Food Inspection: Examination of foods to assure wholesome and clean products free from unsafe microbes or chemical contamination, natural or added deleterious substances, and decomposition during production, processing, packaging, etc.Anthrax: An acute infection caused by the spore-forming bacteria BACILLUS ANTHRACIS. It commonly affects hoofed animals such as sheep and goats. Infection in humans often involves the skin (cutaneous anthrax), the lungs (inhalation anthrax), or the gastrointestinal tract. Anthrax is not contagious and can be treated with antibiotics.Bacillus anthracis: A species of bacteria that causes ANTHRAX in humans and animals.Manuals as Topic: Books designed to give factual information or instructions.Meat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.Tolonium Chloride: A phenothiazine that has been used as a hemostatic, a biological stain, and a dye for wool and silk. Tolonium chloride has also been used as a diagnostic aid for oral and gastric neoplasms and in the identification of the parathyroid gland in thyroid surgery.Burial: The act or ceremony of putting a corpse into the ground or a vault, or into the sea; or the inurnment of CREMAINS.Babesiosis: A group of tick-borne diseases of mammals including ZOONOSES in humans. They are caused by protozoa of the genus BABESIA, which parasitize erythrocytes, producing hemolysis. In the U.S., the organism's natural host is mice and transmission is by the deer tick IXODES SCAPULARIS.Abattoirs: Places where animals are slaughtered and dressed for market.Anaplasmosis: A disease of cattle caused by parasitization of the red blood cells by bacteria of the genus ANAPLASMA.Dictionaries, MedicalTongue, FissuredGlossitis, Benign Migratory: An idiopathic disorder characterized by the loss of filiform papillae leaving reddened areas of circinate macules bound by a white band. The lesions heal, then others erupt.Tongue: A muscular organ in the mouth that is covered with pink tissue called mucosa, tiny bumps called papillae, and thousands of taste buds. The tongue is anchored to the mouth and is vital for chewing, swallowing, and for speech.Dictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Tongue Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the TONGUE.Tongue DiseasesDictionaries, ChemicalTerminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Sodium Iodide: A compound forming white, odorless deliquescent crystals and used as iodine supplement, expectorant or in its radioactive (I-131) form as an diagnostic aid, particularly for thyroid function tests.Iodides: Inorganic binary compounds of iodine or the I- ion.Animal Testing Alternatives: Procedures, such as TISSUE CULTURE TECHNIQUES; mathematical models; etc., when used or advocated for use in place of the use of animals in research or diagnostic laboratories.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Animal Welfare: The protection of animals in laboratories or other specific environments by promoting their health through better nutrition, housing, and care.Animal Experimentation: The use of animals as investigational subjects.Iodine Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of iodine that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. I atoms with atomic weights 117-139, except I 127, are radioactive iodine isotopes.Animals, LaboratoryAnimal Use Alternatives: Alternatives to the use of animals in research, testing, and education. The alternatives may include reduction in the number of animals used, replacement of animals with a non-animal model or with animals of a species lower phylogenetically, or refinement of methods to minimize pain and distress of animals used.Perchlorates: Compounds that contain the Cl(=O)(=O)(=O)O- structure. Included under this heading is perchloric acid and the salts and ester forms of perchlorate.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Northern IrelandIrelandEquipment Reuse: Further or repeated use of equipment, instruments, devices, or materials. It includes additional use regardless of the original intent of the producer as to disposability or durability. It does not include the repeated use of fluids or solutions.Veterinary Medicine: The medical science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in animals.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Education, Veterinary: Use for general articles concerning veterinary medical education.Veterinary Drugs: Drugs used by veterinarians in the treatment of animal diseases. The veterinarian's pharmacological armamentarium is the counterpart of drugs treating human diseases, with dosage and administration adjusted to the size, weight, disease, and idiosyncrasies of the species. In the United States most drugs are subject to federal regulations with special reference to the safety of drugs and residues in edible animal products.Sentinel Surveillance: Monitoring of rate of occurrence of specific conditions to assess the stability or change in health levels of a population. It is also the study of disease rates in a specific cohort such as in a geographic area or population subgroup to estimate trends in a larger population. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Disease Notification: Notification or reporting by a physician or other health care provider of the occurrence of specified contagious diseases such as tuberculosis and HIV infections to designated public health agencies. The United States system of reporting notifiable diseases evolved from the Quarantine Act of 1878, which authorized the US Public Health Service to collect morbidity data on cholera, smallpox, and yellow fever; each state in the US has its own list of notifiable diseases and depends largely on reporting by the individual health care provider. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Actinobacillosis: A disease characterized by suppurative and granulomatous lesions in the respiratory tract, upper alimentary tract, skin, kidneys, joints, and other tissues. Actinobacillus lignieresii infects cattle and sheep while A. equuli infects horses and pigs.Actinobacillus: A genus of PASTEURELLACEAE described as gram-negative, nonsporeforming, nonmotile, facultative anaerobes. Most members are found both as pathogens and commensal organisms in the respiratory, alimentary, and genital tracts of animals.Pasteurella: The oldest recognized genus of the family PASTEURELLACEAE. It consists of several species. Its organisms occur most frequently as coccobacillus or rod-shaped and are gram-negative, nonmotile, facultative anaerobes. Species of this genus are found in both animals and humans.Iothalamate Meglumine: A radiopaque medium used for urography, angiography, venography, and myelography. It is highly viscous and binds to plasma proteins.Actinobacillus Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus ACTINOBACILLUS.Digestive System Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic coccobacillus-shaped bacteria that has been isolated from pneumonic lesions and blood. It produces pneumonia with accompanying fibrinous pleuritis in swine.Cattle Diseases: Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.Hyperpituitarism: Disease of the glandular, anterior portion of the pituitary (PITUITARY GLAND, ANTERIOR) resulting in hypersecretion of ADENOHYPOPHYSEAL HORMONES such as GROWTH HORMONE; PROLACTIN; THYROTROPIN; LUTEINIZING HORMONE; FOLLICLE STIMULATING HORMONE ; and ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE. Hyperpituitarism usually is caused by a functional ADENOMA.Oxidoreductases Acting on CH-NH Group Donors: Enzymes catalyzing the dehydrogenation of secondary amines, introducing a C=N double bond as the primary reaction. In some cases this is later hydrolyzed.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Hydroxyethyl Starch Derivatives: Starches that have been chemically modified so that a percentage of OH groups are substituted with 2-hydroxyethyl ether groups.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.
(1/4) An atypical case of respiratory actinobacillosis in a cow.

A not pregnant 4-year-old Jersey cow was presented with the sudden appearance of respiratory noise, nasal discharge and moderate respiratory difficulty. Upon physical examination a snoring-like noise, extended head and neck position, exaggerated abdominal effort, bilateral nasal discharge and left prescapular lymph node enlargement were noted. Sub-occlusion of the initial portion of the respiratory tract was suspected. Radiographic and endoscopic examinations revealed a pedunculate mass on the dorsal aspect of the rhinopharynx, which was removed with endoscopically assisted electrosurgery. Histologic examination revealed a chronic pyogranulomatous inflammation with eosinophilic club-like bodies surrounding small colonies of rod-shaped bacteria. Results of histochemical staining were consistent with Actinobacillus-like bacteria and a diagnosis of respiratory actinobacillosis was reached. Surgery and antibiotic therapy were resolutive, as demonstated by an endoscopic check at the second month after surgery, even without the association of the traditional iodine cure, which is regarded as the treatment of choice for actinobacillosis.  (+info)

(2/4) Species-specific multiplex PCR for the diagnosis of Brucella ovis, Actinobacillus seminis, and Histophilus somni infection in rams.

 (+info)

(3/4) Nonspecific toxicites in the mouse assay test for botulinum toxin.

In inoculated pack experiments on Clostridium botulinum type E, unirradiated and 0.1-Mrad irradiated haddock fillets often gave nonspecific toxicities by the mouse assay test for botulinum toxin. Samples given 0.2-Mrad radiation failed to produce nonspecific reactions. Nonspecific deaths sometimes occurred within 24 hr after injection, although deaths between 24 and 48 hr were more common. The symptoms and the pattern of these deaths suggested a septicemia. Heart-blood cultured from mice showing nonspecific symptoms indicated an infectious process. Among 23 isolates from the blood, eight were identified as Proteus vulgaris, two P. morganii, one P. rettgeri, one Providence subgroup B, two Aerobacter aerogenes, one Actinobacillus, three enterococci, one Alcaligenes marshalli, and four Erysipelothrix insidiosa. The E. insidiosa, Aerobacter, Providence group, and most of the Proteus isolates were infectious for mice when injected by the intraperitoneal route. But the enterococci, Alcaligenes, and Actinobacillus isolates were not infectious and probably represent secondary invaders. The cultural characteristics of the E. insidiosa isolates conform to those described in the literature, with the exception that the four strains grew in the temperature range 50 F (10 C) to 40 F (4.4 C). Nonspecific toxicities were avoided in assays for botulinum toxin by the protection of mice with chloramphenicol and oxytetracycline.  (+info)

(4/4) In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

The agar dilution technique was used for determination of the antibiotic susceptibilities of 57 oral isolates and 2 nonoral isolates of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Tetracycline, minocycline, and chloramphenicol inhibited more than 96% of the strains tested at a concentration of less than or equal to 2 micrograms/ml; 89% of the strains were inhibited by 2 micrograms of carbenicillin per ml. The other antimicrobial agents tested were less active. Approximately 10% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans strains were resistant to ampicillin, erythromycin, and penicillin G at concentrations of 32 to 64 micrograms/ml. These data suggest that tetracycline and minocycline may be valuable drugs in the treatment of A. actinomycetemcomitans infections.  (+info)

*  Actinobacillosis
... is a zoonotic disease caused by Actinobacillus. It is more commonly associated with animals than with humans. ... There are generally one or two cases of actinobacillosis per herd found in adult cows, foals or adult horses, and other similar ... Mouth actinobacillosis of cattle must be differentiated from actinomycosis that affects bone tissues of the maxilla. ... One of the most common forms seen by veterinarians is mouth actinobacillosis of cattle, due to Actinobacillus lignieresii. The ...
*  Henry Felix Clement Hebeler
"Atypical cutaneous actinobacillosis in young beef cattle". Veterinary Record. 171 (15). doi:10.1136/vr.100906. ...
*  Actinobacillus suis
The bacterium has many strains and is the pathogen responsible for Actinobacillosis in pigs of all ages. It can also infect ... Actinobacillosis - Pig, reviewed and published by Wikivet at http://en.wikivet.net/Actinobacillosis_-_Pig accessed 07/10/2011. ...
*  List of MeSH codes (C01)
... actinobacillosis MeSH C01.252.400.700.433 --- haemophilus infections MeSH C01.252.400.700.433.257 --- chancroid MeSH C01.252. ...
New English-Russian medical dictionary . Новый Англо-Русский медицинский словарь 8  New English-Russian medical dictionary . Новый Англо-Русский медицинский словарь 8
В словаре можно посмотреть переводы слов с английского на русский язык. In this dictionary you can see translations of words from English to Russian. Новый Англо-Русский медицинский словарь. New English-Russian medical dictionary 8.
more infohttps://slovar-vocab.com/english-russian/new-medical-vocab.html?start=700
Actinobacillosis - Wikipedia  Actinobacillosis - Wikipedia
Actinobacillosis is a zoonotic disease caused by Actinobacillus. It is more commonly associated with animals than with humans. ... There are generally one or two cases of actinobacillosis per herd found in adult cows, foals or adult horses, and other similar ... Mouth actinobacillosis of cattle must be differentiated from actinomycosis that affects bone tissues of the maxilla. ... One of the most common forms seen by veterinarians is mouth actinobacillosis of cattle, due to Actinobacillus lignieresii. The ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Actinobacillosis
Manual on meat inspection for developing countries  Manual on meat inspection for developing countries
Actinobacillosis. Actinobacillosis is a chronic disease of cattle caused by Actinobacillus lignieresi. It is manifested by ... 75: Actinobacillosis. Actinobacillosis of the tongue. The tongue is enlarged, firm and contains numerous granulomatous lesions ... Typical actinobacillosis lesions in the lymph nodes and organs consist of greenish-yellow thick creamy pus with "sulphur ... Judgement: see Actinobacillosis. Differential diagnosis: Tooth infection, impacted food, bone injury, neoplasms and ...
more infohttp://www.fao.org/docrep/003/t0756e/T0756E03.htm
Zoonotic Diseases  Zoonotic Diseases
Actinobacillosis is readily treated. Treatment can involve surgical debridement and flushing with iodine. Antibiotics can be ...
more infohttps://motesclearcreekfarms.com/asp/articles/Zoonotic-Diseases.asp
Indentation tongue margin | definition of indentation tongue margin by Medical dictionary  Indentation tongue margin | definition of indentation tongue margin by Medical dictionary
see actinobacillosis.. tongue worm. see linguatulaserrata.. Patient discussion about tongue. Q. What is the treatment for ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/indentation+tongue+margin
Geographic tongue | definition of geographic tongue by Medical dictionary  Geographic tongue | definition of geographic tongue by Medical dictionary
Looking for online definition of geographic tongue in the Medical Dictionary? geographic tongue explanation free. What is geographic tongue? Meaning of geographic tongue medical term. What does geographic tongue mean?
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/geographic+tongue
Associate Professor Navneet Dhand - The University of Sydney  Associate Professor Navneet Dhand - The University of Sydney
Dhand, N., Sandhu, K., Jasmer, S., Randhawa, S. (2003). Outbreak of Actinobacillosis in Dairy Cows. The Veterinary Record. ... Dhand, N., Sandhu, K., Jasmer, S., Randhawa, S. (2003). Outbreak of Actinobacillosis in Dairy Cows. The Veterinary Record. ...
more infohttps://sydney.edu.au/science/people/navneet.dhand.php
Zoonoses : Top topics (The Full Wiki)  Zoonoses : Top topics (The Full Wiki)
Actinobacillosis. 44. 60. Coenurosis in humans. 43. 61. Australian bat lyssavirus. 37. ...
more infohttp://top-topics.thefullwiki.org/Zoonoses
Sodium Iodide (Canada) for Animal Use - Drugs.com  Sodium Iodide (Canada) for Animal Use - Drugs.com
For the treatment of actinomycosis and actinobacillosis in cattle and as an expectorant in mild respiratory disease of cattle, ... Cattle: Actinomycosis and actinobacillosis: 15 mL per 45 kg body weight. Repeat in 7-10 days. ...
more infohttps://www.drugs.com/vet/sodium-iodide-can.html
Northern Ireland disease surveillance, October to December 2010 | Veterinary Record  Northern Ireland disease surveillance, October to December 2010 | Veterinary Record
Actinobacillosis in a cow. *. Enteritis cystica profunda in a bullock. *. Leptospirosis in milking cows ...
more infohttp://veterinaryrecord.bmj.com/content/168/9/234
Sodium iodide - ZooVeterinary  Sodium iodide - ZooVeterinary
Actinobacillosis Actinobacillosis is a disease of cattle similar in some respects to ACTINOMYCOSIS, and sometimes mistaken for ... The lesions produced bear a considerable resemblance to those of actinobacillosis (see above), and are often indistinguishable ...
more infohttp://zooveterinary.com/tag/sodium-iodide/
Shopping Page. Buy or upgrade website.   - Healthmatics | Page 74  Shopping Page. Buy or upgrade website. - Healthmatics | Page 74
actinobacillosis A disease characterized by suppurative and granulomatous lesions in the respiratory tract, upper alimentary ...
more infohttp://healthmatics.info/products-page/74/
Shopping Page. Buy or upgrade website.   - Healthmatics | Page 78  Shopping Page. Buy or upgrade website. - Healthmatics | Page 78
actinobacillosis A disease characterized by suppurative and granulomatous lesions in the respiratory tract, upper alimentary ...
more infohttp://healthmatics.info/products-page/78/
Actinobacillus spp. | MSDSonline  Actinobacillus spp. | MSDSonline
A. lignieresii causes actinobacillosis, a granulomatous disease in cattle and sheep. A few human soft tissue infections, ... Actinobacillus suis actinobacillosis (1-4); Aggregatibacter spp. (formerly Actinobacillus and Haemophilus species), ...
more infohttps://www.msdsonline.com/resources/sds-resources/free-safety-data-sheet-index/actinobacillus-spp/
osis, -sis, -sia, -sy, -se - Word Information	  osis, -sis, -sia, -sy, -se - Word Information
Actinobacillosis affects the soft tissues, often the tongue and cervical lymph nodes, where granulomatous swellings form and ... actinobacillosis 1. An infectious disease of cattle, domestic animals, and occasionally humans, resembling actinomycosis and ... Actinobacillus lignieresii infects cattle and sheep while actinobacillosis Equuli infects horses and pigs. ...
more infohttps://wordinfo.info/unit/1527/s:arteriolonecroses
osis, -sis, -sia, -sy, -se - Word Information	  osis, -sis, -sia, -sy, -se - Word Information
Actinobacillosis affects the soft tissues, often the tongue and cervical lymph nodes, where granulomatous swellings form and ... actinobacillosis 1. An infectious disease of cattle, domestic animals, and occasionally humans, resembling actinomycosis and ... Actinobacillus lignieresii infects cattle and sheep while actinobacillosis Equuli infects horses and pigs. ...
more infohttps://wordinfo.info/unit/1527/s:aerobiosis
Buy prescription soma | Cheap Pharmacy Prescription  Buy prescription soma | Cheap Pharmacy Prescription
... his actinobacillosis syncretize imprudently captivates. Ruben inexperienced re-acquires sport mambos enduringly. John-David, ...
more infohttp://bestshorts.net/buy-prescription-soma
American English  American English
... also known as Actinobacillosis) is a well-defined disease of the soft tissues of the mouth region in adult cattle. It is caused ... Additionally, cutaneous actinobacillosis has been reported (Milne et al., 2001; Holzhauer and Roumen, 2002) where it is ... Wooden tongue (also known as Actinobacillosis) is a well-defined disease of the soft tissues of the mouth region in adult ... If there is an outbreak of cutaneous actinobacillosis, rough objects in the environment (such as feed barriers) should be ...
more infohttp://www.farmhealthonline.com/US/disease-management/cattle-diseases/wooden-tongue/
Atrophic Rhinitis disease: Malacards - Research Articles, Drugs, Genes, Clinical Trials  Atrophic Rhinitis disease: Malacards - Research Articles, Drugs, Genes, Clinical Trials
MalaCards based summary : Atrophic Rhinitis, also known as rhinitis, atrophic, is related to rhinitis and actinobacillosis, and ...
more infohttps://www.malacards.org/card/atrophic_rhinitis
Henry Felix Clement Hebeler - Wikipedia  Henry Felix Clement Hebeler - Wikipedia
"Atypical cutaneous actinobacillosis in young beef cattle". Veterinary Record. 171 (15). doi:10.1136/vr.100906. ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Felix_Clement_Hebeler
TheCattleSite Discussion Forum - Search Results  TheCattleSite Discussion Forum - Search Results
Check if her tongue is normal and she is not developing 'wooden tongue' (actinobacillosis). ...
more infohttp://www.thecattlesite.com/forums/search.php?searchid=685598
Aspiration pneumonia from Vetstream | Definitive Veterinary Intelligence  Aspiration pneumonia from Vetstream | Definitive Veterinary Intelligence
Actinobacillosis Actinobacillosis in the throat/ esophageal area is a risk factor for aspiration pneumonia. ...
more infohttps://www.vetstream.com/treat/bovis/diseases/aspiration-pneumonia