Acromegaly: A condition caused by prolonged exposure to excessive HUMAN GROWTH HORMONE in adults. It is characterized by bony enlargement of the FACE; lower jaw (PROGNATHISM); hands; FEET; HEAD; and THORAX. The most common etiology is a GROWTH HORMONE-SECRETING PITUITARY ADENOMA. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch36, pp79-80)Human Growth Hormone: A 191-amino acid polypeptide hormone secreted by the human adenohypophysis (PITUITARY GLAND, ANTERIOR), also known as GH or somatotropin. Synthetic growth hormone, termed somatropin, has replaced the natural form in therapeutic usage such as treatment of dwarfism in children with growth hormone deficiency.Growth Hormone-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma: A pituitary tumor that secretes GROWTH HORMONE. In humans, excess HUMAN GROWTH HORMONE leads to ACROMEGALY.Pituitary Neoplasms: Neoplasms which arise from or metastasize to the PITUITARY GLAND. The majority of pituitary neoplasms are adenomas, which are divided into non-secreting and secreting forms. Hormone producing forms are further classified by the type of hormone they secrete. Pituitary adenomas may also be characterized by their staining properties (see ADENOMA, BASOPHIL; ADENOMA, ACIDOPHIL; and ADENOMA, CHROMOPHOBE). Pituitary tumors may compress adjacent structures, including the HYPOTHALAMUS, several CRANIAL NERVES, and the OPTIC CHIASM. Chiasmal compression may result in bitemporal HEMIANOPSIA.Octreotide: A potent, long-acting synthetic SOMATOSTATIN octapeptide analog that inhibits secretion of GROWTH HORMONE and is used to treat hormone-secreting tumors; DIABETES MELLITUS; HYPOTENSION, ORTHOSTATIC; HYPERINSULINISM; hypergastrinemia; and small bowel fistula.Somatostatin: A 14-amino acid peptide named for its ability to inhibit pituitary GROWTH HORMONE release, also called somatotropin release-inhibiting factor. It is expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems, the gut, and other organs. SRIF can also inhibit the release of THYROID-STIMULATING HORMONE; PROLACTIN; INSULIN; and GLUCAGON besides acting as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator. In a number of species including humans, there is an additional form of somatostatin, SRIF-28 with a 14-amino acid extension at the N-terminal.Gigantism: The condition of accelerated and excessive GROWTH in children or adolescents who are exposed to excess HUMAN GROWTH HORMONE before the closure of EPIPHYSES. It is usually caused by somatotroph hyperplasia or a GROWTH HORMONE-SECRETING PITUITARY ADENOMA. These patients are of abnormally tall stature, more than 3 standard deviations above normal mean height for age.Insulin-Like Growth Factor I: A well-characterized basic peptide believed to be secreted by the liver and to circulate in the blood. It has growth-regulating, insulin-like, and mitogenic activities. This growth factor has a major, but not absolute, dependence on GROWTH HORMONE. It is believed to be mainly active in adults in contrast to INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR II, which is a major fetal growth factor.Growth Hormone: A polypeptide that is secreted by the adenohypophysis (PITUITARY GLAND, ANTERIOR). Growth hormone, also known as somatotropin, stimulates mitosis, cell differentiation and cell growth. Species-specific growth hormones have been synthesized.Adenoma: A benign epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Bromocriptine: A semisynthetic ergotamine alkaloid that is a dopamine D2 agonist. It suppresses prolactin secretion.Adenoma, Acidophil: A benign tumor, usually found in the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland, whose cells stain with acid dyes. Such pituitary tumors may give rise to excessive secretion of growth hormone, resulting in gigantism or acromegaly. A specific type of acidophil adenoma may give rise to nonpuerperal galactorrhea. (Dorland, 27th ed)Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone: A peptide of 44 amino acids in most species that stimulates the release and synthesis of GROWTH HORMONE. GHRF (or GRF) is synthesized by neurons in the ARCUATE NUCLEUS of the HYPOTHALAMUS. After being released into the pituitary portal circulation, GHRF stimulates GH release by the SOMATOTROPHS in the PITUITARY GLAND.Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone: A tripeptide that stimulates the release of THYROTROPIN and PROLACTIN. It is synthesized by the neurons in the PARAVENTRICULAR NUCLEUS of the HYPOTHALAMUS. After being released into the pituitary portal circulation, TRH (was called TRF) stimulates the release of TSH and PRL from the ANTERIOR PITUITARY GLAND.Receptors, Somatotropin: Cell surface proteins that bind GROWTH HORMONE with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Activation of growth hormone receptors regulates amino acid transport through cell membranes, RNA translation to protein, DNA transcription, and protein and amino acid catabolism in many cell types. Many of these effects are mediated indirectly through stimulation of the release of somatomedins.Ergolines: A series of structurally-related alkaloids that contain the ergoline backbone structure.Peptides, Cyclic: Peptides whose amino and carboxy ends are linked together with a peptide bond forming a circular chain. Some of them are ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS. Some of them are biosynthesized non-ribosomally (PEPTIDE BIOSYNTHESIS, NON-RIBOSOMAL).Adenoma, Chromophobe: A benign tumor of the anterior pituitary in which the cells do not stain with acidic or basic dyes.Prolactinoma: A pituitary adenoma which secretes PROLACTIN, leading to HYPERPROLACTINEMIA. Clinical manifestations include AMENORRHEA; GALACTORRHEA; IMPOTENCE; HEADACHE; visual disturbances; and CEREBROSPINAL FLUID RHINORRHEA.Hyperprolactinemia: Increased levels of PROLACTIN in the BLOOD, which may be associated with AMENORRHEA and GALACTORRHEA. Relatively common etiologies include PROLACTINOMA, medication effect, KIDNEY FAILURE, granulomatous diseases of the PITUITARY GLAND, and disorders which interfere with the hypothalamic inhibition of prolactin release. Ectopic (non-pituitary) production of prolactin may also occur. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch36, pp77-8)Pituitary Gland: A small, unpaired gland situated in the SELLA TURCICA. It is connected to the HYPOTHALAMUS by a short stalk which is called the INFUNDIBULUM.Macroglossia: The presence of an excessively large tongue, which may be congenital or may develop as a result of a tumor or edema due to obstruction of lymphatic vessels, or it may occur in association with hyperpituitarism or acromegaly. It also may be associated with malocclusion because of pressure of the tongue on the teeth. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Sphenoid Bone: An irregular unpaired bone situated at the SKULL BASE and wedged between the frontal, temporal, and occipital bones (FRONTAL BONE; TEMPORAL BONE; OCCIPITAL BONE). Sphenoid bone consists of a median body and three pairs of processes resembling a bat with spread wings. The body is hollowed out in its inferior to form two large cavities (SPHENOID SINUS).Hormones: Chemical substances having a specific regulatory effect on the activity of a certain organ or organs. The term was originally applied to substances secreted by various ENDOCRINE GLANDS and transported in the bloodstream to the target organs. It is sometimes extended to include those substances that are not produced by the endocrine glands but that have similar effects.Hypercementosis: A regressive change of teeth characterized by excessive development of secondary cementum on the tooth surface. It may occur on any part of the root, but the apical two-thirds are most commonly affected. (Dorland, 27th ed)Fibrous Dysplasia, Polyostotic: FIBROUS DYSPLASIA OF BONE affecting several bones. When melanotic pigmentation (CAFE-AU-LAIT SPOTS) and multiple endocrine hyperfunction are additionally associated it is referred to as Albright syndrome.Glucose Tolerance Test: A test to determine the ability of an individual to maintain HOMEOSTASIS of BLOOD GLUCOSE. It includes measuring blood glucose levels in a fasting state, and at prescribed intervals before and after oral glucose intake (75 or 100 g) or intravenous infusion (0.5 g/kg).Hormone Antagonists: Chemical substances which inhibit the function of the endocrine glands, the biosynthesis of their secreted hormones, or the action of hormones upon their specific sites.Hypophysectomy: Surgical removal or destruction of the hypophysis, or pituitary gland. (Dorland, 28th ed)Endocrine Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on any endocrine gland.
(1/672) Neurosurgery restores late GH rise after glucose-induced suppression in cured acromegalics.

OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN: A decrease of GH levels below 2 microg/l after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is still currently accepted as the gold standard for assessing cure in surgically treated acromegaly. Whether glucose-induced suppression of GH is accompanied by a restoration of normal GH late rebound has not yet been evaluated in this disease. In order to assess the restoration of normal GH regulation after removal of a pituitary adenoma, we have evaluated GH changes after an OGTT in a series of selected acromegalic patients (transsphenoidal surgery and lack of pituitary failure). METHODS: Twenty-nine patients (13 male, 16 female, age range 27-70 years) entered the study. Their neuroradiological imaging before neurosurgery showed microadenoma in 7, intrasellar macroadenoma in 8 and macroadenoma with extrasellar extension in 14. Plasma GH levels were assayed up to 300 min after glucose administration (75 g p.o.) and IGF-I on basal samples. RESULTS: Basal GH levels were below 5 microg/l in 20 patients and below 2 microg/l in 5 of these. Normal age-adjusted IGF-I levels were observed in 12 patients. GH values were suppressed below 2 microg/l during an OGTT in 13 patients, and below 1 microg/l in 7 of these. In 9 patients out of these 13, a marked rise in GH levels occurred after nadir. Baseline and nadir GH values of these 9 patients were not different from the corresponding values of the other 4 patients without OGTT-induced late GH peaks. CONCLUSIONS: GH rebound after GH nadir occurs in acromegalic patients considered as cured on the basis of OGTT-induced GH suppression and/or IGF-I normalization. The restoration of this physiological response could be regarded as a marker of recovered/preserved integrity of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Even though the reason for this GH rebound has not yet been elucidated (GHRH discharge?/end of somatostatin inhibition?), the lack of late GH peak in the patients regarded as cured by the usual criteria could be due to injury to the pituitary stalk caused by the adenoma or by surgical manipulation.  (+info)

(2/672) Kleine-Levin and Munchausen syndromes in a patient with recurrent acromegaly.

Hypothalamic disease often affects the patients' personality and this also applies to pituitary tumors with suprasellar extension. We report on a patient with a 12-year history of recurrent acromegaly, treated with three transphenoidal operations, single field radiation therapy and bromocriptine/octreotide administration. During the course of follow-up she presented with self-inflicted anemia and Kleine-Levin syndrome (hypersomnia, hyperphagia and hypersexuality). Furthermore, she developed post-radiation necrosis within the right temporal lobe. Whether her neurological and personality disorders result - at least partially - from the acromegaly or the temporal lobe necrosis remains unclear.  (+info)

(3/672) Growth in Sotos syndrome.

Although there are several reports on infant and childhood growth in patients with Sotos syndrome, there is little information on the final height achieved and puberty. Growth data on 40 patients (20 female and 20 male) aged 2-31 years were collected. These showed that patients with Sotos syndrome are excessively tall at birth, during infancy, and during childhood. Disproportionately long limbs constitute much of the increase in stature. However, the combination of advanced bone age and early onset of menarche led to a mean (SD) final height of 172.9 (5.7) cm in women. This is within the normal range for the population. Most of the men also attained a final height (mean, 184.3 cm; SD, 6.0) within the normal range, although exceptions were more likely in men than in women. Therefore, these results show that most patients with Sotos syndrome do not require intervention to limit their adult height.  (+info)

(4/672) Cell death in acromegalic cardiomyopathy.

BACKGROUND: Prolonged untreated acromegaly leads to a nonspecific myopathy characterized by ventricular dysfunction and failure. However, the mechanisms responsible for the alterations of cardiac pump function remain to be defined. Because cell death is implicated in most cardiac disease processes, the possibility has been raised that myocyte apoptosis may occur in the acromegalic heart, contributing to the deterioration of ventricular hemodynamics. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ten acromegalic patients with diastolic dysfunction and 4 also with systolic dysfunction were subjected to electrocardiography, Holter monitoring, 2-dimensional echocardiography, cardiac catheterization, and biventricular and coronary angiography before surgical removal of a growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma. Endomyocardial biopsies were obtained and analyzed quantitatively in terms of tissue scarring and myocyte and nonmyocyte apoptosis. Myocardial samples from papillary muscles of patients who underwent valve replacement for mitral stenosis were used for comparison. The presence of apoptosis in myocytes and interstitial cells was determined by confocal microscopy with the use of 2 histochemical methods, consisting of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) assay and Taq probe in situ ligation. Acromegaly was characterized by a 495-fold and 305-fold increase in apoptosis of myocytes and nonmyocytes, respectively. The magnitude of myocyte apoptosis correlated with the extent of impairment in ejection fraction and the duration of the disease. A similar correlation was found with the magnitude of collagen accumulation, indicative of previous myocyte necrosis. Myocyte death was independent from the hormonal levels of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1. Apoptosis of interstitial cells did not correlate with ejection fraction. CONCLUSIONS: Myocyte cell death, apoptotic and necrotic in nature, may be critical for the development of ventricular dysfunction and its progression to cardiac failure with acromegaly.  (+info)

(5/672) Prolonged large bowel transit increases serum deoxycholic acid: a risk factor for octreotide induced gallstones.

BACKGROUND: Treatment of acromegaly with octreotide increases the proportion of deoxycholic acid in, and the cholesterol saturation of, bile and induces the formation of gallstones. Prolongation of intestinal transit has been proposed as the mechanism for the increase in the proportion of deoxycholic acid in bile. AIMS: To study the effects of octreotide on intestinal transit in acromegalic patients during octreotide treatment, and to examine the relation between intestinal transit and bile acid composition in fasting serum. METHODS: Mouth to caecum and large bowel transit times, and the proportion of deoxycholic acid in fasting serum were measured in non-acromegalic controls, acromegalic patients untreated with octreotide, acromegalics on long term octreotide, and patients with simple constipation. Intestinal transit and the proportion of deoxycholic acid were compared in acromegalic patients before and during octreotide. RESULTS: Acromegalics untreated with octreotide had longer mouth to caecum and large bowel transit times than controls. Intestinal transit was further prolonged by chronic octreotide treatment. There were significant linear relations between large bowel transit time and the proportion of deoxycholic acid in the total, conjugated, and unconjugated fractions of fasting serum. CONCLUSIONS: These data support the hypothesis that, by prolonging large bowel transit, octreotide increases the proportion of deoxycholic acid in fasting serum (and, by implication, in bile) and thereby the risk of gallstone formation.  (+info)

(6/672) Pituitary tumours in the elderly: a 20 year experience.

The proportion of the elderly in the population is increasing, and the appreciation and management of medical problems in this age group will therefore become more important. We therefore decided to determine the clinical features and types of pituitary tumour presenting in the elderly, and to examine the treatment and outcome in this group. We conducted a retrospective case-note review from a specialist endocrine and neurosurgical unit in a tertiary referral centre. Eighty-four patients aged 65 years and over on diagnosis of a pituitary tumour were referred to the unit between 1975 and 1996. There were 45 males and 39 females, and the mean age was 72.4 years (range 65-86). Over half of the pituitary lesions were non-functioning adenomas (NFAs) (60.7%). GH-secreting tumours were present in 11 (13.1%) and macroprolactinomas in 7 (8.1%). Four patients had microadenomas and 17 had miscellaneous pituitary-related lesions. Visual deterioration was the commonest mode of presentation in 33 (39.3%), but 54 (64.3%) had evidence of visual impairment on detailed examination. Despite the majority of patients (80.8%) having coexisting medical conditions, trans-sphenoidal surgery was performed in 60 (71.4%) and was well tolerated with a zero peri- and post-operative mortality rate, and post-operative complications in 11 (13.1%). Pituitary tumours in the elderly are most frequently NFAs that present with visual deterioration and hypopituitarism. The fact that 46.5% were pan-hypopituitary on diagnosis and that 64.3% of patients had visual impairment suggests a delay in diagnosis in this age group. Despite significant coexisting medical pathology in this large series of patients, surgery was safe and successful in the majority.  (+info)

(7/672) Octreotide suppresses the incretin glucagon-like peptide (7-36) amide in patients with acromegaly or clinically nonfunctioning pituitary tumors and in healthy subjects.

OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of octreotide on glucagon-like peptide (7-36) amide (GLP-1) and insulin secretion in patients with pituitary tumors during preoperative treatment and in healthy subjects. DESIGN: Open design prospective clinical study. METHODS: Eighteen patients with pituitary macroadenomas (13 clinically nonfunctioning (NFA; 11/13 had GH insufficiency), 5 GH secreting (GHA)) received preoperative octreotide treatment: 3x100 microg/day s. c. for 3 months, and 3x500 microg/day s.c. for an additional 3 months. Seven healthy subjects received (for ethical reasons) only 3x100 microg/day for 10 days. A standardized meal (St-M) test, oral glucose test (oGTT) and i.v. glucose test (ivGTT) were done before octreotide therapy, on days 1, 2 and 3 (D1,2,3), after 3 months (M3) and 6 months (M6) of octreotide treatment in the patients, and before treatment, on D1,2,3 and on D8,9,10 of octreotide treatment in the healthy subjects. Serum GLP-1, insulin and GH as well as plasma glucose were determined for 180 min (oGTT, St-M) or 120 min (ivGTT). RESULTS: Pretreatment fasting GLP-1 concentrations as well as integrated responses (area under the curve 0-180 min) to oGTT and St-M were not significantly different between NFA, GHA and healthy subjects. During the oGTT, octreotide initially almost abolished the early (0-60 min) and diminished the late (60-180 min) GLP-1 and insulin responses in patients and healthy subjects. At M6 integrated insulin responses had significantly recovered, while the increase in GLP-1 response failed to reach significance (GLP-1: 56.5% of pretreatment at D2 versus 93.5% at M6 and 41.2 versus 63.1% in NFA and GHA respectively; insulin: 50.2 versus 71.2% and 35.5 versus 70. 4%). An escape of GLP-1 and insulin in healthy subjects (D2 versus D9) was not significant. Intestinal glucose absorption was apparently not reduced, since the early glucose rise was similar before and during octreotide treatment. During the St-M the GLP-1 and insulin responses were similarly suppressed by octreotide and recovered during ongoing treatment (GLP-1: 49.6% of pretreatment at D1 versus 79.0% at M6 in NFA and 46.9 versus 52.9% in GHA. Insulin: 27.6 versus 83.9% and 23.5 versus 54.4%). The escape was significant in NFA but not in GHA. In the healthy subjects the escape was already significant on D8 (GLP-1: 39.5% of pretreatment at D1 versus 68.3% at D8; insulin: 36.6 versus 53.8%). During the ivGTT GLP-1 did not increase. The early insulin response (0-30 min) was abolished by octreotide, followed by a reduced peak at 60 min. The reduction of the integrated insulin response during ivGTT was similar to that during oGTT. An insulin escape reached significance only for NFA (52. 6% of pretreatment at D3 versus 66.7% at M6). Glucose tolerance (KG value) deteriorated and did not improve during ongoing treatment. Octreotide suppressed the median GH concentration (8h profile) of the GHA patients from 10.3 microg/l (pretreatment) to 5.8, 6.3 and 3. 7 microg/l at D4, M3 and M6 with no escape. GH was 1.5 microg/l postoperatively. CONCLUSIONS: Octreotide abolishes the early and diminishes the late GLP-1 and insulin responses to oGTT and St-M in NFA and GHA patients and in healthy subjects. In contrast to GH, both hormones partially escape from suppression during ongoing therapy. During treatment with our conventional octreotide doses suppression of insulin secretion is maximal. Under these conditions an effect of the additional loss of GLP-1 is not apparent. Basal GLP-1 concentrations and integrated responses to oGTT and St-M were similar in healthy subjects and in patients with GH excess or GH insufficiency.  (+info)

(8/672) A case of acromegaly accompanied by adrenal preclinical Cushing's syndrome.

We encountered a 58-year-old woman with acromegaly accompanied by a cortisol-secreting adrenal tumor without clinical features of hypercortisolism. The simultaneous occurrence of these two endocrinopathies in one individual is extremely rare. She was diagnosed as having diabetes mellitus 8 years ago. Afterwards, in spite of insulin therapy, her hyperglycemia could not be well controlled. Her acromegaly and preclinical Cushing's syndrome were histopathologically proven to be due to a pituitary adenoma and an adrenocortical adenoma, respectively. Successful treatment for these endocrinopathies resulted in greatly improved blood sugar control because of a reduction in insulin resistance. In this case of preclinical Cushing's syndrome, replacement therapy with glucocorticoid was able to be discontinued at only 8 weeks after adrenalectomy, so that the period of necessary replacement was much shorter than that for overt Cushing's syndrome. This is the first report describing insulin resistance before and after treatment in a case of acromegaly accompanied by adrenal preclinical Cushing's syndrome.  (+info)

*  Hypothalamic-pituitary-somatotropic axis
Conversely, acromegaly and gigantism are conditions of GH and IGF-1 excess usually due to a pituitary tumor, and are ... Adigun O, Mesfin F (2017). "Acromegaly". PMID 28613738. De Groot LJ, Chrousos G, Dungan K, Feingold KR, Grossman A, Hershman JM ...
*  Growth hormone
Resulting heaviness of the jaw and increased size of digits is referred to as acromegaly. Accompanying problems can include ...
*  Eddie Carmel
... (March 16, 1936 - August 14, 1972) was an entertainer with gigantism and subsequent acromegaly resulting from a ...
*  Hyperprolactinaemia
Prolactinoma or other tumours arising in or near the pituitary - such as those that cause acromegaly may block the flow of ...
*  Pituitary adenoma
Acromegaly is a syndrome that results when the anterior pituitary gland produces excess growth hormone (GH). Approximately 90- ... 95% of acromegaly cases are caused by a pituitary adenoma and it most commonly affects middle aged adults, Acromegly can result ...
*  Hypercementosis
Idiopathic Pituitary Gigantism Paget's Disease Acromegaly Periapical granuloma Arthritis Calcinosis Rheumatic fever It may be ...
*  DMOZ - Health: Conditions and Diseases: Endocrine Disorders: Pituitary: Acromegaly
Acromegaly Consumer health resource center providing an overview of acromegaly and its causes, symptoms, and treatment. From ... Patient: Acromegaly Factsheet on this disorder resulting from an excessive secretion of growth hormone, its epidemiology, ... Support network for people living with Acromegaly. Provides patient information, events, and news. ...
*  Congenital generalized lipodystrophy
Commonly, patients will also have acromegaly with enlargement of the hands, feet, and jaw. After puberty, additional symptoms ... acromegaly; insulin resistance; and high serum levels of triglycerides. Genetic testing can also confirm the disease, as ...
*  Anterior pituitary
For example, acromegaly results from excessive secretion of growth hormone (GH) often being released by a pituitary adenoma. ... Scacchi, Massimo; Francesco Cavagnini (2006). "Acromegaly". Pituitary. 9 (4): 297-303. doi:10.1007/s11102-006-0409-4. ISSN 1573 ...
*  Gigantism
"Gigantism and Acromegaly: Practice Essentials, Background, Pathophysiology and Etiology". 2017-01-07. "Gigantism and Acromegaly ... See acromegaly for additional treatment possibilities. Gigantism, also known as giantism (from Greek γίγας gigas, "giant", ... Characteristics more similar to those seen in acromegaly may occur in patients that are closer in age to adolescence since they ... Acromegaly Deep-sea gigantism Dwarfism Giant of Castelnau Growth hormone Homo heidelbergensis Hypothalamic-pituitary-somatic ...
*  Hyperpituitarism
Gigantism and Acromegaly at eMedicine Aguirre, Alfredo (2014). Cellular Endocrinology in Health and Disease. Elsevier. p. 24. ... ISBN 978-0-12-408134-5. "Acromegaly". NIH. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive, Kidney Disease. 2014. Retrieved 28 ... Hyperpituitarism~treatment at eMedicine "National Guideline Clearinghouse , Acromegaly: an Endocrine Society clinical practice ... gigantism or acromegaly, which can be identified by clinical and radiographic results. Cushing's disease diagnosis is done with ...
*  Hormonal breast enhancement
In acromegaly, a condition caused and maintained by highly elevated GH/IGF-1 levels, overall, there appears to be little or no ... Jenkins PJ (2004). "Acromegaly and cancer". Horm. Res. 62 Suppl 1: 108-15. doi:10.1159/000080768. PMID 15761242. Nathan A. ... In addition, there appears to be an increased risk of colorectal cancer and pre-malignant tubular adenomas in acromegaly. In ... Loeper S, Ezzat S (2008). "Acromegaly: re-thinking the cancer risk". Rev. Endocr. Metab. Disord. 9 (1): 41-58. doi:10.1007/ ...
*  List of English words of French origin (A-C)
acrobatique) acromegaly (Fr. acromégalie) across (Anglo Fr. an cros) act (Old Fr. acte) action activity, (Middle French ...
*  Pfizer
Somavert (pegvisomant) for Acromegaly. Sutent (sunitinib) for cancer and a chemotherapy drug. Toviaz (fesoterodine) for ...
*  Pío Pico
The 1858 image of Pio Pico was used as an example of florid acromegaly in the scientific review paper "Acromegaly Pathogenesis ... Acromegaly is usually a fatal illness if untreated; 80% of patients die within 10 years of the diagnosis. But, Pico survived 36 ... With a height of 67 inches in his forties, his acromegaly must have begun after puberty, or he would have manifested gigantism ... The 1852 daguerreotype of Pio Pico may be the earliest objective image of acromegaly ever recorded since the disease was not ...
*  Pegvisomant
After completing clinical trials, it was approved for the treatment of acromegaly by the FDA in 2003 and marketed by Pfizer. ... It is primarily used if the pituitary gland tumor causing the acromegaly cannot be controlled with surgery or radiation, and ... Pegvisomant (trade name Somavert) is a growth hormone receptor antagonist used in the treatment of acromegaly. ... "Treatment of acromegaly with the GH receptor antagonist pegvisomant in clinical practice: Safety and efficacy evaluation from ...
*  McCune-Albright syndrome
Salenave, Sylvie; Boyce, Alison M.; Collins, Michael T.; Chanson, Philippe (2014-6). "Acromegaly and McCune-Albright Syndrome ...
*  Carpal tunnel syndrome
"Carpel Tunnel Syndrome in Acromegaly". Treatmentandsymptoms.com. Archived from the original on 2016-01-26. Retrieved 2011-10-05 ... acromegaly, and use of corticosteroids and estrogens. Carpal tunnel syndrome is also associated with repetitive activities of ... the hand and wrist, in particular with a combination of forceful and repetitive activities Acromegaly causes excessive ...
*  Gino Anthony Pesi
In 2013, Pesi was diagnosed with Acromegaly while filming 42. Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa removed his tumor, and Pesi credits "Dr ... "Gino Anthony Pesi: Actor and Acromegaly Survivor". "Instagram post by Gino Anthony Pesi • Mar 3, 2017 at 11:18pm UTC". ...
*  Estrogen (medication)
Estrogens have been used to treat acromegaly. This is because they suppress insulin-like growth factor 1 production in the ...
*  Prognathism
It is sometimes a result of acromegaly. This condition is colloquially known as lantern jaw, as well as Habsburg jaw, Habsburg ...
*  Diabetes in cats
Factors which contribute to insulin resistance include obesity and endocrine diseases such as acromegaly. Acromegaly affects 20 ...
*  List of dog diseases
Acromegaly patients often also have diabetes mellitus. There is a transient form of acromegaly which can affect females at the ... Acromegaly is also possible from a somatotroph adenoma. The hormone somatostatin can also be useful in treatment. Since ... Acromegaly (also known as hypersomatotropism) is a hormonal condition resulting from over-secretion of the growth hormone ... Because the bone plates close when entering maturity, the continued growth of acromegaly is not of normal proportions. Most ...
*  Jóhann K. Pétursson
De Herder, W. W. (2009). Acromegaly and gigantism in the medical literature. Case descriptions in the era before and the early ... but doubted that he had acromegaly as his body was proportional and there was no sign of hypogonadism. However, he had an ...
*  High-dose estrogen
Duarte FH, Jallad RS, Bronstein MD (2016). "Estrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators in acromegaly". Endocrine. 54 ... and osteoporosis in women Prevention of tall stature in tall adolescent girls Suppression of IGF-1 levels in acromegaly and ...
About Gigantism (Acromegaly)  : Akron Childrens Hospital  About Gigantism (Acromegaly) : Akron Children's Hospital
also known as Acromegaly). Gigantism is abnormal growth due to an excess of growth hormone during childhood. The most common ... If excess growth hormone occurs after normal bone growth has stopped, the condition is known as acromegaly. ...
more infohttps://www.akronchildrens.org/cms/conditions/7c2813e8a20892f3/index.html
acromegaly - Symptoms, Treatments and Resources for acromegaly  acromegaly - Symptoms, Treatments and Resources for acromegaly
Treatments and Tools for acromegaly. Find acromegaly information, treatments for acromegaly and acromegaly symptoms. ... acromegaly - MedHelp's acromegaly Center for Information, Symptoms, Resources, ... Acromegaly in remission 7 years experiencing pain - Brain, Pituitary and Skull Base Tumor Forum Expert Forum ... Anyone have past Acromegaly...now in remission, but still experiencing chronic headaches an... ...
more infohttp://apps.medhelp.org/tags/show/385/acromegaly
Diagnosis and differential diagnosis of acromegaly - Med Notes  Diagnosis and differential diagnosis of acromegaly - Med Notes
biochemical and hormonal studies play a small role in the diagnosis of acromegaly.A known value in the diagnosis of acromegaly ... Acromegaly is often slow gradually progressive course.In this disease can occur long - up to 50 years.Some authors suggest that ... distinguish acromegaly from Paget's disease, often disfiguring patients, allows the absence of the last disease of soft tissue ... In the active phase of acromegaly also indicates elevated levels of inorganic phosphorus in blood serum as a result of bone ...
more infohttp://mednotess.com/en/pages/1424139
Growth hormone assay in acromegaly, gigantism, dwarfism and hypopituitarism. | Docphin  Growth hormone assay in acromegaly, gigantism, dwarfism and hypopituitarism. | Docphin
Growth hormone assay in acromegaly, gigantism, dwarfism and hypopituitarism. , Postgraduate medicine , 11/1/1969 ... Growth hormone assay in acromegaly, gigantism, dwarfism and hypopituitarism. W H Daughaday 11/1/1969 ... Growth hormone assay in acromegaly, gigantism, dwarfism and hypopituitarism. Postgrad Med. 1969;46(5):84-91. ...
more infohttps://www.docphin.com/research/article-detail/16077254/PubMedID-5361738/Growth-hormone-assay-in-acromegaly-gigantism-dwarfism-and-hypopituitarism
GH-secreting pituitary macroadenoma (acromegaly) associated with progressive dental malocclusion and refractory CPAP treatment ...  GH-secreting pituitary macroadenoma (acromegaly) associated with progressive dental malocclusion and refractory CPAP treatment ...
UK National Acromegaly Register Study Group (UKAR-2). Wide variation in surgical outcomes for acromegaly in the UK. Clin ... Dental patient with acromegaly: a case report. J Oral Sci. 2011;53:133-6.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar. ... Mortality in acromegaly: a metaanalysis. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008;93:61-7.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar. ... Acromegaly: an endocrine society clinical practice guideline. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014;99:3933-51.View ArticlePubMedGoogle ...
more infohttps://head-face-med.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13005-017-0140-6
Overgrowth: Missing a Tumor Acromegaly without Imaging Evidence of Pituitary Adenoma and No Ectopic Source: A Case Report |...  "Overgrowth: Missing a Tumor" Acromegaly without Imaging Evidence of Pituitary Adenoma and No Ectopic Source: A Case Report |...
Treatment of acromegaly with the growth hormone-receptor antagonist pegvisomant. N Engl J Med. 2000;342(16):1171-7. PMID: ... We report a case of acromegaly with no evidence of a pituitary adenoma and no evidence of an ectopic source after imaging ... Acromegaly without imaging evidence of pituitary adenoma. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010;95(9):4192-6. PMCID: PMC2936064. https ... Khandelwal D, Khadgawat R, Mukund A, Suri A. Acromegaly with no pituitary adenoma and no evidence of ectopic source. Indian J ...
more infohttp://www.asean-endocrinejournal.org/index.php/JAFES/article/view/419
Overgrowth: Missing a Tumor Acromegaly without Imaging Evidence of Pituitary Adenoma and No Ectopic Source: A Case Report |...  "Overgrowth: Missing a Tumor" Acromegaly without Imaging Evidence of Pituitary Adenoma and No Ectopic Source: A Case Report |...
Since the signs and symptoms of acromegaly are indolent, the time from onset of signs and symptoms to diagnosis of acromegaly ... Acromegaly without Imaging Evidence of Pituitary Adenoma and No Ectopic Source: A Case Report Nicodemus Ong* and Rosa Allyn Sy ... Diagnosis of acromegaly is suggested by clinical features and confirmed by an elevated age- and sex-matched serum IGF-1 level ... Treatment of acromegaly with the growth hormone-receptor antagonist pegvisomant. N Engl J Med. 2000;342(16):1171-7. PubMed DOI ...
more infohttp://www.asean-endocrinejournal.org/index.php/JAFES/article/view/419/855
Growth Hormone-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma
     Summary Report | CureHunter  Growth Hormone-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma Summary Report | CureHunter
In humans, excess HUMAN GROWTH HORMONE leads to ACROMEGALY. ... In humans, excess HUMAN GROWTH HORMONE leads to ACROMEGALY.. ... 01/01/2007 - "A 68-year-old woman presented with persistent acromegaly after treatment for a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma. " ... 10/01/2004 - "Subjects with somatotroph adenoma presented with classical features of acromegaly: mean fasting and post glucose ... and a 62-year-old man with acromegaly and secondary hypogonadism due to a mixed prolactin and growth hormone secreting ...
more infohttp://www.curehunter.com/public/keywordSummaryD049912-Growth-Hormone-Secreting-Pituitary-Adenoma.do
The effect of octreotide on gastric emptying at a dosage used to prevent complications after pancreatic surgery: a randomised,...  The effect of octreotide on gastric emptying at a dosage used to prevent complications after pancreatic surgery: a randomised,...
... gallbladder motility and hormone release during intermittent and continuous subcutaneous octreotide treatment in acromegaly. ...
more infohttp://gut.bmj.com/content/41/6/758
18.1 Types of Hormones | Concepts of Biology-1st Canadian Edition  18.1 Types of Hormones | Concepts of Biology-1st Canadian Edition
... acromegaly, and pituitary dwarfism), disorders of the thyroid gland (goiter and Graves' disease), and disorders of the adrenal ...
more infohttps://opentextbc.ca/biology/chapter/18-1-types-of-hormones/
Acromegaly | Encyclopedia.com  Acromegaly | Encyclopedia.com
Definition Acromegaly is a disease in which an abnormality in the pituitary gland [1] leads to an oversecretion of growth ... Acromegaly and gigantism. Definition. Acromegaly is a disease in which an abnormality in the pituitary gland leads to an ... Web site: ,www.acromegaly.org,.. WEB SITES. Shim, Melanie, and Pinchas Cohen. "Gigantism and Acromegaly." eMedicine, July 29, ... Acromegaly and Gigantism. Definition. Acromegaly is a disorder in which the abnormal release of a particular chemical from the ...
more infohttps://www.encyclopedia.com/medicine/diseases-and-conditions/pathology/acromegaly
Acromegaly Complications  Acromegaly Complications
Acromegaly can cause several complications if left untreated. These complications, like the symptoms of the disease, are ... Severe headache may be seen as a complication of acromegaly.. *As a complication of surgery or radiation therapy, acromegaly ... Those with acromegaly are at risk of arthritis and joint pains as well. This is called Acromegalic arthropathy and affects up ... Heart disease - acromegaly increases the risk of ischemic heart disease leading to a worsening of risk of heart attacks and ...
more infohttps://www.news-medical.net/health/Acromegaly-Complications.aspx
Category:Acromegaly - Wikimedia Commons  Category:Acromegaly - Wikimedia Commons
Acromegaly (th); Acromegaly (ml); Acromegali, Acromegaly (tr); Ακρομεγαλία (el); Hyperpituitarismus, Pachyakrie (de); ... i-acromegaly (zu); 肢端肥大症 (zh-sg); Акромегалия (kk-cyrl); akromegali (nn); akromegali (nb); Akromeqaliya (az); acromegaly (en); ... Media in category "Acromegaly". The following 35 files are in this category, out of 35 total. ... Hands and feet of a patient suffering from acromegaly Wellcome L0061368.jpg 3,967 × 5,695; 2.29 MB. ...
more infohttps://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Acromegaly
How is acromegaly treated?  How is acromegaly treated?
there are three ways to treat acromegaly: *surgery ... How is acromegaly treated?. ANSWER Your doctor will work with ...
more infohttps://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/qa/how-is-acromegaly-treated
Osteoarticular Changes in Acromegaly  Osteoarticular Changes in Acromegaly
... due to development of complications in the majority of patients with acromegaly. Traditionally, acromegaly is considered as a ... Acromegaly is caused by hypersecretion of growth hormone (GH) and consequently of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-1) due to ... Osteoarticular Changes in Acromegaly. Zdenko Killinger, Martin Kužma, Lenka Sterančáková, and Juraj Payer ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/ije/2012/839282/abs/
ACROMEGALY | Smore Newsletters  ACROMEGALY | Smore Newsletters
ACROMEGALY - A RARE DISEASE by meet akbari , This newsletter was created with Smore, an online tool for creating beautiful ... person suffering from acromegaly Acromegalic legs X-ray of a person having acromegaly ... Early treatment of acromegaly can prevent these complications from developing or becoming worse. If untreated, acromegaly and ... Acromegaly occurs in about 6 of every 100,000 adults. It is caused by abnormal production of growth hormone after the skeleton ...
more infohttps://www.smore.com/xra0
Acromegaly - SNPedia  Acromegaly - SNPedia
Acromegaly is a rare disease caused by overproduction of growth hormone by the pituitary gland, often because of a tumor. The ... Some adults with acromegaly also grow taller. It is generally not an inherited condition. Wikipedia ... Retrieved from "https://www.SNPedia.com/index.php?title=Acromegaly&oldid=260785" ...
more infohttps://www.snpedia.com/index.php/Acromegaly
  • To tell for sure if you have acromegaly, your doctor will do blood tests to see if your IGF-1 hormone levels are high for your age. (webmd.com)
  • Global Markets Directs, Acromegaly - Pipeline Review, H2 2016, provides an overview of the Acromegaly pipeline landscape. (mynewsdesk.com)
  • Additionally, the report provides an overview of key players involved in therapeutic development for Acromegaly and features dormant and discontinued projects. (mynewsdesk.com)