Acrodynia: A condition seen primarily in childhood, most often resulting from chronic exposure to MERCURY COMPOUNDS which may result in encephalopathy and POLYNEUROPATHY. Clinical features include pain, swelling and pinkish discoloration of the fingers and toes, weakness in the extremities, extreme irritability, HYPERESTHESIA, and alterations in level of consciousness. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p603)Mercury Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain mercury as an integral part of the molecule.Mercury: A silver metallic element that exists as a liquid at room temperature. It has the atomic symbol Hg (from hydrargyrum, liquid silver), atomic number 80, and atomic weight 200.59. Mercury is used in many industrial applications and its salts have been employed therapeutically as purgatives, antisyphilitics, disinfectants, and astringents. It can be absorbed through the skin and mucous membranes which leads to MERCURY POISONING. Because of its toxicity, the clinical use of mercury and mercurials is diminishing.Peripheral Nervous System: The nervous system outside of the brain and spinal cord. The peripheral nervous system has autonomic and somatic divisions. The autonomic nervous system includes the enteric, parasympathetic, and sympathetic subdivisions. The somatic nervous system includes the cranial and spinal nerves and their ganglia and the peripheral sensory receptors.Organomercury Compounds: Organic compounds which contain mercury as an integral part of the molecule.Methylmercury Compounds: Organic compounds in which mercury is attached to a methyl group.Mercuric Chloride: Mercury chloride (HgCl2). A highly toxic compound that volatizes slightly at ordinary temperature and appreciably at 100 degrees C. It is corrosive to mucous membranes and used as a topical antiseptic and disinfectant.Polyneuropathies: Diseases of multiple peripheral nerves simultaneously. Polyneuropathies usually are characterized by symmetrical, bilateral distal motor and sensory impairment with a graded increase in severity distally. The pathological processes affecting peripheral nerves include degeneration of the axon, myelin or both. The various forms of polyneuropathy are categorized by the type of nerve affected (e.g., sensory, motor, or autonomic), by the distribution of nerve injury (e.g., distal vs. proximal), by nerve component primarily affected (e.g., demyelinating vs. axonal), by etiology, or by pattern of inheritance.Peripheral Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the peripheral nerves external to the brain and spinal cord, which includes diseases of the nerve roots, ganglia, plexi, autonomic nerves, sensory nerves, and motor nerves.Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system. This includes disorders of the brain, spinal cord, cranial nerves, peripheral nerves, nerve roots, autonomic nervous system, neuromuscular junction, and muscle.Dimercaprol: An anti-gas warfare agent that is effective against Lewisite (dichloro(2-chlorovinyl)arsine) and formerly known as British Anti-Lewisite or BAL. It acts as a chelating agent and is used in the treatment of arsenic, gold, and other heavy metal poisoning.Unithiol: A chelating agent used as an antidote to heavy metal poisoning.Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A diagnostic technique that incorporates the measurement of molecular diffusion (such as water or metabolites) for tissue assessment by MRI. The degree of molecular movement can be measured by changes of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) with time, as reflected by tissue microstructure. Diffusion MRI has been used to study BRAIN ISCHEMIA and tumor response to treatment.Endometrial Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of ENDOMETRIUM, the mucous lining of the UTERUS. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. Their classification and grading are based on the various cell types and the percent of undifferentiated cells.Technetium Tc 99m Dimercaptosuccinic Acid: A nontoxic radiopharmaceutical that is used in the diagnostic imaging of the renal cortex.Chelating Agents: Chemicals that bind to and remove ions from solutions. Many chelating agents function through the formation of COORDINATION COMPLEXES with METALS.Calcaneus: The largest of the TARSAL BONES which is situated at the lower and back part of the FOOT, forming the HEEL.Rickets: Disorders caused by interruption of BONE MINERALIZATION manifesting as OSTEOMALACIA in adults and characteristic deformities in infancy and childhood due to disturbances in normal BONE FORMATION. The mineralization process may be interrupted by disruption of VITAMIN D; PHOSPHORUS; or CALCIUM homeostasis, resulting from dietary deficiencies, or acquired, or inherited metabolic, or hormonal disturbances.Diagnostic Errors: Incorrect diagnoses after clinical examination or technical diagnostic procedures.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Diet, Sodium-Restricted: A diet which contains very little sodium chloride. It is prescribed by some for hypertension and for edematous states. (Dorland, 27th ed)Sodium: A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.Cellulitis: An acute, diffuse, and suppurative inflammation of loose connective tissue, particularly the deep subcutaneous tissues, and sometimes muscle, which is most commonly seen as a result of infection of a wound, ulcer, or other skin lesions.Sodium, Dietary: Sodium or sodium compounds used in foods or as a food. The most frequently used compounds are sodium chloride or sodium glutamate.Joint Deformities, Acquired: Deformities acquired after birth as the result of injury or disease. The joint deformity is often associated with rheumatoid arthritis and leprosy.Foot Deformities, Acquired: Distortion or disfigurement of the foot, or a part of the foot, acquired through disease or injury after birth.Metalloids: A class of nonmetals such as arsenic that have some of the chemical properties of a metal.Poison Control Centers: Facilities which provide information concerning poisons and treatment of poisoning in emergencies.Iron: A metallic element with atomic symbol Fe, atomic number 26, and atomic weight 55.85. It is an essential constituent of HEMOGLOBINS; CYTOCHROMES; and IRON-BINDING PROTEINS. It plays a role in cellular redox reactions and in the transport of OXYGEN.Metals: Electropositive chemical elements characterized by ductility, malleability, luster, and conductance of heat and electricity. They can replace the hydrogen of an acid and form bases with hydroxyl radicals. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Antimony: A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Sb, atomic number 51, and atomic weight 121.75. It is used as a metal alloy and as medicinal and poisonous salts. It is toxic and an irritant to the skin and the mucous membranes.Iron Chelating Agents: Organic chemicals that form two or more coordination links with an iron ion. Once coordination has occurred, the complex formed is called a chelate. The iron-binding porphyrin group of hemoglobin is an example of a metal chelate found in biological systems.Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Poisoning: A condition or physical state produced by the ingestion, injection, inhalation of or exposure to a deleterious agent.Audiovisual Aids: Auditory and visual instructional materials.Aquaglyceroporins: A subgroup of aquaporins that transport WATER; GLYCEROL; and other small solutes across CELL MEMBRANES.Ointments: Semisolid preparations used topically for protective emollient effects or as a vehicle for local administration of medications. Ointment bases are various mixtures of fats, waxes, animal and plant oils and solid and liquid hydrocarbons.Sunburn: An injury to the skin causing erythema, tenderness, and sometimes blistering and resulting from excessive exposure to the sun. The reaction is produced by the ultraviolet radiation in sunlight.Burns: Injuries to tissues caused by contact with heat, steam, chemicals (BURNS, CHEMICAL), electricity (BURNS, ELECTRIC), or the like.Hand: The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.Nerve Endings: Branch-like terminations of NERVE FIBERS, sensory or motor NEURONS. Endings of sensory neurons are the beginnings of afferent pathway to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Endings of motor neurons are the terminals of axons at the muscle cells. Nerve endings which release neurotransmitters are called PRESYNAPTIC TERMINALS.Ice: The solid substance formed by the FREEZING of water.Conjunctivitis, Bacterial: Purulent infections of the conjunctiva by several species of gram-negative, gram-positive, or acid-fast organisms. Some of the more commonly found genera causing conjunctival infections are Haemophilus, Streptococcus, Neisseria, and Chlamydia.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Administration, Topical: The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.
(1/3) Mercury poisoning: a rare but treatable cause of failure to thrive and developmental regression in an infant.

An infant presented with failure to thrive and developmental regression. Physical examination revealed an irritable child with swollen, erythematous extremities, and elevated blood pressure. Extensive investigations, including a metabolic work-up and neuroimaging, were unrevealing. Exposure to self-purchased medication was initially denied. The physical signs were suggestive of acrodynia. Mercury poisoning was ultimately established by measuring paired blood and urine mercury levels. On further enquiry, it was revealed that the child had been given a Chinese medicinal product for 4 months. He responded well to a chelating agent. Acrodynia is a childhood disease considered to be of historical interest only, but making a diagnosis of mercury poisoning is rewarding because the response to treatment is good. This case highlights the common misconception that alternative medicines are safe and benign.  (+info)

(2/3) Ancestry of pink disease (infantile acrodynia) identified as a risk factor for autism spectrum disorders.

 (+info)

(3/3) Mercury as a health hazard.

Pink disease has virtually disappeared since teething powders were withdrawn. We describe a case in a boy who was exposed to metallic mercury vapour. We discuss the potential health hazard of spilled elemental mercury in the house and the difficulties of removing it from the environment.  (+info)

*  Mercurial diuretic
Warkany and Hubbard (1953) noted in their seminal paper establishing mercury as the cause of infantile acrodynia that "... in ... in addition to the sharp decline in infantile acrodynia cases after the late 1950s following the removal of many sources of ...
*  Acrodynia
The word acrodynia is derived from the Greek, where ακρος means end or extremity and οδυνη means pain. As such, it might be ( ... However, acrodynia is a disease rather than a symptom. The condition is known by a large number of other names including pink ... Acrodynia is a condition of pain and dusky pink discoloration in the hands and feet most often seen in children chronically ... Horowitz Y, Greenberg D, Ling G, Lifshitz M (2002). "Acrodynia: a case report of two siblings". Arch Dis Child. 86 (6): 453. ...
*  DMOZ - Health: Conditions and Diseases: Neurological Disorders: Peripheral Nervous System: Acrodynia
eMedicine - Acrodynia Article by a physician describes acrodynia (painful extremities), a condition caused by chronic exposure ...
*  Mercury poisoning
This case of acrodynia was traced to exposure of mercury from a carton of 8-foot fluorescent light bulbs that had broken in a ... Acrodynia is difficult to diagnose, "it is most often postulated that the etiology of this syndrome is an idiosyncratic ... Infantile acrodynia (also known as "calomel disease", "erythredemic polyneuropathy", and "pink disease") is a type of mercury ... Acrodynia resulted primarily from calomel in teething powders and decreased greatly after calomel was excluded from most ...
*  Perspiration
A clinician should immediately consider acrodynia in an afebrile child who is sweating profusely.[citation needed] Some people ... Infantile acrodynia (childhood mercury poisoning) is characterized by excessive perspiration. ...
*  Mercury (element)
Mercury poisoning can result in several diseases, including acrodynia (pink disease), Hunter-Russell syndrome, and Minamata ...
*  Teething
It was removed from most powders in 1954 when it was shown to cause "pink disease" (acrodynia), a form of mercury poisoning. ...
*  Vitamin B6
... dermatitis acrodynia). He named this substance vitamin B6. In 1938, Samuel Lepkovsky isolated vitamin B6 from rice bran. Harris ...
*  Hypocalcaemia
... including infantile acrodynia Excessive dietary magnesium, as with supplementation.[citation needed] Excessive dietary zinc, as ...
*  List of pollution-related diseases
... kidney disease Neurobehavioral impairment Minamata disease Cerebellar ataxia Kidney and autoimmune dysfunction Acrodynia ...
*  Cachexia
... acrodynia), Crohn's disease, untreated/severe type 1 diabetes mellitus, anorexia nervosa, and hormonal deficiency.[medical ...
*  List of MeSH codes (C10)
... acrodynia MeSH C10.886.425.175 --- sleep deprivation MeSH C10.886.425.200 --- sleep disorders, circadian rhythm MeSH C10.886. ... acrodynia MeSH C10.668.829.050 --- amyloid neuropathies MeSH C10.668.829.050.050 --- amyloid neuropathies, familial MeSH ...
*  Hypotonia
Infections Encephalitis Guillain-Barré syndrome Infant botulism Meningitis Poliomyelitis Sepsis Toxins Infantile acrodynia ( ...
*  Kawasaki disease
... infantile acrodynia).[citation needed] Classically, five days of fever plus four of five diagnostic criteria must be met to ...
*  Hyperhidrosis
... disease Fibromyalgia Congestive heart failure Anxiety Menopausal state Night sweats Compensatory Infantile acrodynia induced by ...
*  List of cutaneous conditions
Acrodynia (calomel disease, erythredemic polyneuropathy, pink disease) Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (pustular ...
*  List of MeSH codes (C21)
... acrodynia MeSH C21.613.680.262 --- ergotism MeSH C21.613.680.551 --- mushroom poisoning MeSH C21.613.705.100 --- akathisia, ...
*  DMOZ - Health: Conditions and Diseases: Neurological Disorders: Peripheral Nervous System
This category includes disorders affecting the peripheral nerves like the various neuropathies, plexus disorders etc. Disorders of the cranial nerves can be included here for the moment; ideally a separate category (Cranial Nerve Diseases) will house them in the future.
*  DMOZ - Health: Conditions and Diseases: A
July 24, 2011 at 1:49:53 UTC ...
*  DMOZ - Health: Child Health: Conditions and Diseases: Neurological Disorders
Information, support and advice concerning neurological disorders, in children ranging in age from newborn to pre-teen.
Zastrupitev z živim srebrom - Wikipedija, prosta enciklopedija  Zastrupitev z živim srebrom - Wikipedija, prosta enciklopedija
Infantile acrodynia[uredi , uredi kodo]. Bolezen je znana tudi pod imenom kalomelna bolezen, erythredemična polinevropatija in ... Acrodynia je bila razmeroma pogosta med otroci v prvi polovici 20. stoletja. Na začetku vzrok za epidemijo acrodynije pri ... Tunnessen WW Jr, McMahon KJ, Baser M (1987). "Acrodynia: exposure to mercury from fluorescent light bulbs". Pediatrics 79 (5): ... Iz leta 1987 izhaja poročilo o 23-mesečnem otroku, ki se je zastrupil z živim srebrom (infantile acrodynia) in utrpel posledice ...
more infohttps://sl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zastrupitev_z_%C5%BEivim_srebrom
Acrodynia - Wikipedia  Acrodynia - Wikipedia
The word acrodynia is derived from the Greek, where ακρος means end or extremity and οδυνη means pain. As such, it might be ( ... However, acrodynia is a disease rather than a symptom. The condition is known by a large number of other names including pink ... Acrodynia is a condition of pain and dusky pink discoloration in the hands and feet most often seen in children chronically ... Horowitz Y, Greenberg D, Ling G, Lifshitz M (2002). "Acrodynia: a case report of two siblings". Arch Dis Child. 86 (6): 453. ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acrodynia
Heavy Metal Dermatoses: Mercury(Mercury dermatosis: Hydrargyria, mercurialism, acrodynia, pink disease, Mad Hatters disease,...  Heavy Metal Dermatoses: Mercury(Mercury dermatosis: Hydrargyria, mercurialism, acrodynia, 'pink disease,' Mad Hatter's disease,...
Acrodynia resulting from fluorescent bulbs has not been previously reported.). Dinehart, SM, Dillard, R, Raimer, SS, Diven, S, ... A diagnosis of acrodynia, or pink disease, was confirmed by elevated levels of mercury in the urine. The many cutaneous ... Acrodynia, or pink disease, is childhood mercury poisoning as a result of prolonged exposure to mercury. Inhalation of ... The report summarizes the case of a 14-year-old boy who developed acrodynia during the first year of life from topical ...
more infohttps://www.psychiatryadvisor.com/home/decision-support-in-medicine/dermatology/heavy-metal-dermatoses-mercurymercury-dermatosis-hydrargyria-mercurialism-acrodynia-pink-disease-mad-hatters-disease-hatters-disease-minamata-disease/
Mercury poisoning  Mercury poisoning
Acrodynia epidemic. Acrodynia is a type of mercury poisoning in children characterized by pain and pink discoloration of the ... a b c Horowitz Y, Greenberg D, Ling G, Lifshitz M. Acrodynia: a case report of two siblings. Arch Dis Child 2002; 86: 453. PMID ... Mercury poisoning (also known as mercurialism, hydrargyria, Hunter-Russell syndrome, or acrodynia when affecting children) is a ... However, acrodynia is a disease rather than a symptom.[2] Also known as pink disease, erythredema, Selter's disease, or Swift- ...
more infohttps://www.bionity.com/en/encyclopedia/Mercury_poisoning.html
Heavy Toxic Metals In The Body & Oral Chelation Therapy.  Heavy Toxic Metals In The Body & Oral Chelation Therapy.
Muscle pain; headache; acrodynia; colic. Arsenic, Copper, Lead, Thallium. Alopecia (hair loss) ...
more infohttp://www.angelfire.com/az/sthurston/chelation_for_toxic_metals.html
Valentovic- Herbs and Metals (2)- Leah :) Flashcards by Leah  Stalnaker | Brainscape  Valentovic- Herbs and Metals (2)- Leah :) Flashcards by Leah Stalnaker | Brainscape
photophobia, acrodynia (red face) -NO NEURO TOX (2+ charge cannot cross BBB). -CERTAIN FISH! NO FISH FOR PREGGOS! *Mercury* the ...
more infohttps://www.brainscape.com/flashcards/valentovic-herbs-and-metals-2-leah-5022239/packs/7365499
Technical Report: Mercury in the Environment: Implications for Pediatricians | AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS | Pediatrics  Technical Report: Mercury in the Environment: Implications for Pediatricians | AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS | Pediatrics
Cheek D. Acrodynia. In: Kelley V, ed. Brenneman's Practice of Pediatrics. New York, NY: Harper & Row Publishers; 1977:1-12 ... Sporadic cases of acrodynia have resulted from children playing on carpet contaminated by metallic mercury. Once a carpet is ... Acrodynia (painful extremities), also known as pink disease, seems to be a hypersensitivity response to mercury and was ... 1963) Mercury in house paint as a cause of acrodynia. N Engl J Med 269:889-893. ...
more infohttp://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/108/1/197
Calcaneal bone deformity and Low sodium - Symptom Checker - check medical symptoms at RightDiagnosis  Calcaneal bone deformity and Low sodium - Symptom Checker - check medical symptoms at RightDiagnosis
2. Acrodynia. 3. Addison's Disease. 4. Adrenal Cortex Diseases. 5. Ascites. 6. Bamforth syndrome. 7. Bartter Syndrome type 4. 8 ...
more infohttp://wrongdiagnosis.com/cosymptoms/calcaneal-bone-deformity/low-sodium.htm
Free Nursing Flashcards about peds development  Free Nursing Flashcards about peds development
acrodynia. _______children are at greater risk for lead poisening. hispanic. level of lead in blood considered a concern. 10mcg ...
more infohttps://www.studystack.com/flashcard-229584
References | Waste Incineration and Public Health | The National Academies Press  References | Waste Incineration and Public Health | The National Academies Press
Acrodynia and mercury. J. Pediatr. 42: 365-386.. Waste-Tech (Waste Energy Technologies). 1991. The New York City Medical Waste ...
more infohttps://www.nap.edu/read/5803/chapter/11
Hypocalcaemia - Wikipedia  Hypocalcaemia - Wikipedia
Exposure to mercury, including infantile acrodynia. *Excessive dietary magnesium, as with supplementation.[citation needed] ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypocalcemia
Idiopathic polyneuropathy | definition of idiopathic polyneuropathy by Medical dictionary  Idiopathic polyneuropathy | definition of idiopathic polyneuropathy by Medical dictionary
erythredema polyneuropathy acrodynia.. pol·y·neu·rop·a·thy. (pol'ē-nū-rop'ă-thē), 1. A disease process involving a number of ... erythredema polyneuropathy acrodynia.. familial amyloid polyneuropathy autosomal dominant amyloid polyneuropathy, associated ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/idiopathic+polyneuropathy
Mercury Intoxication and Arterial Hypertension: Report of Two Patients and Review of the Literature | ELECTRONIC ARTICLE |...  Mercury Intoxication and Arterial Hypertension: Report of Two Patients and Review of the Literature | ELECTRONIC ARTICLE |...
Acrodynia is typically caused by inorganic mercury poisoning; however, as demonstrated in our work, new cases are being ... Our 2 patients and the 6 additional patients found in the search of Medline have acrodynia. These children, from 11 months to ... Warkany and Hubbard,8 in their series of 28 pediatric patients published in 1953, established the link between acrodynia ( ... 1993) Acute mercury poisoning (acrodynia) mimicking pheochromocytoma in an adolescent. J Pediatr 122:252-253. ...
more infohttp://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/105/3/e34.full
Saintons disease | definition of Saintons disease by Medical dictionary  Sainton's disease | definition of Sainton's disease by Medical dictionary
Feer disease acrodynia.. fibrocystic disease of breast a form of mammary dysplasia with formation of cysts of various size ...
more infohttp://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Sainton%27s+disease
Chronic Mercury Poisoning: Symptoms & Diseases  Chronic Mercury Poisoning: Symptoms & Diseases
Mercury is the most poisonous, non-radioactive, naturally occurring substance on our planet. There is no safe level of mercury because even one atom of it in your body is doing some harm to it. There is no debate about the toxicity of mercury and every knowledgeable scientist and health professional understands how poisonous mercury is. Yet even today the American Dental Association (ADA) and pro-amalgam dentists who support its insane, logic defying position, continue to say that the mercury released from these fillings is not a health hazard. The World Health Organization (WHO) has stated that there is no safe level of mercury. That means that no amount of mercury is safe, not even one atom. Even if enough mercury hasn't accumulated to manifest a symptom directly or indirectly related to chronic mercury poisoning, it doesn't mean you are not being poisoned by it. The straw that broke the proverbial camel's back wasn't the last straw, it was the sum total of the weight of all of the straws. The ...
more infohttps://dentalwellness4u.com/layperson/symptoms.html
Mouth symptoms - RightDiagnosis.com  Mouth symptoms - RightDiagnosis.com
Acrodynia ... tooth loss, red lips*Acrofacial dysostosis atypical postaxial ... cleft palate, cleft lip, thin lips, small lower ...
more infohttps://www.rightdiagnosis.com/sym/mouth_symptoms.htm
Prevalence of Causes of Symptom: Restlessness  - RightDiagnosis.com  Prevalence of Causes of Symptom: Restlessness - RightDiagnosis.com
Acrodynia... restlessness *Acute leukaemia of ambiguous lineage... agitation *Acute liver failure... agitation *Acute Pesticide ...
more infohttps://www.rightdiagnosis.com/symptoms/restlessness.htm
PPT - Iron and Metals & Metalloids PowerPoint Presentation - ID:175976  PPT - Iron and Metals & Metalloids PowerPoint Presentation - ID:175976
Acrodynia*Immune mediated condition develops in children exposed to all form mercury except short chain alkyls ... 4. Which of the following is not present in the condition known as acrodynia ...
more infohttps://www.slideserve.com/issac/iron-and-metals-metalloids
topic string} - Doctor answers  topic string} - Doctor answers
Acrodynia: The best sense I can make out of the symptoms you report is a rare condition called "acrodynia" (which means painful ...
more infohttps://www.healthtap.com/topics/i-burned-my-hand-on-a-hot-pot-handle-how-can-i-treat-the-burn
Metal Allergy: Mercury | SpringerLink  Metal Allergy: Mercury | SpringerLink
Mercury toxicity (acrodynia) induced by long-term injection of gammaglobulin. J Pediatr. 1980;97(1):153-5.PubMedCrossRefGoogle ... Mutter J, Yeter D. Kawasaki's disease, acrodynia, and mercury. Curr Med Chem. 2008;15(28):3000-10.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar ... Acrodynia and mercury. J Pediatr. 1953;42(3):365-86.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar ... Dinehart SM, Dillard R, Raimer SS, Diven S, Cobos R, Pupo R. Cutaneous manifestations of acrodynia (pink disease). Arch ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-3-319-58503-1_31
  • After finding associations between mercurial diuretics and "mercurial" nephrotic syndrome, in addition to the sharp decline in infantile acrodynia cases after the late 1950s following the removal of many sources of childhood mercury exposure, the dangers of mercurial diuretics were realized. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arsenicosis Cancers (lung, bladder, and skin) Cardiovascular disease Chronic kidney disease Neurobehavioral impairment Minamata disease Cerebellar ataxia Kidney and autoimmune dysfunction Acrodynia Dysarthria Arthritis Respiratory failure Neurological damage Leahy, Stephen (June 13, 2014). (wikipedia.org)