The lateral extension of the spine of the SCAPULA and the highest point of the SHOULDER.
Also called the shoulder blade, it is a flat triangular bone, a pair of which form the back part of the shoulder girdle.
The gliding joint formed by the outer extremity of the CLAVICLE and the inner margin of the acromion process of the SCAPULA.
Compression of the rotator cuff tendons and subacromial bursa between the humeral head and structures that make up the coracoacromial arch and the humeral tuberosities. This condition is associated with subacromial bursitis and rotator cuff (largely supraspinatus) and bicipital tendon inflammation, with or without degenerative changes in the tendon. Pain that is most severe when the arm is abducted in an arc between 40 and 120 degrees, sometimes associated with tears in the rotator cuff, is the chief symptom. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Syndromes and Eponymic Diseases, 2d ed)
The articulation between the head of the HUMERUS and the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA.
The musculotendinous sheath formed by the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, and teres minor muscles. These help stabilize the head of the HUMERUS in the glenoid fossa and allow for rotation of the SHOULDER JOINT about its longitudinal axis.
Bony outgrowth usually found around joints and often seen in conditions such as ARTHRITIS.
A depression in the lateral angle of the scapula that articulates with the head of the HUMERUS.
The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.

Early reactions after reimplantation of the tendon of supraspinatus into bone. A study in rabbits. (1/50)

In 14 rabbits we determined the origin of the cells effecting healing of the tendon of supraspinatus inserted into a bony trough. After two weeks both the cellularity of the underlying bone and the thickness of the subacromial bursa were significantly increased in the operated compared with the control shoulders. The cellularity of the stump of the tendon, however, was significantly decreased in the operated shoulders. In this model, both the underlying bone and the subacromial bursa but not the stump of the tendon contributed to the process of repair. We conclude that the medial stump should be debrided judiciously but that cutting back to bleeding tissue is not necessary during repair of the rotator cuff. Moreover, great care should be taken to preserve the subacromial bursa since it seems to play an important role in the healing process.  (+info)

Coracoacromial arch decompression in rotator cuff surgery. (2/50)

In rotator cuff surgery it is important to obtain adequate decompression of the coracoacromial arch. However, it is difficult to localize the impingement site preoperatively. Based on histological and morphological studies and the clinical findings in 45 patients and 15 cadavers, we have tried to determine the impingement site. In addition, as a part of these investigations, we assessed the clinical outcome for 100 patients. Soft tissue decompression was indicated in 12 shoulders, anterior acromioplasty in 67 and anterior acromioplasty with coracoplasty in 21. According to Neer's criteria there were 92 satisfactory and 8 unsatisfactory results. The mean postoperative UCLA score was 33.4 points and the results were rated excellent in 78, good in 18 and fair in 4.  (+info)

Immunolocalization of cytokines and growth factors in subacromial bursa of rotator cuff tear patients. (3/50)

Inflammation in the subacromial bursa causes pain in patients suffering from rotator cuff tear, with this long-lasting inflammation leading to fibrosis and thickening of the subacromial bursa. Both inflammatory cytokines and mechanical stress, and impingement in the subacromial space, might induce and worsen this inflammation. However, little is known of the mechanism of this inflammation. In this study, we used immunohistological staining to demonstrate the expression of Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in subacromial bursa derived from the patients suffering from rotator cuff tear. On the other hand the expression of these inflammatory cytokines and growth factors were little detected only to a small degree in patients with anterior shoulder instability who did not have severe shoulder pain and impingement in the subacromial space. Our findings suggest that those inflammatory cytokines and growth factors may play an important role in inflammation of the subacromial bursa. Controlling the expression of these cytokines and growth factors might be important for treating patients suffering from shoulder pain due to rotator cuff tear.  (+info)

Modified and classic acromioplasty for impingement of the shoulder. (4/50)

We compared the results of modified and classic anterior acromioplasty in order to identify the significance of the resected acromion. Fifty patients with shoulder impingement syndrome resistant to conservative therapy underwent surgical treatment. We treated 30 patients with classic Neer acromioplasty (group 1), and 20 patients with modified Neer acromioplasty (group 2). The patients were assessed according to pain and shoulder movement. Excellent or good results were achieved in 28/30 patients in group I and 19/20 patients in group 2. The results indicate that both surgical techniques are effective procedures in the treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome, and the type of bone resection does not influence the clinical outcome.  (+info)

Os acromiale associated with tear of the rotator cuff treated operatively. Review of 33 patients. (5/50)

Os acromiale is a rare anatomical abnormality and treatment is controversial. Our retrospective study analyses the outcome of excision, acromioplasty and bony fusion of the os acromiale when it is associated with a tear of the rotator cuff. After a mean follow-up of 41 months, 33 patients were radiologically and clinically assessed using the Constant score. The surgical procedure was to repair the rotator cuff together with excision of the os acromiale in six patients, acromioplasty in five, and fusion in 22. Of the 22 attempted fusions seven failed radiologically. The Constant scores were 82%, 81%, 81% and 84% for patients who had excision, acromioplasty, successful fusion and unsuccessful fusion respectively. There were no statistically significant differences. We conclude that a small mobile os acromiale can be resected, a large stable os acromiale treated by acromioplasty and a large unstable os acromiale by fusion to the acromion. Even without radiological fusion the clinical outcome can be good.  (+info)

Local pressures in the subacromial space. (6/50)

We recorded pressures in the subacromial space with various degrees of humeral abduction. The recordings were made during open surgery and under general anaesthesia using a 2-mm-thick piezo-electric pressure transducer. The pressures were recorded in 14 patients with shoulder impingement syndrome (Neer's stage II) and in eight patients with acromioclavicular dislocation serving as controls. The pressures were higher in the impingement group than in the control group. In both groups the highest pressures were recorded antero-laterally under acromion. In patients with impingement syndrome, the pressures increased significantly with abduction.  (+info)

Arthroscopic subacromial decompression. (7/50)

A study group composed of 11 shoulders in 10 patients underwent arthroscopic subacromial decompression for impingement syndrome. There were no biceps tendon ruptures, acromioclavicular arthritis or glenohumeral instability. Eight men and two women ranging in age from 17 to 65 years (mean age 38.7) with dominant arm involvement in 9/10 were evaluated for an average follow-up of 19.4 months (range 12-26) postoperatively. Based on the University of California at Los Angeles shoulder rating scale, nine (82%) shoulders had satisfactory results and the remaining two (18%) had unsatisfactory results. This is a preliminary report of our early experience in this rather new method of treatment, but the results are encouragingly good.  (+info)

In vivo leptin expression in cartilage and bone cells of growing rats and adult humans. (8/50)

The present investigation was carried out to analyse, immunohistochemically, in vivo leptin expression in cartilage and bone cells, the latter restricted to the elements of the osteogenic system (stromal cells, osteoblasts, osteocytes, bone lining cells). Observations were performed on the first lumbar vertebra, tibia and femur of four rats and on the humerus, femur and acromion of four patients. Histological sections of paraffin-embedded bone samples were immunostained using antibody to leptin. The results showed that, in growing rat bone, leptin is expressed in chondrocytes and stromal cells, but not in osteoblasts; bone lining cells were not found in the microscopic fields examined. In adult human bone, leptin is expressed in chondrocytes, stromal cells and bone lining cells; osteoblasts were not found in the microscopic fields examined. Osteocytes were found to be leptin positive only occasionally and focally in both rat and human bone. The in vivo findings reported show, for the first time, that leptin appears to be expressed only in the cells of the osteogenic lineage (stromal cells, bone lining cells, osteocytes) that, with respect to osteoblasts, are permanent and inactive, i.e. in those cells that according to our terminology constitute the bone basic cellular system (BBCS). Because the BBCS seems to be primarily involved in sensing and integrating mechanical strains and biochemical factors and then in triggering and driving bone formation and/or bone resorption, it appears that leptin seems to be mainly involved in modulating the initial phases of bone modelling and remodelling processes.  (+info)

The acromion is a part of the shoulder blade (scapula). It is the bony process that forms the highest point of the shoulder and articulates with the clavicle (collarbone) to form the acromioclavicular joint. The acromion serves as an attachment site for several muscles and ligaments in the shoulder region.

The scapula, also known as the shoulder blade, is a flat, triangular bone located in the upper back region of the human body. It serves as the site of attachment for various muscles that are involved in movements of the shoulder joint and arm. The scapula has several important features:

1. Three borders (anterior, lateral, and medial)
2. Three angles (superior, inferior, and lateral)
3. Spine of the scapula - a long, horizontal ridge that divides the scapula into two parts: supraspinous fossa (above the spine) and infraspinous fossa (below the spine)
4. Glenoid cavity - a shallow, concave surface on the lateral border that articulates with the humerus to form the shoulder joint
5. Acromion process - a bony projection at the top of the scapula that forms part of the shoulder joint and serves as an attachment point for muscles and ligaments
6. Coracoid process - a hook-like bony projection extending from the anterior border, which provides attachment for muscles and ligaments

Understanding the anatomy and function of the scapula is essential in diagnosing and treating various shoulder and upper back conditions.

The acromioclavicular (AC) joint is the joint located between the acromion process of the scapula (shoulder blade) and the clavicle (collarbone). It allows for a small amount of movement between these two bones and participates in shoulder motion. Injuries to this joint, such as AC joint separations or sprains, are common and can occur due to falls, direct blows, or repetitive motions that cause the ligaments that support the AC joint to become stretched or torn.

Shoulder Impingement Syndrome is a common cause of shoulder pain, characterized by pinching or compression of the rotator cuff tendons and/or bursa between the humeral head and the acromion process of the scapula. This often results from abnormal contact between these structures due to various factors such as:

1. Bony abnormalities (e.g., bone spurs)
2. Tendon inflammation or thickening
3. Poor biomechanics during shoulder movements
4. Muscle imbalances and weakness, particularly in the rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers
5. Aging and degenerative changes

The syndrome is typically classified into two types: primary (or structural) impingement, which involves bony abnormalities; and secondary impingement, which is related to functional or muscular imbalances. Symptoms often include pain, especially during overhead activities, weakness, and limited range of motion in the shoulder. Diagnosis typically involves a combination of physical examination, patient history, and imaging studies such as X-rays or MRI scans. Treatment may involve activity modification, physical therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroid injections, and, in some cases, surgical intervention.

The shoulder joint, also known as the glenohumeral joint, is the most mobile joint in the human body. It is a ball and socket synovial joint that connects the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) to the glenoid cavity of the scapula (shoulder blade). The shoulder joint allows for a wide range of movements including flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, internal rotation, and external rotation. It is surrounded by a group of muscles and tendons known as the rotator cuff that provide stability and enable smooth movement of the joint.

The rotator cuff is a group of four muscles and their tendons that attach to the shoulder blade (scapula) and help stabilize and move the shoulder joint. These muscles are the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis. The rotator cuff helps to keep the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) centered in the glenoid fossa (shoulder socket), providing stability during shoulder movements. It also allows for rotation and elevation of the arm. Rotator cuff injuries or conditions, such as tears or tendinitis, can cause pain and limit shoulder function.

An osteophyte, also known as a bone spur, is a bony projection that forms along the margins of joints, often as a result of degenerative changes in the cartilage and underlying bone. These changes are most commonly seen in conditions such as osteoarthritis, where the protective cartilage that cushions the ends of bones breaks down, leading to inflammation, pain, and reduced mobility.

Osteophytes can develop in any joint in the body, but they are most commonly found in the spine, hips, knees, and hands. They may vary in size from small bumps to large, irregular growths that can restrict joint movement and cause discomfort or pain. In some cases, osteophytes may also compress nearby nerves, leading to symptoms such as numbness, tingling, or weakness in the affected limb.

While osteophytes are often considered a sign of aging or joint degeneration, they can also be caused by other conditions that put excessive stress on the joints, such as injury, infection, or inflammatory arthritis. Treatment for osteophytes typically involves addressing the underlying cause of joint damage, along with pain management strategies such as physical therapy, medication, or in some cases, surgery.

The glenoid cavity, also known as the glenoid fossa, is a medical term that refers to the shallow, pear-shaped depression or socket located on the lateral or outer side of the scapula (shoulder blade) bone. It serves as the articulation surface for the head of the humerus bone, forming the glenohumeral joint, which is the primary shoulder joint. This cavity is lined with hyaline cartilage to provide a smooth surface for articulation and help facilitate movements of the shoulder joint, including flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, internal rotation, and external rotation.

Articular Range of Motion (AROM) is a term used in physiotherapy and orthopedics to describe the amount of movement available in a joint, measured in degrees of a circle. It refers to the range through which synovial joints can actively move without causing pain or injury. AROM is assessed by measuring the degree of motion achieved by active muscle contraction, as opposed to passive range of motion (PROM), where the movement is generated by an external force.

Assessment of AROM is important in evaluating a patient's functional ability and progress, planning treatment interventions, and determining return to normal activities or sports participation. It is also used to identify any restrictions in joint mobility that may be due to injury, disease, or surgery, and to monitor the effectiveness of rehabilitation programs.

... pre-acromion, meso-acromion, meta-acromion, and basi-acromion. In most cases, the first three fuse at 15-18 years, whereas the ... Acromion shown in red. Animation. Acromion shown in red. Left scapula. Posterior view. Acromion labeled at top left. Left ... Acromion is "10" Left scapula. Anterior view. Acromion labeled at top right. Left scapula. Anterior view. Acromion is "2" Left ... Acromion visible at upper left, in blue. Radiograph of the shoulder showing an os acromiale The acromion process of bats ( ...
The shoulder blade lacks an acromion. This is shared with some modern euornithean groups but these are all much more derived. ...
... is a prominent bony point at the junction of the lateral border of acromion and the spine of scapula. Left ... Acromion Spine of scapula "acromial angle." The American Heritage, Stedman's Medical Dictionary. Houghton Mifflin Company. ...
Acromion process is not very large. Origin of scapular ligament of triceps muscle on postero-dorsal edge above the glenoid. ...
The shoulder blade has a rectangular acromion. Like Kentrosaurus, Tuojiangosaurus had two rows of plates along the spine, which ...
... is small oval facet on the medial border of the acromion for articulation with the acromial facet ... Acromion Clavicle Acromioclavicular joint Acromioclavicular ligament Separated shoulder Stedman's Medical Dictionary 27th ed, ... Also called Clavicular articular facet of acromion. The coracoacromial ligament is attached near the clavicular facet. Left ...
The base of the acromion is formed by an extension from the spine; the two nuclei of the acromion unite, and then join with the ... Side The acromion forms the summit of the shoulder, and is a large, somewhat triangular or oblong process, flattened from ... These two muscles act as a force couple within the glenohumeral joint to properly elevate the acromion process, and if a muscle ... At birth, a large part of the scapula is osseous, but the glenoid cavity, the coracoid process, the acromion, the vertebral ...
The ligament is formed by the conoid ligament and trapezoid ligament.) The coracoacromial ligament - to the acromion The ... According to the authors of "The human acromion viewed from an evolutionary perspective", there were different shapes of ... Voisin, J-L (2014). "The human acromion viewed from an evolutionary perspective". Orthopaedics & Traumatology, Surgery & ... together with the acromion, serves to stabilize the shoulder joint. It is palpable in the deltopectoral groove between the ...
The putative acromion process is slightly tilted forwards. The deltoid ridge-a ridge-like structure on the humerus where the ... deltoid muscle is attached-is well developed and extends from the acromion process to the bottom edge of the scapular blade. ...
... the front edge of the acromion being outturned; the presence of a pronounced notch between the acromion and the coracoid; the ... The acromion process on the scapula of Liaoningvenator is poorly developed, as in basal troodontids. Unlike basal troodontids, ...
Excursion of the Rotator Cuff Under the Acromion: Patterns of Subacromial Contact. The American Journal of Sports Medicine. ... "Excursion of the rotator cuff under the acromion: patterns of subacromial contact". scholar.google.com. Retrieved 2023-02-13. ... "Excursion of the rotator cuff under the acromion. Patterns of subacromial contact". The American Journal of Sports Medicine. 22 ...
It also had a comparatively high acromion process. The sternum was fused into a single, large, continuous plate, another ...
Generally, it implies removal of a small piece of the surface of the bone (acromion) that is in contact with a tendon causing, ... Acromioplasty is an arthroscopic surgical procedure of the acromion. ...
Between the capsule and the acromion is the subacromial bursa. The subcoracoid bursa is between the capsule and the coracoid ...
Like other ceratopsids, the acromion was prominent and very roughened. On the bottom edge of the bone, there is an abrupt angle ...
There was a well-developed acromion process at the end of the front margin. The acromion was forwards-pointing as in many other ...
Its ankylosaurian affinities would be proven by a high acromion process. The other nodosaurid fossils found at Reach, specimens ...
With excessive inferior translation, a depression occurs just below the acromion. The appearance of this sulcus is a positive ...
It originates at the acromion process and inserts at the deltoid ridge. When contracted, it raises and rotates the humerus ...
The scapula had a rectangular acromion, or attachment site for clavicle (collarbone). The humerus (upper arm bone) was very ...
The supraspinatus muscle tendon passes laterally beneath the cover of the acromion. The tendon blends with the shoulder joint ... Three bones shown are acromion (top) and coracoid process (center) of scapula, and humerus (left). Diagram of the human ...
... the scapula has a prominent spine and a stout acromion and metacromion; and the carpal bones and tarsal bones are narrow, but ...
The acromion of the scapula rotates on the acromial end of the clavicle. The sternoclavicular joint is the articulation of the ... It is formed by the gap between the humerus and the acromion process of the scapula. This space is filled mostly by the ... The acromioclavicular joint is the articulation between the acromion process of the scapula and the lateral end of the clavicle ...
Also, the scapulae of the examined specimens were identified to lack acromion processes. Taken together, these anatomical ...
Below, the fascia is attached to the thoracic outlet (acromion, clavicle, and manubrium). In doing so, it bifurcates into two ...
As in Maniraptora, Oviraptorosauria and other Alvarezsauridae, the acromion is subtriangular in shape. The glenoid fossa is ...
... the glenoid cavity was twice its length and the acromion was very high. The humerus is relatively short, 497 to 500 millimeters ...
They cushion and protect the rotator cuff from the bony arch of the acromion.[citation needed] Following are some of the ways ... The acromioclavicular (AC) joint is located between the acromion (part of the scapula that forms the highest point of the ... When the rotator cuff tendon becomes inflamed and thickened, it may get trapped under the acromion. Squeezing of the rotator ... If there is no improvement, the doctor may inject a corticosteroid medicine into the space under the acromion. However, recent ...
They cushion and protect the rotator cuff from the bony arch of the acromion. The glenoid labrum is the second kind of ... The deltoid muscle covers the shoulder joint on three sides, arising from the front upper third of the clavicle, the acromion, ... In order to also demonstrate those parts which are hidden under the acromion in the neutral position, a maximum medial rotation ... These supporting structures attach to the clavicle, humerus, and scapula, the latter providing the glenoid cavity, acromion and ...
Meanwhile, the front edge of the scapula has a distinct ridge, probably the acromion process. The scapula of Nundasuchus ... differs from advanced pseudosuchians due to its small triceps pit, but also from phytosaurs due to its distinct acromion. The ...
... pre-acromion, meso-acromion, meta-acromion, and basi-acromion. In most cases, the first three fuse at 15-18 years, whereas the ... Acromion shown in red. Animation. Acromion shown in red. Left scapula. Posterior view. Acromion labeled at top left. Left ... Acromion is "10" Left scapula. Anterior view. Acromion labeled at top right. Left scapula. Anterior view. Acromion is "2" Left ... Acromion visible at upper left, in blue. Radiograph of the shoulder showing an os acromiale The acromion process of bats ( ...
Acromion. With acromion fractures, there is tenderness directly over the acromion process. Deltoid contraction and arm ... Fractures of the acromion are generally caused by a significant blunt force to the shoulder that is directed anteriorly. ... Acromion injuries usually result from a direct downward force to the shoulder. Scapular neck fractures most frequently result ... Fixation of acromion fractures. (A) tension band construct; and (B) plate-screw fixation (most appropriate for proximal ...
The underside of a bone called the acromion may be shaved. A bony growth (spur) on the underside of the acromion often causes ...
Palpate the posterior tip of the acromion, and insert the needle into the space between the acromion and the head of the ...
The AC-joint refers to the acromioclavicular joint, which is the joint between the acromion process of the scapula and the ...
... the acromion or upper part of the shoulder blade, and the clavicle or collar bone. The muscles that power movement of the ...
... narrowing of the acromion, arthrosis of the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints. Bottom: X-ray result after RTSA ...
An impingement occurs when soft tissue becomes pinched between the humeral head and the acromion (i.e., the top bony part of ...
... bursitis and synovitis requiring removal of thickness in the acromion and resection of the bursa ...
Acromion morphology variability. Bigliani et al separated acromions into 3 categories based on their shape and their ... The injury commonly occurs when direct force is applied to the acromion with the arm adducted. The force causes the acromion to ... It is formed by the distal clavicle articulating with the acromion of the scapula. Little motion exists in this joint. The AC ... The scapula has 4 processes, the spine, the acromion, the coracoid, and the glenoid. The glenoid cavity (or, alternatively, the ...
I have to adjust is the strap since I am petite it had to be adjusted so the metal clip did not touch my shoulder/acromion ...
The joint between the end of the scapula (the acromion) and the clavicle is called the acromioclavicular joint (AC joint)-one ...
Most likely to inform anaesthetists face, obesity increases of the acromion. Bleeding; thrombosis; scar is uncommon problem. ...
acromion. The pointed top of the scapula, which forms the tip of the shoulder. acromion; ...
ANKLE IMPINGEMENT RADIOLOGY ANTERIOR X-RAY DISCUSSION Ankle impingement can occur at multiple sites. One of the more common ones is Anterior. The presence of Ankle impingement is ultimately a clinical diagnosis which is based on the patients symptoms and imaging findings, not just the imaging findings. So in the report we describe the …. ANKLE IMPINGEMENT RADIOLOGY ANTERIOR X-RAY (VIDEO) Read More ». ...
Located over anterolateral acromion; radiates to lateral mid-humerus. *Exacerbated by activities that require overhead arm use ...
Reliability of the posterolateral corner of the acromion as a landmark for the posterior arthroscopic portal of the shoulder. ... Morphological parameters of the acromion. Folia Morphol (Warsz). vol.67 no.4 p.255-260. ...
Four acromion angles were defined from these two acromion landmarks: the acromion posterior angle (APA), acromion tilt angle ( ... ATA), acromion length angle (ALA), and acromion axial tilt angle (AXA). Shoulder computed tomography scans of 112 normal ... Association of the Posterior Acromion Extension with Glenoid Retroversion: A CT Study in Normal and Osteoarthritic Shoulders. ... The recently reported association between the acromion shape and glenoid retroversion in both normal and osteoarthritic ...
Application: Used for distal radius fracture of acromion. Screws: Head part:. Φ2.5 Self-tapping locking screws(full-threaded). ...
There is a lubricating sac called a bursa between the rotator cuff and the bone on top of your shoulder (acromion) that allows ... Presence of a hooked or curved acromion, as opposed to flat. Symptoms of Shoulder Impingement. Shoulder impingement can occur ... Bursitis, a condition of irritation and inflammation of the bursa (a fluid-filled sac) located between the acromion and tendon ... Presence of bony growths (spurs) on the acromion. * ...
Acromion presentation. Acromion presentation. SNOMED-CT. Fetal Presentation at Birth- Other (NCHS). Details. ...
Shaving down the acromion bone in a process called acromioplasty. Shaving down the acromion underside relieves shoulder ... the acromion), causing it to rub against your tendons getting bony growths (spurs) on the acromion as you get older. If you ...
The upper and blood from the acromion is a lin. It corresponds to the axis of this plexus and opened acci- the bones. Tered, it ...
This proportion is expressed by what is termed the scapular index (Appendix D). The greater size of the acromion is also a ... The bone included between these two borders is called the acromion. Of compressed form, it much resembles the acromial end of ... The superior surface of the acromion, which is broad and expanded, is subcutaneous, and is directed upwards and dorsally, and ... Up till the age of puberty the acromion remains cartilaginous; centres, two or more in number, then make their appearance, ...
... and the acromion, the highest part of the shoulder blade (scapula). ... The acromion is felt on the top of the shoulder. It allows a small degree of movement but it is kept relatively immobilised by ... This causes the clavicle to become displaced in relation to the acromion. This is a dislocation. The joint itself can also be ... The acromioclavicular joint is between the collarbone (clavicle) and the acromion, the highest part of the shoulder blade ( ...
Pain under the acromion process of the shoulder, (rotator cuff tendonitis). *Pain in the bicipital grooves of the shoulder, ...
  • In human anatomy, the acromion (from Greek: akros, "highest", ōmos, "shoulder", PL: acromia) is a bony process on the scapula (shoulder blade). (wikipedia.org)
  • It starts from the base of acromion which marks its projecting point emerging from the spine of scapula. (wikipedia.org)
  • and between the meta- and basi-acromia This feature was common in skeletons recovered from the Mary Rose shipwreck: it is thought that in those men, much archery practice from childhood on with the mediaeval war bow (which needs a pull three times as strong as the modern standard Olympic bow) pulled at the acromion so much that it prevented bony fusion of the acromion with the scapula. (wikipedia.org)
  • Turtles have an acromion that forms the anterior part of the triradiate pectoral girdle (together with the coracoid and scapula). (wikipedia.org)
  • and the acromion is a medioventral (directed inwards and down) process (also known as the prescapular process) located at the base of the scapula. (wikipedia.org)
  • This had led to some controversy regarding the evolutionary origin of turtles, because in both pareiasaurs and non-mammalian therapsids the acromion is located at the dorsal tip of the scapula. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1) Acromion, (2) scapula, and (3) coracoid Left scapula. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acromion is "10" Left scapula. (wikipedia.org)
  • The scapular receiver was attached using a scapula tracker jig and Velcro strips on the scapular spine and acromion process. (cdc.gov)
  • It is formed by the distal clavicle articulating with the acromion of the scapula. (medscape.com)
  • Scapulae - Lateral rotation of the scapula is required to rotate the acromion high enough to allow room for the upper end of the humerus to move freely. (yogalondon.net)
  • Landmarks were recorded at the most superior and inferior lateral points of the scapula (S1-S2), the most posterior point of the spine ( S3 ), the most antero-medial point of the acromion process ( S4 ) and the medial, superior and inferior points of the glenoid cavity (S5-S7) ( Figure 1-source data 2 ). (elifesciences.org)
  • This occurs as the result of the rotator cuff rubbing against a part of the shoulder blade (scapula) called the acromion. (jonespainrelief.com)
  • The acromion forms the summit of the shoulder, and is a large, somewhat triangular or oblong process, flattened from behind forward, projecting at first lateralward, and then curving forward and upward, so as to overhang the glenoid fossa. (wikipedia.org)
  • The acromion is a continuation of the scapular spine, and hooks over anteriorly. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mean optimized weighting set contained no neglectable weight for all markers from the acromion to the medial border of the scapular spine but showed no significant difference (p = 0.547) compared to homogeneous weights. (bvsalud.org)
  • A bony growth (spur) on the underside of the acromion often causes impingement syndrome. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Purpose of this study was to find the association between shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) and morphological characteristics of acromion (acromial tilt angle, type of acromion, subacromial osteophyte). (kemdikbud.go.id)
  • This is called outlet impingement because it occurs at the shoulder outlet where the supraspinatus muscle passes beneath the acromion bone. (shouldersurgeon.com)
  • An impingement occurs when soft tissue becomes pinched between the humeral head and the acromion (i.e., the top bony part of the shoulder). (atipt.com)
  • The vascularized bone graft could be sufficiently mobilized to allow tension-free transfer to the humeral head as well as to the lateral two-thirds of the clavicle.Conclusion: We demonstrated the feasibility of vascularized bone graft harvesting from the acromion. (unifr.ch)
  • However, in between 1% and 15% of cases, this osseous union fails and the acromion remains separate as an accessory bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • English Objective: To investigate the technical feasibility of harvesting a vascularized bone graft from the acromion pedicled on the acromial branch.Background: Complex fractures of the proximal humerus may result in partial or total avascular necrosis of the head fragment. (unifr.ch)
  • The main focus was the constancy of its anatomical course, its dimensions and potential use as a nutrient vessel for a pedicled bone graft from the acromion.Results: The course of the acromial branch revealed a constant topographic relationship to anatomical landmarks. (unifr.ch)
  • The underside of a bone called the acromion may be shaved. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Acromion process is on what bone? (freezingblue.com)
  • The acromio-clavicular joint (ACJ) is made up of the outer end of the collar bone and part of the shoulder blade, the acromion. (breakingmuscle.com)
  • As the arm is lifted, the acromion bone and/or coracoacromial ligament rub or "impinge" on the surface of the rotator cuff. (shouldersurgeon.com)
  • Overlying the rotator cuff is the shoulder bursa-a smooth, fluid-filled sack that provides padding and lubrication between the cuff and the acromion bone. (shouldersurgeon.com)
  • You can feel your acromion bone when you push down on the top of you shoulder laterally. (shouldersurgeon.com)
  • Spurring of the acromion bone that lies on top of the rotator cuff has also been implicated as one of the causes of shoulder pain. (shouldersurgeon.com)
  • He or she may take x-rays, which will sometimes show a small bone spur on the front edge of the acromion. (shouldersurgeon.com)
  • To conclude, homogenous weights applied on redundant markers located from acromion to scapular medial border spine are recommended when estimating scapular kinematics in upper limb MKO. (bvsalud.org)
  • Fractures of the acromion are generally caused by a significant blunt force to the shoulder that is directed anteriorly. (medscape.com)
  • With acromion fractures, there is tenderness directly over the acromion process. (medscape.com)
  • Nondisplaced fractures of the acromion usually can be treated with sling immobilization, ice, and analgesics. (medscape.com)
  • There are three morphologically distinct types of acromia and a correlation between these morphologies and rotator cuff tear: The acromion has four ossification centers called (from tip to base) pre-acromion, meso-acromion, meta-acromion, and basi-acromion. (wikipedia.org)
  • A rotator cuff injury that results in the head of the humerus impinging on the acromion in overhead activities could also be problematic here. (yogalondon.net)
  • There were 40 SIS patients and 40 individuals with no shoulder pain examined and measured for their acromial tilt angle, type of acromion (according to Biglianiâ s classification and Parkâ s criteria) and for the presence of subacromial osteophyte. (kemdikbud.go.id)
  • The association between SIS and acromial tilt angle or between SIS and type of acromion were statistically insignificant (p=0.241 and p=0.221). (kemdikbud.go.id)
  • Such association was not found in acromial tilt angle and type of acromion. (kemdikbud.go.id)
  • In these primitive ancestors, the acromion projected forward to form a strong and flexible articulation between the shoulder girdle and the clavicle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Radiograph of the shoulder showing an os acromiale The acromion process of bats (Mammalia: Chiroptera) is particularly elongated compared to that of humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its terminal branches reliably supplied the anterior part of the acromion. (unifr.ch)
  • There is no widely accepted standard for the classification and treatment of traumatic acromion/scapular spine fracture nonunion due to the scarcity of this condition and the confusion of terminology. (nih.gov)
  • PubMed and Scopus were searched using "scapular fracture" and "acromion fracture" or "scapular spine fracture" as search terms. (nih.gov)
  • In this study lateral trunk motion was defined as the angular deviation in the frontal plane from the global vertical axis with the axis connecting the midpoint of the trans-acromion line and the midpoint of the trans-posterior-superior-spine (Figure 1). (medscape.com)
  • The acromial part of the deltoid muscle originates from the lateral aspect of the acromion of the scapula. (elsevier.com)
  • All he gets are clavicles and acromion processes. (blogspot.com)
  • A bony growth (spur) on the underside of the acromion often causes impingement syndrome. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Because of the innate unfavorable shape of the acromion (hooked acromion type II and III according to Bigliani classification), the incidence of subacromial impingement syndrome increases significantly. (klinik-am-ring.de)
  • This narrowness is caused when the arm is being raised to shoulder height and the gap between the anterior edge of the acromion and the head of the humerus narrows. (klinik-am-ring.de)
  • The space at the shoulder joint, into which the supraspinatus tendon slides when lifting the arm, is very limited by the acromion (acromion and coracoacromial ligament - the outward end of the shoulder blade). (klinik-am-ring.de)
  • Anatomy looks like acknowledging our care-plans with the acromion. (autopawnohio.com)