The gliding joint formed by the outer extremity of the CLAVICLE and the inner margin of the acromion process of the SCAPULA.
"Dislocation is a traumatic injury wherein the normal articulation between two bones at a joint is disrupted, resulting in the complete separation of the bone ends and associated soft tissues from their usual position."
A bone on the ventral side of the shoulder girdle, which in humans is commonly called the collar bone.
Displacement of the HUMERUS from the SCAPULA.
The lateral extension of the spine of the SCAPULA and the highest point of the SHOULDER.
A subjective psychometric response scale used to measure distinct behavioral or physiological phenomena based on linear numerical gradient or yes/no alternatives.
Compression of the rotator cuff tendons and subacromial bursa between the humeral head and structures that make up the coracoacromial arch and the humeral tuberosities. This condition is associated with subacromial bursitis and rotator cuff (largely supraspinatus) and bicipital tendon inflammation, with or without degenerative changes in the tendon. Pain that is most severe when the arm is abducted in an arc between 40 and 120 degrees, sometimes associated with tears in the rotator cuff, is the chief symptom. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Syndromes and Eponymic Diseases, 2d ed)
The articulation between the head of the HUMERUS and the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA.
Unilateral or bilateral pain of the shoulder. It is often caused by physical activities such as work or sports participation, but may also be pathologic in origin.
The musculotendinous sheath formed by the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, and teres minor muscles. These help stabilize the head of the HUMERUS in the glenoid fossa and allow for rotation of the SHOULDER JOINT about its longitudinal axis.
Also called the shoulder blade, it is a flat triangular bone, a pair of which form the back part of the shoulder girdle.
Part of the body in humans and primates where the arms connect to the trunk. The shoulder has five joints; ACROMIOCLAVICULAR joint, CORACOCLAVICULAR joint, GLENOHUMERAL joint, scapulathoracic joint, and STERNOCLAVICULAR joint.
Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.
Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.
Fibrous cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE that attach bones to each other and hold together the many types of joints in the body. Articular ligaments are strong, elastic, and allow movement in only specific directions, depending on the individual joint.
The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.
Also known as articulations, these are points of connection between the ends of certain separate bones, or where the borders of other bones are juxtaposed.

Diagnostic classification of shoulder disorders: interobserver agreement and determinants of disagreement. (1/85)

OBJECTIVES: To assess the interobserver agreement on the diagnostic classification of shoulder disorders, based on history taking and physical examination, and to identify the determinants of diagnostic disagreement. METHODS: Consecutive eligible patients with shoulder pain were recruited in various health care settings in the Netherlands. After history taking, two physiotherapists independently performed a physical examination and subsequently the shoulder complaints were classified into one of six diagnostic categories: capsular syndrome (for example, capsulitis, arthritis), acute bursitis, acromioclavicular syndrome, subacromial syndrome (for example, tendinitis, chronic bursitis), rest group (for example, unclear clinical picture, extrinsic causes) and mixed clinical picture. To quantify the interobserver agreement Cohen's kappa was calculated. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to determine which clinical characteristics were determinants of diagnostic disagreement. RESULTS: The study population consisted of 201 patients with varying severity and duration of complaints. The kappa for the classification of shoulder disorders was 0.45 (95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.37, 0.54). Diagnostic disagreement was associated with bilateral involvement (odds ratio (OR) 1.9; 95% CI 1.0, 3.7), chronic complaints (OR 2.0; 95% CI 1.1, 3.7), and severe pain (OR 2.7; 95% CI 1.3, 5.3). CONCLUSIONS: Only moderate agreement was found on the classification of shoulder disorders, which implies that differentiation between the various categories of shoulder disorders is complicated. Especially patients with high pain severity, chronic complaints and bilateral involvement represent a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. As diagnostic classification is a guide for treatment decisions, unsatisfactory reproducibility might affect treatment outcome. To improve the reproducibility, more insight into the reproducibility of clinical findings and the value of additional diagnostic procedures is needed.  (+info)

Radiographic joint space in rheumatoid acromioclavicular joints: a 15 year prospective follow-up study in 74 patients. (2/85)

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate radiographically the acromioclavicular joint space in patients with long-term rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: A cohort of 74 patients with RA was followed prospectively for 15 yr. At the end point, 148 shoulders were radiographed with a standard method. The acromioclavicular (AC) joint space was examined from the radiographs with a method developed previously for population studies; the joint space was measured at its superior and inferior border, and the average of the two measurements, the integral space, calculated. RESULTS: Mean AC joint space in RA patients was 4.9 (S.D. 3.7), range 0-20.5 mm; 6.2 mm (S.D. 5.1) in men and 4.5 mm (S.D. 3. 0) in women. An AC joint space wider than 7 mm in men was found in 11 (31%) out of 36 joints and wider than 6 mm in women in 17 (15%) out of 112 joints. Joint space widening was associated (r=0.87, 95% CI 0.82-0.90) with increasing destruction (Larsen grading) of the joint and it seems to be an inevitable consequence of AC joint affection in RA. Joint space widening is more progressive on the caudal side because of the nature of the erosive destruction. Degeneration with joint space narrowing was observed in 8 (11%) patients (11 joints, 7%; three bilateral). CONCLUSIONS: The largest value of the joint space may be used when evaluating rheumatoid AC joint space. In RA patients, a joint space of >7 mm in men and >5 mm in women is a sign of destructive AC joint affection.  (+info)

Relation of glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joint destruction in rheumatoid shoulder. A 15 year follow up study. (3/85)

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the relation of glenohumeral (GH) and acromioclavicular (AC) joint involvement in a cohort of 74 patients with seropositive and erosive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) followed up prospectively. METHODS: At the 15 year follow up radiographs of 148 shoulders were evaluated, and the grade of destruction of GH and AC joints were assessed by the Larsen method. One GH joint arthroplasty had been performed after 13 years of the disease onset and the preoperative radiograph was evaluated. RESULTS: Erosive involvement (Larsen grade >/= 2) was observed in 96 of 148 (65%) of the shoulders. Both GH and AC joints were affected in 62 of 148 (42%) shoulders. GH joint alone was involved in nine (6%) shoulders and only AC joint was affected in 25 (17%) shoulders. AC joint destruction correlated with the GH joint destruction, r=0.74 (95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.65 to 0.80 ). CONCLUSION: In RA AC joint is affected more often than the GH joint, but in half of the patients both joints are involved. This should be remembered when treating painful rheumatoid shoulder.  (+info)

Arthroscopic Mumford procedure variation of technique. (4/85)

Fifty-seven patients had arthroscopic Mumford procedures for acromioclavicular pain non-responsive to conservative treatment. Thirty-nine of these patients had concomitant rotator cuff repairs. All had significant improvement of their distal clavicular pain. Neither the amount nor the completeness of distal clavicle resection affected the results. Arthroscopic distal clavicle resection is a safe and effective method of alleviating acromioclavicular pain.  (+info)

The relationship of age, gender, and degenerative changes observed on radiographs of the shoulder in asymptomatic individuals. (5/85)

Radiographs of the shoulders of 84 asymptomatic individuals aged between 40 and 83 years were evaluated to determine changes in 23 specific areas. Two fellowship-trained orthopaedic radiologists graded each area on a scale of 0 to II (normal 0, mild changes I, advanced changes II). Logistic regression analysis indicated age to be a significant predictor of change (p < 0.05) for sclerosis of the medial acromion and lateral clavicle, the presence of subchondral cysts in the acromion, formation of osteophytes at the inferior acromion and clavicle, and narrowing and degeneration of the acromioclavicular joint. Gender was not a significant predictor (p > 0.05) for radiological changes. Student's t-test determined significance (p < 0.05) between age and the presence of medial acromial and lateral clavicular sclerosis, subchondral acromial cysts, inferior acromial and clavicular osteophytes, and degeneration of the acromioclavicular joint. Radiological analysis in conditions such as subacromial impingement, pathology of the rotator cuff, and acromioclavicular degeneration should be interpreted in the context of the symptoms and normal age-related changes.  (+info)

Benefits and risks of using local anaesthetic for pain relief to allow early return to play in professional football. (6/85)

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the risks and benefits of the use of local anaesthetic in a descriptive case series from three professional football (rugby league and Australian football) teams. METHODS: Cases of local anaesthetic use (both injection and topical routes) and complications over a six year period were recorded. Complications were assessed using clinical presentation and also by recording all cases of surgery, incidences of players missing games or leaving the field through injury, and causes of player retirement. RESULTS: There were 268 injuries for which local anaesthetic was used to allow early return to play. There were 11 minor and six major complications, although none of these were catastrophic or career ending. About 10% of players taking the field did so with the assistance of local anaesthetic. This rate should be considered in isolation and not seen to reflect standard practice by team doctors. CONCLUSIONS: The use of local anaesthetic in professional football may reduce the rates of players missing matches through injury, but there is the risk of worsening the injury, which should be fully explained to players. A procedure should only be used when both the doctor and player consider that the benefits outweigh the risks.  (+info)

Coracoclavicular joint: osteologic study of 1020 human clavicles. (7/85)

We examined 1020 dry clavicles from cadavers of Italian origin to determine the prevalence of the coracoclavicular joint (ccj), a diarthrotic synovial joint occasionally present between the conoid tubercle of the clavicle and the superior surface of the horizontal part of the coracoid process. Five hundred and nine clavicles from individuals of different ages were submitted to X-ray examination. Using radiography, we measured the entire length and the index of sinuosity of the anterior lateral curve, on which the distance between the conoid tubercle and the coracoid process depends. We also used radiography to record the differences in prevalence of arthritis in two neighbouring joints, the acromioclavicular and sternoclavicular joints. Of the 1020 clavicles, eight (0.8%) displayed the articular facet of the ccj. No statistical correlation was found between clavicular length and the index of sinuosity of the anterior lateral curve. The prevalence of arthritis in clavicles with ccj was higher than that revealed in clavicles without ccj. The prevalence of ccj in the studied clavicles is lower than that observed in Asian cohorts. Furthermore, ccj is not conditioned by either length or sinuosity of the anterior lateral curve of the clavicle. Finally, the assumption that ccj is a predisposing factor for degenerative changes of neighbouring joints is statistically justified.  (+info)

Diagnostic and therapeutic injection of the shoulder region. (8/85)

The shoulder is the site of multiple injuries and inflammatory conditions that lend themselves to diagnostic and therapeutic injection. Joint injection should be considered after other therapeutic interventions such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, and activity-modification have been tried. Indications for glenohumeral joint injection include osteoarthritis, adhesive capsulitis, and rheumatoid arthritis. For the acromioclavicular joint, injection may be used for diagnosis and treatment of osteoarthritis and distal clavicular osteolysis. Subacromial injections are useful for a range of conditions including adhesive capsulitis, subdeltoid bursitis, impingement syndrome, and rotator cuff tendinosis. Scapulothoracic injections are reserved for inflammation of the involved bursa. Persistent pain related to inflammatory conditions of the long head of the biceps responds well to injection in the region. The proper technique, choice and quantity of pharmaceuticals, and appropriate follow-up are essential for effective outcomes.  (+info)

The acromioclavicular (AC) joint is the joint located between the acromion process of the scapula (shoulder blade) and the clavicle (collarbone). It allows for a small amount of movement between these two bones and participates in shoulder motion. Injuries to this joint, such as AC joint separations or sprains, are common and can occur due to falls, direct blows, or repetitive motions that cause the ligaments that support the AC joint to become stretched or torn.

A dislocation is a condition in which a bone slips out of its normal position in a joint. This can happen as a result of trauma or injury, such as a fall or direct blow to the body. Dislocations can cause pain, swelling, and limited mobility in the affected area. In some cases, a dislocation may also damage surrounding tissues, such as ligaments, tendons, and nerves.

Dislocations are typically treated by reducing the dislocation, which means putting the bone back into its normal position. This is usually done with the help of medication to relieve pain and relaxation techniques to help the person stay still during the reduction. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to repair damaged tissues or if the dislocation cannot be reduced through other methods. After the dislocation has been reduced, the joint may be immobilized with a splint or sling to allow it to heal properly.

It is important to seek medical attention promptly if you suspect that you have a dislocation. If left untreated, a dislocation can lead to further complications, such as joint instability and chronic pain.

The clavicle, also known as the collarbone, is a long, slender bone that lies horizontally between the breastbone (sternum) and the shoulder blade (scapula). It is part of the shoulder girdle and plays a crucial role in supporting the upper limb. The clavicle has two ends: the medial end, which articulates with the sternum, and the lateral end, which articulates with the acromion process of the scapula. It is a common site of fracture due to its superficial location and susceptibility to direct trauma.

Shoulder dislocation is a medical condition where the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) gets displaced from its normal position in the glenoid fossa of the scapula (shoulder blade). This can occur anteriorly, posteriorly, or inferiorly, with anterior dislocations being the most common. It is usually caused by trauma or forceful movement and can result in pain, swelling, bruising, and limited range of motion in the shoulder joint. Immediate medical attention is required to relocate the joint and prevent further damage.

The acromion is a part of the shoulder blade (scapula). It is the bony process that forms the highest point of the shoulder and articulates with the clavicle (collarbone) to form the acromioclavicular joint. The acromion serves as an attachment site for several muscles and ligaments in the shoulder region.

A Visual Analog Scale (VAS) is a subjective measurement tool used to quantify and communicate the intensity or severity of various symptoms or experiences, such as pain, mood, or fatigue. It typically consists of a straight, horizontal line, 10 centimeters in length, with verbal anchors at each end that describe the extreme limits of the variable being measured (e.g., "no pain" and "worst possible pain"). Patients are asked to mark a point on the line that corresponds to their perceived intensity or severity of the symptom, and the distance from the "no pain" anchor to the patient's mark is then measured in centimeters to obtain a score between 0 and 100.

The VAS has been widely used in clinical research and practice due to its simplicity, ease of use, and ability to detect small but meaningful changes in symptom intensity over time. However, it should be noted that the interpretation of VAS scores may vary among individuals and populations, and additional validation studies are often necessary to establish the psychometric properties of this measurement tool in specific contexts.

Shoulder Impingement Syndrome is a common cause of shoulder pain, characterized by pinching or compression of the rotator cuff tendons and/or bursa between the humeral head and the acromion process of the scapula. This often results from abnormal contact between these structures due to various factors such as:

1. Bony abnormalities (e.g., bone spurs)
2. Tendon inflammation or thickening
3. Poor biomechanics during shoulder movements
4. Muscle imbalances and weakness, particularly in the rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers
5. Aging and degenerative changes

The syndrome is typically classified into two types: primary (or structural) impingement, which involves bony abnormalities; and secondary impingement, which is related to functional or muscular imbalances. Symptoms often include pain, especially during overhead activities, weakness, and limited range of motion in the shoulder. Diagnosis typically involves a combination of physical examination, patient history, and imaging studies such as X-rays or MRI scans. Treatment may involve activity modification, physical therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroid injections, and, in some cases, surgical intervention.

The shoulder joint, also known as the glenohumeral joint, is the most mobile joint in the human body. It is a ball and socket synovial joint that connects the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) to the glenoid cavity of the scapula (shoulder blade). The shoulder joint allows for a wide range of movements including flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, internal rotation, and external rotation. It is surrounded by a group of muscles and tendons known as the rotator cuff that provide stability and enable smooth movement of the joint.

Shoulder pain is a condition characterized by discomfort or hurt in the shoulder joint, muscles, tendons, ligaments, or surrounding structures. The shoulder is one of the most mobile joints in the body, and this mobility makes it prone to injury and pain. Shoulder pain can result from various causes, including overuse, trauma, degenerative conditions, or referred pain from other areas of the body.

The shoulder joint is a ball-and-socket joint made up of three bones: the humerus (upper arm bone), scapula (shoulder blade), and clavicle (collarbone). The rotator cuff, a group of four muscles that surround and stabilize the shoulder joint, can also be a source of pain if it becomes inflamed or torn.

Shoulder pain can range from mild to severe, and it may be accompanied by stiffness, swelling, bruising, weakness, numbness, tingling, or reduced mobility in the affected arm. The pain may worsen with movement, lifting objects, or performing certain activities, such as reaching overhead or behind the back.

Medical evaluation is necessary to determine the underlying cause of shoulder pain and develop an appropriate treatment plan. Treatment options may include rest, physical therapy, medication, injections, or surgery, depending on the severity and nature of the condition.

The rotator cuff is a group of four muscles and their tendons that attach to the shoulder blade (scapula) and help stabilize and move the shoulder joint. These muscles are the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis. The rotator cuff helps to keep the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) centered in the glenoid fossa (shoulder socket), providing stability during shoulder movements. It also allows for rotation and elevation of the arm. Rotator cuff injuries or conditions, such as tears or tendinitis, can cause pain and limit shoulder function.

The scapula, also known as the shoulder blade, is a flat, triangular bone located in the upper back region of the human body. It serves as the site of attachment for various muscles that are involved in movements of the shoulder joint and arm. The scapula has several important features:

1. Three borders (anterior, lateral, and medial)
2. Three angles (superior, inferior, and lateral)
3. Spine of the scapula - a long, horizontal ridge that divides the scapula into two parts: supraspinous fossa (above the spine) and infraspinous fossa (below the spine)
4. Glenoid cavity - a shallow, concave surface on the lateral border that articulates with the humerus to form the shoulder joint
5. Acromion process - a bony projection at the top of the scapula that forms part of the shoulder joint and serves as an attachment point for muscles and ligaments
6. Coracoid process - a hook-like bony projection extending from the anterior border, which provides attachment for muscles and ligaments

Understanding the anatomy and function of the scapula is essential in diagnosing and treating various shoulder and upper back conditions.

In anatomical terms, the shoulder refers to the complex joint of the human body that connects the upper limb to the trunk. It is formed by the union of three bones: the clavicle (collarbone), scapula (shoulder blade), and humerus (upper arm bone). The shoulder joint is a ball-and-socket type of synovial joint, allowing for a wide range of movements such as flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, internal rotation, and external rotation.

The shoulder complex includes not only the glenohumeral joint but also other structures that contribute to its movement and stability, including:

1. The acromioclavicular (AC) joint: where the clavicle meets the acromion process of the scapula.
2. The coracoclavicular (CC) ligament: connects the coracoid process of the scapula to the clavicle, providing additional stability to the AC joint.
3. The rotator cuff: a group of four muscles (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis) that surround and reinforce the shoulder joint, contributing to its stability and range of motion.
4. The biceps tendon: originates from the supraglenoid tubercle of the scapula and passes through the shoulder joint, helping with flexion, supination, and stability.
5. Various ligaments and capsular structures that provide additional support and limit excessive movement in the shoulder joint.

The shoulder is a remarkable joint due to its wide range of motion, but this also makes it susceptible to injuries and disorders such as dislocations, subluxations, sprains, strains, tendinitis, bursitis, and degenerative conditions like osteoarthritis. Proper care, exercise, and maintenance are essential for maintaining shoulder health and function throughout one's life.

Reconstructive surgical procedures are a type of surgery aimed at restoring the form and function of body parts that are defective or damaged due to various reasons such as congenital abnormalities, trauma, infection, tumors, or disease. These procedures can involve the transfer of tissue from one part of the body to another, manipulation of bones, muscles, and tendons, or use of prosthetic materials to reconstruct the affected area. The goal is to improve both the physical appearance and functionality of the body part, thereby enhancing the patient's quality of life. Examples include breast reconstruction after mastectomy, cleft lip and palate repair, and treatment of severe burns.

Orthopedic procedures are surgical or nonsurgical methods used to treat musculoskeletal conditions, including injuries, deformities, or diseases of the bones, joints, muscles, ligaments, and tendons. These procedures can range from simple splinting or casting to complex surgeries such as joint replacements, spinal fusions, or osteotomies (cutting and repositioning bones). The primary goal of orthopedic procedures is to restore function, reduce pain, and improve the quality of life for patients.

Articular ligaments, also known as fibrous ligaments, are bands of dense, fibrous connective tissue that connect and stabilize bones to each other at joints. They help to limit the range of motion of a joint and provide support, preventing excessive movement that could cause injury. Articular ligaments are composed mainly of collagen fibers arranged in a parallel pattern, making them strong and flexible. They have limited blood supply and few nerve endings, which makes them less prone to injury but also slower to heal if damaged. Examples of articular ligaments include the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) in the knee joint, and the medial collateral ligament (MCL) and lateral collateral ligament (LCL) in the elbow joint.

Articular Range of Motion (AROM) is a term used in physiotherapy and orthopedics to describe the amount of movement available in a joint, measured in degrees of a circle. It refers to the range through which synovial joints can actively move without causing pain or injury. AROM is assessed by measuring the degree of motion achieved by active muscle contraction, as opposed to passive range of motion (PROM), where the movement is generated by an external force.

Assessment of AROM is important in evaluating a patient's functional ability and progress, planning treatment interventions, and determining return to normal activities or sports participation. It is also used to identify any restrictions in joint mobility that may be due to injury, disease, or surgery, and to monitor the effectiveness of rehabilitation programs.

A joint is the location at which two or more bones make contact. They are constructed to allow movement and provide support and stability to the body during motion. Joints can be classified in several ways, including structure, function, and the type of tissue that forms them. The three main types of joints based on structure are fibrous (or fixed), cartilaginous, and synovial (or diarthrosis). Fibrous joints do not have a cavity and have limited movement, while cartilaginous joints allow for some movement and are connected by cartilage. Synovial joints, the most common and most movable type, have a space between the articular surfaces containing synovial fluid, which reduces friction and wear. Examples of synovial joints include hinge, pivot, ball-and-socket, saddle, and condyloid joints.

Glenohumeral joint (Shoulder joint) Shoulder Sternoclavicular joint SimonMoyes.co.uk. "What is Acromioclavicular Joint ... The acromioclavicular joint, or AC joint, is a joint at the top of the shoulder. It is the junction between the acromion (part ... Grade II sprain What is Acromioclavicular Joint Osteoarthritis? - www.SimonMoyes.co.uk Acromioclavicular joint disease (CS1 ... The acromioclavicular joint provides the ability to raise the arm above the head. This joint functions as a pivot point ( ...
The acromioclavicular ligament is part of the acromioclavicular joint. It is divided into two parts: superior and inferior. ... This ligament provides horizontal stability to the acromioclavicular joint This ligament is somewhat thinner than the preceding ...
... also known as acromioclavicular joint injury, is a common injury to the acromioclavicular joint. The AC joint is located at the ... With the foam roller you can also lie on your back on top of it and do snow angels.[citation needed] Acromioclavicular joint ... In Italy 1.8 out of 10,000 people are estimated to experience an acromioclavicular joint discolation per year, and this type of ... "Acromioclavicular Joint Separation". ISOST. Archived from the original on 2010-05-27. Retrieved 2010-05-05. Wikimedia Commons ...
Its acromial attachment may be repositioned to the clavicle during reconstructive surgery of the acromioclavicular joint ( ... doi:10.1016/B978-0-12-800548-4.00006-1. ISBN 978-0-12-800548-4. Nguyen, D. (2015). "19 - Failed acromioclavicular joint ... Acromioclavicular joint injuries". Shoulder and Elbow Trauma and its Complications. Vol. 1: The Shoulder. Woodhead Publishing. ... When the pectoralis minor is inserted, as occasionally is the case, into the capsule of the shoulder-joint instead of into the ...
... and include the shoulder joint and the acromioclavicular joint. The shoulder joint also known as the glenohumeral joint is a ... It is a plane synovial joint. The acromioclavicular joint allows the arm to be raised above the head. This joint functions as a ... it is the most mobile joint of the human body. The acromioclavicular joint, is the joint at the top of the shoulder. It is the ... "What is Acromioclavicular Joint Osteoarthritis?". Archived from the original on 2011-05-06. {{cite journal}}: Cite journal ...
C4 - Over the acromioclavicular joint. C5 - On the lateral (radial) side of the antecubital fossa, just proximally to the elbow ... L5 - On the dorsum of the foot at the third metatarsophalangeal joint. S1 - On the lateral aspect of the calcaneus. S2 - At the ...
Injuries to the Acromioclavicular Joint in the Throwing Athlete. 5 (2): 60-64. doi:10.1016/S1060-1872(97)80015-9. ISSN 1060- ... It is not part of the acromioclavicular joint articulation, but is usually described with it, since it keeps the clavicle in ... The coracoclavicular ligament is a strong stabilizer of the acromioclavicular joint. It is also important in the transmission ... There is very little movement at the AC joint.[citation needed] The coracoclavicular ligament may be damaged during a severe ...
Doctors also removed a cyst from his acromioclavicular joint. Lawton spent the entire 2002-03 winter rehabbing. Before the 2003 ...
"The role of the acromioclavicular joint in impingement syndrome". Clin Sports Med. 22 (2): 343-57. doi:10.1016/S0278-5919(03) ... osteoarthritic spurs on the acromioclavicular joint, and variations in the shape of the acromion. Thickening or calcification ... These two muscles act as a force couple within the glenohumeral joint to properly elevate the acromion process, and if a muscle ... be widened by resection of the distal clavicle and excision of osteophytes on the under-surface of the acromioclavicular joint ...
The official diagnosis was fifth-degree acromioclavicular joint dislocation; he needed surgery and extensive rehabilitation. By ...
In March 2012 she fractured her clavicle and acromioclavicular joint while training. At the Asian Beach Games Haiyang, June ...
Inspection Palpation of sternoclavicular joint, clavicle, acromioclavicular joint, subacromial bursa, bicipital tendon. ... positive test indicates acromioclavicular joint degeneration/arthritis Adson's sign tests for thoracic outlet syndrome ...
It articulates with the clavicle (collar bone) to form the acromioclavicular joint. The acromion forms the summit of the ... Acromion is "4" The left shoulder and acromioclavicular joints, and the proper ligaments of the scapula. Anterior view. This ... J Bone Joint Surg Am. 82 (3): 394-400. doi:10.2106/00004623-200003000-00010. PMID 10724231. S2CID 25541990. Archived from the ... Together with the coracoid process it extends laterally over the shoulder joint. The acromion is a continuation of the scapular ...
Scapular movement will also cause movement in the sternoclavicular joint and acromioclavicular joint. If the elbow bends during ... The movement is primarily limited to the two shoulder joints: the glenohumeral joint and the scapulothoracic joint. ... Ligaments that stabilize and prevent deformation of the elbow joint are involved due to the angle of lateral force on the ... It is mostly a joint isolation movement of the shoulder. During the transverse lifts, the scapulae will also articulate and ...
... is a specific technique used to evaluate acromioclavicular joint injuries. He was a Fellow of the American College of Radiology ...
The left shoulder and acromioclavicular joints, and the proper ligaments of the scapula. Human arm bones diagram This article ...
The left shoulder and acromioclavicular joints, and the proper ligaments of the scapula. The difference between anatomical neck ... It affords attachment to the articular capsule of the shoulder-joint, and is perforated by numerous vascular foramina. ... humerus from the greater and lesser tubercles of the humerus It gives attachment to the capsular ligament of the shoulder joint ...
In humans, they are present in the knee, wrist, acromioclavicular, sternoclavicular, and temporomandibular joints; in other ... The Knee-joint". Gray's Anatomy of the Human Body. Archived from the original on January 23, 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-20.[full ... The menisci of the knee are two pads of fibrocartilaginous tissue which serve to disperse friction in the knee joint between ... animals they may be present in other joints. Generally, the term "meniscus" is used to refer to the cartilage of the knee, ...
... degenerative arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint, instability of the glenohumeral joint, or adhesive capsulitis. All ... Osteoarthritis of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint may co-exist and is usually demonstrated on radiographs.[citation needed] ... Joint contracture of the shoulder has also been found to be at a higher incidence in type two diabetics, which may lead to ... If the therapist performs a treatment direction test and gently applies joint traction or a caudal glide during abduction (MWM ...
... they typically occur at the acromioclavicular joint or along the biceps tendon. From their common origin at a joint or tendon, ... Sample chapter available on acromioclavicular joint ganglion Archived 2014-05-18 at the Wayback Machine. Muir B, Kissel JA, ... A ganglion cyst is a fluid-filled bump associated with a joint or tendon sheath. It most often occurs at the back of the wrist ... A common site of the occurrence is along the extensor carpi radialis brevis, as it passes over the dorsum of the wrist joint. ...
Pain located below the acromioclavicular joint with internal rotation is considered a positive test result. "Hawkins Kennedy ...
Elbow joint. Deep dissection. Posterior view. The left shoulder and acromioclavicular joints, and the proper ligaments of the ... front view Diagram of the human shoulder joint, back view The left shoulder and acromioclavicular joints, and the proper ... Fracture of the proximal humerus Left elbow-joint, showing anterior and ulnar collateral ligaments. Capsule of elbow-joint ( ... Elbow joint. Deep dissection. Anterior view. Elbow joint. Deep dissection. Posterior view. ...
2004). "Stability of acromioclavicular joint reconstruction: biomechanical testing of various surgical techniques in a ... Especially Complete Acromioclavicular Separation" (Reprint). Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. 54 (6): 1187-1194. PMID 4652050 ... However, such testing does not account for what the living body may perform in the process of healing, in terms of joint ... There is currently no "gold standard" surgery to repair acromioclavicular separations, and many surgeries have been created. ...
Acromion Clavicle Acromioclavicular joint Acromioclavicular ligament Separated shoulder Stedman's Medical Dictionary 27th ed, ...
Arthritis or osteolysis of the acromioclavicular joint can be treated with the Mumford procedure (open or arthroscopic). ... Shoulder problem Separated shoulder Clavicle fracture Arthroscopy Arthritis Capsule of the glenohumeral joint (shoulder joint) ... The long head of the biceps passes through the shoulder joint and attaches to the labrum. During a biceps tenodesis procedure, ... Many surgeries have been developed to repair the muscles, connective tissue, or damaged joints that can arise from traumatic or ...
The lateral end connects at the acromion of the scapula which is referred to as the acromioclavicular joint. The clavicle forms ... In most cases, the direct hit occurs from the joint side towards the body side of the bone. The muscles involved in clavicle ... Khan LA, Bradnock TJ, Scott C, Robinson CM (February 2009). "Fractures of the clavicle". The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery ... The arm is usually supported by an external immobilizer to keep the joint stable and decrease the risk of further damage. The ...
"Synovial cyst of the acromioclavicular joint with and without rotator cuff tear: A case series of two patients". International ... Baker's cyst or popliteal cyst (behind the knee joint) Mucoid cyst (ganglion cysts of the digits) Stafne static bone cyst (an ... hand and foot joints and tendons) Mucoid cyst (ganglion cysts of the digits) Cysticercal cyst - an infection due to the larval ... anatomic variant with radiographic cystic appearance in the posterior mandible) Subchondral cyst (cysts near the bony joints) ...
... acromioclavicular joint arthritis, and glenohumeral arthritis". The Medical Clinics of North America. 98 (4): 755-75, xii. doi: ... This is because joint tissues are well innervated from nociceptive input and therefore, a surgical procedure in the joint ... Such joint replacement surgery generally is conducted to relieve arthritis pain or fix severe physical joint damage. Shoulder ... joint through a relatively nerve free passageway. The shoulder joint is initially covered by the rotator cuff muscles ( ...
In the game against the Eagles in week nine he suffered an acromioclavicular joint sprain in his right shoulder. Shortly ...
At his first Grand Prix event, 2021 Skate America, Sato dislocated his left acromioclavicular joint on a fall during practice. ...
Glenohumeral joint (Shoulder joint) Shoulder Sternoclavicular joint SimonMoyes.co.uk. "What is Acromioclavicular Joint ... The acromioclavicular joint, or AC joint, is a joint at the top of the shoulder. It is the junction between the acromion (part ... Grade II sprain What is Acromioclavicular Joint Osteoarthritis? - www.SimonMoyes.co.uk Acromioclavicular joint disease (CS1 ... The acromioclavicular joint provides the ability to raise the arm above the head. This joint functions as a pivot point ( ...
... including acromioclavicular joint injuries, occur most commonly in active or athletic young adults. However, pediatric ... acromioclavicular injuries have also increased owing to the rising popularity of dangerous summer and winter sporting ... encoded search term (Acromioclavicular Joint Injury) and Acromioclavicular Joint Injury What to Read Next on Medscape ... Torn acromioclavicular joint ligaments and/or torn coracoclavicular ligaments are seen in acromioclavicular joint sprains. The ...
Help support Wordnik (and make this page ad-free) by adopting the word acromioclavicular joint. ... joint. at the top of the shoulder. , the junction. between the acromion. and the clavicle. . name=description> ... joint. at the top of the shoulder. , the junction. between the acromion. and the clavicle. . ...
Acromioclavicular Joint Sprains - Etiology, pathophysiology, symptoms, signs, diagnosis & prognosis from the MSD Manuals - ... Acromioclavicular Joint Sprains (Shoulder Separation; AC Joint Sprain). By Danielle Campagne , MD, University of California, ... Acromioclavicular joint sprains are common, usually resulting from a fall on the shoulder or, less often, an outstretched arm. ... Treatment of acromioclavicular joint sprains is usually immobilization (eg, with a sling) and early range-of-motion exercises. ...
Three-dimensional acromioclavicular joint motions during elevation of the arm. Rachael M. Teece, Jason B. Lunden, Angela S. ... Three-dimensional acromioclavicular joint motions during elevation of the arm. In: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical ... Three-dimensional acromioclavicular joint motions during elevation of the arm. / Teece, Rachael M.; Lunden, Jason B.; Lloyd, ... Three-dimensional acromioclavicular joint motions during elevation of the arm. Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical ...
The acromioclavicular joint, or AC joint, is a joint at the top of the shoulder. It is the junction between the acromion (part ... The acromioclavicular joint provides the ability to raise the arm above the head. This joint functions as a pivot point ( ... In other joints no synovial joint is present with the joint being made by a pad of fibrous tissue attached to the outer end of ... "What is Acromioclavicular Joint Osteoarthritis?". Archived from the original on 2011-05-06.. {{cite journal}}. : Cite journal ...
... clinical tests for identifying acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) pain are widely utilised without concern for such issues. The aim ... Table 1 Summary of previous studies investigating the diagnostic accuracy of clinical tests for acromioclavicular joint pain ... pain relief following injection of local anaesthetic into the acromioclavicular joint. Abbreviations: ACJ, acromioclavicular ... Table 4 Diagnostic accuracy of traditional tests for acromioclavicular joint pain Full size table. ...
Strain of acromioclavicular ligaments, ligaments intact, AC joint stable.. *Tenderness/swelling isolated to AC joint, no ... Acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments disrupted, deltoid and trapezius insertions disrupted.. *Pain in AC joint and ... Acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments disrupted with inferior dislocation of the distal clavicle inferior to the ... Acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments disrupted, deltoid and trapezius insertions disrupted with ,100% elevation of ...
The acromioclavicular joint is surrounded by a thin joint capsule and 4 small ligaments. These ligaments mostly give joint ... Torn acromioclavicular joint ligaments and/or torn coracoclavicular ligaments are seen in acromioclavicular joint sprains. The ... AC Joint Injuries. Injuries in and around the shoulder are common in todays athletic society.. * Acromioclavicular (AC) joint ... The acromioclavicular joint is made up of 2 bones (the clavicle and the acromion), 4 ligaments, and a meniscus inside the joint ...
... including acromioclavicular joint injuries, occur most commonly in active or athletic young adults. However, pediatric ... acromioclavicular injuries have also increased owing to the rising popularity of dangerous summer and winter sporting ... encoded search term (Acromioclavicular Joint Injury) and Acromioclavicular Joint Injury What to Read Next on Medscape ... Torn acromioclavicular joint ligaments and/or torn coracoclavicular ligaments are seen in acromioclavicular joint sprains. The ...
Steroid injections for Acromioclavicular Joint Osteoarthritis reduce pain and inflammation. Prompt access to cortisone ... Acromioclavicular Joint Anatomy. The AC joint is a small joint on the top of the shoulder. It is located where the end of the ... Steroid injections for acromioclavicular joint osteoarthritis. Acromioclavicular joint osteoarthritis involves degenerative ... Degenerative joint disease of the acromioclavicular joint: a review. The American journal of sports medicine, 41(11), pp.2684- ...
Home / Research » Management of Acromioclavicular Joint Injuries. Management of Acromioclavicular Joint Injuries. Posted in: ... acromioclavicular joint injuries to achieve anatomic reduction of the acromioclavicular joint, reconstruction of the ... Management of Acromioclavicular Joint Injuries. (Current Concepts Review). Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery - American. 2014 ... Acromioclavicular joint injuries are among the most common shoulder girdle injuries in athletes and most commonly result from a ...
An acromioclavicular joint separation is where the clavicle is traumatically pulled away from the highest point of the shoulder ... this joint is called the acromioclavicular joint (AC joint).. Also called a shoulder separation, an acromioclavicular joint ... Acromioclavicular Joint Separation. The bones that make up the shoulder are the upper end of the arm bone (humerus), the ... Some would describe this joint as a ball and socket joint, but, it is more like a ball sitting on a golf tee, meaning that ...
ACJ injury X-ray, ac joint disruption, ac joint dislocation, Rockford classification x-ray, ac joint Rockford, Rockford x-ray. ... Acromioclavicular joint. Key points. *Disruption of the acromioclavicular ligaments results in loss of alignment of the ... The acromioclavicular joint can be assessed with standard shoulder X-rays.. Loss of alignment of the inferior surfaces of the ... Acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) - Normal. *The inferior margins of the acromion and clavicle are well aligned (red lines) ...
The AC Joint or acromioclavicular joint is a small joint between the acromium of the shoulder blade and the collarbone. It ... The AC Joint has a capsule and small AC Joint ligaments, which provide stability. Although the AC Joint ligaments are ... Acute AC Joint Injury Symptoms:. AC Joint injuries are traumatic in nature resulting in significant pain at the point of injury ... Grade 2 AC Joint Injury - Damage of the AC Joint ligaments as well as the coracoclavicular ligaments. There may be slight ...
This video discusses the surgical considerations when planning treatment strategies for acromioclavicular joint separations. ... Acromioclavicular Joint Separation: General Surgical Considerations. This video discusses the surgical considerations when ... Acromioclavicular Joint Separation: Subacute Injuries and Arthroscopic Reconstruction With AC Dog Bone™ Button and Allograft ... Burns Demonstrates Tips and Pearls for Acromioclavicular Joint Injuries: AC Reconstruction Chopsticks ...
Acromioclavicular joint dislocations represent about 10 percent of all dislocation injuries to the shoulder girdle. Forty ... percent of all dislocations occur at the glenohumeral joint. Scapular fractures are often a result of significant force. ... Dislocations of the sternoclavicular joint are infrequent and often missed. Clavicular fractures in adults usually are not hard ... The normal acromioclavicular joint space of 3 to 8 mm varies no more than 2 to 3 mm between the two joints in an individual. In ...
Shoulder surgeons at The Oklahoma Throwing Athlete Association in Oklahoma County offer treatment for acromioclavicular joint ... Acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation is also referred to as acromioclavicular joint separation, subluxation, or disruption. ... Anatomy of the Acromioclavicular Joint. The AC joint is located at the highest point of the shoulder. It acts as a junction ... Types of Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation. The type of AC joint dislocation depends upon the extent of the tear of the ...
NY offers treatment for acromioclavicular arthritis and joint bursitis. ... What is AC or Acromioclavicular Arthritis?. The acromioclavicular joint is part of the shoulder joint. It is formed by the ... An injection into the joint can temporarily reduce pain while identifying the AC joint as the source of pain. Other tests your ... The joint is lined by cartilage that gradually wears with age as well as with repeated overhead or shoulder level activities ...
PA offers treatment for acromioclavicular joint injury and acromioclavicular arthritis. The acromioclavicular joint is part of ... What is AC or Acromioclavicular Arthritis?. The acromioclavicular joint is part of the shoulder joint. It is formed by the ... David J German MD, Orthopedic Joint Replacement Specialist, Erie, PA / Shoulder / Acromioclavicular Joint Injury ... An injection into the joint can temporarily reduce pain while identifying the AC joint as the source of pain. Other tests your ...
Acromioclavicular joint injuries causes, types and their treatment is discussed along with relative anatomy and biomechanics. ... Clinical Photograph of Acromioclavicular Dislocation. Anatomy of Acromioclavicular Joint. The acromioclavicular joint is part ... Pediatric Acromioclavicular Joint Injuries. Acromioclavicular joint injuries in children are rare. The immature clavicle is ... Acromioclavicular joint injuries are also known as shoulder separations, acromioclavicular joint separation or ...
Dislocation of the acromioclavicular joint answers are found in the Evidence-Based Medicine Guidelines powered by Unbound ... "Dislocation of the Acromioclavicular Joint." Evidence-Based Medicine Guidelines, Duodecim Medical Publications Limited, 2019. ... Dislocation of the Acromioclavicular Joint [Internet]. In: Evidence-Based Medicine Guidelines. Duodecim Medical Publications ... Dislocation of the acromioclavicular joint. Evidence-Based Medicine Guidelines. Duodecim Medical Publications Limited; 2019. ...
TN offers treatment for AC joint dislocation also called acromioclavicular joint dislocation. ... Types of AC Joint/Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation. The type of AC joint dislocation depends upon the extent of the tear of ... Causes of AC Joint/Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation. The most common cause of AC joint dislocation is a fall onto the ... Anatomy of the AC Joint/Acromioclavicular Joint. The AC joint is located at the highest point of the shoulder. It acts as a ...
... injuries are associated with damage to the joint and surrounding structures. ... The capsule surrounding the acromioclavicular joint is strengthened by the acromioclavicular ligaments. The joints are ... The acromioclavicular joint, together with the sternoclavicular joint, connects the upper limb to the skeleton. ... Acromioclavicular joint (AC) injuries are associated with damage to the joint and surrounding structures. ...
TX offers AC joint replacement surgery to treat acromioclavicular (AC) joint osteoarthritis. ... Joint Osteoarthritis. What is Acromioclavicular (AC) Joint Osteoarthritis?. Osteoarthritis also called degenerative joint ... The acromioclavicular or AC joint is where the acromion or highest point of the shoulder blade, and the clavicle or collarbone ... The shoulder joint is made up of a ball and socket joint, where the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) articulates with the ...
... with fixing by Dog Bone Arthrex system ... Shoulder-joint arthroscopy. Shoulder-joint arthroscopy and closed reduction of acromioclavicular joint dislocation with fixing ... Shoulder-joint arthroscopy and closed reduction of acromioclavicular joint dislocation with fixing by Dog Bone Arthrex system ... long-standing acromioclavicular joint dislocations (trauma remoteness - over 2 weeks) types III, IV and V by Rockwood and type ...
CA offers acromioclavicular (AC) joint reconstruction to treat AC joint injuries. ... Joint Reconstruction. What is the Acromioclavicular (AC) Joint?. The acromioclavicular (AC) joint is one of the joints present ... Procedure for Acromioclavicular (AC) Joint Reconstruction. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction involves the following steps: ... The AC joint is stabilized by the following structures:. Capsular ligaments: These ligaments are called the acromioclavicular ...
TN offers acromioclavicular (AC) joint reconstruction surgery to treat separation of the AC joint. ... What is the Acromioclavicular (AC) Joint?. The acromioclavicular (AC) joint is one of the joints present within your shoulder. ... Procedure for Acromioclavicular (AC) Joint Reconstruction. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction involves the following steps: ... The AC joint is stabilized by the following structures:. *Capsular ligaments: These ligaments are called the acromioclavicular ...
  • Injuries in and around the shoulder, including acromioclavicular joint injuries, occur most commonly in active or athletic young adults. (medscape.com)
  • [ 1 ] However, pediatric acromioclavicular injuries have also increased owing to the rising popularity of dangerous summer and winter sporting activities. (medscape.com)
  • Acromioclavicular joint injuries are often seen after bicycle wrecks, contact sports, and car accidents. (medscape.com)
  • Although it is not an acromioclavicular joint-stabilizing structure, during operative repair of type III acromioclavicular injuries, the coracoacromial ligament may be resected from its acromial insertion and used to reconstruct the torn coracoclavicular ligament. (medscape.com)
  • See Pathophysiology [intratopic link] for the classification of acromioclavicular injuries. (medscape.com)
  • Evaluation and treatment of acromioclavicular joint injuries. (steroidinjectionslondon.co.uk)
  • Superior-inferior stability is maintained by the coracoclavicular (conoid and trapezoid) ligaments.Type-I or type-II acromioclavicular joint injuries have been treated with sling immobilization, early shoulder motion, and physical therapy, with favorable outcomes. (tigerortho.com)
  • Mild injuries may appear normal on imaging but have symptoms such as pain directly over the joint. (premierortho.org)
  • Grade 4 and above - AC Joint Injuries can be considered variations of a grade 3 AC Joint injury and usually require surgery. (palmsphysiotherapy.com.au)
  • Traumatic AC Joint injuries are most commonly caused by a direct impact to the shoulder but can also occur due to a fall on an outstretched hand, cyclists after falls from their bike and in contact sports such as rugby and football. (palmsphysiotherapy.com.au)
  • AC Joint injuries are traumatic in nature resulting in significant pain at the point of injury. (palmsphysiotherapy.com.au)
  • Acromioclavicular joint dislocations represent about 10 percent of all dislocation injuries to the shoulder girdle. (aafp.org)
  • Acromioclavicular joint injuries are also known as shoulder separations, acromioclavicular joint separation or acromioclavicular joint dislocation and occur as a result of downward force on the acromion. (boneandspine.com)
  • Acromioclavicular joint injuries occur most commonly in sporting activities. (boneandspine.com)
  • Acromioclavicular joint injuries are seen especially in competitive athletes[ rugby or hockey players] and occur most frequently in the second decade of life. (boneandspine.com)
  • All acromioclavicular injuries from stage III onwards are double disruptions. (boneandspine.com)
  • Classification of Acromioclavicular injuries: Case courtesy of Dr Roberto Schubert, Radiopaedia.org . (boneandspine.com)
  • Acromioclavicular joint (AC) injuries are associated with damage to the joint and surrounding structures. (iem-student.org)
  • Acromioclavicular joint injuries occur at all ages, but are most common in the 20-40 year age group , 5x times more common in men than women. (iem-student.org)
  • Imaging can be used to classify acromioclavicular injuries and is the most widely used Rockwood classification. (iem-student.org)
  • Acromioclavicular joint (AC joint) dislocation or shoulder separation is one of the most common injuries of the upper arm. (stlosm.com)
  • Learn about common joint injuries and the best ways to prevent them. (medibank.com.au)
  • S​ome joint injuries require more intervention and even surgery. (medibank.com.au)
  • Fortunately, there are plenty of precautions you can take to keep your joints healthy and to prevent sports injuries. (medibank.com.au)
  • What are some common joint injuries? (medibank.com.au)
  • Common joint injuries are sprains (stretched or torn ligaments) and strains (stretched or torn muscles or tendons). (medibank.com.au)
  • For most Type I and II injuries the shoulder is rested in a sling for two to three weeks whilst the joint is slowly mobilised as pain allows. (sussexshoulder.co.uk)
  • Injuries to the acromioclavicular joint usually result in pain and instability. (pitt.edu)
  • Acromioclavicular injuries. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Combined injuries of Mid-shaft clavicle fracture and Acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation are rare, and only a few cases have been reported. (ac.ir)
  • This mobility makes the shoulder joint very vulnerable to injuries. (healthline.com)
  • Keep in mind that suffering from these symptoms does not automatically mean that you have OA Other rheumatic diseases, injuries or joint overuse can produce similar symptoms. (lu.se)
  • The superior shoulder suspensory complex (SSSC) is a bony and soft-tissue ring composed of the glenoid process, the coracoid process, the coracoclavicular ligament, the distal clavicle, the acromioclavicular joint, and the acromial process at the end of a superior bony strut (the midshaft clavicle) and an inferior bony strut (the junction of the lateral scapular body and the medial glenoid neck). (medscape.com)
  • The acromioclavicular ligament is slightly torn, but there is no damage to the coracoclavicular ligament. (okthrowingathlete.com)
  • Type 2: The acromioclavicular ligament is totally torn, but there is a slight or no tear to the coracoclavicular ligament. (okthrowingathlete.com)
  • Acromioclavicular ligament and coracoclavicular ligament are the primary static stabilizers of the acromioclavicular joint. (boneandspine.com)
  • The degree of damage to the acromioclavicular ligaments and coracoclavicular ligament with resultant displacement of the clavicle relative to the acromion is the primary criterion for the classification of AC separations. (boneandspine.com)
  • Grade 5: 2) of Acromioclavicular joint dislocations, 5 patients were treated by palmaris longus autograft for the coracoclavicular ligament repair and 5 were treated by clavicular hook plate patients were followed up till 1 year postoperatively. (researchbib.com)
  • The horizontal, anteroposterior stability is provided by the acromioclavicular ligaments. (boneandspine.com)
  • Evidence Central , evidence.unboundmedicine.com/evidence/view/EBMG/451861/all/Dislocation_of_the_acromioclavicular_joint. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • The joint is stabilized by three ligaments: The acromioclavicular ligament, which attaches the clavicle to the acromion of the scapula. (wikipedia.org)
  • Superior Acromioclavicular Ligament This ligament is a quadrilateral band, covering the superior part of the articulation, and extending between the upper part of the lateral end of the clavicle and the adjoining part of the upper surface of the acromion. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the Pectoralis minor is inserted, as occasionally is the case, into the capsule of the shoulder-joint instead of into the coracoid process, it passes between these two bands, and the intervening portion of the ligament is then deficient. (wikipedia.org)
  • On some they are separated by a meniscus attached to the superior acromioclavicular ligament. (wikipedia.org)
  • Grade I is slight displacement of the joint, and a badly stretched or partially torn AC ligament. (wikipedia.org)
  • The acromioclavicular ligament , which attaches the clavicle to the acromion of the scapula . (pointcoperni310.sbs)
  • Compression of the joint is restrained mainly by the trapezoid ligament. (orthopaedicsplus.in)
  • The support of the acromioclavicular joint is provided by the ligament and muscle surrounding the joint. (iem-student.org)
  • A torn ligament is a common knee joint injury. (medibank.com.au)
  • The ligament most frequently injured is the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), at the centre of the knee joint. (medibank.com.au)
  • Also known as shoulder separation and refers to the damage of the AC joint ligament situated at outer side of the collar bone where it is attached to the front of the shoulder blade. (sportscoverdirect.com)
  • Acromioclavicular joint anatomy. (medscape.com)
  • noun anatomy A joint at the top of the shoulder , the junction between the acromion and the clavicle . (wordnik.com)
  • Type II sprains are seen when a heavier force is applied to the shoulder, disrupting the acromioclavicular ligaments but leaving the coracoclavicular ligaments intact. (orthopaedicsplus.in)
  • Acromioclavicular joint dislocations are graded from I to VI. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dislocations of the sternoclavicular joint are infrequent and often missed. (aafp.org)
  • Forty percent of all dislocations occur at the glenohumeral joint. (aafp.org)
  • Dislocations of the sternoclavicular joint are infrequent, occurring most often in patients under 25 years of age. (aafp.org)
  • Acromioclavicular joint dislocations usually result from a fall on an outstretched arm in patients who are 15 to 40 years of age. (aafp.org)
  • Therefore, the thesis objective was to evaluate the function of the intact and injured acromioclavicular joint during combined loading to provide guidelines for the development of rehabilitation protocols and reconstructions for complete dislocations.A robotic/universal force-moment sensor testing system was utilized to apply an external load in combination with joint compression to intact and injured joint. (pitt.edu)
  • However, shoulder surgery is also an option to repair joints, rotator cuffs, or dislocations, to name a few. (healthline.com)
  • The acromioclavicular joint is surrounded by a thin joint capsule and 4 small ligaments. (orthopaedicsplus.in)
  • It is a stable joint with minimal movement and is secured by the joint capsule and ligaments. (steroidinjectionslondon.co.uk)
  • The stability of the shoulder joint relies heavily on the soft tissues around the bone, including muscles, tendons, capsule, and labrum, that keep the arm centered with the shoulder blade. (premierortho.org)
  • The AC Joint has a capsule and small AC Joint ligaments, which provide stability. (palmsphysiotherapy.com.au)
  • The AC joint is supported and stabilized by the capsule of the joint and two ligaments known as the coracoclavicular ligaments that attach the collarbone with the front portion of the shoulder blade (coracoid process). (okthrowingathlete.com)
  • The acromioclavicular joint has a thin capsule stabilized by ligaments and by attachment of the fibers of the deltoid and trapezius muscles. (boneandspine.com)
  • The capsule surrounding the acromioclavicular joint is strengthened by the acromioclavicular ligaments. (iem-student.org)
  • The AC joint is an encapsulated diarthrodial joint held together by its joint capsule and the coracoclavicular ligaments: the trapezoid and conoid ligaments. (medscape.com)
  • The joint is enclosed by a capsule and supported by ligaments. (aceshoulderelbowmd.com)
  • This is not the same as a "shoulder dislocation," which refers to dislocation of the glenohumeral joint. (wikipedia.org)
  • It articulates with the head of the humerus, forming the glenohumeral joint, which serves as the main joint of the shoulder. (medscape.com)
  • The glenohumeral joint is the main articulation of the shoulder joint. (medscape.com)
  • Although the labrum increases the depth and volume of the glenoid cavity, it does not seem to increase the stability of the glenohumeral joint. (medscape.com)
  • The largest peak distraction, compression, and anterior-posterior shear forces acting at the glenohumeral joint were 1375 N, 856 N, and 619 N, respectively, during uphill pushing task on 10 degrees ramped walkway at 40 kg weight condition. (cdc.gov)
  • This information provides a foundation for understanding normal acromioclavicular joint motion as a basis for further investigation of pathology and rehabilitation approaches. (umn.edu)
  • The normal acromioclavicular joint space of 3 to 8 mm varies no more than 2 to 3 mm between the two joints in an individual. (aafp.org)
  • Acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation is also referred to as acromioclavicular joint separation, subluxation, or disruption. (okthrowingathlete.com)
  • As the joint is transversely oriented, downward forces may cause disruption of the stabilizing structures [acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments]. (boneandspine.com)
  • Torn ligaments lead to acromioclavicular joint sprains and separations. (medscape.com)
  • Acromioclavicular joint sprains are common, usually resulting from a fall on the shoulder or, less often, an outstretched arm. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Severe sprains tear the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Treatment of acromioclavicular joint sprains is usually immobilization (eg, with a sling) and early range-of-motion exercises. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Torn acromioclavicular joint ligaments and/or torn coracoclavicular ligaments are seen in acromioclavicular joint sprains. (orthopaedicsplus.in)
  • The meniscus that lies in the joint may also be injured during sprains or fractures around the acromioclavicular joint. (orthopaedicsplus.in)
  • In type III sprains, the force completely disrupts the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments. (orthopaedicsplus.in)
  • A shoulder brace reinforcing the AC ligaments can slightly help to prevent injury but the very nature of the sport makes effective prevention very difficult as AC joint sprains are most likely to occur through tackles which cannot be avoided. (sportscoverdirect.com)
  • A common injury to the AC joint is dislocation, often called AC separation or shoulder separation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also called a shoulder separation, an acromioclavicular joint separation is where the clavicle is traumatically pulled away from the highest point of the shoulder blade, called the acromion. (premierortho.org)
  • Most cases of AC joint separation can be treated well without surgery. (premierortho.org)
  • Complications of AC joint separation may include arthritis or joint instability. (premierortho.org)
  • AC joint dislocation is the separation of the collar bone or clavicle from the acromion (the top portion of the shoulder blade or scapula at the outer edge of the shoulder) due to severe trauma or injury. (okthrowingathlete.com)
  • They have superior and inferior components and resist separation of the joint in the horizontal direction. (aceshoulderelbowmd.com)
  • An injury to the AC joint, particularly the ligaments, can result in instability or separation of the AC joint (shoulder separation) causing pain and discomfort and limiting shoulder function. (aceshoulderelbowmd.com)
  • In cases of a severe separation of the AC joint, your surgeon may perform a surgical repair or use a tissue graft to reconstruct the damaged ligaments. (aceshoulderelbowmd.com)
  • It involves separation of the AC joint and injury to the ligaments that support the joint. (stlosm.com)
  • In the most severe shoulder separation injury, both the AC and CC ligaments get torn and the AC joint is completely out of its position. (stlosm.com)
  • Shoulder separation is not an injury to the main shoulder joint itself. (medlineplus.gov)
  • This joint functions as a pivot point (although technically it is a gliding synovial joint), acting like a strut to help with movement of the scapula resulting in a greater degree of arm rotation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 2 coracoclavicular ligaments (the conoid and the trapezoid ligaments) are found medial to the acromioclavicular joint and attach from the coracoid process on the scapula to the inferior surface of the distal clavicle. (medscape.com)
  • Fish eye OBJECTIVES: To determine the 3-dimensional motions occurring between the scapula relative to the clavicle at the acromioclavicular joint during humeral elevation in the scapular plane. (umn.edu)
  • These ligaments are called the coracoclavicular ligaments, which are found medial to the acromioclavicular joint and go from the coracoid process on the scapula to the clavicle. (orthopaedicsplus.in)
  • Symptoms generally include pain or tenderness in the joint that occurs at the top and front of the shoulder where the clavicle and scapula meet, pain with certain motions, swelling, and stiffness due to a limitation of motion of a joint or inactivity. (matthewgotlinmd.com)
  • Coracoclavicular ligaments are medial to the joint and extend from the inferior surface of the clavicle to the base of the coracoid process of the scapula. (boneandspine.com)
  • The acromioclavicular joint may appear to be widened [due to medial rotation of the scapula and posterior displacement of the clavicle by the pull of the trapezius muscle]. (boneandspine.com)
  • The shoulder joint is made up of a ball and socket joint, where the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) articulates with the socket of the scapula (shoulder blade), which is called the glenoid. (drdeanpapaliodis.com)
  • The acromioclavicular (AC) joint is the only articulation between the clavicle and scapula. (medscape.com)
  • Treatment of acromioclavicular separations has been a subject of debate. (medscape.com)
  • This video discusses the surgical considerations when planning treatment strategies for acromioclavicular joint separations. (orthopedia.com)
  • This meniscus may be a blade of fibrocartilage that extends nearly halfway into the joint or it may form a complete disc that divides the joint into two parts. (wikipedia.org)
  • The acromioclavicular joint is made up of 2 bones (the clavicle and the acromion), 4 ligaments, and a meniscus inside the joint. (medscape.com)
  • A meniscus, complete or incomplete is present in the joint. (boneandspine.com)
  • The knee joint is held in place by a piece of cartilage called the meniscus. (medibank.com.au)
  • The acromioclavicular capsular ligaments provide most of the joint stability in the anteroposterior (AP) direction. (medscape.com)
  • These ligaments mostly give joint stability to anterior and posterior translation, as well as provide horizontal stability to the joint. (orthopaedicsplus.in)
  • Another set of ligaments also provides vertical stability to the acromioclavicular joint. (orthopaedicsplus.in)
  • The conoid and trapezoid ligaments aid in providing superior-inferior stability to the joint. (orthopaedicsplus.in)
  • These ligaments provide vertical (superior-inferior) stability to the joint (see the following image). (medscape.com)
  • Your doctor will review your symptoms and medical history and perform a thorough physical examination to check for range of motion, stability, and strength of the joint. (okthrowingathlete.com)
  • The joints are acromioclavicular ligaments that provide horizontal stability. (iem-student.org)
  • Tendons and ligaments around the shoulder joint provide strength and stability to the joint. (drdeanpapaliodis.com)
  • Due to the improved ACJ stability with the two-hole technique, it appears to be a more suitable option than the loop technique for AC joint reduction. (cisejournal.org)
  • It is the multiaxial ball-and-socket synovial joint formed by the articular surfaces of the glenoid cavity and the head of the humerus. (medscape.com)
  • Injury to the acromioclavicular joint may injure the cartilage within the joint and can later cause arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint. (medscape.com)
  • What is AC or Acromioclavicular Arthritis? (matthewgotlinmd.com)
  • The condition is referred to as AC arthritis or acromioclavicular arthritis. (matthewgotlinmd.com)
  • AC arthritis is caused by the wearing out of the cartilage covering the bone ends in a joint. (matthewgotlinmd.com)
  • Osteoarthritis also called degenerative joint disease, is the most common form of arthritis. (drdeanpapaliodis.com)
  • Joint pain caused by arthritis can be debilitating because it interferes to your everyday routines and tasks. (jointhealthmagazine.com)
  • Joint pain can happen to anyone, and the leading cause of joint pain is arthritis. (jointhealthmagazine.com)
  • Joint pain or arthritis is often described as a burning sensation in your joints, and it affects millions of people globally[1]. (jointhealthmagazine.com)
  • Total shoulder replacement might be needed in cases of severe arthritis or a fractured shoulder joint. (healthline.com)
  • Direct trauma to the shoulder transmits forces through the clavicle to the sternoclavicular joint. (aafp.org)
  • The acromioclavicular joint, together with the sternoclavicular joint, connects the upper limb to the skeleton. (iem-student.org)
  • The clavicle has 2 articulations, the sternoclavicular joint and the acromioclavicular joint. (medscape.com)
  • The sternoclavicular joint is formed by the medial aspect of the clavicle articulating with the manubrium of the sternum. (medscape.com)
  • The sternoclavicular joint is the sole connection between the axial skeleton and the upper extremity. (medscape.com)
  • The sternoclavicular joint allows 30-35 º of upward elevation, 35 º of anteroposterior movement, and 44-50 º of rotation about the long axis of the clavicle. (medscape.com)
  • The experimental data was modeled using a full-body musculoskeletal model to compute three-dimensional peak joint reaction forces acting at the sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, and glenohumeral joints. (cdc.gov)
  • The peak forces at the sternoclavicular joint were found to be relatively small ( (cdc.gov)
  • What is Acromioclavicular Joint Reconstruction? (aceshoulderelbowmd.com)
  • Anatomic reconstruction of the AC joint helps ensures static and safe fixation with stable joint function. (aceshoulderelbowmd.com)
  • The novel reconstruction technique that has been designed to reconstruct the AC joint in an anatomic manner is known as anatomic reconstruction. (stlosm.com)
  • Anatomic reconstruction of the AC joint ensures static and safe fixation and stable joint functions. (stlosm.com)
  • Consequently, the individual properties of the tendon graft used during reconstruction had more comparable results to the intact coracoclavicular ligaments than current surgical techniques.The evaluation of the intact and injured joint during a combination of loading conditions provided guidelines for the development of an anatomic reconstruction. (pitt.edu)
  • Both studies provide insight on functional changes of the intact acromioclavicular joint following injury and reconstruction. (pitt.edu)
  • The AC joint assists in raising your arms forwards and to the side, as well as transferring weight from your upper limb to the clavicle. (steroidinjectionslondon.co.uk)
  • The joint is horizontally and vertically stabilized in anterior and posterior translation by a combination of dynamic muscular and static ligamentous structures, which allow a normal anatomic range of motion. (medscape.com)
  • Acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments disrupted with inferior dislocation of the distal clavicle inferior to the coracoid process and posterior to the biceps and coracobrachialis tendons. (eorif.com)
  • The acromioclavicular joint is a diarthrodial articulation with an interposed fibrocartilaginous meniscal disk that links the hyaline cartilage articular surfaces of the acromial process and the clavicle. (medscape.com)
  • Acromioclavicular joint osteoarthritis involves degenerative changes to the cartilage and can become inflamed. (steroidinjectionslondon.co.uk)
  • The joint is lined by cartilage that gradually wears with age as well as with repeated overhead or shoulder level activities such as basketball. (matthewgotlinmd.com)
  • Other tests your doctor may order include X-rays, MRI scans which may reveal cartilage destruction and abnormal fluid accumulation within the joint, and bone scan or ultrasound of the joint. (matthewgotlinmd.com)
  • AC joint osteoarthritis affects the tissue covering the ends of bones (cartilage) in the AC joint of the shoulder. (drdeanpapaliodis.com)
  • The cartilage becomes damaged and worn out causing pain, swelling, stiffness and restricted movement in the AC joint. (drdeanpapaliodis.com)
  • A strong tissue called cartilage protects the bones in our joints. (medibank.com.au)
  • A SLAP tear is an injury to the ring of cartilage surrounding the socket of your shoulder joint. (healthline.com)
  • The acromioclavicular joint is part of the shoulder girdle and is diarthrodial joint between the acromion process and lateral end of the clavicle. (boneandspine.com)
  • The acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) is a diarthrodial joint located between the acromion and the clavicle and is supported by the AC and coracoclavicular (CC) ligaments. (cisejournal.org)
  • A diagnosis for AC joint osteoarthritis can generally be made by taking a detailed history and undertaking a series of tests. (steroidinjectionslondon.co.uk)
  • If necessary, your doctor will order certain imaging tests such as X-ray, MRI, CT scan, or ultrasound for a detailed evaluation of the joint and surrounding soft tissue structures to confirm the diagnosis. (okthrowingathlete.com)
  • Diagnosis of AC joint osteoarthritis includes a review of your symptoms and medical history. (drdeanpapaliodis.com)
  • Seeking medical care and getting the right diagnosis on time to be able to commence first-line treatment, increases the chances of living an active life with less pain and increased joint mobility. (lu.se)
  • The majority of patients with AC joint osteoarthritis will resolve with over the counter pain relief and a course of physiotherapy. (steroidinjectionslondon.co.uk)
  • Physiotherapy aims to improve flexibility and strength of the shoulder joint by prescribing an independent exercise program and providing manual therapy. (steroidinjectionslondon.co.uk)
  • Grade 1 AC Joint Injury - Minor damage of the ACJ ligaments without damage to the coracoclavicular ligaments. (palmsphysiotherapy.com.au)
  • Strain of acromioclavicular ligaments, ligaments intact, AC joint stable. (eorif.com)
  • Tenderness/swelling isolated to AC joint, no palpable displacement of joint, minimal pain with arm ROM. (eorif.com)
  • There is no displacement of the clavicle in a grade 1 AC Joint injury. (palmsphysiotherapy.com.au)
  • There may be slight upward displacement of the clavicle in a grade 2 AC Joint injury. (palmsphysiotherapy.com.au)
  • Several ligaments surround this joint and, depending on the severity of the injury, one or all of the ligaments may be torn. (msdmanuals.com)
  • In more complex issues with multiple ligaments torn around the joint, the clavicle will appear higher, and the shoulder will pull down due to the arm's weight. (premierortho.org)
  • Both the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments are totally torn. (okthrowingathlete.com)
  • It usually involves removal of less than one centimeter of bone from the end of the collarbone (distal clavicle resection) to prevent the bones in the joint from rubbing against each other. (matthewgotlinmd.com)
  • These findings suggest common surgical techniques such as distal clavicle resection, which remove painful joint contact, may cause loads to be supported by other structures and be transmitted over a smaller area due to the increased coupled motion and joint contact. (pitt.edu)
  • There is significant upward translation of the clavicle leading to a step deformity in a grade 3 AC Joint injury. (palmsphysiotherapy.com.au)
  • This may be due to excessive strain over prolonged periods of time, or due to other joint diseases, injury or deformity. (matthewgotlinmd.com)
  • The surgery involves taking out any damaged areas of the shoulder joint and replacing them with artificial parts. (healthline.com)
  • The ACJ is the small fibrous joint between the end of your clavicle (collar bone) and the acromion (a protruberance of your wing-blade). (sussexshoulder.co.uk)
  • Shoulder Injury - Dislocated Clavicle (Collar Bone) and Acromioclavicular (AC) Joint. (medicalillustration.com)
  • Patients have pain and tenderness at the acromioclavicular joint. (msdmanuals.com)
  • It does not properly belong to the acromioclavicular joint articulation, but is usually described with it, since it forms a most efficient means of retaining the clavicle in contact with the acromion. (wikipedia.org)
  • The AC Joint or acromioclavicular joint is a small joint between the acromium of the shoulder blade and the collarbone. (palmsphysiotherapy.com.au)
  • AC joint dislocation usually occurs as a result of a direct fall on to the top of the shoulder which causes the shoulder blade to be forced downwards and the collarbone to pop up. (okthrowingathlete.com)
  • The acromioclavicular or AC joint is where the acromion or highest point of the shoulder blade, and the clavicle or collarbone join. (drdeanpapaliodis.com)
  • The AC joint forms where the clavicle (collarbone) meets the shoulder blade (acromion). (stlosm.com)
  • The AC joint connects the collarbone to the point of the shoulder. (medibank.com.au)
  • Subacromial bursa can be thoroughly assessed in DL sequences, while the other structures of the shoulder joint can be assessed in conventional and DL sequences with a good agreement between sequences. (springer.com)
  • They may be performed in a minimally invasive fashion using cameras, called arthroscopy, or in an open manner where the surgeon will make an incision over the joint, then move the bones to a better position and apply sutures or hardware. (premierortho.org)
  • A dislocation occurs when the ends of your bones are partially or completely moved out of their normal position in a joint. (okthrowingathlete.com)
  • specifically disturbance or disarrangement of the normal relation of the bones entering into the formation of a joint. (itheraputix.com)
  • A safe and active lifestyle is dependent on strong muscles, bones, and joints. (jointhealthmagazine.com)
  • If these options are not effective, shoulder surgery may be considered to repair or replace joints, bones, or tendons in the shoulder area. (healthline.com)
  • Pain is controlled by pain medication, anti-inflammatory medication, corticosteroid injections into the joint, and physical therapy. (matthewgotlinmd.com)
  • Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery - American. (tigerortho.com)
  • Some would describe this joint as a ball and socket joint, but, it is more like a ball sitting on a golf tee, meaning that there is a tiny surface area of bone contact. (premierortho.org)
  • A dislocated shoulder occurs when the arm bone comes out of the main shoulder joint. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers optimal bone and soft tissue contrast and is hence the preferred modality for the assessment of the shoulder joint [ 1 , 2 ]. (springer.com)
  • The specific type of shoulder replacement will depend on your injury, the quality of your bone and joint, and what your surgeon believes is best for your health needs. (healthline.com)
  • Conservative treatment is usually effective, but in cases of a severely unstable joint, surgery is required. (okthrowingathlete.com)
  • AC Joint replacement surgery is considered an option when the pain is so severe that it affects your ability to carry out normal activities. (drdeanpapaliodis.com)
  • In this surgery, the damaged articulating parts of the shoulder joint are removed and replaced with artificial prostheses. (drdeanpapaliodis.com)
  • The patient showed up 6weeks after the surgery with slightly uncorrected AC joint. (ac.ir)
  • The acromioclavicular joint is commonly injured when the clavicle is fractured. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments disrupted, deltoid and trapezius insertions disrupted. (eorif.com)
  • The deltoid muscle on the outside of the shoulder and the trapezius muscle in the upper back and neck also help stabilize the acromioclavicular joint. (aceshoulderelbowmd.com)
  • The aims of this prospective study were to determine the prevalence of pain 6 months after arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD) and/or acromioclavicular joint resection (AC resection), to reveal causes of the pain, and to identify risk factors for persistent pain. (sicot-j.org)
  • The objective of the treatment is to reduce pain, improve joint movement, and prevent further damage to the joint. (drdeanpapaliodis.com)
  • The most common cause of AC joint dislocation is a fall onto the shoulder which injures the surrounding ligaments that stabilize the joint. (okthrowingathlete.com)
  • It is currently unclear as to how the dynamic cart pushing tasks affect the musculoskeletal loading of shoulder complex joints. (cdc.gov)