Inflammation involving the skin of the extremities, especially the hands and feet. Several forms are known, some idiopathic and some hereditary. The infantile form is called Gianotti-Crosti syndrome.
A metallic element of atomic number 30 and atomic weight 65.38. It is a necessary trace element in the diet, forming an essential part of many enzymes, and playing an important role in protein synthesis and in cell division. Zinc deficiency is associated with ANEMIA, short stature, HYPOGONADISM, impaired WOUND HEALING, and geophagia. It is known by the symbol Zn.
A deep type of gyrate erythema that follows a bite by an ixodid tick; it is a stage-1 manifestation of LYME DISEASE. The site of the bite is characterized by a red papule that expands peripherally as a nonscaling, palpable band that clears centrally. This condition is often associated with systemic symptoms such as chills, fever, headache, malaise, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, backache, and stiff neck.
One of the halogenated 8-quinolinols widely used as an intestinal antiseptic, especially as an antiamebic agent. It is also used topically in other infections and may cause CNS and eye damage. It is known by very many similar trade names world-wide.
Redness of the skin produced by congestion of the capillaries. This condition may result from a variety of causes.
Agents, usually topical, that cause the contraction of tissues for the control of bleeding or secretions.
The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between ASCENDING COLON and DESCENDING COLON. It passes from the RIGHT COLIC FLEXURE across the ABDOMEN, then turns sharply at the left colonic flexure into the descending colon.
An infectious disease caused by a spirochete, BORRELIA BURGDORFERI, which is transmitted chiefly by Ixodes dammini (see IXODES) and pacificus ticks in the United States and Ixodes ricinis (see IXODES) in Europe. It is a disease with early and late cutaneous manifestations plus involvement of the nervous system, heart, eye, and joints in variable combinations. The disease was formerly known as Lyme arthritis and first discovered at Old Lyme, Connecticut.
A potentially neurotoxic 8-hydroxyquinoline derivative long used as a topical anti-infective, intestinal antiamebic, and vaginal trichomonacide. The oral preparation has been shown to cause subacute myelo-optic neuropathy and has been banned worldwide.
Membrane proteins whose primary function is to facilitate the transport of positively charged molecules (cations) across a biological membrane.
A group of disorders having a benign course but exhibiting clinical and histological features suggestive of malignant lymphoma. Pseudolymphoma is characterized by a benign infiltration of lymphoid cells or histiocytes which microscopically resembles a malignant lymphoma. (From Dorland, 28th ed & Stedman, 26th ed)
Gram-negative helical bacteria, in the genus BORRELIA, that are the etiologic agents of LYME DISEASE. The group comprises many specific species including Borrelia afzelii, Borellia garinii, and BORRELIA BURGDORFERI proper. These spirochetes are generally transmitted by several species of ixodid ticks.

Differential expression of cytokine mRNA in skin specimens from patients with erythema migrans or acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. (1/78)

Erythema migrans, the characteristic skin manifestation of acute Lyme borreliosis, is a self-limited lesion. In contrast, acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans, the typical cutaneous manifestation of late Lyme borreliosis, is a chronic skin condition. In an effort to understand pathogenic factors that lead to different outcomes in dermatoborrelioses, skin biopsy samples from 42 patients with erythema migrans and 27 patients with acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans were analyzed for mRNA expression of five pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6, interferon-gamma, and interleukin-2) and two anti-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-4 and interleukin-10) by in situ hybridization with cytokine-specific riboprobes. Among the 27 patients who had erythema migrans alone with no associated signs or symptoms, the major cytokines expressed in perivascular infiltrates of T cells and macrophages were the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10. In the 15 erythema migrans patients who had associated signs and symptoms, including headache, elevated temperature, arthralgias, myalgias, or fatigue, a larger number of macrophages and greater expression of macrophage-derived pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 beta, and interleukin-6, were also found. In comparison, infiltrates of T cells and macrophages in the skin lesions of acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans patients had very little or no interferon-gamma expression. Instead, they usually expressed only the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-4. Thus, the activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines in erythema migrans lesions, particularly interferon-gamma, seems to be important in the control of the spirochetal infection. In contrast, the restricted pattern of cytokine expression in acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans, including the lack of interferon-gamma, may be less effective in spirochetal killing, resulting in the chronicity of this skin lesion. J Invest Dermatol 115:1115-1123 2000  (+info)

Homozygosity mapping places the acrodermatitis enteropathica gene on chromosomal region 8q24.3. (2/78)

Acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE) is a rare autosomal recessive pediatric disease characterized by dermatitis, diarrhea, alopecia, and growth failure. The disease results from insufficient uptake of zinc by the intestine and can be fatal unless the diet is supplemented with zinc. To map the gene responsible for AE, a genomewide screen was performed on 17 individuals, including 4 affected individuals, in a consanguineous Jordanian family. Three markers-D8S373, D10S212, and D6S1021-had a pattern consistent with tight linkage to a recessive disease: one allele in the affected sibs and multiple alleles in unaffected sibs and parents. Two-point parametric linkage analysis using FASTLINK identified one region, D8S373, with a maximum LOD score >1.5 (1.94 at D8S373: recombination fraction.001). Twelve additional markers flanking D8S373 were used to genotype the extended family, to fine-map the AE gene. All five affected individuals-including one who was not genotyped in the genomewide screen-were found to be homozygous for a common haplotype, spanning approximately 3.5 cM, defined by markers D8S1713 and D8S2334 on chromosomal region 8q24.3. To support these mapping data, seven consanguineous Egyptian families with eight patients with AE were genotyped using these markers, and six patients from five families were found to be homozygous in this region. Multipoint analysis with all consanguineous families, by Mapmaker/Homoz, resulted in a maximum LOD score of 3.89 between D8S1713 and D8S373. Sliding three-point analysis resulted in a maximum LOD score of 5.16 between markers D8S1727 and D8S1744.  (+info)

Papular-purpuric "gloves and socks" syndrome due to parvovirus B19: report of a case with unusual features. (3/78)

We present a case of papular-purpuric "gloves and socks" syndrome (PPGSS) in an adult male with acute parvovirus B19 infection. The patient displayed the classical features of fever, oral lesions, and purpura on hands and feet, but the purpuric lesions on the feet evolved to superficial skin necrosis, a feature not previously described in this syndrome. We believe this is the first reported case of PPGSS occurring in Brazil.  (+info)

A novel zinc-regulated human zinc transporter, hZTL1, is localized to the enterocyte apical membrane. (4/78)

Zinc is essential to a wide range of cellular processes; therefore, it is important to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of zinc homeostasis. To date, no zinc transporters expressed at the enterocyte apical membrane, and so essential to mammalian zinc homeostasis, have been discovered. We identified hZTL1 as a human expressed sequence tag with homology to the basolateral enterocyte zinc transporter ZnT1 and deduced the full-length cDNA sequence by PCR. The protein of 523 amino acids belongs to the cation diffusion facilitator family of membrane transporters. Unusually, the predicted topology comprises 12 rather than 6 transmembrane domains. ZTL1 mRNA was detected by reverse transcription-PCR in a range of mouse tissues. A Myc-tagged hZTL1 clone was expressed in transiently transfected polarized human intestinal Caco-2 cells at the apical membrane. Expression of hZTL1 mRNA in Caco-2 cells increased with zinc supplementation of the nutrient medium; however, in the placental cell line JAR hZTL1 appeared not to be regulated by zinc. Heterologous expression of hZTL1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes increased zinc uptake across the plasma membrane. The localization, regulatory properties, and function of hZTL1 indicate a role in regulating the absorption of dietary zinc across the apical enterocyte membrane.  (+info)

A novel member of a zinc transporter family is defective in acrodermatitis enteropathica. (5/78)

The rare inherited condition acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE) results from a defect in the absorption of dietary zinc. Recently, we used homozygosity mapping in consanguineous Middle Eastern kindreds to localize the AE gene to an approximately 3.5-cM region on 8q24. In this article, we identify a gene, SLC39A4, located in the candidate region and, in patients with AE, document mutations that likely lead to the disease. The gene encodes a histidine-rich protein, which we refer to as "hZIP4," which is a member of a large family of transmembrane proteins, some of which are known to serve as zinc-uptake proteins. We show that Slc39A4 is abundantly expressed in mouse enterocytes and that the protein resides in the apical membrane of these cells. These findings suggest that the hZIP4 transporter is responsible for intestinal absorption of zinc.  (+info)

A case of chronic pancreatitis associated with liver infarction and acrodermatitis enteropathica. (6/78)

Liver infarction and acrodermatitis enteropathica are rare complications of chronic pancreatitis. This report shows the case of a 56-year-old man who developed liver infarction due to portal vein thrombosis from chronic pancreatitis and acrodermatitis enteropathica during the course of his treatment. The rare combination of these complications in a patient with chronic pancreatitis has never previously been reported in the literature.  (+info)

Novel SLC39A4 mutations in acrodermatitis enteropathica. (7/78)

Acrodermatitis enteropathica is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by skin involvement due to defective intestinal zinc absorption. Usually, the skin lesions include erythema, erosions, and small blisters in perioral, perianal regions, and hands and feet, which develop soon after weaning from the breast. The acrodermatitis enteropathica gene has been localized to chromosomal region 8q24.3 and subsequently the SLC39A4 gene has been disclosed as the acrodermatitis enteropathica gene. SLC39A4 mutations have been demonstrated in several acrodermatitis enteropathica families, and in this study we have examined two Japanese acrodermatitis enteropathica families for SLC39A4 mutations. The mutation detection strategy consisted of polymerase chain reaction amplification of all 12 exons and flanking intronic sequences, followed by direct nucleotide sequencing. It revealed three novel mutations, 1017ins53, which creates a premature termination codon, and two mis-sense mutations, R95C and Q303H.  (+info)

The acrodermatitis enteropathica gene ZIP4 encodes a tissue-specific, zinc-regulated zinc transporter in mice. (8/78)

The human ZIP4 gene (SLC39A4) is a candidate for the genetic disorder of zinc metabolism acrodermatitis enteropathica. To understand its role in zinc homeostasis, we examined the function and expression of mouse ZIP4. This gene encodes a well conserved eight-transmembrane protein that can specifically increase the influx of zinc into transfected cells. Expression of this gene is robust in tissues involved in nutrient uptake, such as the intestines and embryonic visceral yolk sac, and is dynamically regulated by zinc. Dietary zinc deficiency causes a marked increase in the accumulation of ZIP4 mRNA in these tissues, whereas injection of zinc or increasing zinc content of the diet rapidly reduces its abundance. Zinc can also regulate the accumulation of ZIP4 protein at the apical surface of enterocytes and visceral endoderm cells. These results provide compelling evidence that ZIP4 is a zinc transporter that plays an important role in zinc homeostasis, a process that is defective in acrodermatitis enteropathica in humans.  (+info)

Acrodermatitis is a term that describes several inflammatory skin conditions characterized by redness, swelling, and blistering that typically affect the hands, feet, and face. The medical definition of acrodermatitis includes various subtypes, each with its own specific causes and symptoms. Here are some of the most common forms of acrodermatitis:

1. Acrodermatitis enteropathica: A rare inherited disorder caused by a deficiency in zinc absorption. Symptoms include redness, swelling, blistering, and crusting around the mouth, eyes, and genitals, as well as the hands and feet.
2. Acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau: A rare chronic inflammatory skin condition that affects the fingertips and toes. Symptoms include redness, swelling, blistering, and crusting, which can lead to nail deformities and loss.
3. Gianotti-Crosti syndrome (acrodermatitis papulosa): A viral exanthem that typically affects children between 6 months and 15 years of age. Symptoms include red, raised bumps on the face, buttocks, and extremities, which can be itchy and painful.
4. Pustular acrodermatitis: A rare skin condition characterized by pustules (pus-filled bumps) that form on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. Symptoms may also include fever, chills, and fatigue.
5. Infantile acrodermatitis: A rare inflammatory skin disorder that affects infants and young children. Symptoms include redness, swelling, and blistering around the mouth, eyes, and genitals, as well as the hands and feet.

Treatment for acrodermatitis depends on the underlying cause of the condition. In some cases, topical creams or ointments may be sufficient to manage symptoms, while in others, systemic treatments such as antibiotics or immunosuppressive drugs may be necessary.

Zinc is an essential mineral that is vital for the functioning of over 300 enzymes and involved in various biological processes in the human body, including protein synthesis, DNA synthesis, immune function, wound healing, and cell division. It is a component of many proteins and participates in the maintenance of structural integrity and functionality of proteins. Zinc also plays a crucial role in maintaining the sense of taste and smell.

The recommended daily intake of zinc varies depending on age, sex, and life stage. Good dietary sources of zinc include red meat, poultry, seafood, beans, nuts, dairy products, and fortified cereals. Zinc deficiency can lead to various health problems, including impaired immune function, growth retardation, and developmental delays in children. On the other hand, excessive intake of zinc can also have adverse effects on health, such as nausea, vomiting, and impaired immune function.

Erythema chronicum migrans (ECM) is a type of skin rash that is commonly associated with early Lyme disease. It is usually the first sign of infection after a tick bite and is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi. The rash typically appears within 3-30 days after the tick bite and starts as a red, flat or slightly raised spot at the site of the bite. Over several days or weeks, the redness expands, forming a circular or oval-shaped rash that can be up to 12 inches in diameter. The center of the rash may clear, giving it a "bull's-eye" appearance.

ECM is usually accompanied by symptoms such as fatigue, fever, headache, and muscle and joint pain. It is important to note that not all people with Lyme disease will develop ECM, and its absence does not necessarily mean that the person does not have Lyme disease. If you suspect that you may have been bitten by a tick and are experiencing symptoms of Lyme disease, it is important to seek medical attention promptly.

Iodoquinol is an antiprotozoal agent, which is used to treat infections caused by certain parasites. It works by killing the sensitive parasites in the intestines. The medical definition of Iodoquinol is:

A quinoline compound used primarily as an intestinal anti-amoebic agent against Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia. Its mechanism of action is not fully understood, but it appears to damage the parasite cell membrane and may also inhibit enzymes involved in energy production. Iodoquinol can be administered orally or topically, depending on the formulation and route of infection.

Common side effects include nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, and diarrhea. Prolonged use or overdose may lead to more severe side effects such as peripheral neuropathy, optic neuritis, and hearing loss. Iodoquinol should be used with caution in patients with known hypersensitivity to iodine, thyroid disorders, or kidney or liver disease. It is contraindicated during pregnancy and breastfeeding due to potential fetal harm and excretion in breast milk.

Erythema is a term used in medicine to describe redness of the skin, which occurs as a result of increased blood flow in the superficial capillaries. This redness can be caused by various factors such as inflammation, infection, trauma, or exposure to heat, cold, or ultraviolet radiation. In some cases, erythema may also be accompanied by other symptoms such as swelling, warmth, pain, or itching. It is a common finding in many medical conditions and can vary in severity from mild to severe.

Astringents are substances that cause the contraction of body tissues, particularly the skin and mucous membranes. They have the ability to shrink or constrict proteins in the skin or mucous membrane, leading to a tightening effect. This is often used in various medical and cosmetic applications.

In a medical context, astringents are often used to:

1. Dry up weeping or oozing wounds or sores.
2. Reduce local inflammation.
3. Control bleeding from minor cuts or wounds by constricting the blood vessels.

Commonly used astringent substances include tannins, found in plants like oak bark and witch hazel, as well as aluminum salts, found in some antiperspirants. Astringents are often applied topically in the form of lotions, gels, or solutions. However, they can also be used systemically, although this is less common.

It's important to note that while astringents have therapeutic uses, they can also cause skin irritation and dryness if not used properly. Therefore, it's recommended to follow the instructions provided by a healthcare professional or as directed on the product label.

The transverse colon is the section of the large intestine that runs horizontally across the abdomen, located between the ascending colon and the descending colon. It receives digested food material from the left side of the cecum via the transverse mesocolon, a double-layered fold of peritoneum that attaches it to the posterior abdominal wall.

The transverse colon is responsible for absorbing water, electrolytes, and vitamins from the digested food material before it moves into the distal sections of the large intestine. It also contains a large number of bacteria that help in the breakdown of complex carbohydrates and the production of certain vitamins, such as vitamin K and biotin.

The transverse colon is highly mobile and can change its position within the abdomen depending on factors such as respiration, digestion, and posture. It is also prone to various pathological conditions, including inflammation (colitis), diverticulosis, and cancer.

Lyme disease is not a "medical definition" itself, but it is a medical condition named after the town of Lyme, Connecticut, where it was first identified in 1975. Medical definitions for this disease are provided by authoritative bodies such as the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). According to the CDC, Lyme disease is a "infection caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected black-legged ticks."

The WHO defines Lyme borreliosis (LB), also known as Lyme disease, as "an infectious disease caused by spirochetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex. It is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected Ixodes spp. ticks."

Both definitions highlight that Lyme disease is a bacterial infection spread by tick bites, specifically from black-legged ticks (Ixodes scapularis in the United States and Ixodes pacificus on the Pacific Coast) or deer ticks (Ixodes ricinus in Europe). The primary cause of the disease is the spirochete bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi.

Clioquinol is an antimicrobial drug that contains a combination of clioquinal and hydrocortisone acetate. It is used topically to treat various skin infections and inflammatory conditions. Clioquinol has antibacterial and antifungal properties, while hydrocortisone acetate is a corticosteroid that reduces inflammation and suppresses the immune response.

Clioquinol was first synthesized in the 1930s and was widely used as an antidiarrheal medication until it was banned in many countries due to its association with a neurological disorder called subacute myelooptic neuropathy (SMON). However, topical clioquinol is still available in some countries for the treatment of skin conditions.

It's important to note that topical clioquinol should be used with caution and under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as it can cause skin irritation and sensitization in some individuals. Additionally, prolonged or excessive use of corticosteroids like hydrocortisone acetate can lead to thinning of the skin, increased susceptibility to infection, and other adverse effects.

Cation transport proteins are a type of membrane protein that facilitate the movement of cations (positively charged ions) across biological membranes. These proteins play a crucial role in maintaining ion balance and electrical excitability within cells, as well as in various physiological processes such as nutrient uptake, waste elimination, and signal transduction.

There are several types of cation transport proteins, including:

1. Ion channels: These are specialized protein structures that form a pore or channel through the membrane, allowing ions to pass through rapidly and selectively. They can be either voltage-gated or ligand-gated, meaning they open in response to changes in electrical potential or binding of specific molecules, respectively.

2. Ion pumps: These are active transport proteins that use energy from ATP hydrolysis to move ions against their electrochemical gradient, effectively pumping them from one side of the membrane to the other. Examples include the sodium-potassium pump (Na+/K+-ATPase) and calcium pumps (Ca2+ ATPase).

3. Ion exchangers: These are antiporter proteins that facilitate the exchange of one ion for another across the membrane, maintaining electroneutrality. For example, the sodium-proton exchanger (NHE) moves a proton into the cell in exchange for a sodium ion being moved out.

4. Symporters: These are cotransporter proteins that move two or more ions together in the same direction, often coupled with the transport of a solute molecule. An example is the sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT), which facilitates glucose uptake into cells by coupling its movement with that of sodium ions.

Collectively, cation transport proteins help maintain ion homeostasis and contribute to various cellular functions, including electrical signaling, enzyme regulation, and metabolic processes. Dysfunction in these proteins can lead to a range of diseases, such as neurological disorders, cardiovascular disease, and kidney dysfunction.

Pseudolymphoma is a term used to describe a benign reactive lymphoid hyperplasia that mimics the clinical and histopathological features of malignant lymphomas. It is also known as pseudolymphomatous cutis or reactive lymphoid hyperplasia.

Pseudolymphoma can occur in various organs, but it is most commonly found in the skin. It is usually caused by a localized immune response to an antigenic stimulus such as insect bites, tattoos, radiation therapy, or certain medications. The condition presents as a solitary or multiple nodular lesions that may resemble lymphoma both clinically and histologically.

Histologically, pseudolymphoma is characterized by a dense infiltrate of lymphocytes, plasma cells, and other immune cells, which can mimic the appearance of malignant lymphoma. However, unlike malignant lymphomas, pseudolymphomas lack cytological atypia, mitotic activity, and clonal proliferation of lymphoid cells.

Pseudolymphoma is usually a self-limiting condition that resolves spontaneously or with the removal of the antigenic stimulus. However, in some cases, it may persist or recur, requiring further evaluation and treatment to exclude malignant lymphoma.

The Borrelia burgdorferi group, also known as the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) complex, refers to a genetically related group of spirochetal bacteria that cause Lyme disease and other related diseases worldwide. The group includes several species, with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.), B. afzelii, and B. garinii being the most common and best studied. These bacteria are transmitted to humans through the bite of infected black-legged ticks (Ixodes scapularis in the United States and Ixodes pacificus on the West Coast; Ixodes ricinus in Europe).

Lyme disease is a multisystem disorder that can affect the skin, joints, nervous system, and heart. Early symptoms typically include a characteristic expanding rash called erythema migrans, fever, fatigue, headache, and muscle and joint pain. If left untreated, the infection can spread to other parts of the body and cause more severe complications, such as arthritis, neurological problems, and carditis.

Diagnosis of Lyme disease is based on a combination of clinical symptoms, exposure history, and laboratory tests. Treatment usually involves antibiotics, such as doxycycline, amoxicillin, or ceftriaxone, and is generally most effective when initiated early in the course of the illness. Preventive measures, such as using insect repellent, checking for ticks after being outdoors, and promptly removing attached ticks, can help reduce the risk of Lyme disease and other tick-borne infections.

... enteropathica Acropustulosis Acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans Papular acrodermatitis of childhood Dermatitis ... "Acrodermatitis". MedlinePlus. Retrieved 16 February 2013. "Acrodermatitis : definition on Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and ... Acrodermatitis /ac·ro·der·ma·ti·tis/ is a childhood form of dermatitis selectively affecting the hands and feet and may be ... repens "Acrodermatitis : definition on Dorland's Medical Dictionary for Health Consumers". TheFreeDictionary. Retrieved 17 ...
Acrodermatitis RESERVED, INSERM US14 -- ALL RIGHTS. "Orphanet: Acrodermatitis enteropathica". www.orpha.net. Retrieved 18 ... Acrodermatitis enteropathica, in terms of genetics, indicates that a mutation of the SLC39A4 gene on chromosome 8 q24.3 is ... Acrodermatitis enteropathica is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder affecting the uptake of zinc through the inner lining ... Individuals with acrodermatitis enteropathica may present with the following: Blistering of skin Dry skin Emotional lability ...
... (ACA) is a skin rash indicative of the third or late stage of European Lyme borreliosis. ... National Guideline Centre (UK) (2018). Evidence review for management of acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans: Lyme disease: ...
Danbolt-Closs syndrome (acrodermatitis enteropathica) was named after him and Karl Philipp Closs. Danbolt was born in Bergen, ... "Acrodermatitis enteropathica". Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center. Retrieved May 1, 2017. "Niels Chr. G. Danbolt". ...
Acrodermatitis continua is a form of localized psoriasis limited to the fingers and toes that may spread to the hands and feet ... Pustulosis palmaris et plantaris is another form of localized pustular psoriasis similar to acrodermatitis continua with ... Rosenberg, Benjamin E.; Strober, Bruce E. (2004-11-30). "Acrodermatitis continua". Dermatology Online Journal. 10 (3): 9. doi: ...
Acrodermatitis enteropathica, a condition in which the intestine cannot absorb zinc. Autoimmune enteropathy, a rare condition ... "Acrodermatitis enteropathica , Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) - an NCATS Program". rarediseases.info.nih. ... From 1-12 months, typical causes of chronic diarrhea are the following: Acrodermatitis enteropathica, a condition in which the ...
IHH Acrodermatitis enteropathica; 201100; SLC39A4 Acrokeratosis verruciformis; 101900; ATP2A2 Acromesomelic dysplasia, Hunter- ...
Über acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. Archiv für Dermatologie und Syphilis, Berlin, 1902, 61: 57-76. Ueber eine bei ... Herxheimer is credited with providing an early description of acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans (Taylor's disease), which is ...
Beigi, Pooya Khan Mohammd; Maverakis, Emanual (2015). "Acrodermatitis Enteropathica: A Clinician's Guide". {{cite journal}}: ... the intestine was also responsible for the decreased serum zinc levels observed in patients who have the disease Acrodermatitis ...
OMIM entry on ACRODERMATITIS ENTEROPATHICA, ZINC-DEFICIENCY TYPE; AEZ Beigi, Pooya Khan Mohammd; Maverakis, Emanual (2015). ... It is associated with acrodermatitis enteropathica. Solute carrier family ENSG00000285243 GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ... Acrodermatitis Enteropathica: A Clinician's Guide. Springer. ISBN 9783319178196. Retrieved 18 February 2017. v t e (Articles ... during zinc deficiency is inhibited by acrodermatitis enteropathica mutations". Mol. Cell. Biol. 29 (1): 129-39. doi:10.1128/ ...
... refers to acrodermatitis with pustular involvement. Types include: Pustulosis palmaris et plantaris Infantile ...
Thyresson N (1949). "The penicillin treatment of acrodermatitis atrophicans chronica (Herxheimer)". Acta Dermato-Venereologica ... Acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans is a chronic skin disorder observed primarily in Europe among the elderly. It begins as a ... except in cases of peripheral neuropathy associated with acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans, which usually is caused by ... physician Alfred Buchwald described a man who for 16 years had had a degenerative skin disorder now known as acrodermatitis ...
ZIP12 is most closely related to a similar transporter, ZIP4, which is mutated in the genetic disorder acrodermatitis ... "A novel member of a zinc transporter family is defective in acrodermatitis enteropathica". American Journal of Human Genetics. ... a gene involved in acrodermatitis enteropathica". Nature Genetics. 31 (3): 239-40. doi:10.1038/ng913. PMID 12068297. S2CID ...
Acrodermatitis enteropathica is a biochemical disorder of zinc metabolism. Diaper dermatitis in infancy Epidermal cysts ...
2001). "Expression pattern, genomic structure and evaluation of the human SLC30A4 gene as a candidate for acrodermatitis ... 2002). "ZNT4 gene is not responsible for acrodermatitis enteropathica in Japanese families". Hum. Genet. 110 (2): 201-2. doi: ... and exclusion as a candidate gene in different clinical variants of acrodermatitis enteropathica". Arch. Dermatol. Res. 293 (8 ...
Zinc deficiencies like acrodermatitis enteropathica, can lead to the loss of eyebrow/eyelash hair. Other deficiencies like ...
Acrodermatitis enteropathica is an inherited deficiency of the zinc carrier protein ZIP4 resulting in inadequate zinc ... Severe zinc deficiency is rare, and is mainly seen in persons with acrodermatitis enteropathica, a severe defect in zinc ... A review of pregnancy outcomes in women with acrodermatitis enteropathica, reported that out of every seven pregnancies, there ... In 1973 the first case of acrodermatitis enteropathica due to severe zinc deficiency was described. In 1974 the National ...
"The possible role of Diodoquin as a zinc ionophore in the treatment of acrodermatitis enteropathica". Biochemical and ...
Lethal Acrodermatitis or LAD is a lethal genetic degenerative disease found in Miniature Bull Terriers. It starts appearing in ...
... enhances zinc absorption in the zinc deficiency disorder acrodermatitis enteropathica, probably because ... "The possible role of Diodoquin as a zinc ionophore in the treatment of acrodermatitis enteropathica". Biochemical and ...
Two types of localized pustular psoriasis include psoriasis pustulosa palmoplantaris and acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau; ...
A disease that is similar to LS, acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Viral ...
Acrodermatitis enteropathica is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder causing impaired absorption of zinc, and is associated ...
While zinc deficiency is usually due to insufficient dietary intake, it can be associated with malabsorption, acrodermatitis ... acrodermatitis enteropathica and transient neonatal zinc deficiency as examples". Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and ...
While zinc deficiency is usually due to insufficient dietary intake, it can be associated with malabsorption, acrodermatitis ... Zinc supplement is an effective treatment for acrodermatitis enteropathica, a genetic disorder affecting zinc absorption that ... acrodermatitis enteropathica and transient neonatal zinc deficiency as examples". Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and ...
Journal of Cutaneous Diseases Including Syphilis, Volume 29 Philipp Josef Pick at Who Named It Acrodermatitis chronica ... a disorder also known as acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. He is credited for introducing iodoform into dermatology and for ...
... while Europe also includes a persistent skin condition called acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. Like the Borrelia that ...
... acrodermatitis enteropathica, ichthyosis and so on. The third kind is X-linked dominant inheritance, in this kind of ...
Research in Europe had found that erythema migrans and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans, another rash caused by ticks in ...
Dermatitis repens (acrodermatitis continua, acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau, acrodermatitis continua suppurativa Hallopeau ... acrodermatitis perstans, dermatitis repens Crocker, Hallopeau's acrodermatitis, Hallopeau's acrodermatitis continua, pustular ... infantile papular acrodermatitis, papular acrodermatitis of childhood, papulovesicular acrolocated syndrome) Giant condyloma ... Acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans (Herxheimer disease, primary diffuse atrophy) Actinic elastosis (solar elastosis) ...
Acrodermatitis enteropathica Acropustulosis Acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans Papular acrodermatitis of childhood Dermatitis ... "Acrodermatitis". MedlinePlus. Retrieved 16 February 2013. "Acrodermatitis : definition on Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and ... Acrodermatitis /ac·ro·der·ma·ti·tis/ is a childhood form of dermatitis selectively affecting the hands and feet and may be ... repens "Acrodermatitis : definition on Dorlands Medical Dictionary for Health Consumers". TheFreeDictionary. Retrieved 17 ...
Acrodermatitis enteropathica is a skin condition peculiar to children that may be accompanied by mild symptoms of fever and ... Acrodermatitis enteropathica is a skin condition peculiar to children that may be accompanied by mild symptoms of fever and ...
Acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE) classically refers to the inborn error of zinc metabolism that is inherited as an autosomal ... encoded search term (Pediatric Acrodermatitis Enteropathica) and Pediatric Acrodermatitis Enteropathica What to Read Next on ... Pediatric Acrodermatitis Enteropathica. Updated: Nov 03, 2021 * Author: Siva Subramanian, MD, FAAP; Chief Editor: Dirk M Elston ... Acrodermatitis enteropathica has been reported as a presentation of food allergy. Serum total immunoglobulin E (IgE) and food- ...
Acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE) classically refers to the inborn error of zinc metabolism that is inherited as an autosomal ... encoded search term (Pediatric Acrodermatitis Enteropathica) and Pediatric Acrodermatitis Enteropathica What to Read Next on ... Pediatric Acrodermatitis Enteropathica. Updated: Nov 03, 2021 * Author: Siva Subramanian, MD, FAAP; Chief Editor: Dirk M Elston ... Acrodermatitis enteropathica has been reported as a presentation of food allergy. Serum total immunoglobulin E (IgE) and food- ...
title = "Acrodermatitis enteropathica and an overview of zinc metabolism",. abstract = "Acrodermatitis enteropathica is a rare ... Acrodermatitis enteropathica and an overview of zinc metabolism. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. 2007 Jan;56(1 ... Acrodermatitis enteropathica and an overview of zinc metabolism. In: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. 2007 ; Vol ... Acrodermatitis enteropathica and an overview of zinc metabolism. Emanual Maverakis, Maxwell A. Fung, Peter J. Lynch, Michelle ...
Acrodermatitis enteropathica is a rare inherited form of zinc deficiency, characterized by periorificial and acral dermatitis, ... encoded search term (Acrodermatitis Enteropathica) and Acrodermatitis Enteropathica What to Read Next on Medscape ... Tabanlioglu D, Ersoy-Evans S, Karaduman A. Acrodermatitis enteropathica-like eruption in metabolic disorders: acrodermatitis ... Acrodermatitis Enteropathica Differential Diagnoses. Updated: Dec 13, 2013 * Author: Kristina Marie Dela Rosa, MD; Chief Editor ...
Acrodermatitis enteropathica is a rare inherited form of zinc deficiency, characterized by periorificial and acral dermatitis, ... encoded search term (Acrodermatitis Enteropathica) and Acrodermatitis Enteropathica What to Read Next on Medscape ... Tabanlioglu D, Ersoy-Evans S, Karaduman A. Acrodermatitis enteropathica-like eruption in metabolic disorders: acrodermatitis ... Acrodermatitis Enteropathica. Updated: Dec 13, 2013 * Author: Kristina Marie Dela Rosa, MD; Chief Editor: William D James, MD ...
Acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE) is a rare genetic disorder that affects the bodys ability to absorb zinc from the diet. Zinc ... Acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE) is a rare genetic disorder that affects the bodys ability to absorb zinc from the diet. Zinc ...
The following are lists of common microorganisms that cause acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans:[1][2][3][4][5][6] *Borrelia ... American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans causes All Images. X-rays. Echo & Ultrasound. CT ... However borrelia afzelii is not the exclusive etiologic agent of acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans and other microorganisms ... Based on numerous studies, majority of skin biopsies from acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans patients demonstrated borrelia ...
Acrodermatitis enteropathica is an inborn error of zinc metabolism which is inherited as an autosomal recessive disorder. It is ... Acrodermatitis enteropathica in Pakistan. Eur. J. Pediat. Dermatol. 17 (2):73-76. ... infections.The aim of this study was to determine the pattern frequency of these abnormalities in children with acrodermatitis ...
ICD-10-CM code L44.4 for Infantile papular acrodermatitis [Gianotti-Crosti] - Billable ... L44.4 is a valid billable ICD-10 diagnosis code for Infantile papular acrodermatitis [Gianotti-Crosti]. It is found in the 2023 ...
Viac o ochorení Lethal acrodermatitis (LAD) sa dočítate v ČLÁNKU na klubových stránkach SBC v sekcii Zdravie. ... Máme možnosť zakúpiť genetické testy na vyšetrenie ochorenia L.A.D. (Lethal Acrodermatitis) pre bullteriérov a miniatúrnych ...
Open the PDF for Highly Resistant Acrodermatitis Continua of Hallopeau and Pustular Psoriasis in another window ... View article titled, Highly Resistant Acrodermatitis Continua of Hallopeau and Pustular Psoriasis ...
Acrodermatitis continua L40.3 Pustulosis palmaris et plantaris L40.4 Guttate psoriasis L40.8 Other psoriasis ...
Acrodermatitis enteropathica. LYON JB. LYON JB. Proc R Soc Med. 1959 Dec;52(12):1029. Proc R Soc Med. 1959. PMID: 14419178 Free ...
Acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. No autochthonous US cases. Occurs in Europe (late manifestation). ...
Start your 7 day free trial. Trusted and used in more than 2,300 hospitals, large clinics, and medical schools to improve clinical decision-making.. Start Trial Subscriber Sign In ...
Acrodermatitis - illustration Acrodermatitis enteropathica is a skin condition peculiar to children that may be accompanied by ... Acrodermatitis - illustration Acrodermatitis enteropathica is a skin condition peculiar to children that may be accompanied by ... Gianotti-Crosti disease is also called acrodermatitis of childhood. These red, elevated lesions do not contain pus and can ... Gianotti-Crosti disease is also called acrodermatitis of childhood. These red, elevated lesions do not contain pus and can ...
Acrodermatitis enteropathica and an overview of zinc metabolism. J Am Acad Dermatol. (2007) 56:116-24. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad. ...
Jackson Weiss type[?] Acrocephaly pulmonary stenosis mental retardation[?] Acrodermatitis enteropathica[?] Acrodermatitis[?] ...
One case with widespread cutaneous eruption resembling acrodermatitis enteropathica was described, [30] as well as a patient ... Seyhan ME, Selimoglu MA, Ertekin V, Fidanoglu O, Altinkaynak S. Acrodermatitis enteropathica-like eruptions in a child with ... with manifestations of kwashiorkor and acrodermatitis enteropathica but with normal zinc levels, which led to the search for ...
Acrodermatitis Continua of Hallopeau. This photo shows pustular lesions on the tip of a finger in a patient with acrodermatitis ...
Lethal Acrodermatitis (Discovered in the Bull Terrier) Lethal acrodermatitis (LAD) is a disease characterized by poor growth, ...
Acrodermatitis enteropathica Acrodermatitis enteropathica (a rare, once fatal autosomal recessive disorder) causes ... Acrodermatitis Enteropathica in a Child. Visible characteristic findings include hair loss and facial psoriasiform dermatitis. ... Acrodermatitis Enteropathica With Severe Perianal and Perineal Dermatitis. Psoriasiform dermatitis has progressed to local ... Acrodermatitis Enteropathica With Paronychia. Dermatitis can involve the nail folds and progress to paronychia. ...
Lyme neuroborreliosis, acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans, and borrelial lymphocytoma, for example, are mostly restricted to ...
... noncataclysmal due to acrodermatitis. Hexameric, manacling, and générique atarax 10 mg acheter du vrai en ligne nonetheless ... opposing mousily ou acheter le vardenafil au maroc ungrating schizoprosopia and often indents throughout other acrodermatitis. ...
Acrodermatitis enteropathica (skin inflammation on the face and genitals). *Alopecia (baldness). *Psoriasis ...
  • This progressive skin disorder is due to the effect of chronic infection with the spirochete borrelia afzelii , which is the predominant cause of acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. (wikidoc.org)
  • However borrelia afzelii is not the exclusive etiologic agent of acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans and other microorganisms such as borrelia garinii and borrelia burgdorferi have also been detected. (wikidoc.org)
  • Based on numerous studies, majority of skin biopsies from acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans patients demonstrated borrelia afzelii . (wikidoc.org)
  • 1998). "Identification of three species of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, B. garinii, and B. afzelii) among isolates from acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans lesions" . (wikidoc.org)
  • 1997). "Detection of Borrelia afzelii, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia garinii and group VS116 by PCR in skin biopsies of patients with erythema migrans and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans" . (wikidoc.org)
  • Acrodermatitis enteropathica is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of zinc deficiency. (umn.edu)
  • Acrodermatitis enteropathica is a rare inherited form of zinc deficiency, characterized by periorificial and acral dermatitis, alopecia, and diarrhea. (medscape.com)
  • Acrodermatitis enteropathica is an autosomal recessive disorder postulated to occur as a result of mutations in the SLC39A4 gene located on band 8q24.3. (medscape.com)
  • Acrodermatitis enteropathica is an inborn error of zinc metabolism which is inherited as an autosomal recessive disorder. (ejpd.com)
  • Acrodermatitis enteropathica (a rare, once fatal autosomal recessive disorder) causes malabsorption of zinc. (msdmanuals.com)
  • A second genetic cause of acrodermatitis enteropathica is due to a genetic mutation in a breastfeeding mother. (medscape.com)
  • Case 1 was Papular Acrodermatitis of Childhood aka Gianotti-Crosti Syndrome. (otago.ac.nz)
  • Acrodermatitis /ac·ro·der·ma·ti·tis/ is a childhood form of dermatitis selectively affecting the hands and feet and may be accompanied by mild symptoms of fever and malaise. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is characterized by periorificial -oral, anal and genital-, acral dermatitis, anorexia, diarrhea, behavioral/mental changes, neurological disturbances, alopecia and secondary bacterial/fungal infections.The aim of this study was to determine the pattern frequency of these abnormalities in children with acrodermatitis enteropathica. (ejpd.com)
  • Viac o ochorení Lethal acrodermatitis (LAD) sa dočítate v ČLÁNKU na klubových stránkach SBC v sekcii Zdravie. (bullterrierclub.sk)
  • L44.4 is a valid billable ICD-10 diagnosis code for Infantile papular acrodermatitis [Gianotti-Crosti] . (icd10coded.com)
  • Atypical mycobacteriosis Generalized pustular psoriasis Acrodermatitis continua. (karger.com)
  • However, a number of other inborn errors of metabolism or diseases characterized by malnutrition may mimic acrodermatitis enteropathica and these have been termed acrodermatitis dysmetabolica. (medscape.com)
  • Tabanlioglu D, Ersoy-Evans S, Karaduman A. Acrodermatitis enteropathica-like eruption in metabolic disorders: acrodermatitis dysmetabolica is proposed as a better term. (medscape.com)
  • Acrodermatitis enteropathica-like eruption in an infant with nonketotic hyperglycinemia. (medscape.com)
  • [ 30 ] as well as a patient with manifestations of kwashiorkor and acrodermatitis enteropathica but with normal zinc levels, which led to the search for other metabolic disorders, and Hartnup disorder was confirmed. (medscape.com)
  • Aside from the severe rash of acrodermatitis enteropathica seen in profound zinc deficiency, the manifestations of zinc deficiency are protean and non-specific. (rusmedserv.com)
  • Acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE) is the clinical manifestation of zinc deficiency. (medscape.com)
  • Acrodermatitis enteropathica is a manifestation of severe zinc deficiency typically caused by an autosomal-recessive disease, through impaired absorption. (rusmedserv.com)
  • Niiyama S, Koelker S, Degen I, Hoffmann GF, Happle R, Hoffmann R. Acrodermatitis acidemica secondary to malnutrition in glutaric aciduria type I. Eur J Dermatol . (medscape.com)
  • Acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE) is a rare genetic disorder that affects the body's ability to absorb zinc from the diet. (overseas-doctor.com)
  • In infants with acrodermatitis enteropathica, an absence of this binding ligand may contribute to zinc malabsorption during weaning from breast milk. (medscape.com)
  • Acrodermatitis in breast-fed premature infants: evidence for a defect of mammary zinc secretion. (medscape.com)
  • Acrodermatitis enteropathica is a skin condition peculiar to children that may be accompanied by mild symptoms of fever and malaise. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Food allergy should be suspected in children with clinical symptoms of acquired acrodermatitis enteropathica. (medscape.com)
  • Differentiating acquired zinc deficiency disorders from acrodermatitis enteropathica is difficult because they have similar clinical presentations. (medscape.com)
  • Acrodermatitis enteropathica has been reported as a presentation of food allergy . (medscape.com)
  • [ 9 ] Acrodermatitis enteropathica can occur in children who are still breastfeeding if the levels of zinc are low in the breast milk. (medscape.com)
  • However, acrodermatitis enteropathica may also rarely occur in adults with severe nutritional deficiency. (rusmedserv.com)
  • Acrodermatitis enteropathica typically appears in the first few weeks after birth if the child is fed bovine milk or shortly after cessation of breastfeeding. (medscape.com)
  • The frequency of acrodermatitis enteropathica is unknown. (medscape.com)
  • Acrodermatitis is a skin disease which mainly affects the hands and feet, and might be accompanied by a slight fever. (wordinfo.info)
  • All races and genders are equally susceptible to milia, however, women tend to get the rare inflammatory milia (milia en plaque and eruptive milia) more frequently. (firstderm.com)
  • Although the condition is mostly harmless, the spots can turn into milia en plaque (a rare inflammatory condition). (firstderm.com)
  • A Zinc Sulphate-Resistant Acrodermatitis Enteropathica Patient with a Novel Mutation in SLC39A4 Gene. (medscape.com)
  • Perafan-Riveros C, Franca LF, Alves AC, Sanches JA Jr. Acrodermatitis enteropathica: case report and review of the literature. (medscape.com)
  • At the same time, mutations in the ECD can result in the zinc-deficiency disease Acrodermatitis enteropathica. (bvsalud.org)
  • Dysfunction of hZIP4 can result in the Zn2+ deficiency disease acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE). (bvsalud.org)
  • In such cases, doctors suspect acrodermatitis enteropathica. (msdmanuals.com)
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