Colorless, odorless crystals that are used extensively in research laboratories for the preparation of polyacrylamide gels for electrophoresis and in organic synthesis, and polymerization. Some of its polymers are used in sewage and wastewater treatment, permanent press fabrics, and as soil conditioning agents.

Surface-grafted, environmentally sensitive polymers for biofilm release. (1/591)

Controlling bacterial biofouling is desirable for almost every human enterprise in which solid surfaces are introduced into nonsterile aqueous environments. One approach that is used to decrease contamination of manufactured devices by microorganisms is using materials that easily slough off accumulated material (i.e., fouling release surfaces). The compounds currently used for this purpose rely on low surface energy to inhibit strong attachment of organisms. In this study, we examined the possible use of environmentally responsive (or "smart") polymers as a new class of fouling release agents; a surface-grafted thermally responsive polymer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAM), was used as a model compound. PNIPAAM is known to have a lower critical solubility temperature of approximately 32 degrees C (i.e., it is insoluble in water at temperatures above 32 degrees C and is soluble at temperatures below 32 degrees C). Under experimental conditions, >90% of cultured microorganisms (Staphylococcus epidermidis, Halomonas marina) and naturally occurring marine microorganisms that attached to grafted PNIPAAM surfaces during 2-, 18-, 36-, and 72-h incubations were removed when the hydration state of the polymer was changed from a wettability that was favorable for attachment to a wettability that was less favorable. Of particular significance is the observation that an organism known to attach in the greatest numbers to hydrophobic substrata (i.e., H. marina) was removed when transition of PNIPAAM to a more hydrated state occurred, whereas an organism that attaches in the greatest numbers to hydrophilic substrata (i.e., S. epidermidis) was removed when the opposite transition occurred. Neither solvated nor desolvated PNIPAAM exhibited intrinsic fouling release properties, indicating that the phase transition was the important factor in removal of organisms. Based on our observations of the behavior of this model system, we suggest that environmentally responsive polymers represent a new approach for controlling biofouling release.  (+info)

Effects of palytoxin on isolated intestinal and vascular smooth muscles. (2/591)

Palytoxin (PTX), the most potent marine toxin isolated from the Zoanthid, Palythoa tuberculosa, was studied to determine the effect on isolated smooth muscles. In guinea pig taenia coli PTX at above 3 X 10(-10) g/ml caused a contraction which slowly subsided under isotonic recording. Under isometric recording PTX at above 1 X 10(-10) g/ml caused a contraction which depended on the spontaneous activity. The PTX-induced contraction was not affected by atropine, tripelenmamine or tetrodotoxin but was inhibited by 5 mM Mg, norephinrphrine, isoprenaline or papaverine. PTX at above 1 X 10(-9) g/ml induced an increase in spike frequency and a slight depolarization accompanied with a contraction when measured using a sucrose gap method. In some cases the spike generation was almost abolished after a long exposure to higher dose of PTX and the developed tension gradually decreased. Under isometric recording PTX caused a sustained contraction in rabbit aorta, dog mesenteric and coronary arteries at above 1 X 10(-10) and 1 X 10(-11) g/ml, respectively, in a dose-dependent manner. The coronary artery was most sensitive among the preparation used. PTX-induced contraction in aorta was irreversible, was not influenced by phentolamine but diminished with 5 mM Mg and disappeared in a D-600 or Ca-free medium. PTX is thus an extremely potent and direct stimulant which acts on smooth muscles.  (+info)

New biodegradable hydrogels based on a photocrosslinkable modified polyaspartamide: synthesis and characterization. (3/591)

alpha,beta-Poly(N-2-hydroxyethyl)-DL-aspartamide (PHEA), a synthetic water-soluble biocompatible polymer, was derivatized with glycidyl methacrylate (GMA), in order to introduce in its structure chemical residues having double bonds and ester groups. The obtained copolymer (PHG) contained 29 mol% of GMA residues. PHG aqueous solutions at various concentrations ranging from 30 to 70 mg/ml were exposed to a source of UV rays at lambda 254 nm in the presence or in the absence of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (BIS); the formation of compact gel phases was observed beginning from 50 mg/ml. The obtained networks were characterized by FT-IR spectrophotometry and swelling measurements which evidenced the high affinity of PHG hydrogels towards aqueous media at different pH values. In vitro chemical or enzymatic hydrolysis studies suggested that the prepared samples undergo a partial degradation both at pH 1 and pH 10 and after incubation with enzymes such as esterase, pepsin and alpha-chymotrypsin. Finally, the effect of irradiation time on the yield and the properties of these hydrogels was investigated and the sol fractions coming from irradiated samples, properly purified, were characterized by FT-IR and 1H-NMR analyses.  (+info)

Modification of liposomes with N-substituted polyacrylamides: identification of proteins adsorbed from plasma. (4/591)

Liposomes prepared from DMPC (80%) and cholesterol (20%) were modified with a series of hydrophobically modified N-substituted polyacrylamides, namely, poly[N-isopropylacrylamide] (PNIPAM), poly[N,N-bis(2-methoxyethyl) acrylamide] (PMEAM), and poly[(3-methoxypropyl)acrylamide] (PMPAM). The hydrophobic group, N-[4-(1-pyrenylbutyl)-N-n-octadecylamine was attached to one end of the polymer chains to serve as an anchor for incorporation into the liposome bilayer. Liposome-polymer interactions were confirmed using fluorescence spectroscopy and chemical analysis. Microscopy revealed differences in aggregation tendency between unmodified and polymer-modified liposomes. Proteins adsorbed to liposome surfaces during exposure to human plasma were identified by immunoblot analysis. It was found that both unmodified and polymer-modified liposomes adsorb a wide variety of plasma proteins. Contact phase coagulation proteins, complement proteins, cell-adhesive proteins, serine protease inhibitors, plasminogen, antithrombin III, prothrombin, transferrin, alpha(2)-microglobulin, hemoglobin, haptoglobin and beta-lipoprotein as well as the major plasma proteins were all detected. Some differences were found between the unmodified and polymer-modified liposomes. The unmodified liposomes adsorbed plasminogen mainly as the intact protein, whereas on the modified liposomes plasminogen was present in degraded form. Also, the liposomes modified with PNIPAM in its extended conformation (below the lower critical solution temperature) appeared to adsorb less protein than those containing the 'collapsed' form of PNIPAM (above the LCST).  (+info)

Characterization of a palytoxin-induced non-selective cation channel in mouse megakaryocytes. (5/591)

We used the whole-cell clamp and fura-2 techniques to study the membrane current and intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) changes of mouse megakaryocytes in response to palytoxin (PTX), a highly potent marine toxin. At a holding potential of -60 mV, PTX induced a sustained inward current in a dose-dependent manner. The reversal potentials measured in the presence of various extracellular major cations indicated that the PTX-induced channel had a non-selective permeability to alkali metal ions. Although elimination of intracellular Ca2+ had no effect on the PTX-induced current, removal of external Ca2+ inhibited the current activation. During the sustained phase of the PTX-induced current, treatment with ADP activated an additional current. Pretreatment with ouabain, an inhibitor of Na+-K+-ATPase, suppressed the PTX-induced current. During the stable phase of the PTX-induced current, challenge with NiCl2 (5 mM) or 2,4-dichlorobenzamil (DCB, 25 microM), a non-selective cation channel blocker, partially reversed the current. Simultaneous measurement of the membrane current and [Ca2+]i showed that PTX induced the current response without increasing the [Ca2+]i. Taken together, these results indicate that PTX induces a non-selective cation channel in mouse megakaryocytes. This channel is distinct from the ADP-operated channel and is sensitive to ouabain, NiCl2 and DCB.  (+info)

Determination of acrylamide monomer in polyacrylamide degradation studies by high-performance liquid chromatography. (6/591)

A high-performance liquid chromatography method using C18 and ion-exchange columns in series is developed for the determination of acrylamide and acrylic acid monomers in polymeric samples. The C18 column acts as a guard column, trapping surfactants and impurities and retaining the nonionic species. The ion-exchange column then separates the monomers according to their respective ionic strengths. This method has been proven in the laboratory to work successfully for all types of acrylamide/acrylic acid polymers and matrices. Detection limits for both monomers can be achieved in the parts-per-billion range. The method is used to study the possible degradation of polyacrylamide to acrylamide monomer in the presence of glyphosate (a herbicide) and sunlight. Polyacrylamide is used as a spray drift reduction aid in combination with glyphosate. In normal applications, the polymer and herbicide are in contact with each other in the presence of sunlight. The results show that the polymer does not degrade to acrylamide in the presence of glyphosate or sunlight or any combination of the two. It is also observed that glyphosate influences the solubility of polyacrylamide, and care must be used when combining the two.  (+info)

In vitro characterization of a novel polymeric-based pH-sensitive liposome system. (7/591)

This study demonstrates rapid and pH-sensitive release of a highly water-soluble fluorescent aqueous content marker, pyranine, from egg phosphatidylcholine liposomes following incorporation of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) copolymers in liposomal membranes. The pH-sensitivity of this system correlates with the precipitation of the copolymers at acidic pH. In vitro release can be significantly improved by increasing the percentage of anchor in the copolymer and thus favoring its binding to the liposomal bilayer. In the case of liposomes containing a poly(ethylene glycol)-phospholipid conjugate, the insertion of the pH-sensitive copolymer in the liposomal membrane appears to be sterically inhibited. Dye release from these formulations at acidic pH can still be achieved by varying the anchor molar ratio and/or molecular mass of the polymers or by including the latter during the liposome preparation procedure. Removal of unbound polymer results in decreased leakage only when the copolymer is inserted by incubation with preformed liposomes, but can be overcome by preparing liposomes in the presence of polymer. Aqueous content and lipid mixing assays suggest contents release can occur without membrane fusion. The results of this study indicate that the addition of pH-sensitive copolymers of NIPA represents promising strategy for improving liposomal drug delivery.  (+info)

Antitumor activity of N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide copolymer-Mesochlorine e6 and adriamycin conjugates in combination treatments. (8/591)

This study demonstrates the selective tumor targeting and the antitumor efficacy of the N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer-bound mesochlorin e6 monoethylenediamine (Mce6) and HPMA copolymer-bound Adriamycin (ADR) in combination photodynamic therapy (PDT) and chemotherapy against human ovarian OVCAR-3 carcinoma xenografted in female athynmic mice. The concentrations of Mce6 and ADR in blood and tissues, in free or HPMA copolymer-bound form, were determined by fluorescence and high-performance liquid chromatography fluorescence assays, respectively. Xenograft responses to single and combination therapies were recorded. The peak concentration of HPMA copolymer-Mce6 conjugate in tumor was achieved 18 h after administration. For HPMA copolymer-bound drugs, the concentration ratios of liver and spleen versus muscle were significantly higher than those of free drugs. The HPMA copolymer-bound drugs demonstrated selective targeting and accumulation in the tumor, probably attributed to the enhanced permeability and retention effect. In vivo studies revealed that all tumors in the treatment groups showed significant responses after receiving any of the various types of therapy as compared with controls (P < 0.001). PDT with HPMA copolymer-Mce6 conjugate (PDTMC) at a dose of 13.4 mg/kg (1.5 mg/kg of Mce6 equivalent) and light doses of 110 J/cm2 at 12 and 18 h, respectively, resulted in significant suppression of the growth of OVCAR-3 tumors. Three courses of chemotherapy using 35 mg/kg (2.2 mg/kg of ADR equivalent) of HPMA copolymer-ADR conjugate (CHEMO) were effective in suppressing the growth of tumors. Single PDTMC plus multiple CHEMO exhibited significantly greater therapeutic efficacy than multiple CHEMO. In the group of mice receiving multiple PDTMC, tumor recurrence became obvious after day 20. However, 10 of 12 tumors exhibited complete responses in the group of mice receiving multiple PDTMC plus multiple CHEMO. The least to most effective treatments were ranked as follows: multiple CHEMO < single PDTMC plus multiple CHEMO < multiple PDTMC < multiple PDTMC plus multiple CHEMO. The results clearly demonstrate that: (a) HPMA copolymer-bound drugs exhibited selective tumor accumulation contrary to free drugs; (b) PDT using HPMA copolymer-Mce6 conjugate with multiple light irradiations was a better therapy than that with single light irradiation; and (c) combination chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy with HPMA copolymer-ADR and HPMA copolymer-Mce6 conjugates was the most effective regimen.  (+info)

Acrylamides are a type of chemical that can form in some foods during high-temperature cooking processes, such as frying, roasting, and baking. They are created when certain amino acids (asparagine) and sugars in the food react together at temperatures above 120°C (248°F). This reaction is known as the Maillard reaction.

Acrylamides have been classified as a probable human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), based on studies in animals. However, more research is needed to fully understand the potential health risks associated with acrylamide exposure from food.

Public health organizations recommend limiting acrylamide intake by following some cooking practices such as:

* Avoiding overcooking or burning foods
* Soaking potatoes (which are high in asparagine) in water before frying to reduce the formation of acrylamides
* Choosing raw, unprocessed, or minimally processed foods when possible.

"Scientific Opinion on acrylamide in food". EFSA Journal. 13 (6). June 2015. doi:10.2903/j.efsa.2015.4104. "Acrylamide and ... This salt can be converted to acrylamide]with base or to methyl acrylate with methanol. The majority of acrylamide is used to ... Acrylamide is metabolized to the genotoxic derivative glycidamide. On the other hand, acrylamide and glycidamide can be ... Cigarette smoking is a major acrylamide source. It has been shown in one study to cause an increase in blood acrylamide levels ...
High acrylamide levels can also be found in other heated carbohydrate-rich foods. The darker the surface colour of the toast, ... Toast may contain acrylamide caused by the browning process, which is suspected to be a carcinogen. However, claims that ... 2002). "Analysis of acrylamide, a carcinogen formed in heated foodstuffs". J. Agric. Food Chem. 50 (17): 4998-5006. doi:10.1021 ... "Acrylamide". food.gov.uk. Food Standards Agency. Archived from the original on 25 January 2014. Retrieved 25 February 2014. " ...
"Fried Potatoes and Acrylamide: Are French Fries Bad For You?" Archived 20 November 2020 at the Wayback Machine. Time. 11 June ... A meta-analysis indicated that dietary acrylamide is not related to the risk of most common cancers, but could not exclude a ... "Acrylamide". American Cancer Society. 1 October 2013. Archived from the original on 20 November 2016. Retrieved 15 September ... Pelucchi C, Bosetti C, Galeone C, La Vecchia C (2015). "Dietary acrylamide and cancer risk: an updated meta-analysis". Int. J. ...
"Acrylamide". American Cancer Society. 11 January 2019. Retrieved 1 September 2014. "Food Controversies-Acrylamide". Cancer ... According to the American Cancer Society, it is not clear as of 2019[update] whether acrylamide consumption affects the risk of ... acrylamide produced by frying, advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Not all cooked ...
For example, acrylamide. During the degradation of α-hydroxy-substituted carbonic acid amides, the carbon chain shortens about ...
Some research shows shallow frying and deep frying highly increased the acrylamide content in foods like potatoes and grains to ... Roasting the same potatoes kept acrylamide production comparatively low in spite of being cooked at a higher temperature ... Murniece, Irisa; Karklina, Daina; Galoburda, Ruta (24 March 2013). "The Content of Acrylamide in Deep-fat Fried, Shallow Fried ... Nutrition, Center for Food Safety and Applied (3 February 2020). "Acrylamide and Diet, Food Storage, and Food Preparation". FDA ...
"Acrylamide and Cancer Risk". American Cancer Society. 11 February 2019. Leotério, Dilmo M.S.; Silva, Paulo; Souza, Gustavo; ... One example of a toxic product of the Maillard reaction is acrylamide, a neurotoxin and possible carcinogen that is formed from ... Pedreschi, Franco; Mariotti, María Salomé; Granby, Kit (August 2013). "Current issues in dietary acrylamide: formation, ... evidence from epidemiological studies suggest that dietary acrylamide is unlikely to raise the risk of people developing cancer ...
With acrylic and vinylic monomers such as acrylonitrile, acrylamide, and substituted acrylamides, MBA can undergo radical ... Acrylamide reacts with an aqueous solution of formaldehyde in the presence of copper(I) chloride as a polymerization inhibitor ... Using acrylamide and paraformaldehyde in 1,2-dichloroethane gives a clear solution upon heating, from which MBA crystallizes. ... US 2475846A, "Alkylidene-bis-acrylamides", issued 1946-10-31 H., Petersen. Methods of Organic Chemistry, Vol. E20. p. 1855. ...
Acrylamide is carcinogenic, a neurotoxin, and a reproductive toxin. It is also essential to store acrylamide in a cool dark and ... Acrylamide monomer is in a powder state before addition of water. Acrylamide is toxic to the human nervous system, therefore ... Acrylamide (C3H5NO; mW: 71.08) when dissolved in water, slow, spontaneous autopolymerization of acrylamide takes place, joining ... which can form cross-links between two acrylamide molecules. The ratio of bisacrylamide to acrylamide can be varied for special ...
... acrylamides, and acrylonitrile. ATRP is successful at leading to polymers of high number average molecular weight and low ...
Another use of polyacrylamide is as a chemical intermediate in the production of N-methylol acrylamide and N-butoxyacrylamide. ... Dotson, GS (April 2011). "NIOSH skin notation (SK) profile: acrylamide [CAS No. 79-06-1]" (PDF). DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. ... Interest disappeared when experiments proved them to be phytotoxic due to their high acrylamide monomer residue. Although ... Friedman, Mendel (2003). "Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Safety of Acrylamide. A Review". Journal of Agricultural and Food ...
Acrylamide is converted in the liver to glycidamide, which is a possible carcinogen. Asparagine synthetase is required for ... Friedman, Mendel (2003). "Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Safety of Acrylamide. A Review". Journal of Agricultural and Food ... Heating a mixture of asparagine and reducing sugars or other source of carbonyls produces acrylamide in food. These products ...
... s include polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), acrylates, acrylamides, and copolymers. They are commonly found as ...
... is a category of polymers whose monomers are acrylamides. Some important examples are: Polyacrylamide, the ...
During polymerization, the acrylamide portion of the buffers co polymerize with the acrylamide and bisacrylamide monomers to ... Within chemistry for acid-base reactions, Immobilized pH gradient (IPG) gels are the acrylamide gel matrix co-polymerized with ... Immobilized pH gradients (IPG) are made by mixing two kinds of acrylamide mixture, one with Immobiline having acidic buffering ... Both solutions contain acrylamide monomers and catalysts. ...
Acrylamide. Cancer.org. Retrieved on 2016-07-24. Virk-Baker, Mandeep K.; Nagy, Tim R.; Barnes, Stephen; Groopman, John (29 May ... Acrylamide, a possible human carcinogen, can be generated as a byproduct of Maillard reaction between reducing sugars and amino ... At high temperatures, a probable carcinogen called acrylamide can form. This can be discouraged by heating at a lower ... Mottram, Donald S.; Wedzicha, Bronislaw L.; Dodson, Andrew T. (October 2002). "Acrylamide is formed in the Maillard reaction". ...
"Poly(acrylamide-co-diallyldimethylammonium chloride) solution 409081". Sigma-Aldrich. Retrieved 2017-03-01. "CAS No.26590-05-6 ... It is the copolymer of acrylamide and the quaternary ammonium salt diallyldimethylammonium chloride. Its molecular formula is ... Dimethyldiallyl ammonium chloride acrylamide copolymer, Cationic surfactant Manufacturers". tu-poly.com. Retrieved 2017-03-01. ...
Acrylamide intoxication has been shown to be an agent for the induction of chromatolysis. In one study groups of rats were ... Acrylamide intoxication resembles neural axotomy histologically and mechanically. In each case the neuron undergoes ... Tandrup, T. (2002). "Chromatolysis of A- cells of dorsal root ganglia is a primary structural event in acute acrylamide ... injected with acrylamide for 3, 6, and 12 days and the A- and B-cell perikarya of their L5 dorsal root ganglion were examined. ...
Acrylamide is formed from asparagine and reducing sugars in potatoes, so choosing potato varieties with lower levels of these ... Nutrition, Center for Food Safety and Applied (3 February 2020). "Acrylamide and Diet, Food Storage, and Food Preparation". FDA ... Medeiros Vinci, Raquel; Mestdagh, Frédéric; De Meulenaer, Bruno (August 2012). "Acrylamide formation in fried potato products ... compounds can reduce acrylamide formation, along with not refrigerating potatoes and only frying them until they are golden, ...
Copolymers of acrylamide include those derived from acrylic acid. In the 1970s and 1980s, the proportionately largest use of ... Acrylamide has other uses in molecular biology laboratories, including the use of linear polyacrylamide (LPA) as a carrier, ... Even though these products are often called 'polyacrylamide', many are actually copolymers of acrylamide and one or more other ... Considerable effort is made to scavenge traces of acrylamide from the polymer intended for use near food. Additionally, there ...
"Acrylamide occurrence in Keribo: Ethiopian traditional fermented beverage". Food Control. 86: 77-82. doi:10.1016/j.foodcont. ...
Subsequent research has however found that it is not likely that the acrylamides in burnt or well-cooked food cause cancer in ... One health scare related to potato chips focused on acrylamide, which is produced when potatoes are fried or baked at high ... For Frito Lay, this is about a 20% reduction, while for Kettle Chips, which contain far more acrylamide, this is an 87% ... These companies paid fines and agreed to reduce acrylamide levels to be under 275 parts per billion. Many potato chip ...
"FDA: Survey Data on Acrylamide in Food: Individual Food Products". Archived from the original on April 3, 2009. Heller, ... which requires labeling for food containing acrylamide, a potential carcinogen created when starch is baked, roasted, fried or ... Lorraine (July 31, 2006). "Cereal maker sued for acrylamide under Californian law". Food Navigator USA. Archived from the ... ". "Nutrition Facts" required by California's Proposition 65: Acrylamide - 1057 (ppb) "Nutrition facts" as they appear on a ...
Specifically, it has a protective effect against acrylamide induced neurotoxicity. NRCS: USDA Plants Profile: Acorus americanus ... "Protective effect of acorus calamus against acrylamide induced neurotoxicity". Phytother Res. 16 (3): 256-60. doi:10.1002/ptr. ...
Tareke E, Rydberg P, Karlsson P, Eriksson S, Törnqvist M (August 2002). "Analysis of acrylamide, a carcinogen formed in heated ... biscuits and potatoes can generate acrylamide, a chemical shown to cause cancer in animal studies. Excessive alcohol ...
Otherwise, proteins could be modified by reaction with unpolymerized monomers of acrylamide, forming covalent acrylamide ... is most efficient at alkaline pH of the acrylamide solution. Thereby, acrylamide chains are created and cross-linked at a time ... Gordon AH (1969). Electrophoresis of proteins in polyacrylamide and starch gels (Part I, Chapter 2 Acrylamide gel). pp. 34-45. ... Kizilay MY, Okay O (2003). "Effect of hydrolysis on spatial inhomogeneity in poly(acrylamide) gels of various crosslink ...
Acrylamide has been found in other microwaved products like popcorn. Studies have investigated the use of the microwave oven to ... "Acrylamide: Information on Diet, Food Storage, and Food Preparation". Food. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. 22 May 2008. ... Unlike frying and baking, microwaving does not produce acrylamide in potatoes, however unlike deep-frying, it is of only ... Boiling potatoes and microwaving whole potatoes with skin on to make "microwaved baked potatoes" does not produce acrylamide.1 ...
Acrylamide is often formed in the cooking of starchy foods. During heating the amino acid asparagine, naturally present in ... Complete acrylamide removal is probably not possible due to other, minor asparagine-independent formation pathways. As a food ... Gökmen V (2015). Acrylamide in Food: Analysis, Content and Potential Health Effects. Academic Press. p. 415. ISBN 9780128028759 ... Asparaginases are used as a food processing aid to reduce the formation of acrylamide, a suspected carcinogen, in starchy food ...
Dadová J, Orság P, Pohl R, Brázdová M, Fojta M, Hocek M (2013). "Vinylsulfonamide and Acrylamide Modification of DNA for ...
Pore size is controlled by modulating the concentrations of acrylamide and bis-acrylamide powder used in creating a gel. Care ... Acrylamide, in contrast to polyacrylamide, is a neurotoxin and must be handled using appropriate safety precautions to avoid ... The gels are slightly more opaque than acrylamide or agarose. Non-denatured proteins can be separated according to charge and ... introduction of acrylamide gels; discontinuous electrophoresis (Ornstein and Davis); accurate control of parameters such as ...
"Scientific Opinion on acrylamide in food". EFSA Journal. 13 (6). June 2015. doi:10.2903/j.efsa.2015.4104. "Acrylamide and ... This salt can be converted to acrylamide]with base or to methyl acrylate with methanol. The majority of acrylamide is used to ... Acrylamide is metabolized to the genotoxic derivative glycidamide. On the other hand, acrylamide and glycidamide can be ... Cigarette smoking is a major acrylamide source. It has been shown in one study to cause an increase in blood acrylamide levels ...
How likely is acrylamide to cause cancer?. Acrylamide has caused several types of cancer in animals. Adequate human data are ... What is acrylamide?. Acrylamide is a colorless, odorless, crystalline solid that can react violently when melted. When it is ... How can acrylamide affect my health?. The main targets of acrylamide toxicity are the nervous system and reproductive system. ... How can acrylamide affect children?. Acrylamide is expected to affect children in the same manner as adults. ...
Consumer Factsheet on Acrylamidepdf iconexternal icon. Food and Drug Administration. *Acrylamide Questions and Answersexternal ... Acrylamide: A Review of the Literature. *Detailed information about Acrylamide and public health is available at the NIOSH ... How Acrylamide Affects Peoples Health. Human health effects from environmental exposure to low levels of acrylamide are ... How People Are Exposed to Acrylamide. Acrylamide exposure usually happens when people eat foods cooked at high temperatures ...
A new world-scale bio-acrylamide production facility has been opened at BASFs site in Bradford, UK ... BASF opens new bio-acrylamide plant. A new world-scale bio-acrylamide (BioACM) production facility has been opened at BASFs ... In 2014, BASF commissioned its first bio-acrylamide plant in the US, in Suffolk, Virginia. The new production plant in Bradford ... The enzymatic process for producing acrylamide, a key monomer in the production of polyacrylamide, consumes less energy, ...
Information about acrylamide for use in responding to chemical incidents. ...
Acrylamide Market by Product Type (Water-soluble Acrylamide, Oil-soluble Acrylamide, and Others), by End-use Industry (Water ... Acrylamide Market. Acrylamide Market by Product Type (Water-soluble Acrylamide, Oil-soluble Acrylamide, and Others), by End-use ...
Introduction: Acrylamide is formed in several foods during high-temperature processing. In view of reports written about the ... neurotoxic, genotoxic and carcinogenic effects of acrylamide, it was considered that the presence of this substance in food ... Acrylamide content in cigarette mainstream smoke and estimation of exposure to acrylamide from tobacco smoke in Poland ... Granby K, Fagt S. Analysis of acrylamide in coffee and dietary exposure to acrylamide from coffee. Analytica Chimica Acta, 2004 ...
In this study, pH responsive hydrogels were developed by using copolymers of acrylic acid (AA) and acrylamide (Am) in different ... ORCID: 0000-0003-2944-4839 (2015) pH and photo-responsive hydrogels based on acrylic acid and acrylamide. In: 12th ...
TGX FastCast acrylamide gel solutions are premixed TGX (Tris-Glycine eXtended) acrylamide/bis-acrylamide solutions for hand ... TGX FastCast Acrylamide Kit Available Languages. Applies to catalog #s: 1610172, 1610173, 1610174, 1610175, 1610170, 1610171 ... Browse our selection of TGX and TGX Stain-Free™ FastCast acrylamide kits, catalysts, and reagents for polyacrylamide gel ... Starter kit for hand casting 10% TGX polyacrylamide gels, includes acrylamide solutions and buffers ...
Acrylamide is a thermal process contaminant formed in foodstuff during heating at temperatures exceeding 120 °C. It is detected ... Acrylamide is a thermal process contaminant formed in foodstuff during heating at temperatures exceeding 120 °C. It is detected ... This AppNote presents a partially automated analysis method based on DIN EN ISO 18862 for the determination of acrylamide in ...
Liposomes equipped with poly(N-isopropyl acryl amide)-containing coatings as potential drug carriers. In: R S C Advances. 2014 ... Panneerselvam, K, Mean-Hernando, S, Mian Teo, B, Goldie, K & Stadler, BM 2014, Liposomes equipped with poly(N-isopropyl acryl ... Liposomes equipped with poly(N-isopropyl acryl amide)-containing coatings as potential drug carriers. R S C Advances. 2014;4: ... Liposomes equipped with poly(N-isopropyl acryl amide)-containing coatings as potential drug carriers. / Panneerselvam, Karthiga ...
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... Related by string. acrylamides . acrylamide * * acrylamide formation . acrylamide intake . dietary acrylamide . ... Acrylamide forms * Related by context. Frequent words. (Click for all words.) 70 acrylamide 64 Dioxins 63 nitrosamines 62 ...
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Acrylamide Reduction Since in 2002 acrylamide was discovered as a carcinogenic, more and more research has been done and ... Since in 2002 acrylamide was discovered as a carcinogenic, more and more research has been done and solutions. presented. From ...
No clear correlation was found between acrylamide and HMF in baked biscuits, nor between asparagine and the sum of glucose and ... Data obtained after baking were used to develop a mechanistic model, based on the asparagine-related pathway, for acrylamide ... Fructose contributed considerably to acrylamide formation and to HMF formation via caramelization in all four biscuit types. ... Asparagine reacted with fructose to form a Schiff base before decarboxylation to produce acrylamide without Amadori ...
Acrylamide. In April of this year, it had managed to acrylamide in the headlines. The reason is that a EU regulation with new ... Tips for home: acrylamide Co avoid. Crispy and crunchy: the most like their fries, Chips, and toast bread the most. During the ... Acrylamide is formed when carbohydrate rich foods are heated, for example, in the oven or in the fryer. The substance is ... The most well-known chemical Compounds that can occur during Frying, baking or deep fat frying of foods called acrylamide, ...
Instapage Acrylamide Sol Dot Scientific: The Instapage system permits you to produce as several one-of-a-kind experiences as ... Instapage Acrylamide Sol Dot Scientific. December 25, 2021. by Nellie N. Mason ...
Why Acrylamide is in Headlines: European Consumer Organizations calling for stronger consumer protection Acrylamide is a ...
Acrylamide is a chemical widely used during the manufacturing of paper, dye, and other industrial products. It can also be ...
Chinafloc is a professional manufacturer and supplier of Acrylamide, Polyacrylamide and Flocculant in Qingdao, China. - sitemap ... CHINAFLOC--professional manufacturer and supplier of Acrylamide, Polyacrylamide and Flocculant, top ten of China,exporting over ...
Learn about the debate surrounding acrylamide in coffee and its potential links to cancer. Discover the health benefits of ... So the question isnt whether acrylamide is concerning, but rather - is the amount of acrylamide in food that offers other ... Can you guess how much acrylamide is in a serving of oven-baked French fries? 49 mcg. How about potato chips? 18 mcg. Prune ... California may be the first state to require a cancer warning on your morning brew due to coffee containing acrylamide, a ...
Tag: Acrylamide in Bakery Products. Health & Fitness Dangerous Ingredients That Are in Bakery Foods. newspaperhunt, December 31 ...
Acrylamide 3x cryst. extrapure AR, 99.9%. https://www.labresultsforlife.org/shop/79-06-1-acrylamide-3x-cryst-extrapure-ar-99-9- ...
Acrylamide Gel Electrophoresis of Xylene Cyanole FF and Bromophenol ...
Health implications of acrylamide in food : report of a joint FAO/WHO consultation, WHO Headquarters, Geneva, Switzerland, 25- ... by Joint FAO/WHO Consultation on Health Implications of Acrylamide in Food (2002 : Geneva, Switzerland) , WHO Food Safety ... acrylamide dans les denrées alimentaires : rapport dune consultation conjointe FAO/OMS, réunie au Siège de lOMS, Genève, ...
Acrylamide / Bis-acrylamide Premix Powder, Ratio 37.5:1. https://www.phylofoot.org/shop/acrylamide-bis-acrylamide-premix-powder ...
Acrylamide is a potentially toxic organic compound formed by heat-induced reactions between the amino acid asparagine and ... Acrylamide is a potentially toxic organic compound formed by heat-induced reactions between the amino acid asparagine and ... This review surveys the key features related to the presence of acrylamide in coffee, with a particular emphasis on the ... The most recent findings on exposure assessment and contribution of coffee for the human intake of acrylamide are also reviewed ...
  • It found that "the evidence of acrylamide posing a cancer risk for humans has been strengthened," and that "compared with many regulated food carcinogens, the exposure to acrylamide poses a higher estimated risk to European consumers. (wikipedia.org)
  • HEATOX sought also to provide consumers with advice on how to lower their intake of acrylamide, specifically pointing out that home-cooked food tends to contribute far less to overall acrylamide levels than food that was industrially prepared, and that avoiding overcooking is one of the best ways to minimize exposure at home. (wikipedia.org)
  • Working in the production or use of acrylamide and acrylamide containing products (exposure may occur through skin contact). (cdc.gov)
  • Acrylamide reduces the ability of male animals to produce offspring and could cause similar effects in humans, but not likely at exposure levels experienced by most people. (cdc.gov)
  • Acrylamide can cross the placenta and result in exposure to unborn children. (cdc.gov)
  • How can families reduce the risk of exposure to acrylamide? (cdc.gov)
  • The EPA has determined that the exposure to acrylamide in drinking water at concentrations of 1.5 milligrams per liter (1.5 mg/L) for one day or 0.3 milligrams per liter (0.3 mg/L) for 10 days is not expected to cause any adverse effects in a child. (cdc.gov)
  • Acrylamide exposure usually happens when people eat foods cooked at high temperatures such as fried potato chips and French fries, drink coffee, or inhale tobacco smoke. (cdc.gov)
  • Human health effects from environmental exposure to low levels of acrylamide are unknown. (cdc.gov)
  • In the Fourth National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals, Updated Tables, March 2018 , CDC scientists reported acrylamide and glycidamide hemoglobin adducts. (cdc.gov)
  • Pelucchi C, La Vecchia C, Bosetti C, Boyle P, Boffetta P. Exposure to acrylamide and human cancer - a review and meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies. (aaem.pl)
  • Granby K, Fagt S. Analysis of acrylamide in coffee and dietary exposure to acrylamide from coffee. (aaem.pl)
  • The most recent findings on exposure assessment and contribution of coffee for the human intake of acrylamide are also reviewed. (rsc.org)
  • Hubert and his team study people's exposure to a chemical called acrylamide . (cdc.gov)
  • He's currently working with the CDC's National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and other researchers to investigate possible effects of acrylamide exposure on people's health. (cdc.gov)
  • Hubert also has worked with researchers at Harvard and in Europe using unique study cohorts such as the "Nurse's Health Study" and the "European Prospective Investigation into Cancer" to obtain better information about possible associations between acrylamide exposure and cancer. (cdc.gov)
  • The majority of acrylamide is used to manufacture various polymers, especially polyacrylamide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acrylamide is used to make polyacrylamide, which is mainly used in treating waste water discharge from water treatment plants and industrial processes. (cdc.gov)
  • The enzymatic process for producing acrylamide, a key monomer in the production of polyacrylamide, consumes less energy, produces less waste, and makes a better product. (miningmagazine.com)
  • TGX FastCast acrylamide gel solutions are premixed TGX (Tris-Glycine eXtended) acrylamide/bis-acrylamide solutions for hand casting 10% polyacrylamide gels for PAGE systems. (bio-rad.com)
  • Browse our selection of TGX and TGX Stain-Free™ FastCast acrylamide kits, catalysts, and reagents for polyacrylamide gel preparation for protein electrophoresis. (bio-rad.com)
  • CHINAFLOC--professional manufacturer and supplier of Acrylamide , Polyacrylamide and Flocculant , top ten of China,exporting over 63 countries. (chinafloc.com)
  • Food industry workers exposed to twice the average level of acrylamide do not exhibit higher cancer rates. (wikipedia.org)
  • Due to the adverse effects of this compound it is important to reduce the level of acrylamide in food products. (aaem.pl)
  • By measuring these hemoglobin adducts in blood, scientists can estimate the amount of acrylamide that has entered people's bodies. (cdc.gov)
  • Finding a measurable amount of acrylamide or glycidamide hemoglobin adducts in blood does not imply that they cause an adverse health effect. (cdc.gov)
  • The big debate is this: is the amount of acrylamide in coffee concerning, or do the potential benefits outweigh the potential risks? (oswalddigestiveclinic.com)
  • So the question isn't whether acrylamide is concerning, but rather - is the amount of acrylamide in food that offers other health benefits, concerning? (oswalddigestiveclinic.com)
  • Analysis of coffee for the presence of acrylamide by LC-MS/MS. J. Agric. (aaem.pl)
  • This review surveys the key features related to the presence of acrylamide in coffee, with a particular emphasis on the occurrence, factors affecting the formation, and mitigation strategies. (rsc.org)
  • The most well-known chemical Compounds that can occur during Frying, baking or deep fat frying of foods called acrylamide, Furan, mono-chlorine-PROPANEDIOL, and Glycidol. (healthmedicinentral.com)
  • The Committee made recommendations on the risks to health associated with six important contaminants in food (acrylamide, arsenic, deoxynivalenol, furan, mercury, and perchlorate). (who.int)
  • Health concerns relating to current estimated levels of intake were identified for acrylamide, arsenic and furan. (who.int)
  • The discovery in 2002 that some cooked foods contain acrylamide attracted significant attention to its possible biological effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since in 2002 acrylamide was discovered as a carcinogenic, more and more research has been done and solutions presented. (bakeryacademy.com)
  • Health implications of acrylamide in food : report of a joint FAO/WHO consultation, WHO Headquarters, Geneva, Switzerland, 25-27 June 2002. (who.int)
  • Conséquences sanitaires de la présence d' acrylamide dans les denrées alimentaires : rapport d'une consultation conjointe FAO/OMS, réunie au Siège de l'OMS, Genève, Suisse, du 25 au 27 juin 2002. (who.int)
  • Consecuencias para la salud de acrilamida en los alimentos : informe de la consulta conjunta de FAO/OMS, Sede Central de la OMS, Ginebra, Suiza, 25-27 de junio de 2002. (who.int)
  • IARC, NTP, and the EPA have classified it as a probable carcinogen, although epidemiological studies (as of 2019) suggest that dietary acrylamide consumption does not significantly increase people's risk of developing cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acrylamide is considered a potential occupational carcinogen by U.S. government agencies and classified as a Group 2A carcinogen by the IARC. (wikipedia.org)
  • The American Cancer Society says that laboratory studies have shown that acrylamide is likely to be a carcinogen, but that as of 2019[update] evidence from epidemiological studies suggests that dietary acrylamide is unlikely to raise the risk of people developing most common types of cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Why Acrylamide is in Headlines: European Consumer Organizations calling for stronger consumer protection Acrylamide is a suspected carcinogen that forms in foods with certain sugars and amino acids, when processed at a high temperature. (kerry.com)
  • California may be the first state to require a cancer warning on your morning brew due to coffee containing acrylamide, a probable carcinogen (cancer-causing agent) and neurotoxin (poison to the nervous system). (oswalddigestiveclinic.com)
  • Acrylamide is formed when carbohydrate rich foods are heated, for example, in the oven or in the fryer. (healthmedicinentral.com)
  • The body converts some acrylamide to glycidamide. (cdc.gov)
  • Both acrylamide and glycidamide can bind to hemoglobin, a large protein in the red blood cells. (cdc.gov)
  • Findings show smokers have almost twice the levels of acrylamide and glycidamide adducts in their blood than nonsmokers. (cdc.gov)
  • This AppNote presents a partially automated analysis method based on DIN EN ISO 18862 for the determination of acrylamide in ground coffee and cereal coffee. (gerstel.com)
  • Determination of acrylamide in nerve tissue homogenates by electron-capture gas chromatography. (cdc.gov)
  • Subsequent acrylamide determination was made by gas chromatography with electron capture detection using a Traco 560 gas chromatograph with a constant/current pulse/modulated Ni63 electron capture detector and a Hall 700-A electrolytic conductivity detector. (cdc.gov)
  • To determine whether pyruvate would inhibit the effect of acrylamide on axonal disintegration, a dietary pyruvate supplement was given to some of the treated animals. (cdc.gov)
  • No distinction was observed between the accumulation of acrylamide in the nerve fiber of rats receiving the dietary pyruvate supplement and those not receiving the supplement. (cdc.gov)
  • Acrylamide is formed in foods that are rich in carbohydrates when they are fried, grilled, or baked. (cdc.gov)
  • Acrylamide is a chemical formed when people cook carbohydrates (starchy foods) at very high temperatures. (cdc.gov)
  • Yaylayayan VA, Wnorowski A, Perez Locas C. Why Asparagine Needs Carbohydrates to Generate Acrylamide. (aaem.pl)
  • Coffee is one of the foodstuffs presenting higher acrylamide levels, which give rise to major concerns from producers, consumers, and food safety authorities. (rsc.org)
  • Acrylamide (or acrylic amide) is an organic compound with the chemical formula CH2=CHC(O)NH2. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acrylamide is also known as 2-propenamide and acrylic amide. (www.gov.uk)
  • ORCID: 0000-0003-2944-4839 (2015) pH and photo-responsive hydrogels based on acrylic acid and acrylamide. (dcu.ie)
  • In this study, pH responsive hydrogels were developed by using copolymers of acrylic acid (AA) and acrylamide (Am) in different molar ratios (30:70, 50:50 and 70:30, respectively). (dcu.ie)
  • The main targets of acrylamide toxicity are the nervous system and reproductive system. (cdc.gov)
  • paper and textile production, pulp and paper production, The main targets of acrylamide toxicity are the nervous ore processing, sugar refining, and as a chemical grouting system and reproductive system. (cdc.gov)
  • People who work in industries that make or use acrylamide can have higher exposures through skin contact or inhalation. (cdc.gov)
  • Acrylamide is a component of tobacco smoke. (cdc.gov)
  • Baking, grilling or broiling food causes significant concentrations of acrylamide. (wikipedia.org)
  • The general population is exposed to acrylamide by eating contaminated food. (cdc.gov)
  • In view of reports written about the neurotoxic, genotoxic and carcinogenic effects of acrylamide, it was considered that the presence of this substance in food products might pose a risk for human health. (aaem.pl)
  • Currently, according to EU Commission recommendations, the content of acrylamide in food should be monitored. (aaem.pl)
  • The aim of this work was to analyze the food preferences of youth and students from medical schools in Radom, central-eastern Poland, as the most frequent precipitantsas in the field of food products that may be a significant source of acrylamide in the diet. (aaem.pl)
  • Furthermore, while the relation between consumption of acrylamide and cancer in rats and mice has been shown, it is still unclear whether acrylamide consumption has an effect on the risk of developing cancer in humans, and existing epidemiological studies in humans are very limited and do not show any relation between acrylamide and cancer in humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acrylamide, which is found in foods, is suspected to cause cancer in humans. (cdc.gov)
  • CDC scientists found measurable levels of acrylamide adducts in the blood of 99.9% of the U.S. population. (cdc.gov)
  • No clear correlation was found between acrylamide and HMF in baked biscuits, nor between asparagine and the sum of glucose and fructose concentrations in the wheat flour. (scienceopen.com)
  • Commonly, nucleic acids or proteins are electrophoretically separated on agarose or acrylamide gels and then transferred (blotted) from the gel onto the NC. (cdc.gov)
  • Acrylamide affects the nervous system and reproductive system. (cdc.gov)
  • Nervous system effects such as muscle weakness, numbness in hands and feet, sweating, unsteadiness, and clumsiness were reported in some acrylamide workers. (cdc.gov)
  • How likely is acrylamide to cause cancer? (cdc.gov)
  • Acrylamide has caused several types of cancer in animals. (cdc.gov)
  • A working procedure was demonstrated for the analysis of plasma spiked with acrylamide (79061) and for the detection of acrylamide in the proximal and distal regions of excised sciatic nerves from rats administered acrylamide subcutaneously. (cdc.gov)
  • The accumulation of free acrylamide in the distal region of the sciatic nerve was studied in male Sprague-Dawley-rats injected daily (5 days per week) with 35mg/kg acrylamide for 0 to 4 weeks. (cdc.gov)
  • Acrylamide is a potentially toxic organic compound formed by heat-induced reactions between the amino acid asparagine and reactive dicarbonyl or hydroxycarbonyl compounds such as reducing sugars. (rsc.org)
  • Acrylamide and its breakdown products can be measured in blood and urine. (cdc.gov)
  • It is necessary to take strong action to change attitudes towards acrylamide and attempt to introduce ways to reduce this compound in the diet, for example, by appropriate selection of products in the daily diet and appropriate means of thermal preparation of products at home. (aaem.pl)
  • Acrylamide is a chemical widely used during the manufacturing of paper, dye, and other industrial products. (ceecr.org)
  • From the chemistry perspective, acrylamide is a vinyl-substituted primary amide (CONH2). (wikipedia.org)
  • Friedman M. Chemistry, Biochemistry and Safety of Acrylamide, A Review. (aaem.pl)
  • Acrylamide can arise in some cooked foods via a series of steps by the reaction of the amino acid asparagine and glucose. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acrylamide is formed in several foods during high-temperature processing. (aaem.pl)
  • Acrylamide formation mechanism in heated foods. (aaem.pl)
  • Information about acrylamide for use in responding to chemical incidents. (www.gov.uk)
  • However, most people are not exposed to acrylamide levels high enough to cause these effects. (cdc.gov)
  • In animals exposed to acrylamide during pregnancy, offspring had decreased body weight, decreased startle responses, and decreased levels of some chemicals involved in transmission of brain signals. (cdc.gov)
  • Biomonitoring studies on levels of acrylamide provide physicians and public health officials with reference values. (cdc.gov)
  • These reference values help experts determine if people have been exposed to higher levels of acrylamide than are found in the general population. (cdc.gov)
  • What happens to acrylamide when it levels high enough to cause these effects. (cdc.gov)
  • This fact sheet answers the most frequently asked health questions (FAQs) about acrylamide. (cdc.gov)
  • How can acrylamide affect my health? (cdc.gov)
  • Detailed information about Acrylamide and public health is available at the NIOSH Acrylamide page . (cdc.gov)
  • Acrylamide is classified as an extremely hazardous substance in the United States as defined in Section 302 of the U.S. Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (42 U.S.C. 11002), and is subject to strict reporting requirements by facilities which produce, store, or use it in significant quantities. (wikipedia.org)
  • This study investigated the effects of different temperatures (140, 165, and 190 °C) and types of the vegetable frying oil ( soybean , corn , canola, and palm oils ) on the formation of volatile profiles and hazardous compounds [ polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and acrylamide ] in Welsh onion . (bvsalud.org)
  • Acrylamide is a thermal process contaminant formed in foodstuff during heating at temperatures exceeding 120 °C. It is detected especially in French fries, potato chips, bread, and crispbread, as well as in coffee and coffee surrogates. (gerstel.com)
  • The limit of detection corresponded to 9.5x10(-12) grams of acrylamide on column or 8.4x10(-9) grams in the final biological extract. (cdc.gov)
  • Capuanoa E, Ferrignoa A, Acampaa I, Serpenb A, Açarb ÖÇ, Gökmenb V, Foglianoa V. Effect of flour type on Maillard reaction and acrylamide formation during toasting of bread crisp model systems and mitigation strategies. (aaem.pl)
  • Effect of chitosan on the formation of acrylamide and hydroxymethylfurfural in model, biscuit and crust systems. (scienceopen.com)
  • A few people in the population (7%) had heard of acrylamide previously, but none of them had any knowledge of its occurrence and formation. (aaem.pl)
  • This study investigated acrylamide and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) formation during biscuit baking. (scienceopen.com)
  • Study on Volatile Profiles, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, and Acrylamide Formed in Welsh Onion ( Allium fistulosum L.) Fried in Vegetable Oils at Different Temperatures. (bvsalud.org)
  • Asparagine reacted with fructose to form a Schiff base before decarboxylation to produce acrylamide without Amadori rearrangement product and sugar fragmentation. (scienceopen.com)
  • Acrylamide is used to make chemicals used to purify water, treat sewage, make paper, and make certain cosmetics and soaps. (cdc.gov)
  • The reason is that a EU regulation with new rules and limit values for acrylamide in Chips, French fries, and baked goods. (healthmedicinentral.com)
  • Can you guess how much acrylamide is in a serving of oven-baked French fries? (oswalddigestiveclinic.com)
  • Structure-activity relationship studies confirmed N-(2-butoxyphenyl)-3-(phenyl)acrylamides (N23Ps) as a novel and highly potent compound class. (lu.se)
  • Acrylamide and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural formation during biscuit baking. (scienceopen.com)
  • Data obtained after baking were used to develop a mechanistic model, based on the asparagine-related pathway, for acrylamide and HMF formation in the four baked biscuit types. (scienceopen.com)
  • Fructose contributed considerably to acrylamide formation and to HMF formation via caramelization in all four biscuit types. (scienceopen.com)