some enzymes to screen myocardial infraction.It also consists of some proteins, motor proteins helps to make cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation. Learn More ...
Antisera against Actinobacillus seminis, Brucella ovis and Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis were prepared in adult female goats. Specific immunofluorescence was observed in cultural smears of A seminis, B ovis and C pseudotuberculosis by the direct technique and in smears of A seminis also by the indirect technique. Individual organisms could be recognised. Specific fluorescence of A seminis was readily detected in semen. The results indicate that immunofluorescence may offer an effective method for rapidly and accurately diagnosing bacterial epididymitis in sheep, especially before epididymal lesions are palpable.. ...
Serum bile food viagra acids is increased, whereas in other indigenous populations, such as syrup of ipecac in these patients. Table. Patients usually have no real meaning is obvi-ously useful. This is not a common complication of serious reactions. A. Topical keratolytic agents address the developmental, medical, psychosocial, and environmental e.G., natural dis-asters, socioeconomic status are not replaced with fat and fat-soluble vitamins. The common bile duct. An increase in lactic acid with a concomitant course of the location of the. Which occurs minutes after taking the oral route is usually accom-plished by activation of t cell b cell to swell and eventually drooling occur, a. Neurologicthe major neurologic complication is displacement. Single positive blood culture, or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test kits specific for particular neoplasms and inflammatory disorders e.G., ulcerative colitis, cystic fibrosis, autoimmune disorders. Have you ever been sad for more than were fully ...
Posttranslational modification (PTM) of proteins is a versatile cellular process to regulate the activities of proteins. These modifications are mostly brought about by enzymes that regioselectively introduce a not-genetically encoded functionality at one or several specific proteins. Very interestingly, PTMs are also utilized by bacterial pathogens to manipulate the activities of such host proteins that could potentially interfere with the survival and replication of infectious agents. Since small GTPases are major regulators of intracellular signaling, they are not surprisingly targeted frequently by pathogenic proteins in order to divert cellular defense mechanisms. In this respect, the recent discovery of reversible adenylylation and phosphocholination of the Rab1 subfamily of small GTPases by Legionella pneumophila has been very insightful since these PTMs differently affect Rab biology [1, 2]. Also, adenylylation of the Rho family by enzymes from Histophilus somni and Vibrio ...
You can see our quality! Our Creamy Rice Brown Rice Farina Hot Cereal is carefully milled form the finest whole grain brown rice. Satisfyingly smooth and gentle in flavor, this wholesome cereal is a favorite of adults and kids alike. It contains no sugar or saturated fat and provides three grams of protein and two grams of fiber per serving. Its also gluten-free, so its great for people with special diets. Friend of the heart. All natural. 100% whole grain. 41 g or more per serving. Eat 48 g or more of whole grains daily. An employee-owned company. To your good health. - Bob Moore. Gluten free. Our product line is diverse and extensive. For information and recipes, visit our website at www.bobsredmill.com. Diets rich in whole grain foods and other plant foods low in total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease and some cancers. Bobs Red Mill products labeled Gluten Free are batch tested in our quality control laboratory. We use an ELISA Gluten Assay test to ...
"Atypical cutaneous actinobacillosis in young beef cattle". Veterinary Record. 171 (15). doi:10.1136/vr.100906. ...
The bacterium has many strains and is the pathogen responsible for Actinobacillosis in pigs of all ages. It can also infect ... Actinobacillosis - Pig, reviewed and published by Wikivet at http://en.wikivet.net/Actinobacillosis_-_Pig accessed 07/10/2011. ...
... actinobacillosis MeSH C01.252.400.700.433 --- haemophilus infections MeSH C01.252.400.700.433.257 --- chancroid MeSH C01.252. ...
... is a zoonotic disease caused by Actinobacillus. It is more commonly associated with animals than with humans. ... There are generally one or two cases of actinobacillosis per herd found in adult cows, foals or adult horses, and other similar ... Mouth actinobacillosis of cattle must be differentiated from actinomycosis that affects bone tissues of the maxilla. ... One of the most common forms seen by veterinarians is mouth actinobacillosis of cattle, due to Actinobacillus lignieresii. The ...
A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection that affects part of the urinary tract.[1] When it affects the lower urinary tract it is known as a bladder infection (cystitis) and when it affects the upper urinary tract it is known as a kidney infection (pyelonephritis).[9] Symptoms from a lower urinary tract infection include pain with urination, frequent urination, and feeling the need to urinate despite having an empty bladder.[1] Symptoms of a kidney infection include fever and flank pain usually in addition to the symptoms of a lower UTI.[9] Rarely the urine may appear bloody.[6] In the very old and the very young, symptoms may be vague or non-specific.[1][10] The most common cause of infection is Escherichia coli, though other bacteria or fungi may rarely be the cause.[2] Risk factors include female anatomy, sexual intercourse, diabetes, obesity, and family history.[2] Although sexual intercourse is a risk factor, UTIs are not classified as sexually transmitted infections (STIs).[11] ...
The word cholera is from Greek: χολέρα kholera from χολή kholē "bile". Cholera likely has its origins in the Indian subcontinent as evidenced by its prevalence in the region for centuries.[13] Early outbreaks in the Indian subcontinent are believed to have been the result of poor living conditions as well as the presence of pools of still water, both of which provide ideal conditions for cholera to thrive.[71] The disease first spread by trade routes (land and sea) to Russia in 1817, later to the rest of Europe, and from Europe to North America and the rest of the world.[13] Seven cholera pandemics have occurred in the past 200 years, with the seventh pandemic originating in Indonesia in 1961.[72] The first cholera pandemic occurred in the Bengal region of India, near Calcutta starting in 1817 through 1824. The disease dispersed from India to Southeast Asia, the Middle East, Europe, and Eastern Africa.[73] The movement of British Army and Navy ships and personnel is believed to have ...
... (TD) is a stomach and intestinal infection. TD is defined as the passage of unformed stool (one or more by some definitions, three or more by others) while traveling.[2][3] It may be accompanied by abdominal cramps, nausea, fever, and bloating.[3] Occasionally bloody diarrhea may occur.[5] Most travelers recover within four days with little or no treatment.[3] About 10% of people may have symptoms for a week.[3] Bacteria are responsible for more than half of cases.[3] The bacteria enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are typically the most common except in Southeast Asia, where Campylobacter is more prominent.[2][3] About 10% to 20% of cases are due to norovirus.[3] Protozoa such as Giardia may cause longer term disease.[3] The risk is greatest in the first two weeks of travel and among young adults.[2] People affected are more often from the developed world.[2] Recommendations for prevention include eating only properly cleaned and cooked food, drinking bottled water, and ...
Protective levels of anticapsular antibodies are not achieved until 7-14 days following administration of a meningococcal vaccine, vaccination cannot prevent early onset disease in these contacts and usually is not recommended following sporadic cases of invasive meningococcal disease. Unlike developed countries, in sub-Saharan Africa and other under developed countries, entire families live in a single room of a house.[21][22] Meningococcal infection is usually introduced into a household by an asymptomatic person. Carriage then spreads through the household, reaching infants usually after one or more other household members have been infected. Disease is most likely to occur in infants and young children who lack immunity to the strain of organism circulating and who subsequently acquire carriage of an invasive strain.[23] By preventing susceptible contacts from acquiring infection by directly inhibiting colonization. Close contacts are defined as those persons who could have had intimate ...
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... is a large family of Gram-negative bacteria. It was first proposed by Rahn in 1936, and now includes over 30 genera and more than 100 species. Its classification above the level of family is still a subject of debate, but one classification places it in the order Enterobacterales of the class Gammaproteobacteria in the phylum Proteobacteria.[2][3][4][5] Enterobacteriaceae includes, along with many harmless symbionts, many of the more familiar pathogens, such as Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella, and Shigella. Other disease-causing bacteria in this family include Enterobacter and Citrobacter. Members of the Enterobacteriaceae can be trivially referred to as enterobacteria or "enteric bacteria",[6] as several members live in the intestines of animals. In fact, the etymology of the family is enterobacterium with the suffix to designate a family (aceae)-not after the genus Enterobacter (which would be "Enterobacteraceae")-and the type genus is Escherichia. ...
... are a class of gram-negative bacteria, and one of the eight classes of the phylum Proteobacteria.[1] The Betaproteobacteria are a class comprising over 75 genera and 400 species of bacteria.[2] Together, the Betaproteobacteria represent a broad variety of metabolic strategies and occupy diverse environments from obligate pathogens living within host organisms to oligotrophic groundwater ecosystems. Whilst most members of the Betaproteobacteria are heterotrophic, deriving both their carbon and electrons from organocarbon sources, some are photoheterotrophic, deriving energy from light and carbon from organocarbon sources. Other genera are autotrophic, deriving their carbon from bicarbonate or carbon dioxide and their electrons from reduced inorganic ions such as nitrite, ammonium, thiosulfate or sulfide [1] - many of these chemolithoautotrophic Betaproteobacteria are economically important, with roles in maintaining soil pH and in elementary cycling. Other economically ...
Toxoplasmosis is becoming a global health hazard as it infects 30-50% of the world human population. Clinically, the life-long presence of the parasite in tissues of a majority of infected individuals is usually considered asymptomatic. However, a number of studies show that this 'asymptomatic infection' may also lead to development of other human pathologies. ... The seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis correlated with various disease burden. Statistical associations does not necessarily mean causality. The precautionary principle suggests however that possible role of toxoplasmosis as a triggering factor responsible for development of several clinical entities deserves much more attention and financial support both in everyday medical practice and future clinical research ...
... [1], previously known as Enterobacter aerogenes, is a Gram-negative, oxidase negative, catalase positive, citrate positive, indole negative, rod-shaped bacterium.[2] The bacterium is approximately 1-3 microns in length, and is capable of motility via peritrichous flagella.[3] K. aerogenes is a nosocomial and pathogenic bacterium that causes opportunistic infections including most types of infections. The majority are sensitive to most antibiotics designed for this bacteria class, but this is complicated by their inducible resistance mechanisms, particularly lactamase, which means that they quickly become resistant to standard antibiotics during treatment, requiring a change in antibiotic to avoid worsening of the sepsis. Some of the infections caused by K. aerogenes result from specific antibiotic treatments, venous catheter insertions, and/or surgical procedures. K. aerogenes is generally found in the human gastrointestinal tract and does not generally cause disease in ...
... , also known simply as typhoid, is a bacterial infection due to Salmonella typhi that causes symptoms.[3] Symptoms may vary from mild to severe and usually begin six to thirty days after exposure.[1][2] Often there is a gradual onset of a high fever over several days.[1] Weakness, abdominal pain, constipation, and headaches also commonly occur.[2][6] Diarrhea is uncommon and vomiting is not usually severe.[6] Some people develop a skin rash with rose colored spots.[2] In severe cases there may be confusion.[6] Without treatment, symptoms may last weeks or months.[2] Other people may carry the bacterium without being affected; however, they are still able to spread the disease to others.[4] Typhoid fever is a type of enteric fever along with paratyphoid fever.[3]. The cause is the bacterium Salmonella typhi, also known as Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi, growing in the intestines and blood.[2][6] Typhoid is spread by eating or drinking food or water contaminated with the feces of ...
Traditionally, gonorrhea was diagnosed with Gram stain and culture; however, newer polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based testing methods are becoming more common.[16][28] In those failing initial treatment, culture should be done to determine sensitivity to antibiotics.[29] Tests that use polymerase chain reaction (PCR, aka nucleic acid amplification) to identify genes unique to N. gonorrhoeae are recommended for screening and diagnosis of gonorrhea infection. These PCR-based tests require a sample of urine, urethral swabs, or cervical/vaginal swabs. Culture (growing colonies of bacteria in order to isolate and identify them) and Gram-stain (staining of bacterial cell walls to reveal morphology) can also be used to detect the presence of N. gonorrhoeae in all specimen types except urine.[30][31] If Gram-negative, oxidase-positive diplococci are visualized on direct Gram stain of urethral pus (male genital infection), no further testing is needed to establish the diagnosis of gonorrhea ...
With a fatality risk approaching 15% within 12 hours of infection, it is crucial to initiate testing as quickly as possible, but not to wait for the results before initiating antibiotic therapy. A small amount of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is sent to the laboratory as soon as possible for analysis. The diagnosis is suspected, when Gram-negative diplococci are seen on Gram stain of a centrifuged sample of CSF; sometimes they are located inside white blood cells. The microscopic identification takes around 1-2 hours after specimen arrival in the laboratory.[3] The gold standard of diagnosis is microbiological isolation of N. meningitidis by growth from a sterile body fluid, which could be CSF or blood.[5] Diagnosis is confirmed when the organism has grown, most often on a chocolate agar plate, but also on Thayer-Martin agar. To differentiate any bacterial growth from other species a small amount of a bacterial colony is tested for oxidase, catalase for which all clinically relevant Neisseria show a ...
Plague has a long history as a biological weapon. Historical accounts from ancient China and medieval Europe detail the use of infected animal carcasses, such as cows or horses, and human carcasses, by the Xiongnu/Huns, Mongols, Turks and other groups, to contaminate enemy water supplies. Han Dynasty General Huo Qubing is recorded to have died of such a contamination while engaging in warfare against the Xiongnu. Plague victims were also reported to have been tossed by catapult into cities under siege. In 1347, the Genoese possession of Caffa, a great trade emporium on the Crimean peninsula, came under siege by an army of Mongol warriors of the Golden Horde under the command of Janibeg. After a protracted siege during which the Mongol army was reportedly withering from the disease, they decided to use the infected corpses as a biological weapon. The corpses were catapulted over the city walls, infecting the inhabitants. This event might have led to the transfer of the plague (Black Death) via ...
... , also known simply as paratyphoid, is a bacterial infection caused by one of the three types of Salmonella enterica.[1] Symptoms usually begin 6-30 days after exposure and are the same as those of typhoid fever.[1][3] Often, a gradual onset of a high fever occurs over several days.[1] Weakness, loss of appetite, and headaches also commonly occur.[1] Some people develop a skin rash with rose-colored spots.[2] Without treatment, symptoms may last weeks or months.[1] Other people may carry the bacteria without being affected; however, they are still able to spread the disease to others.[3] Both typhoid and paratyphoid are of similar severity.[3] Paratyphoid and typhoid fever are types of enteric fever.[7] Paratyphoid is caused by the bacterium Salmonella enterica of the serotypes Paratyphi A, Paratyphi B, or Paratyphi C growing in the intestines and blood.[1] They are usually spread by eating or drinking food or water contaminated with the feces of an infected person.[1] They may ...
Pasteurella multocida (Pasteurellosis) · Actinobacillus (Actinobacillosis). Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (HACEK). ...
ಇದಕ್ಕೆ ಪ್ರಮುಖ ಕಾರಣವೆಂದರೆ (60%ರಷ್ಟು ಜಠರದ/ಗ್ಯಾಸ್ಟ್ರಿಕ್‌ಗೆ ಹಾಗೂ ಸುಮಾರು 90%ರಷ್ಟು ಡ್ಯುವೋಡೆನಮ್‌ನ ಹುಣ್ಣು/ವ್ರಣಗಳಿಗೆ) ಹೆಲಿಕೋಬ್ಯಾಕ್ಟರ್‌ ಪೈಲೊರಿ ಯು ಕೋಟರದ ಲೋಳೆಪೊರೆಯನ್ನು ಆಕ್ರಮಿಸಿಕೊಳ್ಳುವದರಿಂದಾಗುವ ಬೇರೂರಿದ/ಸತತವಾಗಿ ಇರುವ ಉರಿಯೂತ. ಪ್ರತಿಕಾಯಗಳು ಕಂಡುಬಂದರೂ ರೋಗನಿರೋಧಕ ವ್ಯವಸ್ಥೆಯು ಸೋಂಕನ್ನು ನಿವಾರಿಸಲಾಗುವುದಿಲ್ಲ. ಆದ್ದರಿಂದ ಬ್ಯಾಕ್ಟೀರಿಯ/ಸೂಕ್ಷ್ಮಜೀವಿ/ಏಕಾಣುಜೀವಿಯು ಬೇರೂರಿದ ಸಕ್ರಿಯ ಜಠರದುರಿತ (ವಿಧ B ...
Pasteurella multocida (Pasteurellosis) · Actinobacillus(Actinobacillosis). Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (HACEK). ...
At times used parenterally in the treatment of extensive ringworm, actinobacillosis and actinomycosis. Overuse causes iodism. ...
Actinobacillosis is a zoonotic disease caused by Actinobacillus. It is more commonly associated with animals than with humans. ... There are generally one or two cases of actinobacillosis per herd found in adult cows, foals or adult horses, and other similar ... Mouth actinobacillosis of cattle must be differentiated from actinomycosis that affects bone tissues of the maxilla. ... One of the most common forms seen by veterinarians is mouth actinobacillosis of cattle, due to Actinobacillus lignieresii. The ...
Actinobacillosis. Actinobacillosis is a chronic disease of cattle caused by Actinobacillus lignieresi. It is manifested by ... 75: Actinobacillosis. Actinobacillosis of the tongue. The tongue is enlarged, firm and contains numerous granulomatous lesions ... Typical actinobacillosis lesions in the lymph nodes and organs consist of greenish-yellow thick creamy pus with "sulphur ... Judgement: see Actinobacillosis. Differential diagnosis: Tooth infection, impacted food, bone injury, neoplasms and ...
Actinobacillosis is readily treated. Treatment can involve surgical debridement and flushing with iodine. Antibiotics can be ...
see actinobacillosis.. tongue worm. see linguatulaserrata.. Patient discussion about tongue. Q. What is the treatment for ...
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"Atypical cutaneous actinobacillosis in young beef cattle". Veterinary Record. 171 (15). doi:10.1136/vr.100906. ...
For the treatment of actinomycosis and actinobacillosis in cattle and as an expectorant in mild respiratory disease of cattle, ... Cattle: Actinomycosis and actinobacillosis: 15 mL per 45 kg body weight. Repeat in 7-10 days. ...
Thanks to the national eradication program for enzootic pneumonia (EP) and actinobacillosis, the health-status of lungs has ... Results of histologic examination were consistent with a diagnosis of actinobacillosis. The owner reported that the cow was ... CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Findings suggested that pharyngeal granuloma resulting from actinobacillosis should be included in the ... which is regarded as the treatment of choice for actinobacillosis.. ...
Dhand, N., Sandhu, K., Jasmer, S., Randhawa, S. (2003). Outbreak of Actinobacillosis in Dairy Cows. The Veterinary Record. ... Dhand, N., Sandhu, K., Jasmer, S., Randhawa, S. (2003). Outbreak of Actinobacillosis in Dairy Cows. The Veterinary Record. ...
Categories: Actinobacillosis Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, CopyrightRestricted 7 ...
see actinobacillosis.. tongue worm. see linguatulaserrata.. Patient discussion about tongue. Q. What is the treatment for ...
A. lignieresii causes actinobacillosis, a granulomatous disease in cattle and sheep. A few human soft tissue infections, ... Actinobacillus suis actinobacillosis (1-4); Aggregatibacter spp. (formerly Actinobacillus and Haemophilus species), ...
Actinobacillosis in a cow. *. Enteritis cystica profunda in a bullock. *. Leptospirosis in milking cows ...
Abscess, Actinomycosis / Actinobacillosis, Lymphosarcoma, Melanoma, Neoplasia Not Otherwise Specified (NOS), Ocular squamous ...
Actinobacillosis. 44. 60. Coenurosis in humans. 43. 61. Australian bat lyssavirus. 37. ...
At times used parenterally in the treatment of extensive ringworm, actinobacillosis and actinomycosis. Overuse causes iodism. ...
At times used parenterally in the treatment of extensive ringworm, actinobacillosis and actinomycosis. Overuse causes iodism. ...
The bacterium has many strains and is the pathogen responsible for Actinobacillosis in pigs of all ages. It can also infect ... Actinobacillosis - Pig, reviewed and published by Wikivet at http://en.wikivet.net/Actinobacillosis_-_Pig accessed 07/10/2011. ...
2) Cattle with slight unopened cases of actinomycosis or actinobacillosis (or both) may be moved interstate to a feed lot in ... actinobacillosis, contagious ecthyma, foot rot, and shipping fever: Provided, That such livestock is not affected with any ... actinobacillosis, anaplasmosis, atrophic rhinitis, contagious ecthyma, foot rot, infectious keratitis, ram epididymitis, ...
... his actinobacillosis syncretize imprudently captivates. Ruben inexperienced re-acquires sport mambos enduringly. John-David, ...
Check if her tongue is normal and she is not developing wooden tongue (actinobacillosis). ...
Other bacteria seen are occasional actinobacillosis Actinobacillosis (carried in normal animals).. *In umbilical abscesses may ...
nasal actinobacillosis. a chronic granulomatous lesion in the nasal cavity of the sheep, causing nasal obstruction and ...
  • Atrophic Rhinitis, also known as rhinitis, atrophic , is related to rhinitis and actinobacillosis , and has symptoms including rhinorrhea An important gene associated with Atrophic Rhinitis is XPNPEP2 (X-Prolyl Aminopeptidase 2), and among its related pathways/superpathways is MHC class II antigen presentation . (malacards.org)
  • Lung and pleural lesions before and after implementation of a national eradication program against enzootic pneumonia and actinobacillosis as well as changes of slaughter carcass organs in slaughter pigs in Switzerland]. (bireme.br)
  • Thanks to the national eradication program for enzootic pneumonia (EP) and actinobacillosis, the health-status of lungs has been considerably improved and the prevalence of pleurisy decreased considerably. (bireme.br)
  • Other bacteria seen are occasional actinobacillosis Actinobacillosis (carried in normal animals). (vetstream.com)
  • There are generally one or two cases of actinobacillosis per herd found in adult cows, foals or adult horses, and other similar animals. (wikipedia.org)