Acridine Orange: A cationic cytochemical stain specific for cell nuclei, especially DNA. It is used as a supravital stain and in fluorescence cytochemistry. It may cause mutations in microorganisms.District of Columbia: A federal area located between Maryland and Virginia on the Potomac river; it is coextensive with Washington, D.C., which is the capital of the United States.AcridinesMinicomputers: Small computers that lack the speed, memory capacity, and instructional capability of the full-size computer but usually retain its programmable flexibility. They are larger, faster, and more flexible, powerful, and expensive than microcomputers.Guyana: A republic in the north of South America, east of VENEZUELA and west of SURINAME. Its capital is Georgetown.Myanmar: A republic of southeast Asia, northwest of Thailand, long familiar as Burma. Its capital is Yangon, formerly Rangoon. Inhabited by people of Mongolian stock and probably of Tibetan origin, by the 3d century A.D. it was settled by Hindus. The modern Burmese state was founded in the 18th century but was in conflict with the British during the 19th century. Made a crown colony of Great Britain in 1937, it was granted independence in 1947. In 1989 it became Myanmar. The name comes from myanma, meaning the strong, as applied to the Burmese people themselves. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p192 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p367)Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Citrus sinensis: A plant species of the genus CITRUS, family RUTACEAE that provides the familiar orange fruit which is also a source of orange oil.Aminoacridines: Acridines which are substituted in any position by one or more amino groups or substituted amino groups.Thailand: Formerly known as Siam, this is a Southeast Asian nation at the center of the Indochina peninsula. Bangkok is the capital city.Acridine Orange: A cationic cytochemical stain specific for cell nuclei, especially DNA. It is used as a supravital stain and in fluorescence cytochemistry. It may cause mutations in microorganisms.AcridinesStaining and Labeling: The marking of biological material with a dye or other reagent for the purpose of identifying and quantitating components of tissues, cells or their extracts.Citrus sinensis: A plant species of the genus CITRUS, family RUTACEAE that provides the familiar orange fruit which is also a source of orange oil.Aminoacridines: Acridines which are substituted in any position by one or more amino groups or substituted amino groups.Cell Nucleus: Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Mutagens: Chemical agents that increase the rate of genetic mutation by interfering with the function of nucleic acids. A clastogen is a specific mutagen that causes breaks in chromosomes.Fluorescent Dyes: Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.DNA Adducts: The products of chemical reactions that result in the addition of extraneous chemical groups to DNA.Histocytochemistry: Study of intracellular distribution of chemicals, reaction sites, enzymes, etc., by means of staining reactions, radioactive isotope uptake, selective metal distribution in electron microscopy, or other methods.Acridine Orange: A cationic cytochemical stain specific for cell nuclei, especially DNA. It is used as a supravital stain and in fluorescence cytochemistry. It may cause mutations in microorganisms.Zinc Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain zinc as an integral part of the molecule.AcridinesChlorides: Inorganic compounds derived from hydrochloric acid that contain the Cl- ion.Hexachlorophene: A chlorinated bisphenol antiseptic with a bacteriostatic action against Gram-positive organisms, but much less effective against Gram-negative organisms. It is mainly used in soaps and creams and is an ingredient of various preparations used for skin disorders. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p797)Zinc: A metallic element of atomic number 30 and atomic weight 65.38. It is a necessary trace element in the diet, forming an essential part of many enzymes, and playing an important role in protein synthesis and in cell division. Zinc deficiency is associated with ANEMIA, short stature, HYPOGONADISM, impaired WOUND HEALING, and geophagia. It is known by the symbol Zn.Staining and Labeling: The marking of biological material with a dye or other reagent for the purpose of identifying and quantitating components of tissues, cells or their extracts.Fluorescent Dyes: Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.Citrus sinensis: A plant species of the genus CITRUS, family RUTACEAE that provides the familiar orange fruit which is also a source of orange oil.Aminoacridines: Acridines which are substituted in any position by one or more amino groups or substituted amino groups.Acridine Orange: A cationic cytochemical stain specific for cell nuclei, especially DNA. It is used as a supravital stain and in fluorescence cytochemistry. It may cause mutations in microorganisms.AcridinesSalts: Substances produced from the reaction between acids and bases; compounds consisting of a metal (positive) and nonmetal (negative) radical. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Citrus sinensis: A plant species of the genus CITRUS, family RUTACEAE that provides the familiar orange fruit which is also a source of orange oil.Aminoacridines: Acridines which are substituted in any position by one or more amino groups or substituted amino groups.Staining and Labeling: The marking of biological material with a dye or other reagent for the purpose of identifying and quantitating components of tissues, cells or their extracts.Fluorescent Dyes: Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.Bromides: Salts of hydrobromic acid, HBr, with the bromine atom in the 1- oxidation state. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Ethidium: A trypanocidal agent and possible antiviral agent that is widely used in experimental cell biology and biochemistry. Ethidium has several experimentally useful properties including binding to nucleic acids, noncompetitive inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, and fluorescence among others. It is most commonly used as the bromide.Intercalating Agents: Agents that are capable of inserting themselves between the successive bases in DNA, thus kinking, uncoiling or otherwise deforming it and therefore preventing its proper functioning. They are used in the study of DNA.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Glass: Hard, amorphous, brittle, inorganic, usually transparent, polymerous silicate of basic oxides, usually potassium or sodium. It is used in the form of hard sheets, vessels, tubing, fibers, ceramics, beads, etc.Fixatives: Agents employed in the preparation of histologic or pathologic specimens for the purpose of maintaining the existing form and structure of all of the constituent elements. Great numbers of different agents are used; some are also decalcifying and hardening agents. They must quickly kill and coagulate living tissue.Microtomy: The technique of using a microtome to cut thin or ultrathin sections of tissues embedded in a supporting substance. The microtome is an instrument that hold a steel, glass or diamond knife in clamps at an angle to the blocks of prepared tissues, which it cuts in sections of equal thickness.Waxes: A plastic substance deposited by insects or obtained from plants. Waxes are esters of various fatty acids with higher, usually monohydric alcohols. The wax of pharmacy is principally yellow wax (beeswax), the material of which honeycomb is made. It consists chiefly of cerotic acid and myricin and is used in making ointments, cerates, etc. (Dorland, 27th ed)Formaldehyde: A highly reactive aldehyde gas formed by oxidation or incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. In solution, it has a wide range of uses: in the manufacture of resins and textiles, as a disinfectant, and as a laboratory fixative or preservative. Formaldehyde solution (formalin) is considered a hazardous compound, and its vapor toxic. (From Reynolds, Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p717)PicratesMedlinePlus: NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE service for health professionals and consumers. It links extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other reviewed sources of information on specific diseases and conditions.Paraffin: A mixture of solid hydrocarbons obtained from petroleum. It has a wide range of uses including as a stiffening agent in ointments, as a lubricant, and as a topical anti-inflammatory. It is also commonly used as an embedding material in histology.Methanol: A colorless, flammable liquid used in the manufacture of FORMALDEHYDE and ACETIC ACID, in chemical synthesis, antifreeze, and as a solvent. Ingestion of methanol is toxic and may cause blindness.
(1/413) Comparison of five methods of malaria detection in the outpatient setting.

In eastern Africa where 90% of the malaria is due to Plasmodium falciparum, the accuracy of malaria diagnosis at the outpatient level is becoming increasingly important due to problems of drug resistance and use of alternative, costly antimalarial drugs. The quantitative buffy coat (QBC) technique, acridine orange staining with an interference filter system, and the ParaSight-F test have been introduced as alternative methods to conventional microscopy for the diagnosis of malaria. Two hundred thirteen outpatients were tested using these alternative methods and conventional microscopy by five experienced technologists; two were randomly allocated to read the results of each test. Paired results showed the highest level of agreement with the ParaSight-F test (99%), followed by Field stain (92%). The results of the QBC technique showed the least agreement (73%). Using conventional microscopy as the reference standard, the ParaSight-F test had a sensitivity range of 90-92% and a specificity of 99%, staining with acridine orange had a sensitivity range of 77-96% and a specificity range of 81-98% and the QBC technique had a sensitivity range of 88-98% and a specificity range of 58-90%. All microscopic tests showed lower sensitivities (as low as 20% using staining with acridine orange) in detecting low parasitemias (< or = 320/microl) than the ParaSight-F test (70%). Due to the high cost of the ParaSight-F test, Field-stained blood films remain the most appropriate method for diagnosis of P. falciparum in eastern Africa. The ParaSight-F test may be used in situations where no trained microscopists are available, or where malaria is strongly suspected and the results of microscopy are negative.  (+info)

(2/413) Destruction of protamine in human sperm inhibits sperm binding and penetration in the zona-free hamster penetration test but increases sperm head decondensation and male pronuclear formation in the hamster-ICSI assay.

PURPOSE: Our purpose was to investigate the fertilizing ability of human protamine-damaged sperm in a heterologous system using hamster oocytes. METHODS: The protamine of the sperm were damaged by exposure to dithiothreitol, a disulfide-reducing agent. Their ability to penetrate and form male pronuclei were investigated using the zona-free hamster penetration test and the hamster-intracytoplasmic sperm injection assay, respectively. RESULTS: The zona-free hamster penetration test revealed that protamine-damaged sperm are unable to bind and penetrate the hamster oocyte. On the other hand, hamster-intracytoplasmic sperm injection assay results showed that 56.9% and 39.2% of the injected oocytes developed male pronuclei in protamine-damaged and live-intact sperm groups, respectively, with a significant difference in these rates (P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that protamine-damaged sperm are able to undergo sperm head decondensation and male pronuclear formation only when injected into the ooplasm, although they cannot bind and penetrate through the zona and enter the ooplasm.  (+info)

(3/413) Reactive oxygen species-induced apoptosis and necrosis in bovine corneal endothelial cells.

PURPOSE: The loss of corneal endothelial cells associated with aging and possibly other causes has been speculated to be related to exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS). The current study was conducted to investigate, by use of photosensitizers, the underlying mechanisms involved in the death of bovine corneal endothelial cells (BCENs) caused by ROS. METHODS: BCEN cells in primary culture were treated with a photosensitizer (riboflavin or rose bengal) with light exposure. The patterns of cell damage and death were assessed using an acridine orange-ethidium bromide differential staining method, TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, and transmission electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity was assayed by mitochondrial function using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) testing. Antioxidants, including catalase, L-histidine, salicylic acid, and superoxide dismutase, were used to determine the types of ROS involved. Activation of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB was examined by fluorescent immunocytochemistry with anti-p65 antibody. RESULTS: Light-irradiated riboflavin or rose bengal resulted in a significant decrease in viability of BCEN cells. Chromosomal condensation and fragmentation were observed in apoptotic cells, and membrane lysis and damage of cell ultrastructures were observed in necrotic cells. Riboflavin induced apoptosis at 30 minutes and thereafter and induced necrosis after 2 hours. Rose bengal was shown to cause similar effects within half the time required for the effects of riboflavin. Catalase and salicylic acid were found to provide protection for BCENs from cytotoxic effects of riboflavin, and L-histidine was found to protect BCENs from cytotoxicity induced by rose bengal. Kinetic studies using immunocytochemistry showed that NF-kappaB was translocated into the nucleus within 15 minutes and 30 minutes after treatment with rose bengal and riboflavin, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The cytotoxic effects of photo-irradiated riboflavin and rose bengal are shown to be mediated by two distinct but parallel pathways, one leading to apoptosis and the other to necrosis. Possible involvement of NF-kappaB in cell death is suggested. These findings provide potential leads for future investigation into the molecular mechanisms of loss of corneal endothelial cells related to aging, oxidative stress, and possibly other similar causes.  (+info)

(4/413) Differential chemosensitivity of breast cancer cells to ganciclovir treatment following adenovirus-mediated herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene transfer.

The development of resistance to radiation and chemotherapeutic agents that cause DNA damage is a major problem for the treatment of breast and other cancers. The p53 tumor suppressor gene plays a direct role in the signaling of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to DNA damage, and p53 gene mutations have been correlated with increased resistance to DNA-damaging agents. Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene transfer followed by ganciclovir (GCV) treatment is a novel tumor ablation strategy that has shown good success in a variety of experimental tumor models. However, GCV cytotoxicity is believed to be mediated by DNA damage-induced apoptosis, and the relationship between p53 gene status, p53-mediated apoptosis, and the sensitivity of human tumors to HSV-tk/GCV treatment has not been firmly established. To address this issue, we compared the therapeutic efficacy of adenovirus-mediated HSV-tk gene transfer and GCV treatment in two human breast cancer cell lines: MCF-7 cells, which express wild-type p53, and MDA-MB-468 cells, which express high levels of a mutant p53 (273 Arg-His). Treating MCF-7 cells with AdHSV-tk/GCV led to the predicted increase in endogenous p53 and p21WAF1/CIP1 protein levels, and apoptosis was observed in a significant proportion of the target cell population. However, treating MDA-MB-468 cells under the same conditions resulted in a much stronger apoptotic response in the absence of induction in p21WAF1/CIP1 protein levels. This latter result suggested that HSV-tk/GCV treatment can activate a strong p53-independent apoptotic response in tumor cells that lack functional p53. To confirm this observation, four additional human breast cancer cell lines expressing mutant p53 were examined. Although a significant degree of variability in GCV chemosensitivity was observed in these cell lines, all displayed a greater reduction in cell viability than MCF-7 or normal mammary cells treated under the same conditions. These results suggest that endogenous p53 status does not correlate with chemosensitivity to HSV-tk/GCV treatment. Furthermore, evidence for a p53-independent apoptotic response serves to extend the potential of this therapeutic strategy to tumors that express mutant p53 and that may have developed resistance to conventional genotoxic agents.  (+info)

(5/413) Evanescent-wave microscopy: a new tool to gain insight into the control of transmitter release.

Evanescent-wave excitation was used to visualize individual fluorescently labelled vesicles in an optical slice near the plasma membrane of bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. A standard upright microscope was modified to accommodate the optics used for directing a laser beam under a supracritical angle on to the glass-water interface on top of which the cells are grown. Whereas epi-illumination images appeared blurred and structureless, evanescent-wave excitation highlighted acridine orange-labelled vesicles as individual pinpoints. Three-dimensional (3D) trajectories of individual vesicles were obtained from time-resolved image stacks and used to characterize vesicles in terms of their average fluorescence F and mobility, expressed here as the 3D diffusion coefficient D(3). Based on the single-vesicle analysis, two groups of vesicles were identified. Transitions between these states were studied before and after stimulation of exocytosis by repetitive or maintained membrane depolarizations by elevated extracellular [K+]. Findings were interpreted as sequential transitions between the previously characterized pools of vesicles preceding the fusion step. The observed approach of vesicles to their docking sites was not explained in terms of free diffusion: most vesicles moved unidirectionally as if directed to their binding sites at the plasma membrane. Vesicle mobility at the membrane was low, such that the sites of docking and fusion were in close vicinity. Both the rim region and confined areas in the centre of the footprint region were the site of intense vesicle trafficking.  (+info)

(6/413) Arrest of endosome acidification by bafilomycin A1 mimics insulin action on GLUT4 translocation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

In insulin-sensitive fat and muscle cells, the major glucose transporter GLUT4 is constitutively sequestered in endosomal tubulovesicular membranes, and moves to the cell surface in response to insulin. While sequence information within GLUT4 appears to be responsible for its constitutive intracellular sequestration, the regulatory elements and mechanisms that enable this protein to achieve its unique sorting pattern under basal and insulin-stimulated conditions are poorly understood. We show here that arrest of endosome acidification in insulin-sensitive 3T3-L1 adipocytes by bafilomycin A1, a specific inhibitor of the vacuolar proton pump, results in the rapid and dose-dependent translocation of GLUT4 from the cell interior to the membrane surface; the effects of maximally stimulatory concentrations of bafilomycin A1 (400-800 nM) were equivalent to 50-65% of the effects of acute insulin treatment. Like insulin, bafilomycin A1 induced the redistribution of GLUT1 and Rab4, but not that of other proteins whose membrane localization has been shown to be insulin-insensitive. Studies to address the mechanism of this effect demonstrated that neither autophosphorylation nor internalization of the insulin receptor was altered by bafilomycin A1 treatment. Bafilomycin-induced GLUT4 translocation was not blocked by cell pretreatment with wortmannin. Taken together, these data indicate that arrest of endosome acidification mimics insulin action on GLUT4 and GLUT1 translocation by a mechanism distal to insulin receptor and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation, and suggest an important role for endosomal pH in the membrane dynamics of the glucose transporters.  (+info)

(7/413) Radiation-induced leukocyte entrapment in the rat retinal microcirculation.

PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of irradiation on leukocyte dynamics in the rat retinal microcirculation. METHODS: Thirty-five Brown-Norway rats received a dose of 10 Gy irradiation in one fraction. Leukocyte dynamics were studied with acridine orange digital fluorography, in which a nuclear fluorescent dye of acridine orange is used and examined by scanning laser ophthalmoscope. This technique allowed visualization of fluorescent leukocytes in vivo. The leukocyte dynamics were evaluated at 0, 4, 7, 14, 30, and 60 days after the irradiation. RESULTS: Mean leukocyte velocity in the retinal capillaries decreased immediately. It partially recovered on day 4 but then gradually decreased up to the 2-month mark. Low-dose irradiation induced entrapment of leukocytes in the retinal microcirculation. The number of entrapped leukocytes gradually increased with time. The major retinal vessels significantly constricted immediately after irradiation. The diameter was reduced by 76% in arteries and 75% in veins, 2 months after irradiation. CONCLUSIONS: Entrapped leukocytes may be activated and exacerbate vascular injury and microinfarction and thus may participate in the pathogenesis of radiation retinopathy.  (+info)

(8/413) Tick-borne relapsing fever imported from West Africa: diagnosis by quantitative buffy coat analysis and in vitro culture of Borrelia crocidurae.

West African tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF) is difficult to diagnose due to the low number of spirochetes in the bloodstream of patients. Previously, the causative microorganism, Borrelia crocidurae, had never been cultured in vitro. TBRF was rapidly diagnosed for two patients returning from western Africa with fever of unknown origin by quantitative buffy coat (QBC) analysis. Diagnosis was confirmed by intraperitoneal inoculation of blood specimens from patients into laboratory mice. In vitro experiments showed that QBC analysis may be as much as 100-fold more sensitive than thick smear. Spirochetes were also cultured from blood samples from both patients in modified Kelly's medium and were identified as B. crocidurae by partial sequencing of the PCR-amplified rrs gene.  (+info)

*  Vital stain
Hathaway WE, Newby LA, Githens JH (1964). "THE ACRIDINE ORANGE VIABILITY TEST APPLIED TO BONE MARROW CELLS. I. CORRELATION WITH ...
*  Acridine orange
... using acridine orange is specified in methods for the microbial examination of food and water. The use of acridine orange in ... and seawater samples can be achieved using acridine orange. Acridine orange direct count (AODC) methodology has been used in ... Acridine orange emission changes from yellow, to orange, to red fluorescence as the pH drops in acidic vacuole of the living ... Acridine orange is useful for enumerating the microbes in a sample. Acridine dyes are prepared via the condensation of 1,3- ...
*  Acridine yellow
... damages DNA and is used as a mutagen in microbiology. Acridine yellow is similar to acridine orange. Acridine ... Acridine yellow, also known as acridine yellow G, acridine yellow H107, basic yellow K, and 3,6-diamino-2,7-dimethylacridine, ... It is a derivate of acridine. In histology, it is used as a fluorescent stain, and as a fluorescent probe for non-invasive ...
*  Fluorophore
Acridine derivatives: proflavin, acridine orange, acridine yellow, etc. Arylmethine derivatives: auramine, crystal violet, ... DRAQ7 and CyTRAK Orange Pyrene derivatives: cascade blue, etc. Oxazine derivatives: Nile red, Nile blue, cresyl violet, oxazine ...
*  Metachromasia
Acta 883: 173-177 Notes Darzynkiewicz Z, Kapuscinski J. (1990)"Acridine Orange, a Versatile Probe of Nucleic Acids and Other ... Another example of metachromatic dye (fluorochrome) is acridine orange. Under certain conditions it stains single-stranded ...
*  Lysosome
Traganos F, Darzynkiewicz Z.(1994) Lysosomal proton pump activity: supravital cell staining with acridine orange differentiates ...
*  Microbial loop
1977). Bacterial cells were counted with an epifluorescence microscope, producing what is called an "acridine orange direct ...
*  Microscopy with UV surface excitation
Several dyes have been studied for MUSE's application, including eosin, rhodamine, DAPI, Hoechst, acridine orange, propidium ...
*  Buffy coat
The blood is taken in a QBC capillary tube which is coated with acridine orange (a fluorescent dye) and centrifuged; the ...
*  CD47
Affected cells do not exhibit hallmarks of apoptosis but rather autophagy as seen by staining with acridine orange and ...
*  Borrelia turicatae
B. turicatae is best visualized by dark-field microscopy, but the organisms can also be detected using acridine orange or ...
*  Cardiolipin
M Garciafernandez; D Ceccarelli; U Muscatello (2004). "Use of the fluorescent dye 10-N-nonyl acridine orange in quantitative ... Jacobson J, Duchen MR, Heales SJ (2002). "Intracellular distribution of the fluorescent dye nonyl acridine orange responds to ... Based on this special structure, the fluorescent mitochondrial indicator, nonyl acridine orange (NAO) was introduced in 1982, ... "Staining of mitochondrial membranes with 10-nonyl acridine orange, MitoFluor Green, and Mito-Tracker Green is affected by ...
*  Lactalbumin
Apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry on PBMC from HIV infected individuals (cells were stained with acridine orange and ...
*  Apicomplexan life cycle
... as revealed by acridine orange staining and PCR-based diagnoses". Tropical Medicine & International Health. 3 (4): 304-312. doi ...
*  Helicobacter pylori
... acridine orange stain, and phase-contrast microscopy. It is capable of forming biofilms and can convert from spiral to a ...
*  Cell cycle analysis
An exception is the metachromatic fluorochrome acridine orange, which under the specific staining protocol can differentially ... or DNA susceptibility to denaturation at low pH using the metachromatic dye acridine orange, reveals the G1Q, G1A, and G1B cell ... Aside from propidium iodide and acridine orange, quantifiable dyes that are frequently used include (but are not limited to) ...
*  Acridine
... and related derivatives (such as amsacrine) bind to DNA and RNA due to their abilities to intercalate. Acridine orange ... Acridine is easily oxidized by peroxymonosulfuric acid to the acridine amine oxide. The carbon 9-position of acridine is ... biologically active acridines, applications of acridines, new syntheses and reactions of acridines] Synthesis of acridone in ... Acridine and its homologues are weakly basic. Acridine is a photobase which have a ground state pKa of 5.1, which is similar to ...
*  List of MeSH codes (D03)
... acridine orange MeSH D03.494.046.250.177 --- acriflavine MeSH D03.494.046.250.200 --- aminacrine MeSH D03.494.046.250.225 --- ...
*  List of IARC Group 3 carcinogens
Further details can be found in the IARC Monographs Acenaphthene Acepyrene Aciclovir Acridine orange Acriflavinium chloride ... acridine Benz[c]acridine Benzo[g]chrysene Benzo[a]fluoranthene Benzo[ghi]fluoranthene Benzo[a]fluorene Benzo[b]fluorene Benzo[c ... Orange I Orange G Oxyphenbutazone Palygorskite (attapulgite) (short fibres, < 5 micrometers) Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) ... metallic Chrysene Chrysoidine CI Acid Orange 3 Cimetidine Cinnamyl anthranilate CI Pigment Red 3 Citrinin Clofibrate Clomiphene ...
*  Photodermatitis
Psoralens, coal tars, photo-active dyes (eosin, acridine orange) Musk ambrette, methylcoumarin, lemon oil (may be present in ... In these areas an unsightly orange to brown tint may form, usually near or on the face. Many medications and conditions can ...
*  Apoptotic DNA fragmentation
The flow-cytometric assay utilizing the fluorochrome acridine orange shows that DNA fragmentation within individual cells is ...
*  GelGreen
Ethidium bromide GelRed SYBR Green I Agarose gel electrophoresis and gel electrophoresis of nucleic acids Acridine orange US ... GelGreen is structurally closely related to acridinium orange and consists of two acridinium orange subunits that are bridged ... Its fluorophore, and therefore its optical properties, are essentially identical to those of other N-alkylacridinium orange ...
*  Escherichia coli in molecular biology
... and then in 1985 of the F plasmid by acridine orange curing.[citation needed] Strains derived from MG1655 include DH1, parent ...
*  2,4-Diaminotoluene
Its reaction with benzenediazonium chloride gives the cationic azo dye Basic Orange 1. Condensation of 2,4-diaminotoluene with ... acetaldehyde gives the acridine dye called Basic Yellow 9. "NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards #0620". National Institute ...
*  Ethacridine lactate
It forms orange-yellow crystals with a melting point of 226 °C and it has a stinging smell. Its primary use is as an antiseptic ... is an aromatic organic compound based on acridine. Its formal name is 2-ethoxy-6,9-diaminoacridine monolactate monohydrate. ...
*  Acriflavine
It has the form of an orange or brown powder. It may be harmful in the eyes or if inhaled. It is a dye and it stains the skin ... It is derived from acridine. Commercial preparations are often mixtures with proflavine. It is known by a variety of commercial ...
Acridine Orange  Acridine Orange
... Joanne Lannigan joannelannigan at virginia.edu Mon Jun 7 15:20:40 EST 2004 *Previous message: Acridine Orange ... Acridine Orange , , Does anyone routinely run acridine orange through their , FACScan/FACSort? I would like suggestions for ...
more infohttps://lists.purdue.edu/pipermail/cytometry/2004-June/026822.html
Acridine Orange  Acridine Orange
... Does anyone routinely run acridine orange through their FACScan/FACSort? I would like suggestions for cleaning ... Acridine Orange. DARZYNKIEWICZ ZBIGNIEW Z_DARZYNKIEWICZ at nymc.edu Mon Jun 7 14:47:50 EST 2004 *Previous message: Parts to ... We do routinely use acridine orange using FACScan. A 20 min rinse with 10 times water-diluted Chlorox bleach is adequate to ...
more infohttps://lists.purdue.edu/pipermail/cytometry/2004-June/026821.html
Acridine orange hemi(zinc chloride) salt | Abcam  Acridine orange hemi(zinc chloride) salt | Abcam
... acridine hydrochloride zinc chloride double salt (CAS 10127-02-3), a cell-permeable metachromatic fluorescent cationic DNA and ... Acridine orange for cell sorting of sputum.. J Histochem Cytochem 27:552-6 (1979). Read more (PubMed: 86576) » ... The use of thionin and acridine orange in staining semithin sections of plant material embedded in epoxy resin.. Stain Technol ... Analysis of single- and double-stranded nucleic acids on polyacrylamide and agarose gels by using glyoxal and acridine orange. ...
more infohttp://www.abcam.com/acridine-orange-hemizinc-chloride-salt-ab146348.html
Acridine Orange
     Summary Report | CureHunter  Acridine Orange Summary Report | CureHunter
Acridine Orange: A cationic cytochemical stain specific for cell nuclei, especially DNA. It is used as a supravital stain and ... Acridine Orange; Diamine, Tetramethyl Acridine; Orange 3RN, Basic; Orange Base, Acridine; Orange, Acridine; Orange, Rhoduline; ... 3,6-Bis(dimethylamino)acridine; Acridine Orange Base; Basic Orange 3RN; C.I. 46005; C.I. Basic Orange 14; Rhoduline Orange; ... Acridine Orange. Subscribe to New Research on Acridine Orange A cationic cytochemical stain specific for cell nuclei, ...
more infohttp://www.curehunter.com/public/keywordSummaryD000165-Acridine-Orange.do
Acridine orange - Wikipedia  Acridine orange - Wikipedia
... using acridine orange is specified in methods for the microbial examination of food and water. The use of acridine orange in ... and seawater samples can be achieved using acridine orange. Acridine orange direct count (AODC) methodology has been used in ... Acridine orange emission changes from yellow, to orange, to red fluorescence as the pH drops in acidic vacuole of the living ... Acridine orange is useful for enumerating the microbes in a sample. Acridine dyes are prepared via the condensation of 1,3- ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acridine_orange
Acridine Orange hemi(zinc chloride) salt from Sigma-Aldrich  Acridine Orange hemi(zinc chloride) salt from Sigma-Aldrich
Acridine orange has been used as a fluorescent stain for nucleic acids in agarose and polyacrylamide gels. Acridine orange at a ... Acridine Orange hemi(zinc chloride) salt from Sigma-Aldrich,Application: ... Acridine orange; 10 mg/mL solution in water from AnaSpec. 2. Acridine orange 10-nonyl bromide from AnaSpec. 3. Acridine orange ... Acridine orange has been used as a fluorescent stain for nucleic acids in agarose and polyacrylamide gels. Acridine orange at a ...
more infohttp://www.bio-medicine.org/biology-products/Acridine-Orange-hemi-28zinc-chloride-29-salt-from-Sigma-Aldrich-1874-1/
Acridine Orange  Acridine Orange
By Leo Chan,2018-06-20T20:27:59+00:00May 20th, 2015,Categories: Cellometer Application News,Tags: Acridine Orange, Propidium ...
more infohttps://www.nexcelom.com/tag/acridine-orange/
Acridine orange, C.I. 46005 | Polysciences, Inc.  Acridine orange, C.I. 46005 | Polysciences, Inc.
A grade of acridine orange of exceptionally high purity, suitable for quantitative work. Free of inorganic salts. ... Polysciences' grade of acridine orange is of exceptionally high purity, suitable for quantitative work. It is free of inorganic ... Acridine orange is a nucleic acid-selective fluorescent cationic dye useful for cell cycle determination. It emits green ... We offer a highly purified form of acridine orange while most of the other commercially available grades are either of low ...
more infohttp://www.polysciences.com/chinese/catalog-products/life-sciences/fluorescent-dyes-stains/acridine-orange-ci-46005-very-high/
Acridine orange, C.I. 46005 | Polysciences, Inc.  Acridine orange, C.I. 46005 | Polysciences, Inc.
A grade of acridine orange of exceptionally high purity, suitable for quantitative work. Free of inorganic salts. ... Polysciences' grade of acridine orange is of exceptionally high purity, suitable for quantitative work. It is free of inorganic ... Acridine orange is a nucleic acid-selective fluorescent cationic dye useful for cell cycle determination. It emits green ... We offer a highly purified form of acridine orange while most of the other commercially available grades are either of low ...
more infohttp://www.polysciences.com/default/catalog-products/life-sciences/fluorescent-dyes-stains/acridine-orange-ci-46005-very-high/
Rapid Diagnosis of Bacteremia in Adults Using Acridine Orange Stained Buffy Coat Smears  Rapid Diagnosis of Bacteremia in Adults Using Acridine Orange Stained Buffy Coat Smears
The use of acridine orange stained buffy coat smears was assessed as a rapid screening test for bacteremia in adults. A total ... Rapid Diagnosis of Bacteremia in Adults Using Acridine Orange Stained Buffy Coat Smears. Mark Miller1,2 and Jack Mendelson1 ... Compared to blood culture, the overall sensitivity of acridine orange stained buffy coat smears was 16%, specificity 88%, and ... from which a buffy coat smear was prepared and stained with acridine orange (100 mg/L; pH 3.0). Forty-one of 356 blood samples ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/cjidmm/1990/159215/abs/
Diagnosis of malaria by acridine orange fluorescent microscopy in an endemic area of venezuela.  - PubMed - NCBI  Diagnosis of malaria by acridine orange fluorescent microscopy in an endemic area of venezuela. - PubMed - NCBI
Diagnosis of malaria by acridine orange fluorescent microscopy in an endemic area of venezuela.. Bosch I1, Bracho C, Pérez HA. ... Fluorescent (acridine orange) microscopical examination of capillary centrifuged blood (quantitative buffy coat [QBC] analysis ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8734954?dopt=Abstract
DMC reduces proliferation in GBM cells. Acridine orange | Open-i  DMC reduces proliferation in GBM cells. Acridine orange | Open-i
Acridine orange staining was used to visualize apoptosis in A172 (A) and U87 (B). Cells were treated with 0, 10 or 100 n ... Acridine orange staining was used to visualize apoptosis in A172 (A) and U87 (B). Cells were treated with 0, 10 or 100 ng/ml ... Acridine orange staining was used to visualize apoptosis in A172 (A) and U87 (B). Cells were treated with 0, 10 or 100 ng/ml ... After 24h, cells were stained using acridine orange dye. Mentions: To confirm that the combinatorial effects described above ...
more infohttps://openi.nlm.nih.gov/detailedresult.php?img=PMC4554544_40064_2014_Article_1207_Fig5_HTML&req=4
Comparison of the automicrobic system, acridine orange-stained smears, and gram-stained smears in detecting bacteriuria. |...  Comparison of the automicrobic system, acridine orange-stained smears, and gram-stained smears in detecting bacteriuria. |...
Comparison of the automicrobic system, acridine orange-stained smears, and gram-stained smears in detecting bacteriuria.. B A ... We compared the accuracy of the Gram-stained smear, the acridine orange-stained smear, and the AutoMicrobic system (AMS; Vitek ... For 1,024 clinical specimens, results with the acridine orange-stained smear and the Gram-stained smear were very similar. When ... Comparison of the automicrobic system, acridine orange-stained smears, and gram-stained smears in detecting bacteriuria. ...
more infohttps://jcm.asm.org/content/22/2/176
10127-02-3 - Acridine Orange - 3,6-Bis(dimethylamino)acridine hydrochloride zinc chloride double salt - C.I. 46005 - L13159 -...  10127-02-3 - Acridine Orange - 3,6-Bis(dimethylamino)acridine hydrochloride zinc chloride double salt - C.I. 46005 - L13159 -...
Zhang, Y.; Pan, J.; Zhang, G.; Zhou, X. Intercalation of herbicide propyzamide into DNA using acridine orange as a fluorescence ... Silica nanoparticles assisted photodegradation of acridine orange in aqueous suspensions. Appl. Catal., B 2015, 168-169, 363- ... An RNA polymerase inhibitorAcridine Orange acts as a lysosomal dye. It is used for cell-cycle studies. It plays an important ...
more infohttps://www.alfa.com/en/catalog/L13159/
Utility of Acridine Orange staining for detection of bacteria from positive blood cultures, Journal Of Microbiological Methods ...  Utility of Acridine Orange staining for detection of bacteria from positive blood cultures, Journal Of Microbiological Methods ...
"Utility of Acridine Orange staining for detection of bacteria from positive blood cultures, Journal Of Microbiological Methods ... Utility of Acridine Orange staining for detection of bacteria from positive blood cultures. Utility of Acridine Orange staining ... Utility of Acridine Orange staining for detection of bacteria from positive blood cultures. Neeraja, M.; Lakshmi, V.; Padmasri ... Evaluation of acridine orange staining as a replacement of subcultures for BacT/ALERT-positive, Gram stain-negative blood ...
more infohttps://www.deepdyve.com/lp/elsevier/utility-of-acridine-orange-staining-for-detection-of-bacteria-from-gNiZzevdxQ
Metal complex mediated conjugation of peptides to nucleus targeting acridine orange: a modular concept for dual-modality...  Metal complex mediated conjugation of peptides to nucleus targeting acridine orange: a modular concept for dual-modality...
Zelenka, K; Borsig, L; Alberto, R (2011). Metal complex mediated conjugation of peptides to nucleus targeting acridine orange: ... With this concept, we have conjugated the acridine orange part to a bombesin peptide directly on the (99m)Tc core and in one ... With this concept, we have conjugated the acridine orange part to a bombesin peptide directly on the (99m)Tc core and in one ... We have synthesized acridine orange derivatives which comprise an imidazole-2-carbaldehyde function for coordination to the Re( ...
more infohttps://www.zora.uzh.ch/id/eprint/60360/
Acridine orange | ISB Server Wahoo  Acridine orange | ISB Server Wahoo
Will try new PBS first, then a concentration gradient of acridine orange. ... Acridine orange. Fri, 08/03/2012 - 20:01 - kdorfman Sigma A8097-10 mL ...
more infohttps://wahoo.cns.umass.edu/content/acridine-orange
Acridine Orange, Certified 25 g - Lab Supplies - Products - CN Tech  Acridine Orange, Certified 25 g - Lab Supplies - Products - CN Tech
Not meant for drug, food household use ,/p, ,p, (Basic Orange 14) C,sub,17,/sub,H,sub,2,/sub,ON,sub,3,/sub, Cl F.W. 301.82 CAS ... Basic Orange 14) C17H2ON3 Cl F.W. 301.82 CAS #65-61-2 ...
more infohttps://www.cntech.co.uk/products/lab-supplies/acridine-orange-certified
Acridine orange staining of virus infected host cells to monitor proli by Ronald Bartzatt  "Acridine orange staining of virus infected host cells to monitor proli" by Ronald Bartzatt
The interaction of acridine orange with target molecules (i.e. DNA and RNA) is by intercalation or electrostatic attraction, ... This work presents methodology and results of a cell staining that utilizes acridine orange fluoresence. It is possible to ... Acridine orange staining is a methodology for nucleic acid selective metachromatic staining that is useful for following cell ... The interaction of acridine orange with target molecules (i.e. DNA and RNA) is by intercalation or electrostatic attraction, ...
more infohttps://digitalcommons.unomaha.edu/chemfacpub/27/
The effect of acridine orange on the early steps of protein biosynthesis in tissue culture cells  The effect of acridine orange on the early steps of protein biosynthesis in tissue culture cells
Reference: Liapunova E.A., Zelenin A.V., The effect of acridine orange on the early steps of protein biosynthesis in tissue ... The effect of acridine orange on the early steps of protein biosynthesis in tissue culture cells. ...
more infohttp://pbmc.ibmc.msk.ru/index.php/en/article/PBMC-1966-12-2-218-en
  • The staining has to be performed at an acid pH in order to obtain this differential staining effect with bacteria showing orange stain and tissue components yellow to green. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since then the use of acridine orange has been performed frequently in the examination of soil and water for microbial content. (wikipedia.org)
  • Direct epifluoresent filter technique (DEFT) using acridine orange is specified in methods for the microbial examination of food and water. (wikipedia.org)
  • Liapunova E.A., Zelenin A.V., The effect of acridine orange on the early steps of protein biosynthesis in tissue culture cells, Voprosy meditsinskoi khimii, 1966, vol: 12(2), 218-220. (msk.ru)
  • They also determined that the best estimation of the bacterial population in lake, river, and seawater samples can be achieved using acridine orange. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bright orange organisms are easily detected against a black to faint green background. (wikipedia.org)