The measurement and recording of MOTOR ACTIVITY to assess rest/activity cycles.
A readily reversible suspension of sensorimotor interaction with the environment, usually associated with recumbency and immobility.
Dyssomnias associated with disruption of the normal 24 hour sleep wake cycle secondary to travel (e.g., JET LAG SYNDROME), shift work, or other causes.
Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)
Simultaneous and continuous monitoring of several parameters during sleep to study normal and abnormal sleep. The study includes monitoring of brain waves, to assess sleep stages, and other physiological variables such as breathing, eye movements, and blood oxygen levels which exhibit a disrupted pattern with sleep disturbances.
The region of the upper limb between the metacarpus and the FOREARM.
A state in which there is an enhanced potential for sensitivity and an efficient responsiveness to external stimuli.
Disorders characterized by impairment of the ability to initiate or maintain sleep. This may occur as a primary disorder or in association with another medical or psychiatric condition.
The state of being deprived of sleep under experimental conditions, due to life events, or from a wide variety of pathophysiologic causes such as medication effect, chronic illness, psychiatric illness, or sleep disorder.
The use of electronic equipment to observe or record physiologic processes while the patient undergoes normal daily activities.
A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of SLEEP WAKE DISORDERS and their causes.
The regular recurrence, in cycles of about 24 hours, of biological processes or activities, such as sensitivity to drugs and stimuli, hormone secretion, sleeping, and feeding.
A feeling of restlessness associated with increased motor activity. This may occur as a manifestation of nervous system drug toxicity or other conditions.
Treatment of disease by exposure to light, especially by variously concentrated light rays or specific wavelengths.
The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.
Periods of sleep manifested by changes in EEG activity and certain behavioral correlates; includes Stage 1: sleep onset, drowsy sleep; Stage 2: light sleep; Stages 3 and 4: delta sleep, light sleep, deep sleep, telencephalic sleep.
Disorders characterized by multiple cessations of respirations during sleep that induce partial arousals and interfere with the maintenance of sleep. Sleep apnea syndromes are divided into central (see SLEEP APNEA, CENTRAL), obstructive (see SLEEP APNEA, OBSTRUCTIVE), and mixed central-obstructive types.
Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.
Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.
Disorders characterized by hypersomnolence during normal waking hours that may impair cognitive functioning. Subtypes include primary hypersomnia disorders (e.g., IDIOPATHIC HYPERSOMNOLENCE; NARCOLEPSY; and KLEINE-LEVIN SYNDROME) and secondary hypersomnia disorders where excessive somnolence can be attributed to a known cause (e.g., drug affect, MENTAL DISORDERS, and SLEEP APNEA SYNDROME). (From J Neurol Sci 1998 Jan 8;153(2):192-202; Thorpy, Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine, 2nd ed, p320)
A biogenic amine that is found in animals and plants. In mammals, melatonin is produced by the PINEAL GLAND. Its secretion increases in darkness and decreases during exposure to light. Melatonin is implicated in the regulation of SLEEP, mood, and REPRODUCTION. Melatonin is also an effective antioxidant.
Bouts of physical irritability or movement alternating with periods of quiescence. It includes biochemical activity and hormonal activity which may be cellular. These cycles are shorter than 24 hours and include sleep-wakefulness cycles and the periodic activation of the digestive system.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
The state of weariness following a period of exertion, mental or physical, characterized by a decreased capacity for work and reduced efficiency to respond to stimuli.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.

The effect of exercise counselling with feedback from a pedometer on fatigue in adult survivors of childhood cancer: a pilot study. (1/483)

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Sleep quality after initial chemotherapy for breast cancer. (2/483)

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An artificial neural network to estimate physical activity energy expenditure and identify physical activity type from an accelerometer. (3/483)

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Reduced overnight consolidation of procedural learning in chronic medicated schizophrenia is related to specific sleep stages. (4/483)

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Influence of major pulmonary resection on postoperative daily ambulatory activity of the patients. (5/483)

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Pilot study of a cell phone-based exercise persistence intervention post-rehabilitation for COPD. (6/483)

OBJECTIVE: To determine the feasibility and efficacy of a six-month, cell phone-based exercise persistence intervention for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) following pulmonary rehabilitation. METHODS: Participants who completed a two-week run-in were randomly assigned to either MOBILE-Coached (n = 9) or MOBILE-Self-Monitored (n = 8). All participants met with a nurse to develop an individualized exercise plan, were issued a pedometer and exercise booklet, and instructed to continue to log their daily exercise and symptoms. MOBILE-Coached also received weekly reinforcement text messages on their cell phones; reports of worsening symptoms were automatically flagged for follow-up. Usability and satisfaction were assessed. Participants completed incremental cycle and six minute walk (6MW) tests, wore an activity monitor for 14 days, and reported their health-related quality of life (HRQL) at baseline, three, and six months. RESULTS: The sample had a mean age of 68 +/-11 and forced expiratory volume in one second 18% predicted. Participants reported that logging their exercise and symptoms (FEV(1)) of 40 +/- was easy and that keeping track of their exercise helped them remain active. There were no differences between groups over time in maximal workload, 6MW distance, or HRQL (p > 0.05); however, MOBILE-Self-Monitored increased total steps/day whereas MOBILE-Coached logged fewer steps over six months (p =0.04). CONCLUSIONS: We showed that it is feasible to deliver a cell phone-based exercise persistence intervention to patients with COPD post-rehabilitation and that the addition of coaching appeared to be no better than self-monitoring. The latter finding needs to be interpreted with caution since this was a purely exploratory study. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00373932).  (+info)

Characterizing recovery of sleep after four successive night shifts. (7/483)

The purpose of this study was to characterize the recovery pattern of sleep following simulated, four successive night shifts in ten healthy men (22.9 + or - 3.2 yr). Poor sleep was defined as sleep efficiency of 80% or lower as determined actigraphically. The results showed that four (rapid, slow, pseudo, and incomplete) patterns of sleep recovery were observed over three recovery sleep periods. The rapid and slow recovery pattern represented immediate and slow return to baseline level prior to the nightshifts, respectively. The pseudo recovery pattern demonstrated poor sleep at the 3rd recovery sleep period, despite transient recovery at the 2nd sleep period. The incomplete recovery pattern was characterized by consistently poorer sleep during the entire recovery period. The correlation analysis indicated that sleep habits (bed time and variation of wake time) prior to the experiment were significantly related to the recovery patterns, rather than performance and alertness during the night shifts.  (+info)

Sex differences in subjective and actigraphic sleep measures: a population-based study of elderly persons. (8/483)

STUDY OBJECTIVES: To investigate and explain sex differences in subjective and actigraphic sleep parameters in community-dwelling elderly persons. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: The study was embedded in the Rotterdam Study, a population-based study. PARTICIPANTS: Nine hundred fifty-six participants aged 59 to 97 years. INTERVENTIONS: N/A. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Participants wore an actigraph and kept a sleep diary for an average of 6 consecutive nights. Subjective sleep quality was assessed with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Unadjusted sex differences in sleep parameters were assessed with t tests. Women reported shorter total sleep time, a less favorable sleep-onset latency, lower sleep efficiency, and worse global sleep quality, as compared with men. When assessed with actigraphy, however, women were found to have longer and less-fragmented sleep than men. Sex differences in diary-reported sleep duration and other subjective sleep parameters were attenuated by adjustment for marital status, the use of sleep medication, and other covariates, but all sex differences remained significant in a multivariate-adjusted model. Sex differences in actigraphic sleep parameters were barely attenuated by multivariate adjustment, although the shorter actigraphically measured sleep duration in men was partly explained by their higher alcohol consumption. Some covariates (eg, sleep medication) had a different relationship with diary-reported or actigraphic total sleep time in men and women. CONCLUSIONS: If assessed by diary or interview, elderly women consistently reported shorter and poorer sleep than elderly men. In contrast, actigraphic sleep measures showed poorer sleep in men. These discrepancies are partly explained by determinants of sleep duration, such as sleep medication use and alcohol consumption.  (+info)

Actigraphy is a non-invasive method used to estimate sleep-wake patterns and physical activity levels over extended periods, typically ranging from several days to weeks. It involves the use of a small device called an actigraph, which is usually worn on the wrist like a watch.

The actigraph contains an accelerometer that detects movement and records the intensity and duration of motion. This data is then analyzed using specialized software to provide information about sleep and wake times, as well as patterns of physical activity.

Actigraphy can be useful in assessing various sleep disorders, such as insomnia, circadian rhythm disorders, and sleep-related breathing disorders. It can also help evaluate the effectiveness of treatments for these conditions. However, it is important to note that actigraphy is not a substitute for a formal sleep study (polysomnography) and should be used in conjunction with other assessment tools and clinical evaluations.

Sleep is a complex physiological process characterized by altered consciousness, relatively inhibited sensory activity, reduced voluntary muscle activity, and decreased interaction with the environment. It's typically associated with specific stages that can be identified through electroencephalography (EEG) patterns. These stages include rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, associated with dreaming, and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, which is further divided into three stages.

Sleep serves a variety of functions, including restoration and strengthening of the immune system, support for growth and development in children and adolescents, consolidation of memory, learning, and emotional regulation. The lack of sufficient sleep or poor quality sleep can lead to significant health problems, such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and even cognitive decline.

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) defines sleep as "a period of daily recurring natural rest during which consciousness is suspended and metabolic processes are reduced." However, it's important to note that the exact mechanisms and purposes of sleep are still being researched and debated among scientists.

A Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorder (CRSD) is a condition in which a person's sleep-wake cycle is out of sync with the typical 24-hour day. This means that their internal "body clock" that regulates sleep and wakefulness does not align with the external environment, leading to difficulties sleeping, staying awake, or functioning at appropriate times.

CRSDs can be caused by a variety of factors, including genetic predisposition, environmental influences, and medical conditions. Some common types of CRSDs include Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome (DSPS), Advanced Sleep Phase Syndrome (ASPS), Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Rhythm Disorder, and Shift Work Disorder.

Symptoms of CRSDs may include difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep at the desired time, excessive sleepiness during the day, difficulty concentrating or functioning at work or school, and mood disturbances. Treatment for CRSDs may involve lifestyle changes, such as adjusting sleep schedules or exposure to light at certain times of day, as well as medications or other therapies.

Sleep disorders are a group of conditions that affect the ability to sleep well on a regular basis. They can include problems with falling asleep, staying asleep, or waking up too early in the morning. These disorders can be caused by various factors such as stress, anxiety, depression, medical conditions, or substance abuse.

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) recognizes over 80 distinct sleep disorders, which are categorized into the following major groups:

1. Insomnia - difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep.
2. Sleep-related breathing disorders - abnormal breathing during sleep such as obstructive sleep apnea.
3. Central disorders of hypersomnolence - excessive daytime sleepiness, including narcolepsy.
4. Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders - disruption of the internal body clock that regulates the sleep-wake cycle.
5. Parasomnias - abnormal behaviors during sleep such as sleepwalking or night terrors.
6. Sleep-related movement disorders - repetitive movements during sleep such as restless legs syndrome.
7. Isolated symptoms and normal variants - brief and occasional symptoms that do not warrant a specific diagnosis.

Sleep disorders can have significant impacts on an individual's quality of life, productivity, and overall health. If you suspect that you may have a sleep disorder, it is recommended to consult with a healthcare professional or a sleep specialist for proper evaluation and treatment.

Polysomnography (PSG) is a comprehensive sleep study that monitors various body functions during sleep, including brain activity, eye movement, muscle tone, heart rate, respirations, and oxygen levels. It is typically conducted in a sleep laboratory under the supervision of a trained technologist. The data collected during PSG is used to diagnose and manage various sleep disorders such as sleep-related breathing disorders (e.g., sleep apnea), movement disorders (e.g., periodic limb movement disorder), parasomnias, and narcolepsy.

The study usually involves the attachment of electrodes to different parts of the body, such as the scalp, face, chest, and legs, to record electrical signals from the brain, eye movements, muscle activity, and heartbeats. Additionally, sensors may be placed on or near the nose and mouth to measure airflow, and a belt may be worn around the chest and abdomen to monitor breathing efforts. Oxygen levels are also monitored through a sensor attached to the finger or ear.

Polysomnography is often recommended when a sleep disorder is suspected based on symptoms or medical history, and other diagnostic tests have been inconclusive. The results of the study can help guide treatment decisions and improve overall sleep health.

A medical definition of the wrist is the complex joint that connects the forearm to the hand, composed of eight carpal bones arranged in two rows. The wrist allows for movement and flexibility in the hand, enabling us to perform various activities such as grasping, writing, and typing. It also provides stability and support for the hand during these movements. Additionally, numerous ligaments, tendons, and nerves pass through or near the wrist, making it susceptible to injuries and conditions like carpal tunnel syndrome.

Wakefulness is a state of consciousness in which an individual is alert and aware of their surroundings. It is characterized by the ability to perceive, process, and respond to stimuli in a purposeful manner. In a medical context, wakefulness is often assessed using measures such as the electroencephalogram (EEG) to evaluate brain activity patterns associated with consciousness.

Wakefulness is regulated by several interconnected neural networks that promote arousal and attention. These networks include the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS), which consists of a group of neurons located in the brainstem that project to the thalamus and cerebral cortex, as well as other regions involved in regulating arousal and attention, such as the basal forebrain and hypothalamus.

Disorders of wakefulness can result from various underlying conditions, including neurological disorders, sleep disorders, medication side effects, or other medical conditions that affect brain function. Examples of such disorders include narcolepsy, insomnia, hypersomnia, and various forms of encephalopathy or brain injury.

Sleep initiation and maintenance disorders are a category of sleep disorders that involve difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep throughout the night. This category includes:

1. Insomnia disorder: A persistent difficulty in initiating or maintaining sleep, or early morning awakening, despite adequate opportunity and circumstances for sleep, which causes clinically significant distress or impairment.
2. Narcolepsy: A chronic neurological disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy (sudden loss of muscle tone triggered by strong emotions), hypnagogic hallucinations (vivid, dream-like experiences that occur while falling asleep) and sleep paralysis (temporary inability to move or speak while falling asleep or waking up).
3. Breathing-related sleep disorders: A group of disorders that involve abnormal breathing patterns during sleep, such as obstructive sleep apnea and central sleep apnea, which can lead to difficulty initiating and maintaining sleep.
4. Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders: A group of disorders that involve a misalignment between the individual's internal circadian rhythm and the external environment, leading to difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep at desired times.
5. Parasomnias: A group of disorders that involve abnormal behaviors or experiences during sleep, such as sleepwalking, night terrors, and REM sleep behavior disorder, which can disrupt sleep initiation and maintenance.

These disorders can have significant impacts on an individual's quality of life, daytime functioning, and overall health, and should be evaluated and managed by a healthcare professional with expertise in sleep medicine.

Sleep deprivation is a condition that occurs when an individual fails to get sufficient quality sleep or the recommended amount of sleep, typically 7-9 hours for adults. This can lead to various physical and mental health issues. It can be acute, lasting for one night or a few days, or chronic, persisting over a longer period.

The consequences of sleep deprivation include:

1. Fatigue and lack of energy
2. Difficulty concentrating or remembering things
3. Mood changes, such as irritability or depression
4. Weakened immune system
5. Increased appetite and potential weight gain
6. Higher risk of accidents due to decreased reaction time
7. Health problems like high blood pressure, diabetes, and heart disease over time

Sleep deprivation can be caused by various factors, including stress, shift work, sleep disorders like insomnia or sleep apnea, poor sleep hygiene, and certain medications. It's essential to address the underlying causes of sleep deprivation to ensure proper rest and overall well-being.

Ambulatory monitoring is a medical practice that involves the continuous or intermittent recording of physiological parameters in a patient who is mobile and able to perform their usual activities while outside of a hospital or clinical setting. This type of monitoring allows healthcare professionals to evaluate a patient's condition over an extended period, typically 24 hours or more, in their natural environment.

Ambulatory monitoring can be used to diagnose and manage various medical conditions such as hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, sleep disorders, and mobility issues. Common methods of ambulatory monitoring include:

1. Holter monitoring: A small, portable device that records the electrical activity of the heart for 24-48 hours or more.
2. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM): A device that measures blood pressure at regular intervals throughout the day and night.
3. Event monitors: Devices that record heart rhythms only when symptoms occur or when activated by the patient.
4. Actigraphy: A non-invasive method of monitoring sleep-wake patterns, physical activity, and circadian rhythms using a wristwatch-like device.
5. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM): A device that measures blood sugar levels continuously throughout the day and night.

Overall, ambulatory monitoring provides valuable information about a patient's physiological status in their natural environment, allowing healthcare professionals to make informed decisions regarding diagnosis, treatment, and management of medical conditions.

Sleep medicine is a medical specialty or subspecialty devoted to the diagnosis and therapy of sleep disturbances and disorders. Sleep-related problems such as snoring, sleep apnea, insomnia, narcolepsy, restless legs syndrome, parasomnias, circadian rhythm disorders, and unusual behaviors during sleep are among the conditions that sleep medicine physicians diagnose and treat.

Sleep medicine specialists often work in multidisciplinary teams that include other healthcare professionals such as neurologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, pulmonologists, otolaryngologists, and dentists to provide comprehensive care for patients with sleep disorders. They use various diagnostic tools, including polysomnography (sleep studies), actigraphy, and multiple sleep latency tests, to evaluate patients' sleep patterns and diagnose their conditions accurately. Based on the diagnosis, they develop individualized treatment plans that may include lifestyle modifications, pharmacological interventions, medical devices, or surgery.

To become a sleep medicine specialist, physicians typically complete a residency in a related field such as neurology, pulmonology, psychiatry, or internal medicine and then pursue additional training and certification in sleep medicine. The American Board of Medical Specialties recognizes sleep medicine as a subspecialty, and the American Board of Sleep Medicine offers certification to qualified physicians who pass a rigorous examination.

A circadian rhythm is a roughly 24-hour biological cycle that regulates various physiological and behavioral processes in living organisms. It is driven by the body's internal clock, which is primarily located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus in the brain.

The circadian rhythm controls many aspects of human physiology, including sleep-wake cycles, hormone secretion, body temperature, and metabolism. It helps to synchronize these processes with the external environment, particularly the day-night cycle caused by the rotation of the Earth.

Disruptions to the circadian rhythm can have negative effects on health, leading to conditions such as insomnia, sleep disorders, depression, bipolar disorder, and even increased risk of chronic diseases like cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Factors that can disrupt the circadian rhythm include shift work, jet lag, irregular sleep schedules, and exposure to artificial light at night.

Psychomotor agitation is a state of increased physical activity and purposeless or semi-purposeful voluntary movements, usually associated with restlessness, irritability, and cognitive impairment. It can be a manifestation of various medical and neurological conditions such as delirium, dementia, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and substance withdrawal. Psychomotor agitation may also increase the risk of aggressive behavior and physical harm to oneself or others. Appropriate evaluation and management are necessary to address the underlying cause and alleviate symptoms.

Phototherapy is a medical treatment that involves the use of light to manage or improve certain conditions. It can be delivered in various forms, such as natural light exposure or artificial light sources, including lasers, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), or fluorescent lamps. The wavelength and intensity of light are carefully controlled to achieve specific therapeutic effects.

Phototherapy is most commonly used for newborns with jaundice to help break down bilirubin in the skin, reducing its levels in the bloodstream. This type of phototherapy is called bilirubin lights or bili lights.

In dermatology, phototherapy can be applied to treat various skin conditions like psoriasis, eczema, vitiligo, and acne. Narrowband ultraviolet B (UVB) therapy, PUVA (psoralen plus UVA), and blue or red light therapies are some examples of dermatological phototherapies.

Phototherapy can also be used to alleviate symptoms of seasonal affective disorder (SAD) and other mood disorders by exposing patients to bright artificial light, which helps regulate their circadian rhythms and improve their mood. This form of phototherapy is called light therapy or bright light therapy.

It's essential to consult a healthcare professional before starting any phototherapy treatment, as inappropriate use can lead to adverse effects.

"Motor activity" is a general term used in the field of medicine and neuroscience to refer to any kind of physical movement or action that is generated by the body's motor system. The motor system includes the brain, spinal cord, nerves, and muscles that work together to produce movements such as walking, talking, reaching for an object, or even subtle actions like moving your eyes.

Motor activity can be voluntary, meaning it is initiated intentionally by the individual, or involuntary, meaning it is triggered automatically by the nervous system without conscious control. Examples of voluntary motor activity include deliberately lifting your arm or kicking a ball, while examples of involuntary motor activity include heartbeat, digestion, and reflex actions like jerking your hand away from a hot stove.

Abnormalities in motor activity can be a sign of neurological or muscular disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, cerebral palsy, or multiple sclerosis. Assessment of motor activity is often used in the diagnosis and treatment of these conditions.

Sleep stages are distinct patterns of brain activity that occur during sleep, as measured by an electroencephalogram (EEG). They are part of the sleep cycle and are used to describe the different types of sleep that humans go through during a normal night's rest. The sleep cycle includes several repeating stages:

1. Stage 1 (N1): This is the lightest stage of sleep, where you transition from wakefulness to sleep. During this stage, muscle activity and brain waves begin to slow down.
2. Stage 2 (N2): In this stage, your heart rate slows, body temperature decreases, and eye movements stop. Brain wave activity becomes slower, with occasional bursts of electrical activity called sleep spindles.
3. Stage 3 (N3): Also known as deep non-REM sleep, this stage is characterized by slow delta waves. It is during this stage that the body undergoes restorative processes such as tissue repair, growth, and immune function enhancement.
4. REM (Rapid Eye Movement) sleep: This is the stage where dreaming typically occurs. Your eyes move rapidly beneath closed eyelids, heart rate and respiration become irregular, and brain wave activity increases to levels similar to wakefulness. REM sleep is important for memory consolidation and learning.

The sleep cycle progresses through these stages multiple times during the night, with REM sleep periods becoming longer towards morning. Understanding sleep stages is crucial in diagnosing and treating various sleep disorders.

Sleep apnea syndromes refer to a group of disorders characterized by abnormal breathing patterns during sleep. These patterns can result in repeated pauses in breathing (apneas) or shallow breaths (hypopneas), causing interruptions in sleep and decreased oxygen supply to the body. There are three main types of sleep apnea syndromes:

1. Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA): This is the most common form, caused by the collapse or obstruction of the upper airway during sleep, often due to relaxation of the muscles in the throat and tongue.

2. Central Sleep Apnea (CSA): This type is less common and results from the brain's failure to send proper signals to the breathing muscles. It can be associated with conditions such as heart failure, stroke, or certain medications.

3. Complex/Mixed Sleep Apnea: In some cases, a person may experience both obstructive and central sleep apnea symptoms, known as complex or mixed sleep apnea.

Symptoms of sleep apnea syndromes can include loud snoring, excessive daytime sleepiness, fatigue, morning headaches, difficulty concentrating, and mood changes. Diagnosis typically involves a sleep study (polysomnography) to monitor breathing patterns, heart rate, brain activity, and other physiological factors during sleep. Treatment options may include lifestyle modifications, oral appliances, positive airway pressure therapy, or even surgery in severe cases.

Medical records are organized, detailed collections of information about a patient's health history, including their symptoms, diagnoses, treatments, medications, test results, and any other relevant data. These records are created and maintained by healthcare professionals during the course of providing medical care and serve as an essential tool for continuity, communication, and decision-making in healthcare. They may exist in paper form, electronic health records (EHRs), or a combination of both. Medical records also play a critical role in research, quality improvement, public health, reimbursement, and legal proceedings.

A "self-report" in a medical context refers to the information or data provided by an individual about their own symptoms, experiences, behaviors, or health status. This can be collected through various methods such as questionnaires, surveys, interviews, or diaries. Self-reports are commonly used in research and clinical settings to assess various aspects of health, including physical and mental health symptoms, quality of life, treatment adherence, and substance use.

While self-reports can be a valuable source of information, they may also be subject to biases such as recall bias, social desirability bias, or response distortion. Therefore, it is important to consider the potential limitations and validity of self-reported data in interpreting the results. In some cases, self-reports may be supplemented with other sources of information, such as medical records, physiological measures, or observer ratings.

Disorders of excessive somnolence (DES) are a group of medical conditions characterized by an increased tendency to fall asleep or experience excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), despite having adequate opportunity and circumstances for sleep. These disorders are typically classified as central disorders of hypersomnolence according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD-3).

The most common DES is narcolepsy, a chronic neurological disorder caused by the brain's inability to regulate sleep-wake cycles normally. Other DES include idiopathic hypersomnia, Kleine-Levin syndrome, and recurrent hypersomnia. These disorders can significantly impact an individual's daily functioning, quality of life, and overall health.

Narcolepsy is further divided into two types: narcolepsy type 1 (NT1) and narcolepsy type 2 (NT2). NT1 is characterized by the presence of cataplexy, a sudden loss of muscle tone triggered by strong emotions, while NT2 does not include cataplexy. Both types of narcolepsy involve excessive daytime sleepiness, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations, and fragmented nighttime sleep.

Idiopathic hypersomnia is a DES without the presence of REM-related symptoms like cataplexy or sleep paralysis. Individuals with idiopathic hypersomnia experience excessive daytime sleepiness and prolonged nighttime sleep, often lasting 10 to 14 hours, but do not feel refreshed upon waking.

Kleine-Levin syndrome is a rare DES characterized by recurrent episodes of excessive sleepiness, often accompanied by cognitive impairment, altered perception, hyperphagia (excessive eating), and hypersexuality during the episodes. These episodes can last days to weeks and typically occur multiple times per year.

Recurrent hypersomnia is another rare DES with recurring episodes of excessive sleepiness lasting for several days, followed by a period of normal or reduced sleepiness. The episodes are not as predictable or consistent as those seen in Kleine-Levin syndrome.

Treatment for DES typically involves pharmacological interventions to manage symptoms and improve daytime alertness. Modafinil, armodafinil, and traditional stimulants like amphetamine salts are commonly used to treat excessive daytime sleepiness. Additionally, antidepressants may be prescribed to manage REM-related symptoms like cataplexy or sleep paralysis. Non-pharmacological interventions, such as scheduled napping and good sleep hygiene practices, can also help improve symptoms.

Melatonin is a hormone that is produced by the pineal gland in the brain. It helps regulate sleep-wake cycles and is often referred to as the "hormone of darkness" because its production is stimulated by darkness and inhibited by light. Melatonin plays a key role in synchronizing the circadian rhythm, the body's internal clock that regulates various biological processes over a 24-hour period.

Melatonin is primarily released at night, and its levels in the blood can rise and fall in response to changes in light and darkness in an individual's environment. Supplementing with melatonin has been found to be helpful in treating sleep disorders such as insomnia, jet lag, and delayed sleep phase syndrome. It may also have other benefits, including antioxidant properties and potential uses in the treatment of certain neurological conditions.

It is important to note that while melatonin supplements are available over-the-counter in many countries, they should still be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional, as their use can have potential side effects and interactions with other medications.

'Activity cycles' is a term that can have different meanings in different contexts, and I could not find a specific medical definition for it. However, in the context of physiology or chronobiology, activity cycles often refer to the natural rhythms of behavior and physiological processes that occur over a 24-hour period, also known as circadian rhythms.

Circadian rhythms are biological processes that follow an approximate 24-hour cycle and regulate various functions in living organisms, including sleep-wake cycles, body temperature, hormone secretion, and metabolism. These rhythms help the body adapt to the changing environment and coordinate various physiological processes to optimize function and maintain homeostasis.

Therefore, activity cycles in a medical or physiological context may refer to the natural fluctuations in physical activity, alertness, and other behaviors that follow a circadian rhythm. Factors such as sleep deprivation, jet lag, and shift work can disrupt these rhythms and lead to various health problems, including sleep disorders, mood disturbances, and impaired cognitive function.

Reproducibility of results in a medical context refers to the ability to obtain consistent and comparable findings when a particular experiment or study is repeated, either by the same researcher or by different researchers, following the same experimental protocol. It is an essential principle in scientific research that helps to ensure the validity and reliability of research findings.

In medical research, reproducibility of results is crucial for establishing the effectiveness and safety of new treatments, interventions, or diagnostic tools. It involves conducting well-designed studies with adequate sample sizes, appropriate statistical analyses, and transparent reporting of methods and findings to allow other researchers to replicate the study and confirm or refute the results.

The lack of reproducibility in medical research has become a significant concern in recent years, as several high-profile studies have failed to produce consistent findings when replicated by other researchers. This has led to increased scrutiny of research practices and a call for greater transparency, rigor, and standardization in the conduct and reporting of medical research.

Physiological monitoring is the continuous or intermittent observation and measurement of various body functions or parameters in a patient, with the aim of evaluating their health status, identifying any abnormalities or changes, and guiding clinical decision-making and treatment. This may involve the use of specialized medical equipment, such as cardiac monitors, pulse oximeters, blood pressure monitors, and capnographs, among others. The data collected through physiological monitoring can help healthcare professionals assess the effectiveness of treatments, detect complications early, and make timely adjustments to patient care plans.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

Fatigue is a state of feeling very tired, weary, or exhausted, which can be physical, mental, or both. It is a common symptom that can be caused by various factors, including lack of sleep, poor nutrition, stress, medical conditions (such as anemia, diabetes, heart disease, or cancer), medications, and substance abuse. Fatigue can also be a symptom of depression or other mental health disorders. In medical terms, fatigue is often described as a subjective feeling of tiredness that is not proportional to recent activity levels and interferes with usual functioning. It is important to consult a healthcare professional if experiencing persistent or severe fatigue to determine the underlying cause and develop an appropriate treatment plan.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) is a statistical technique used to compare the means of two or more groups and determine whether there are any significant differences between them. It is a way to analyze the variance in a dataset to determine whether the variability between groups is greater than the variability within groups, which can indicate that the groups are significantly different from one another.

ANOVA is based on the concept of partitioning the total variance in a dataset into two components: variance due to differences between group means (also known as "between-group variance") and variance due to differences within each group (also known as "within-group variance"). By comparing these two sources of variance, ANOVA can help researchers determine whether any observed differences between groups are statistically significant, or whether they could have occurred by chance.

ANOVA is a widely used technique in many areas of research, including biology, psychology, engineering, and business. It is often used to compare the means of two or more experimental groups, such as a treatment group and a control group, to determine whether the treatment had a significant effect. ANOVA can also be used to compare the means of different populations or subgroups within a population, to identify any differences that may exist between them.

A Severity of Illness Index is a measurement tool used in healthcare to assess the severity of a patient's condition and the risk of mortality or other adverse outcomes. These indices typically take into account various physiological and clinical variables, such as vital signs, laboratory values, and co-morbidities, to generate a score that reflects the patient's overall illness severity.

Examples of Severity of Illness Indices include the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) system, the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS), and the Mortality Probability Model (MPM). These indices are often used in critical care settings to guide clinical decision-making, inform prognosis, and compare outcomes across different patient populations.

It is important to note that while these indices can provide valuable information about a patient's condition, they should not be used as the sole basis for clinical decision-making. Rather, they should be considered in conjunction with other factors, such as the patient's overall clinical presentation, treatment preferences, and goals of care.

... reveals itself to be more likely to detect sleep than wake phases. Actigraphy has been actively used in sleep- ... Actigraphy also captures daytime activity, which is not captured by polysomnography. Actigraphy turns out to be especially ... With the actigraphy it is also possible to determine some general information related to the sleep and the sleep quality of the ... Actigraphy is a non-invasive method of monitoring human rest/activity cycles. A small actigraph unit, also called an actimetry ...
Actigraphy is a useful, objective wrist-worn tool if the validity of self-reported sleep diaries or questionnaires is ... Actigraphy works by recording movements and using computerized algorithms to estimate total sleep time, sleep onset latency, ... "Actigraphy". stanfordhealthcare.org. Retrieved 21 January 2021. Morgenthaler, Timothy; Alessi, Cathy; Friedman, Leah; Owens, ... "Use of Actigraphy for the Evaluation of Sleep Disorders and Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders: An American Academy of Sleep ...
"Wrist Actigraphy". Chest. 139 (6): 1514-1527. doi:10.1378/chest.10-1872. PMC 3109647. PMID 21652563. Sadeh, Avi; Sharkey, M.; ... "Validity and reliability of the Japanese version of the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire evaluated from actigraphy". Sleep ...
An actigraphy over several days can show longer sleep periods, which are characteristic for idiopathic hypersomnia. Actigraphy ... Actigraphy, which operates by analyzing the patient's limb movements, is used to record the sleep and wake cycles. In order to ... The advantage actigraphy shows over polysomnography is that it is possible to record for 24-hours a day for weeks. Furthermore ... Ancoli-Israel, S., Cole, R., Alessi, C., Chambers, M., Moorcroft, W., & Pollak, C. P. (2003). The role of actigraphy in the ...
Actigraphy and polysomnography could indicate some interesting patterns. Further studies are needed to see if some phase ... Sleep log and/or actigraphy monitoring (with sleep diaries) demonstrate for more than 14 days (work and free days included) ...
Actigraphy is a common and minimally invasive way to measure sleep architecture. Actigraphy has only one method of recording, ... But, actigraphy often over estimates sleep time (de Souza 2003 and Kanady 2011). Most studies point to the specific deficits in ...
The use of actigraphy can be promising in the diagnostical assessment of NREM-related parasomnias, for example to rule out ... Eventually, using actigraphy for parasomnias in general is disputed. Parasomnias can be considered as potentially harmful to ... "Actigraphy as a diagnostic aid for REM sleep behavior disorder in Parkinson's disease". BMC Neurology. 14 (1): 76. doi:10.1186/ ...
A non-linear study of actigraphy data". Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and Its Applications. 514: 612-619. arXiv:1702.03912. ...
Sleep diaries may be used in conjunction with actigraphy. In addition to being a useful tool for medical professionals in the ...
França, L. G. S.; Montoya, Pedro; Miranda, J. G. V. (2017). "On multifractals: a non-linear study of actigraphy data". Physica ...
"Personalized Sleep Parameters Estimation from Actigraphy: A Machine Learning Approach". Nature and Science of Sleep. 11: 387- ...
Actigraphy can assess sleep/wake patterns without confining one to the laboratory. The monitors are small, wrist-worn movement ... The first actigraphy device was made in 1978 by Krupke, and continuous positive airway pressure therapy and ... Other diagnostic tools are used while the patient is asleep such as the polysomnograph and actigraphy. A sleep diary is a daily ... The sleep diary may be used in conjunction with actigraphy. Sleep questionnaires help determine the presence of a sleep ...
NASA (2007). "Sleep-Wake Actigraphy and Light Exposure During Spaceflight-Long (Sleep-Long)". NASA. Archived from the original ...
Polysomnography and actigraphy are tests commonly ordered for diagnosing sleep disorders. Sleep disorders are broadly ...
Special interest groups in areas such as pediatrics and actigraphy have been established. It now provides a comprehensive ...
Moreover, self-reported sleep duration is only moderately correlated with actual sleep time as measured by actigraphy, and ... Sleep researchers also use simplified electrocardiography (EKG) for cardiac activity and actigraphy for motor movements. The ...
An MSLT is used to rule out disorders of hypersomnolence such as narcolepsy.[citation needed] Actigraphy is sometimes used to ... Methods include clinical interview, sleep diaries, standardized questionnaires, polysomnography, actigraphy, and multiple sleep ... or actigraphy. In that case, the BSM provider conducts a clinical interview and administers questionnaires if needed. ...
Recent studies showed actigraphy may be combined to PSG as a screening tool for PLMD diagnosis. Actigraphs are watch-shaped ... Recent actigraphy devices allow more precise recordings which helps evaluating if actual movements meet diagnostic criteria for ...
De la Iglesia and his team used actigraphy to measure the sleep cycles of their participants. They also conducted interviews ...
The sleep diary can be replaced or validated by the use of out-patient actigraphy for a week or more, using a non-invasive ... Actigraphy is indicated as a method to characterize circadian patterns or sleep disturbances in individuals with insomnia, ... ...
Compliance in these studies is typically measured with actigraphy in order to track movements and time in bed. The mechanism by ...
GET does not enable patients to increase their activity levels (as objectively measured by actigraphy) or return to work. Major ...
... a controlled naturalistic study using actigraphy. Journal of Affective Disorders 80, 145-153 Stott, R,, Pimm, J,, Emsley, R., ...
to supplement the actigraphy data. Collecting this data allows sleep professionals to carefully document and measure patient's ... To measure sleep variables candidly, patients wear actigraphy watches that record sleep onset, wake time, and many other ... 2007 NASA Sleep-Wake Actigraphy and Light Exposure During Spaceflight-Long Experiment (CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list ...
One actigraphy study reports a modest decline in total sleep time of 25 min in late-reproductive woman during the premenstrual ...
... and Actigraphy. It is typically not possible to assess these tests prior to an injury. Therefore, it is often not clear whether ...
The WakeMate was an electronic device with sensors intended to be used to monitor the sleep state of the user using actigraphy ...
Polysomnography (PSG) and actigraphy (both related to sleep parameters) are more objective resources that provide evidences of ...
Roth has also applied the use of skin conductance, electrocardiography, actigraphy, and monitoring of other physiological ...
Those conducting the treatment noticed how the nocturnal median motor activity was decreased, as was assessed by actigraphy, ...
Actigraphy reveals itself to be more likely to detect sleep than wake phases. Actigraphy has been actively used in sleep- ... Actigraphy also captures daytime activity, which is not captured by polysomnography. Actigraphy turns out to be especially ... With the actigraphy it is also possible to determine some general information related to the sleep and the sleep quality of the ... Actigraphy is a non-invasive method of monitoring human rest/activity cycles. A small actigraph unit, also called an actimetry ...
Objective The majority of research on sleep and cognition has focused on mean markers of sleep across multiple nights; however, variable sleep patterns have become increasingly common in the modern era. The purpose of this study […]. ...
Compare 7 actigraphy devices side by side. The matrix compares features such as accelerometers, battery, logging intervals, and ... Actigraphy Side-by-Side Comparison Guide (December 2014). Dec 2, 2014 , Actigraphy , 0 , ... Compare 7 actigraphy devices side by side. Click on the thumbnail above or on "Actigraphy2014"to view the full matrix at a ... Sleep Reviews actigraphy matrix compares features such as warranty, accelerometer technology, battery life, logging intervals ...
AcqKnowledge software licensed feature provides actigraphy analysis with automated routines for sleep and gross motor activity ... The new Actigraphy licensed feature operates in two modes to provide a general indication of activity and also sleep patterns. ... Actigraphy License add-on , measure cycles of activity and sleep (rest) over days or even weeks to nninvasively assess sleep ... Automated Actigraphy Analysis Package with Routines for Sleep & General Gross Motor Activity! ...
... while actigraphy may provide additional information about nocturnal wake times. Sleep diary associated with actigraphy could be ... Actigraphy and sleep diaries showed good agreement for bedtime and wake-up time, but not for SOL and WASO. A satisfactory ... Compared to actigraphy, children overestimated their sleep duration by 92 min and demonstrated significant difficulty to assess ... that their children went to bed 36 min earlier and obtained 36.5 min more sleep than objective estimations with actigraphy. ...
An Actigraphy-Based Validation Study of the Sleep Disorder Inventory in the Nursing Home. Hjetland, Gunnhild Johnsen; Nordhus, ... Spearman correlations were used to evaluate the convergent validity between actigraphy and the SDI. Test performance was ... and with actigraphy (Actiwatch II, Philips Respironics). The SDI evaluates the frequency, severity, and distress of seven sleep ... to a nursing home context and validate it against actigraphy. ...
... , Check out the latest industry focused articles. ... actigraphy, sleep, Data Science, DHT, medical-grade wearables, ... actigraphy, sleep, algorithms, raw data, digital measure, wearables, ActiGraph, vital signs Frequently Asked Questions: ... actigraphy, algorithms, raw data, wear compliance, API, centrepoint insight watch, temperature More Sensors. More Data. ... actigraphy, digital endpoints, Data Science, medical-grade wearables, ActiGraph, fit-for-purpose, real-world environment, heart ...
Obesity and Body Composition in Preschool Children with Different Levels of Actigraphy-Derived Physical Activity-A Cross- ... Obesity and Body Composition in Preschool Children with Different Levels of Actigraphy-Derived Physical Activity-A Cross- ... Obesity and Body Composition in Preschool Children with Different Levels of Actigraphy-Derived Physical Activity-A Cross- ...
Actigraphy. For actigraphy, a portable device is worn around the wrist to record gross motor activity and light/darkness over ... Actigraphy has shown concordance with polysomnography in the assessment of total sleep time. [67] The role of actigraphy in ... Natale V, Plazzi G, Martoni M. Actigraphy in the assessment of insomnia: a quantitative approach. Sleep. 2009 Jun 1. 32(6):767- ... Maintaining a sleep diary can be done in conjunction with wrist actigraphy. In the diary, patients should record estimates of ...
Actigraphy. Actigraphy is a technique used to assess your activity and rest over several days to weeks. ...
... Author: ... Validating chronotype questionnaires in adolescents : correlations with actigraphy and the dim light melatonin onset. DSpace ...
Ambulatory actigraphy devices that collect and download continuous, objective, long-term sleep/wake data. ...
Obstructive sleep apnea is a condition marked by abnormal nighttime breathing. Learn more about the symptoms, causes, and treatments of obstructive sleep apnea.
Actigraphy primarily measures your movement. Some advanced devices also measure light exposure. It does not measure sleep ...
When involving actigraphy in clinical trials, there are several points to be considered, including issues of validity, data ... In many studies, actigraphy endpoints are exploratory or "nice to haves" - in such studies the focus is somewhere else and it ... However, if the actigraphy (or sleep and/or vital signs) are important secondary or even primary endpoints, you will need to ... Acting out? Points to consider when planning to involve actigraphy measurements into your study design Acting out? Points to ...
Perfect enough to sleep? Perfectionism and actigraphy-determined markers of insomnia Perfect enough to sleep? Perfectionism and ... The REP survey is used as a pre-screening survey to find potential participants to participate in the two-week actigraphy study ... 1. Explore the relationship between perfectionism and insomnia using objective sleep parameters obtained from actigraphy. ... actigraphy-determined markers of insomnia. Background. Research has found that insomnia symptoms and severity are associated ...
Comparison of sleep time and duration between sleep diary and wrist actigraphy in a population with mental health problems. ... Comparison of sleep time and duration between sleep diary and wrist actigraphy in a population with mental health problems. In ... Comparison of sleep time and duration between sleep diary and wrist actigraphy in a population with mental health problems. / ... Comparison of sleep time and duration between sleep diary and wrist actigraphy in a population with mental health problems. ...
Actigraphy Bookmark [insert headline / title here]. Actigraphy is worn like a watch on the wrist and is used to assess cycles ...
Actigraphy is a relatively new method of measuring sleep functioning that provides objective information and addresses some ... In this article, we first review conventional sleep assessment methods, and then we discuss the utility of actigraphy, a ... Home > Education & Research , ISTSS Research Guidelines , Trauma Research Methods , Actigraphy Improves Measurement of Sleep ...
Keynote on Developing fine-grained actigraphys for rheumatoid arthritis patient. Keynote presentation, 1st Digital Rheumatoid ...
The role of actigraphy in insomnia evaluation is not well established yet. In the current sleep research field, actigraphy is ... Natale V, Plazzi G, Martoni M. Actigraphy in the assessment of insomnia: a quantitative approach. Sleep. 2009 Jun 1. 32(6):767- ... On sleep diaries or actigraphy, these patients show a consistent sleep time with earlier wake times that correspond to school ... There is typically a mismatch between objective findings from polysomnography or actigraphy and subjective sleep estimates from ...
Learn more about Actigraphy Motion Biosensors for Athletic Performance. ... Actigraphy Motion Biosensors for athletic performance. Our Motion Biosensors are used to monitor and provide reliable feedback ...
However, using actigraphy, patients with prostate cancer had poorer sleep efficiency (P=0.02) than patients with breast cancer ... and wrist actigraphy. Differences in sleep disturbance and fatigue between groups were evaluated using independent sample t- ...
aActigraphy: A technique that uses a small instrument called an actigraph (a watch-like sensory unit) worn on the wrist or ... Sleep diary; ISI; actigraphy; fatigue, depression/anxiety, and QOL assessments. Compared with control group, PCBT-I and VCBT-I ... Sleep diary, actigraphy, ISI. Both groups improved over time; significant improvement between groups favored CBT-I group in ... PSQI, sleep diary, actigraphya, fatigue assessment. Significant improvement in sleep quality and nighttime awakenings for CBT ...
... ... The novel actigraphy sleep score (ASS) had the following ranges: 0-25 (healthy controls), 67-103 (HAT stage I), 111-126 (HAT ... The novel actigraphy sleep score (ASS) had the following ranges: 0-25 (healthy controls), 67-103 (HAT stage I), 111-126 (HAT ... Simultaneous actigraphy and polysomnography as well as CSF white blood cell (WBC) count, trypanosome presence, and CXCL-10 ...
Table 2 Sleep evaluated by polysomnography, actigraphy, and questionnaires Control (n=8). Stretching (n=10). Resistance (n=10) ... whereas actigraphy was assessed over 15 nights. Actigraphy has been a reliable method for evaluating sleep patterns in patients ... Further validation of actigraphy for sleep studies. Sleep. 2003;26:81-5.,3030. Cole RJ, Kripke DF, Gruen W, Mullaney DJ, Gillin ... The role of actigraphy in the study of sleep and circadian rhythms. Sleep. 2003;26:342-92. These results are consistent with ...
Measures of sleep quality recorded by actigraphy and subjective sleep questionnaires were completed. Sequential urine samples ...
Variability of sleep duration is related to subjective sleep quality and subjective well-being : An actigraphy study. PLoS ONE ... Variability of sleep duration is related to subjective sleep quality and subjective well-being : An actigraphy study ... assessed by actigraphy, were related to subjective well-being and whether this relationship was mediated by subjective sleep ... and time awake after sleep onset were assessed by actigraphy over a period of 7 days. Subjective sleep quality was assessed ...
Seven days of actigraphy data were utilised to calculate sedentary time and bouts of variable duration based on a threshold of ... We investigate the daytime actigraphy data and identify temporal patterns of inactivity among adults with acute insomnia and ... Patterns of sedentary behaviour in adults with acute insomnia derived from actigraphy data ... Patterns of sedentary behaviour in adults with acute insomnia derived from actigraphy data. ...
Actigraphy (wrist-worn accelerometry) has been used for many years as a simple proxy measurement of sleep patterns, but its use ... Actigraphy (wrist-worn accelerometry) has been used for many years as a simple proxy measurement of sleep patterns, but its use ... Actigraphy (wrist-worn accelerometry) has been used for many years as a simple proxy measurement of sleep patterns, but its use ... Actigraphy (wrist-worn accelerometry) has been used for many years as a simple proxy measurement of sleep patterns, but its use ...
  • Studies have found actigraphy to be helpful for sleep research because it tends to be less expensive and cumbersome than polysomnography. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, actigraphy cannot be considered as a substitute to polysomnography. (wikipedia.org)
  • The main reason for this development is the fact that, while retaining mobility, actigraphy offers reliable results with an accuracy that is close to those of polysomnography (above 90% for estimating total sleep time but dropping to 55% for a 4 - way sleep stage estimation problem). (wikipedia.org)
  • A variety of objective and subjective tools have been used to assess sleep-wake rhythms in children and adolescents, including polysomnography (PSG), actigraphy, sleep diary, and parental report questionnaires. (frontiersin.org)
  • Actigraphy has shown concordance with polysomnography in the assessment of total sleep time. (medscape.com)
  • Simultaneous actigraphy and polysomnography as well as CSF white blood cell (WBC) count, trypanosome presence, and CXCL-10 cytokine levels were performed in 20 HAT patients and nine healthy individuals (controls) using standard procedures. (univr.it)
  • Sleep was evaluated with polysomnography, actigraphy, and questionnaires. (scielo.br)
  • [ 11 ] Sleep can be monitored by subjective (questionnaires), objective (polysomnography [PSG] or actigraphy), or multimodal ways. (medscape.com)
  • Measures of sleep quality recorded by actigraphy and subjective sleep questionnaires were completed. (nih.gov)
  • Parents estimated that their children went to bed 36 min earlier and obtained 36.5 min more sleep than objective estimations with actigraphy. (frontiersin.org)
  • Sleep diary associated with actigraphy could be an interesting tool to evaluate parameters that could contribute to adjust subjective perception to objective sleep values. (frontiersin.org)
  • Ambulatory actigraphy devices that collect and download continuous, objective, long-term sleep/wake data. (streamhealthinc.com)
  • Actigraphy is a relatively new method of measuring sleep functioning that provides objective information and addresses some limitations of conventional measures. (istss.org)
  • 1. Explore the relationship between perfectionism and insomnia using objective sleep parameters obtained from actigraphy. (edu.au)
  • Objective: To determine the validity of different sensitivity settings of actigraphy analysis to optimize its use as a proxy for recording sleep patterns in individuals with a TBI. (umn.edu)
  • There is also objective evidence on actigraphy of differing levels of activity. (bmj.com)
  • Using data of the Survey of Mid-Life in the United States (MIDUS), we investigated whether duration and quality of sleep, assessed by actigraphy, were related to subjective well-being and whether this relationship was mediated by subjective sleep quality. (unibas.ch)
  • Sleep was assessed with the SDI, completed by nursing home staff, and with actigraphy (Actiwatch II, Philips Respironics). (uib.no)
  • [ 67 ] The role of actigraphy in insomnia evaluation has not been well established, but actigraphy can help document sleep patterns and circadian rhythms. (medscape.com)
  • Patterns of sedentary behaviour in adults with acute insomnia derived from actigraphy data. (bvsalud.org)
  • We investigate the daytime actigraphy data and identify temporal patterns of inactivity among adults with acute insomnia and healthy adults . (bvsalud.org)
  • These results suggested that sleep diary completed by children provides interesting measures of self-perception, while actigraphy may provide additional information about nocturnal wake times. (frontiersin.org)
  • Maintaining a sleep diary can be done in conjunction with wrist actigraphy. (medscape.com)
  • Actigraphy units were attached to their waist with an adjustable elastic belt for 7 consecutive days and a child sleep diary was completed by their parents. (nature.com)
  • In most cases, currently used actigraphy devices utilize accelerometry to provide information on the subject's activity. (clinfo.eu)
  • Actigraphy (wrist-worn accelerometry) has been used for many years as a simple proxy measurement of sleep patterns, but its use has not been thoroughly validated in individuals with TBI. (umn.edu)
  • In this article, we first review conventional sleep assessment methods, and then we discuss the utility of actigraphy, a relatively new sleep measure that is beginning to receive more attention in studies of PTSD. (istss.org)
  • Alternate methods of scoring sleep from actigraphy data are necessary in this population. (umn.edu)
  • Actigraphy is useful for assessing daytime sleepiness in place of a laboratory sleep latency test. (wikipedia.org)
  • There was an overall difference in daytime activity (p=0.03) from actigraphy recordings. (bmj.com)
  • Main Outcome Measure: Concordance between PSG- and actigraphy-determined sleep using different sensitivity threshold settings (low, medium, high, automated). (umn.edu)
  • Conclusions: In hospitalized patients with TBI and poor sleep, actigraphy underestimates the level of sleep disruption and has poor concordance with PSG-determined sleep. (umn.edu)
  • Patients with breast (n=78) and prostate (n=82) cancer were evaluated before the initiation of RT using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, General Sleep Disturbance Scale, Lee Fatigue Scale, and wrist actigraphy. (nih.gov)
  • The Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children and actigraphy were assessed in 975 children at 10 to 15 years. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Can we identify dementia risk from 24-hour wrist-worn actigraphy? (healthresearchbc.ca)
  • Several studies have identified circadian risk factors for cognitive decline and dementia using wrist-worn actigraphy (a common field measure for indexing the sleep-wake cycle of circadian rhythms). (healthresearchbc.ca)
  • However, there are opportunities to use the power of artificial intelligence, specifically machine learning (ML), to enhance the sensitivity and specificity of wrist-worn actigraphy (WWA) for detecting sleep-wake cycle disturbances which are associated with increased dementia risk. (healthresearchbc.ca)
  • Spearman correlations were used to evaluate the convergent validity between actigraphy and the SDI. (uib.no)
  • Actigraphy and sleep diaries showed good agreement for bedtime and wake-up time, but not for SOL and WASO. (frontiersin.org)
  • Sleep and Sleepiness Measured by Diaries and Actigraphy among Norwegian and Austrian Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) Pilots. (uib.no)
  • A trivial pubmed search for "clinical trial AND actigraph*" shows a remarkable trend towards increasing utilization of actigraphy tools in clinical research, with a peak beyond the year 2010 (see Figure 1). (clinfo.eu)
  • In the current study, to gain an answer to this question, we examined the relationship between the sleep properties and the cognitive development of toddlers born prematurely using actigraphy and the Kyoto scale of psychological development (KSPD) test. (nature.com)
  • Indeed, actigraphy may be efficient in measuring sleep parameters and sleep quality, however it is not provided with measures for brain activity (EEG), eye movements (EOG), muscle activity (EMG) or heart rhythm (ECG). (wikipedia.org)
  • The REP survey is used as a pre-screening survey to find potential participants to participate in the two-week actigraphy study. (edu.au)
  • The present study aimed to adapt the proxy-rated Sleep Disorder Inventory (SDI) to a nursing home context and validate it against actigraphy. (uib.no)
  • That being said, when planning to involve actigraphy measurements into your study design, there are several points to be considered, including issues of the validity of the method, data transfer and data analysis , as well as "trivial" yet vital considerations like memory capacity and battery life of the device. (clinfo.eu)
  • Design: Comparison of actigraphy to criterion standard polysomnographic (PSG)-determination of sleep on a single overnight study. (umn.edu)
  • With the actigraphy it is also possible to determine some general information related to the sleep and the sleep quality of the subject, such as his/her chronotype, the sleep onset latency, the total sleep duration, the sleep consolidation (sleep efficiency), the time spent in bed, movements, and the sleep cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sleep duration, variability of sleep duration, sleep onset latency, and time awake after sleep onset were assessed by actigraphy over a period of 7 days. (unibas.ch)
  • Compared to actigraphy, children overestimated their sleep duration by 92 min and demonstrated significant difficulty to assess the amount of time they spent awake during the night. (frontiersin.org)
  • However, using actigraphy, patients with prostate cancer had poorer sleep efficiency (P=0.02) than patients with breast cancer. (nih.gov)
  • Research showed that both sleep and wake are not equally assessed by actigraphy devices. (wikipedia.org)
  • Compare 7 actigraphy devices side by side. (sleepreviewmag.com)
  • Actigraphy reveals itself to be more likely to detect sleep than wake phases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Actigraphy is a non-invasive method to assess sleep-wake rhythms in the child's natural setting for extended periods of time, with a reasonable validity and reliability compared to PSG ( 7 ) or videosomnography ( 8 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • Precision-recall statistics indicate that with less sensitive actigraphy thresholds, episodes identified as "wake" are usually "wake," but many true episodes of "wake" are missed. (umn.edu)
  • With more sensitive actigraphy thresholds, more episodes of "wake" are identified, but only some of these are true episodes of "wake. (umn.edu)
  • Actigraphy is a non-invasive method of monitoring human rest/activity cycles. (wikipedia.org)
  • In fact, whenever discussing the topic of digitalization of healthcare and health research, key words like actigraphy , vital sign monitoring and somnography are named. (clinfo.eu)
  • For actigraphy, a portable device is worn around the wrist to record gross motor activity and light/darkness over extended periods. (medscape.com)
  • Actigraphy is a technique used to assess your activity and rest over several days to weeks. (psychcentral.com)
  • An accelerometer can be something as simple as a step count device (registering commotion) or part of a complex device, such as an actigraphy device or a cell phone. (clinfo.eu)
  • Actigraphy has been actively used in sleep-related studies since the early 1990s. (wikipedia.org)
  • The novel actigraphy sleep score (ASS) had the following ranges: 0-25 (healthy controls), 67-103 (HAT stage I), 111-126 (HAT intermediate), and 133-250 (HAT stage II). (univr.it)