Acrospiroma: A rare cutaneous tumor of eccrine sweat gland origin. It is most commonly found on the extremities and is usually benign. There is no indication that heredity or external agents cause these tumors.Eccrine Glands: Simple sweat glands that secrete sweat directly onto the SKIN.Sweat Glands: Sweat-producing structures that are embedded in the DERMIS. Each gland consists of a single tube, a coiled body, and a superficial duct.Salivary Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SALIVARY GLANDS.Sweat: The fluid excreted by the SWEAT GLANDS. It consists of water containing sodium chloride, phosphate, urea, ammonia, and other waste products.Sweat Gland NeoplasmsSweating: The process of exocrine secretion of the SWEAT GLANDS, including the aqueous sweat from the ECCRINE GLANDS and the complex viscous fluids of the APOCRINE GLANDS.Heredity: The transmission of traits encoded in GENES from parent to offspring.Re-Epithelialization: Reconstitution of eroded or injured EPITHELIUM by proliferation and migration of EPITHELIAL CELLS from below or adjacent to the damaged site.Eccrine Porocarcinoma: A rare malignant neoplasm of the sweat glands. It most often develops as a form of degenerative progression from a benign ECCRINE POROMA.Dictionaries, MedicalDictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Diagnostic Errors: Incorrect diagnoses after clinical examination or technical diagnostic procedures.Cellulitis: An acute, diffuse, and suppurative inflammation of loose connective tissue, particularly the deep subcutaneous tissues, and sometimes muscle, which is most commonly seen as a result of infection of a wound, ulcer, or other skin lesions.Light: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Breast Diseases: Pathological processes of the BREAST.Palpation: Application of fingers with light pressure to the surface of the body to determine consistence of parts beneath in physical diagnosis; includes palpation for determining the outlines of organs.Dark Adaptation: Adjustment of the eyes under conditions of low light. The sensitivity of the eye to light is increased during dark adaptation.Skin DiseasesCranial Nerve Diseases: Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.Cranial Nerves: Twelve pairs of nerves that carry general afferent, visceral afferent, special afferent, somatic efferent, and autonomic efferent fibers.Abducens Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the sixth cranial (abducens) nerve or its nucleus in the pons. The nerve may be injured along its course in the pons, intracranially as it travels along the base of the brain, in the cavernous sinus, or at the level of superior orbital fissure or orbit. Dysfunction of the nerve causes lateral rectus muscle weakness, resulting in horizontal diplopia that is maximal when the affected eye is abducted and ESOTROPIA. Common conditions associated with nerve injury include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ISCHEMIA; and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.Oculomotor Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the oculomotor nerve or nucleus that result in weakness or paralysis of the superior rectus, inferior rectus, medial rectus, inferior oblique, or levator palpebrae muscles, or impaired parasympathetic innervation to the pupil. With a complete oculomotor palsy, the eyelid will be paralyzed, the eye will be in an abducted and inferior position, and the pupil will be markedly dilated. Commonly associated conditions include neoplasms, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, ischemia (especially in association with DIABETES MELLITUS), and aneurysmal compression. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p270)Cranial Nerve Injuries: Dysfunction of one or more cranial nerves causally related to a traumatic injury. Penetrating and nonpenetrating CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; NECK INJURIES; and trauma to the facial region are conditions associated with cranial nerve injuries.Facial Paralysis: Severe or complete loss of facial muscle motor function. This condition may result from central or peripheral lesions. Damage to CNS motor pathways from the cerebral cortex to the facial nuclei in the pons leads to facial weakness that generally spares the forehead muscles. FACIAL NERVE DISEASES generally results in generalized hemifacial weakness. NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION DISEASES and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause facial paralysis or paresis.Paralysis: A general term most often used to describe severe or complete loss of muscle strength due to motor system disease from the level of the cerebral cortex to the muscle fiber. This term may also occasionally refer to a loss of sensory function. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p45)Ophthalmoplegia: Paralysis of one or more of the ocular muscles due to disorders of the eye muscles, neuromuscular junction, supporting soft tissue, tendons, or innervation to the muscles.Trochlear Nerve Injuries: Traumatic injuries to the TROCHLEAR NERVE.Mohs Surgery: A surgical technique used primarily in the treatment of skin neoplasms, especially basal cell or squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. This procedure is a microscopically controlled excision of cutaneous tumors either after fixation in vivo or after freezing the tissue. Serial examinations of fresh tissue specimens are most frequently done.Dermatologic Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures performed on the SKIN.Neoplasms, Fibroepithelial: Neoplasms composed of fibrous and epithelial tissue. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in fibrous tissue or epithelium.Skin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.Lectins, C-Type: A class of animal lectins that bind to carbohydrate in a calcium-dependent manner. They share a common carbohydrate-binding domain that is structurally distinct from other classes of lectins.Search Engine: Software used to locate data or information stored in machine-readable form locally or at a distance such as an INTERNET site.Databases, Genetic: Databases devoted to knowledge about specific genes and gene products.Lectins: Proteins that share the common characteristic of binding to carbohydrates. Some ANTIBODIES and carbohydrate-metabolizing proteins (ENZYMES) also bind to carbohydrates, however they are not considered lectins. PLANT LECTINS are carbohydrate-binding proteins that have been primarily identified by their hemagglutinating activity (HEMAGGLUTININS). However, a variety of lectins occur in animal species where they serve diverse array of functions through specific carbohydrate recognition.Genome, Human: The complete genetic complement contained in the DNA of a set of CHROMOSOMES in a HUMAN. The length of the human genome is about 3 billion base pairs.Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Tenascin: Hexameric extracellular matrix glycoprotein transiently expressed in many developing organs and often re-expressed in tumors. It is present in the central and peripheral nervous systems as well as in smooth muscle and tendons. (From Kreis & Vale, Guidebook to the Extracellular Matrix and Adhesion Proteins, 1993, p93)Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Syringoma: A benign tumor of the sweat glands which is usually multiple and results from malformation of sweat ducts. It is uncommon and more common in females than in males. It is most likely to appear at adolescence, and further lesions may develop during adult life. It does not appear to be hereditary. (Rook et al., Textbook of Dermatology, 4th ed, pp2407-8)Adenoma, Pleomorphic: A benign, slow-growing tumor, most commonly of the salivary gland, occurring as a small, painless, firm nodule, usually of the parotid gland, but also found in any major or accessory salivary gland anywhere in the oral cavity. It is most often seen in women in the fifth decade. Histologically, the tumor presents a variety of cells: cuboidal, columnar, and squamous cells, showing all forms of epithelial growth. (Dorland, 27th ed)Textbooks as Topic: Books used in the study of a subject that contain a systematic presentation of the principles and vocabulary of a subject.Dermatology: A medical specialty concerned with the skin, its structure, functions, diseases, and treatment.Crows: Common name for the largest birds in the order PASSERIFORMES, family Corvidae. These omnivorous black birds comprise most of the species in the genus Corvus, along with ravens and jackdaws (which are often also referred to as crows).Electrosurgery: Division of tissues by a high-frequency current applied locally with a metal instrument or needle. (Stedman, 25th ed)Umbilicus: The pit in the center of the ABDOMINAL WALL marking the point where the UMBILICAL CORD entered in the FETUS.Operating Tables: A raised flat surface on which a patient is placed during surgical procedures.Electromagnetic Fields: Fields representing the joint interplay of electric and magnetic forces.Thorax: The upper part of the trunk between the NECK and the ABDOMEN. It contains the chief organs of the circulatory and respiratory systems. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Rare Diseases: A large group of diseases which are characterized by a low prevalence in the population. They frequently are associated with problems in diagnosis and treatment.Apolipoproteins D: A glycoprotein component of HIGH-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS that transports small hydrophobic ligands including CHOLESTEROL and STEROLS. It occurs in the macromolecular complex with LECITHIN CHOLESTEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE. Apo D is expressed in and secreted from a variety of tissues such as liver, placenta, brain tissue and others.Carcinoma, Squamous Cell: A carcinoma derived from stratified SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS. It may also occur in sites where glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Pilomatrixoma: A tumor composed of cells resembling those of the hair matrix, which undergo 'mummification' and may calcify. It is a relatively uncommon tumor, which may occur at any age from infancy. The majority of patients are under 20, and females are affected more than males. The lesion is usually a solitary deep dermal or subcutaneous tumor 3-30 mm in diameter, situated in the head, neck, or upper extremity. (From Rook et al., Textbook of Dermatology, 4th ed, p2401)Carcinoembryonic Antigen: A glycoprotein that is secreted into the luminal surface of the epithelia in the gastrointestinal tract. It is found in the feces and pancreaticobiliary secretions and is used to monitor the response to colon cancer treatment.Carcinoma, Basosquamous: A skin carcinoma that histologically exhibits both basal and squamous elements. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Chromogranin A: A type of chromogranin which was first isolated from CHROMAFFIN CELLS of the ADRENAL MEDULLA but is also found in other tissues and in many species including human, bovine, rat, mouse, and others. It is an acidic protein with 431 to 445 amino acid residues. It contains fragments that inhibit vasoconstriction or release of hormones and neurotransmitter, while other fragments exert antimicrobial actions.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Receptors, Progesterone: Specific proteins found in or on cells of progesterone target tissues that specifically combine with progesterone. The cytosol progesterone-receptor complex then associates with the nucleic acids to initiate protein synthesis. There are two kinds of progesterone receptors, A and B. Both are induced by estrogen and have short half-lives.IllinoisElectronic Mail: Messages between computer users via COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS. This feature duplicates most of the features of paper mail, such as forwarding, multiple copies, and attachments of images and other file types, but with a speed advantage. The term also refers to an individual message sent in this way.Automation: Controlled operation of an apparatus, process, or system by mechanical or electronic devices that take the place of human organs of observation, effort, and decision. (From Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 1993)Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Privacy: The state of being free from intrusion or disturbance in one's private life or affairs. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)Automation, Laboratory: Controlled operations of analytic or diagnostic processes, or systems by mechanical or electronic devices.Lakes: Inland bodies of still or slowly moving FRESH WATER or salt water, larger than a pond, and supplied by RIVERS and streams.Computational Biology: A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.Microscopy: The use of instrumentation and techniques for visualizing material and details that cannot be seen by the unaided eye. It is usually done by enlarging images, transmitted by light or electron beams, with optical or magnetic lenses that magnify the entire image field. With scanning microscopy, images are generated by collecting output from the specimen in a point-by-point fashion, on a magnified scale, as it is scanned by a narrow beam of light or electrons, a laser, a conductive probe, or a topographical probe.Horseshoe Crabs: An arthropod subclass (Xiphosura) comprising the North American (Limulus) and Asiatic (Tachypleus) genera of horseshoe crabs.Skin Aging: The process of aging due to changes in the structure and elasticity of the skin over time. It may be a part of physiological aging or it may be due to the effects of ultraviolet radiation, usually through exposure to sunlight.Photoreceptor Cells: Specialized cells that detect and transduce light. They are classified into two types based on their light reception structure, the ciliary photoreceptors and the rhabdomeric photoreceptors with MICROVILLI. Ciliary photoreceptor cells use OPSINS that activate a PHOSPHODIESTERASE phosphodiesterase cascade. Rhabdomeric photoreceptor cells use opsins that activate a PHOSPHOLIPASE C cascade.Scalp: The outer covering of the calvaria. It is composed of several layers: SKIN; subcutaneous connective tissue; the occipitofrontal muscle which includes the tendinous galea aponeurotica; loose connective tissue; and the pericranium (the PERIOSTEUM of the SKULL).Alopecia: Absence of hair from areas where it is normally present.Fibrocystic Breast Disease: A common and benign breast disease characterized by varying degree of fibrocystic changes in the breast tissue. There are three major patterns of morphological changes, including FIBROSIS, formation of CYSTS, and proliferation of glandular tissue (adenosis). The fibrocystic breast has a dense irregular, lumpy, bumpy consistency.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.
(1/8) Metastatic eccrine porocarcinoma: response to docetaxel (Taxotere) chemotherapy.

BACKGROUND: Eccrine porocarcinoma is an uncommon neoplasm of the intra-epidermal sweat gland duct. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A case of eccrine porocarcinoma in a female renal transplant patient aged 45 years is described with a review of pertinent literature. RESULTS: The primary tumour was highly pleomorphic. In places large and small cells merged and focally the former component infiltrated the epidermis in a manner akin to Paget's disease of the breast. The majority of the tumour was high grade; using the modified Bloom and Richardson grading system, usually applied to mammary ductal carcinomas, the tumour graded as 3. Metastatic disease developed nine months following primary surgical treatment. The metastatic eccrine porocarcinoma was resistant to epirubicin but responded to docetaxel chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: There are no data to support the use of adjuvant therapy in the management of eccrine porocarcinoma. The use of the modified Bloom and Richardson grading system may define cases at high risk of relapse in which adjuvant therapy might be considered. Metastatic eccrine porocarcinoma has proven resistant to many chemotherapeutic agents. We report the first use of docetaxel in the management of this disease. The treatment was well tolerated and resulted in marked symptomatic and radiological responses. Treatment with docetaxel should be considered in future cases of this rare tumour.  (+info)

(2/8) Eccrine porocarcinoma (malignant eccrine poroma): a case report.

Eccrine porocarcinoma is a rare malignancy of eccrine sweat gland usually presenting as a long-standing growth on the lower extremity. It is more common in females. It may arise in a pre-existing eccrine poroma. A case presenting as nodular swelling over the dorsum of left hand in a 56-year-old man is described. Cytologic and histologic examination along with flow cytometric analysis is presented.  (+info)

(3/8) Eccrine porocarcinoma.

We present an unusual case of eccrine porocarcinoma in that diagnosis was delayed for many years after the initial lesion appeared, resulting in relatively large tumor.  (+info)

(4/8) Poromatosis: the occurrence of multiple eccrine poromas.

Eccrine poromas are rare, benign adnexal tumors derived from the intraepidermal portion of sweat ducts. Historically they were thought to arise from eccrine ducts although today it is thought that they may also have an apocrine origin. They usually appear as solitary, slow-growing, skin-colored papules on acral surfaces. Here we present the unusual situation of a patient with multiple poromas only three of which are located near the distal extremities.  (+info)

(5/8) Eccrine poroma: a clinical-dermoscopic study of seven cases.

 (+info)

(6/8) Poroma of the hip and buttock.

Poroma is a benign adnexal skin tumor seen in middle aged individuals with no sex predilection. The acral sites are the most commonly affected regions. Hip or buttock as a location of origin has rarely been reported. We report two cases of poroma, one located on the hip of a 75-year-old man and the other on the buttock of a 60-year-old man.  (+info)

(7/8) EWS-Oct-4B, an alternative EWS-Oct-4 fusion gene, is a potent oncogene linked to human epithelial tumours.

 (+info)

(8/8) Dermoscopy of eccrine acrospiroma masquerading as nodular malignant melanoma.

Eccrine acrospiroma, better known as eccrine poroma, is a benign adnexal neoplasm of the skin. Its clinical aspect can masquerade as some other nodular and cystic lesions. The current dermoscopy literature offers very few case studies. Moreover, these very few examples present a totally different appearance pattern compared to the one we examined. Its homogeneous blue pattern suggested the better-known nodular malignant melanoma; in fact, this dermoscopic appearance was due to the Tyndall effect.  (+info)

*  Hidrocystoma
Syringoma Acrospiroma Seborrheic keratosis List of cutaneous conditions List of cutaneous neoplasms associated with systemic ...
*  Acrospiroma
... (also known as hidradenoma) is a cutaneous condition, primarily occurring in adult women, that is a form of benign ...
*  Malignant acrospiroma
A malignant acrospiroma (also known as hidradenocarcinoma, and "Spiradenocarcinoma") is a sweat gland carcinoma of the hand, ... Acrospiroma Syringoma Hidrocystoma List of cutaneous conditions Rapini, Ronald P.; Bolognia, Jean L.; Jorizzo, Joseph L. (2007 ... ISBN 1-4160-2999-0. Wilson KM, Jubert AV, Joseph JI (May 1989). "Sweat gland carcinoma of the hand (malignant acrospiroma)". J ...
*  Hidradenoma
Dermal duct tumor Acrospiroma, solid type Acrospiroma, clear cell type Spiroma List of cutaneous conditions List of cutaneous ... For example, acrospiroma and hidradenoma are synonymous, and sometimes the term acrospiroma is used to generally describe ... clear-cell hidradenoma or acrospiroma nodular hidradenoma or acrospiroma solid-cystic hidradenoma Discussion of sweat gland ... Hidradenoma (also known as acrospiroma, from akral "peripheral" + spiroma "epithelial tumor of sweat gland") refers to a benign ...
*  Dermal cylindroma
Spiradenoma Malignant acrospiroma James, William D.; Berger, Timothy G.; et al. (2006). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: clinical ...
*  International Classification of Diseases for Oncology
Eccrine acrospiroma Clear cell hidradenoma M8402/3 Nodular hidradenoma, malignant (C44._) Hidradenocarcinoma M8403/0 Eccrine ...
*  Syringoma
Acrospiroma Hidrocystoma List of cutaneous conditions List of cutaneous neoplasms associated with systemic syndromes James, ...
*  Spiradenoma
Malignant acrospiroma List of cutaneous conditions Dermal cylindroma Trichoepithelioma List of cutaneous neoplasms associated ...
*  Hidradenocarcinoma
... (also known as malignant hidradenoma, malignant acrospiroma, clear cell eccrine carcinoma, or primary ...
*  List of MeSH codes (C04)
... acrospiroma, eccrine MeSH C04.557.470.035.175.375 --- hidrocystoma MeSH C04.557.470.035.175.800 --- syringoma MeSH C04.557. ... acrospiroma, eccrine MeSH C04.557.470.550.175.375 --- hidrocystoma MeSH C04.557.470.550.175.800 --- syringoma MeSH C04.557. ...
*  List of diseases (A)
... dysplasia Acrophobia Acropigmentation of Dohi Acrorenal syndrome recessive Acrorenoocular syndrome Acrospiroma ACTH deficiency ...
*  List of cutaneous conditions
Aberrant basal cell carcinoma Acanthoma fissuratum (granuloma fissuratum, spectacle frame acanthoma) Acrospiroma (clear cell ... Malignant acrospiroma (malignant poroma, porocarcinoma, spiradenocarcinoma) Malignant mixed tumor (malignant chondroid ...
*  Sweat gland
... tumors include: Acrospiroma Aggressive digital papillary adenocarcinoma Apocrine gland carcinoma Ceruminoma ...
Eccrine acrospiroma | definition of eccrine acrospiroma by Medical dictionary  Eccrine acrospiroma | definition of eccrine acrospiroma by Medical dictionary
What is eccrine acrospiroma? Meaning of eccrine acrospiroma medical term. What does eccrine acrospiroma mean? ... Looking for online definition of eccrine acrospiroma in the Medical Dictionary? eccrine acrospiroma explanation free. ... Synonym(s): eccrine acrospiroma, nodular hidradenoma. eccrine acrospiroma. A benign lobulated skin adnexal tumour arising from ... eccrine acrospiroma. clear cell hi·drad·e·no·ma. a tumor derived from eccrine sweat glands, composed of glycogen-rich clear ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/eccrine+acrospiroma
Acrospiroma
     Summary Report | CureHunter  Acrospiroma Summary Report | CureHunter
Acrospiroma: A rare cutaneous tumor of eccrine sweat gland origin. It is most commonly found on the extremities and is usually ... Acrospiroma. Subscribe to New Research on Acrospiroma A rare cutaneous tumor of eccrine sweat gland origin. It is most commonly ... Drugs and Important Biological Agents (IBA) related to Acrospiroma: 1. styrene-methylmethacrylate copolymerIBA 07/01/1994 - " ... 11/01/1990 - "Excision and skin grafting were done and a diagnosis of malignant acrospiroma was established. ". ...
more infohttp://www.curehunter.com/public/keywordSummaryD018250-Acrospiroma.do
Acrospiroma - Wikipedia  Acrospiroma - Wikipedia
Acrospiroma (also known as hidradenoma) is a cutaneous condition, primarily occurring in adult women, that is a form of benign ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acrospiroma
Malignant acrospiroma - Wikipedia  Malignant acrospiroma - Wikipedia
A malignant acrospiroma (also known as hidradenocarcinoma, and "Spiradenocarcinoma") is a sweat gland carcinoma of the hand, ... Acrospiroma Syringoma Hidrocystoma List of cutaneous conditions Rapini, Ronald P.; Bolognia, Jean L.; Jorizzo, Joseph L. (2007 ... ISBN 1-4160-2999-0. Wilson KM, Jubert AV, Joseph JI (May 1989). "Sweat gland carcinoma of the hand (malignant acrospiroma)". J ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malignant_acrospiroma
Eccrine acrospiroma of the eyelid with oncocytic, apocrine and sebaceous differentiation. Further evidence for...  Eccrine acrospiroma of the eyelid with oncocytic, apocrine and sebaceous differentiation. Further evidence for...
Büchi, E. R., Peng, Y-W., Eng, A. M., & Tso, M. O. (1991). Eccrine acrospiroma of the eyelid with oncocytic, apocrine and ... Büchi, E. R. ; Peng, You-Wei ; Eng, A. M. ; Tso, M. O. / Eccrine acrospiroma of the eyelid with oncocytic, apocrine and ... Büchi, ER, Peng, Y-W, Eng, AM & Tso, MO 1991, 'Eccrine acrospiroma of the eyelid with oncocytic, apocrine and sebaceous ... title = "Eccrine acrospiroma of the eyelid with oncocytic, apocrine and sebaceous differentiation. Further evidence for ...
more infohttps://nebraska.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/eccrine-acrospiroma-of-the-eyelid-with-oncocytic-apocrine-and-seb
Dark and light patches on the skin and Lump - Symptom Checker - check medical symptoms at RightDiagnosis  Dark and light patches on the skin and Lump - Symptom Checker - check medical symptoms at RightDiagnosis
4. Acrospiroma. 5. Actinic keratosis. 6. Adenocarcinoma. 7. Adenocarcinoma, Follicular. 8. Adenoid cystic carcinoma. 9. Adenoma ...
more infohttp://wrongdiagnosis.com/cosymptoms/dark-and-light-patches-on-the-skin/lump.htm
7th cranial nerve palsy and Lump - Symptom Checker - check medical symptoms at RightDiagnosis  7th cranial nerve palsy and Lump - Symptom Checker - check medical symptoms at RightDiagnosis
4. Acrospiroma. 5. Adenocarcinoma. 6. Adenocarcinoma, Follicular. 7. Adenoid cystic carcinoma. 8. Adenoma. 9. Adult ...
more infohttp://wrongdiagnosis.com/cosymptoms/7th-cranial-nerve-palsy/lump.htm
Linox Smart S DX PME/Master Study  Linox Smart S DX PME/Master Study
Acrospiroma. A rare cutaneous tumor of eccrine sweat gland origin. It is most commonly found on the extremities and is usually ...
more infohttps://www.bioportfolio.com/resources/trial/66737/Linox-Smart-S-DX-PME-Master-Study.html
Porocarcinoma: case report  Porocarcinoma: case report
Keywords: Acrospiroma; Carcinoma; Eccrine glands; Sweat gland neoplasms. INTRODUCTION. Eccrine porocarcinoma was first ...
more infohttp://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0365-05962011000600024&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en
CLEC2A Gene - GeneCards | CLC2A Protein | CLC2A Antibody  CLEC2A Gene - GeneCards | CLC2A Protein | CLC2A Antibody
eccrine acrospiroma. *eccrine hidradenoma. - elite association - COSMIC cancer census association via MalaCards ...
more infohttp://www.genecards.org/cgi-bin/carddisp.pl?gene=CLEC2A
Syringoma
     Summary Report | CureHunter  Syringoma Summary Report | CureHunter
Acrospiroma 5. Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma (Cylindroma) Experts. 1. Cho, Sung Bin: 2 articles (01/2015 - 04/2011) ...
more infohttp://www.curehunter.com/public/keywordSummaryD018252-Syringoma.do
Tumoren der Hautadnexe | SpringerLink  Tumoren der Hautadnexe | SpringerLink
Johnson BL Jr, Helwig EB (1969) Eccrine acrospiroma. Cancer 23:641-657CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-3-662-49544-5_103
Heidi - The Hauns in Africa  Heidi - The Hauns in Africa
Eccrine Acrospiroma. February 4, 2019. by Heidi Working here in Northern Ghana, I have seen conditions and tumors that I have ...
more infohttps://haunsinafrica.com/author/heidihaun/
Rare Diseases Awareness Ribbons - A | Personalized Cause  Rare Diseases Awareness Ribbons - A | Personalized Cause
Acrospiroma. ACTH deficiency. ACTH resistance. ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia. Actinic cheilitis. ...
more infohttps://www.personalizedcause.com/rare-diseases-and-disorders-awareness-ribbons-a
Rare Diseases Awareness Ribbons - E | Personalized Cause  Rare Diseases Awareness Ribbons - E | Personalized Cause
Eccrine acrospiroma. Eccrine mucinous carcinoma. Eclampsia. Ectodermal dysplasia. Ectodermal dysplasia 2 hidrotic. Ectodermal ...
more infohttps://www.personalizedcause.com/rare-diseases-and-disorders-awareness-ribbons-e
Syringoma disease: Malacards - Research Articles, Drugs, Genes, Clinical Trials  Syringoma disease: Malacards - Research Articles, Drugs, Genes, Clinical Trials
malignant acrospiroma 10.8. 6. 2q31.1 microdeletion syndrome 10.7. MUC1 VIM 7. myeloid/lymphoid neoplasm associated with pdgfra ...
more infohttp://www.malacards.org/card/syringoma
Case of the Week #15  Case of the Week #15
Malignant eccrine acrospiroma typically does not occur in the digits, or have papillary patterns or back to back glands. ... The differential diagnosis includes other eccrine tumors, including malignant eccrine acrospiroma / hidradenoma, malignant ...
more infohttp://pathologyoutlines.com/caseofweek/case200515.htm