A mitosporic fungal genus with many reported ascomycetous teleomorphs. Cephalosporin antibiotics are derived from this genus.
Poisoning by the ingestion of plants or its leaves, berries, roots or stalks. The manifestations in both humans and animals vary in severity from mild to life threatening. In animals, especially domestic animals, it is usually the result of ingesting moldy or fermented forage.
An enzyme that converts ascorbic acid to dehydroascorbic acid. EC 1.10.3.3.
A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.
A compound formed when iodoacetic acid reacts with sulfhydryl groups in proteins. It has been used as an anti-infective nasal spray with mucolytic and expectorant action.
Mycoses are a group of diseases caused by fungal pathogens that can infect various tissues and organs, potentially leading to localized or systemic symptoms, depending on the immune status of the host.
A group of broad-spectrum antibiotics first isolated from the Mediterranean fungus ACREMONIUM. They contain the beta-lactam moiety thia-azabicyclo-octenecarboxylic acid also called 7-aminocephalosporanic acid.
Poisoning caused by ingesting ergotized grain or by the misdirected or excessive use of ergot as a medicine.
A series of structurally-related alkaloids containing the ergotaman backbone structure.
An order of fungi in the phylum ASCOMYCOTA that includes a number of species which are parasitic on higher plants, insects, or fungi. Other species are saprotrophic.
A mitosporic fungal species used in the production of penicillin.
An unnatural amino acid that is used experimentally to study protein structure and function. It is structurally similar to METHIONINE, however it does not contain SULFUR.
A metabolite in the principal biochemical pathway of lysine. It antagonizes neuroexcitatory activity modulated by the glutamate receptor, N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE; (NMDA).
A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.
A mitosporic fungal genus occurring in soil or decaying plant matter. It is structurally similar to Penicillium.

Contaminations occurring in fungal PCR assays. (1/240)

Successful in vitro amplification of fungal DNA in clinical specimens has been reported recently. In a collaboration among five European centers, the frequency and risk of contamination due to airborne spore inoculation or carryover contamination in fungal PCR were analyzed. The identities of all contaminants were specified by cycle sequencing and GenBank analysis. Twelve of 150 PCR assays that together included over 2,800 samples were found to be contaminated (3.3% of the negative controls were contaminated during the DNA extraction, and 4.7% of the PCR mixtures were contaminated during the amplification process). Contaminants were specified as Aspergillus fumigatus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Acremonium spp. Further analysis showed that commercially available products like zymolyase powder or 10x PCR buffer may contain fungal DNA. In conclusion, the risk of contamination is not higher in fungal PCR assays than in other diagnostic PCR-based assays if general precautions are taken.  (+info)

Chemical modification of NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase from Cephalosporium acremonium evidence of essential histidine and lysine groups at the active site. (2/240)

NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase from Cephalosporium acremonium CW-19 has been inactivated by diethyl pyrocarbonate following a first-order process giving a second-order rate constant of 3.0 m-1. s-1 at pH 6.5 and 25 degrees C. The pH-inactivation rate data indicated the participation of a group with a pK value of 6.9. Quantifying the increase in absorbance at 240 nm showed that six histidine residues per subunit were modified during total inactivation, only one of which was essential for catalysis, and substrate protection analysis would seem to indicate its location at the substrate binding site. The enzyme was not inactivated by 5, 5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate), N-ethylmaleimide or iodoacetate, which would point to the absence of an essential reactive cysteine residue at the active site. Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate reversibly inactivated the enzyme at pH 7.7 and 5 degrees C, with enzyme activity declining to an equilibrium value within 15 min. The remaining activity depended on the modifier concentration up to about 2 mm. The kinetic analysis of inactivation and reactivation rate data is consistent with a reversible two-step inactivation mechanism with formation of a noncovalent enzyme-pyridoxal 5'-phosphate complex prior to Schiff base formation with a probable lysyl residue of the enzyme. The analysis of substrate protection shows the essential residue(s) to be at the active site of the enzyme and probably to be involved in catalysis.  (+info)

High performance liquid chromatography of natural products. I. Separation of cephalosporin C derivatives and cephalosporin antibiotics;isolation of cephalosporin C from fermentation broth. (3/240)

Microbonded propylamine silica with a solvent system containing acetic acid, methanol, acetonitrile and water (2:4:7.5:86.5) is suitable for an efficient separation of mixtures containing several closely related cephem derivatives. The same system with preparative columns was used for the isolation of cephalosporin C directly from the filtered broth of C. acremonium fermentation.  (+info)

RIT 2214, a new biosynthetic penicillin produced by a mutant of Cephalosporium acremonium. (4/240)

A number of lysine-requiring auxotrophs of Cephalosporium acremonium were investigated for incorporation of side-chain precursors and for accumulation of beta-lactam compounds. One of the auxotrophs, Acremonium chrysogenum ATCC 20389, producing cephalosporin C and penicillin N only if grown in media supplemented with DL-alpha-amino-adipic acid (DL-alpha-AAA), was found to use L-S-carboxymethylcysteine (L-CMC) as a side-chain precursor for the synthesis of a new penicillin (RIT 2214). No corresponding cephalosporin was detected. The penicillin present in the culture filtrate, was concentrated by adsorption on activated carbon and successive column chromatography on Amberlite IRA-68 and Amberlite XAD-4. Final purification was achieved by cellulose column chromatography. RIT 2214 was identified as 6-(D)-[(2-amino-2-carboxy)-ethylthio]-acetamido]-penicillanic acid by spectral analysis, bioactivity spectrum, elucidation of side-chain structure and finally by semisynthesis. Its biological properties were also evaluated.  (+info)

Fungi from geothermal soils in Yellowstone National Park. (5/240)

Geothermal soils near Amphitheater Springs in Yellowstone National Park were characterized by high temperatures (up to 70 degrees C), high heavy metal content, low pH values (down to pH 2.7), sparse vegetation, and limited organic carbon. From these soils we cultured 16 fungal species. Two of these species were thermophilic, and six were thermotolerant. We cultured only three of these species from nearby cool (0 to 22 degrees C) soils. Transect studies revealed that higher numbers of CFUs occurred in and below the root zone of the perennial plant Dichanthelium lanuginosum (hot springs panic grass). The dynamics of fungal CFUs in geothermal soil and nearby nongeothermal soil were investigated for 12 months by examining soil cores and in situ mesocosms. For all of the fungal species studied, the temperature of the soil from which the organisms were cultured corresponded with their optimum axenic growth temperature.  (+info)

Quantitative assessment of in planta distribution of metabolic activity and gene expression of an endophytic fungus. (6/240)

Using perennial ryegrass infected with an Acremonium transformant carrying the Escherichia coli beta-D-glucuronidase gene (gusA) (GUS system) under control of a constitutive promoter, we have developed methods for the quantitative extraction of endophyte-associated GUS activity from plant material. Fluorometric assays of these extracts allow quantitative assessment of the distribution of endophyte-associated GUS activity within single plants (tillers) with high resolution. Fluorescence microscopy with the dye Imagene Green can in addition visualize individual GUS-expressing hyphae. Since the transformant expresses the GUS gene constitutively, GUS activity can be used as an indicator of in planta endophyte metabolic activity. Using this approach we found that (i) the concentration of endophyte metabolic activity in plant tissue decreases with increasing plant size, (ii) approximately 70% of endophyte metabolic activity present in a plant is located in the leaf sheaths, (iii) basal-apical gradients and lateral (younger to older tissue) gradients of endophyte metabolic activity exist and (iv) basal-apical gradients are established early in leaf development. Our data suggest that the concentration of endophyte in each part of the plant is regulated so that a predetermined threshold of total endophyte activity per plant is not exceeded and a consistent distribution pattern is maintained.  (+info)

Influence of consumption of endophyte-infested tall fescue hay on performance of heifers and lambs. (7/240)

Two experiments were conducted to evaluate performance and physiological responses of heifers and lambs to Neotyphodium coenophialum-infested tall fescue hay fed under European rearing conditions. Endophyte-free (E-) or 100% endophyte-infested (E+) hay was derived from the same cultivar (cv. Clarine) so that the effect of the endophytic fungus could be clearly separated from a possible cultivar effect. In Exp. 1, starting in June 1996, 20 age- and body weight-paired Holstein dairy heifers were assigned for 97 d to one of two treatments consisting of ad libitum access to either E- or E+ hay, corresponding to 0 and .41 mg/kg ergovaline, respectively. During the experimental period, no significant difference (P>.20) in forage consumption, rectal temperature, or behavioral status of the animals was observed between the two treatments. The E+ diet induced a 10% apparent decrease in ADG and a clear reduction in prolactin (PRL) plasma concentration compared to the E- diet. When animals were all reassigned to a common endophyte-free diet, the E+ group recovered body weight and PRL to levels similar to those in animals fed E- after 7 wk. In Exp. 2, 30 Texel ram lambs were assigned to two treatments consisting of dietary E- or E+ tall fescue hay. The E- and E+ hays were harvested from the same plots as used in Exp. 1 and contained 0 and .96 mg/kg ergovaline, respectively. No effect of the endophyte was found on intake or carcass or testicle weight (P>.20) after the 95-d feeding period. The E+ treatment resulted in a slight reduction in BW at slaughter, mainly explained by a lower ruminal fill (P<.01). In E+ treated animals, prolactin concentrations dropped significantly (P<.001) from d 27. Hay assessment in both experiments showed no difference in chemical composition and IVDMD. The endophytic fungus strongly lowered the palatability of the E+ hay, although there was no effect on intake with heifers (Exp. 1) or with lambs (Exp. 2). The potential of severe heat stress, as expressed by the temperature humidity index, was not high in our experimental conditions, although they were considered rather unusually stressful for the western part of northern Europe. Yet, no economic effect on cattle was observed, in disagreement with results obtained in many previous U.S. studies.  (+info)

The fungal CPCR1 protein, which binds specifically to beta-lactam biosynthesis genes, is related to human regulatory factor X transcription factors. (8/240)

Here we report the isolation and characterization of a novel transcription factor from the cephalosporin C-producing fungus Acremonium chrysogenum. We have identified a protein binding site in the promoter of the beta-lactam biosynthesis gene pcbC, located 418 nucleotides upstream of the translational start. Using the yeast one-hybrid system, we succeeded in isolating a cDNA clone encoding a polypeptide, which binds specifically to the pcbC promoter. The polypeptid shows significant sequence homology to human transcription factors of the regulatory factor X (RFX) family and was designated CPCR1. A high degree of CPCR1 binding specificity was observed in in vivo and in vitro experiments using mutated versions of the DNA binding site. The A. chrysogenum RFX protein CPCR1 recognizes an imperfect palindrome, which resembles binding sites of human RFX transcription factors. One- and two-hybrid experiments with truncated versions of CPCR1 showed that the protein forms a DNA binding homodimer. Nondenaturing electrophoresis revealed that the CPCR1 protein exists in vitro solely in a multimeric, probably dimeric, state. Finally, we isolated a homologue of the cpcR1 gene from the penicillin-producing fungus Penicillium chrysogenum and determined about 60% identical amino acid residues in the DNA binding domain of both fungal RFX proteins, which show an overall amino acid sequence identity of 29%.  (+info)

"Acremonium" is a genus of filamentous fungi that are commonly found in soil, decaying vegetation, and water. Some species of Acremonium can cause infections in humans, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems. These infections can affect various organs and tissues, including the skin, nails, lungs, and eyes.

The medical definition of "Acremonium" is therefore a type of fungus that can cause a variety of infectious diseases, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. It's important to note that Acremonium infections are relatively rare, but they can be serious and require prompt medical treatment.

Plant poisoning is a form of poisoning that occurs when someone ingests, inhales, or comes into contact with any part of a plant that contains toxic substances. These toxins can cause a range of symptoms, depending on the type and amount of plant consumed or exposed to, as well as the individual's age, health status, and sensitivity to the toxin.

Symptoms of plant poisoning may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, difficulty breathing, skin rashes, seizures, or in severe cases, even death. Some common plants that can cause poisoning include poison ivy, poison oak, foxglove, oleander, and hemlock, among many others.

If you suspect plant poisoning, it is important to seek medical attention immediately and bring a sample of the plant or information about its identity if possible. This will help healthcare providers diagnose and treat the poisoning more effectively.

Ascorbate oxidase is an enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) to dehydroascorbic acid in the presence of oxygen. This reaction also results in the production of water and hydrogen peroxide as byproducts. Ascorbate oxidase plays a significant role in regulating the levels of ascorbic acid in plants, where it is primarily found. It belongs to the family of copper-containing oxidoreductases. The enzyme's active site contains two copper ions that facilitate the electron transfer during the catalytic process. Ascorbate oxidase is not considered essential for human health since humans do not produce ascorbic acid and must obtain it through dietary sources.

Poaceae is not a medical term but a taxonomic category, specifically the family name for grasses. In a broader sense, you might be asking for a medical context where knowledge of this plant family could be relevant. For instance, certain members of the Poaceae family can cause allergies or negative reactions in some people.

In a medical definition, Poaceae would be defined as:

The family of monocotyledonous plants that includes grasses, bamboo, and sedges. These plants are characterized by narrow leaves with parallel veins, jointed stems (called "nodes" and "internodes"), and flowers arranged in spikelets. Some members of this family are important food sources for humans and animals, such as rice, wheat, corn, barley, oats, and sorghum. Other members can cause negative reactions, like skin irritation or allergies, due to their silica-based defense structures called phytoliths.

Carbocisteine is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs known as mucolytic agents. It works by breaking down and thinning mucus in the airways, making it easier to cough up and clear the airways. This can help to relieve symptoms of respiratory conditions such as chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, and cystic fibrosis.

The chemical name for carbocisteine is S-carboxymethylcysteine. It is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and syrup, and is typically taken by mouth several times a day. As with any medication, it's important to follow the dosage instructions provided by your healthcare provider and to be aware of potential side effects and interactions with other medications.

Mycoses are a group of diseases caused by fungal infections. These infections can affect various parts of the body, including the skin, nails, hair, lungs, and internal organs. The severity of mycoses can range from superficial, mild infections to systemic, life-threatening conditions, depending on the type of fungus and the immune status of the infected individual. Some common types of mycoses include candidiasis, dermatophytosis, histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and aspergillosis. Treatment typically involves antifungal medications, which can be topical or systemic, depending on the location and severity of the infection.

Cephalosporins are a class of antibiotics that are derived from the fungus Acremonium, originally isolated from seawater and cow dung. They have a similar chemical structure to penicillin and share a common four-membered beta-lactam ring in their molecular structure.

Cephalosporins work by inhibiting the synthesis of bacterial cell walls, which ultimately leads to bacterial death. They are broad-spectrum antibiotics, meaning they are effective against a wide range of bacteria, including both Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms.

There are several generations of cephalosporins, each with different spectra of activity and pharmacokinetic properties. The first generation cephalosporins have a narrow spectrum of activity and are primarily used to treat infections caused by susceptible Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

Second-generation cephalosporins have an expanded spectrum of activity that includes some Gram-negative organisms, such as Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae. Third-generation cephalosporins have even broader spectra of activity and are effective against many resistant Gram-negative bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

Fourth-generation cephalosporins have activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms, including some that are resistant to other antibiotics. They are often reserved for the treatment of serious infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria.

Cephalosporins are generally well tolerated, but like penicillin, they can cause allergic reactions in some individuals. Cross-reactivity between cephalosporins and penicillin is estimated to occur in 5-10% of patients with a history of penicillin allergy. Other potential adverse effects include gastrointestinal symptoms (such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea), neurotoxicity, and nephrotoxicity.

Ergotism is a condition that results from the consumption of ergot alkaloids, which are found in ergot fungus that infects grains such as rye. There are two types of ergotism: convulsive and gangrenous. Convulsive ergotism can cause seizures, muscle spasms, vomiting, and mental disturbances. Gangrenous ergotism, on the other hand, can lead to constriction of blood vessels, resulting in dry gangrene of the extremities, which can ultimately require amputation. Ergotism has been known since ancient times and was once a significant public health problem before modern agricultural practices were implemented.

Ergotamines are a type of medication that is derived from the ergot fungus (Claviceps purpurea). They are primarily used to treat migraines and cluster headaches. Ergotamines work by narrowing blood vessels around the brain, which helps to alleviate the symptoms of migraines and headaches.

Ergotamines are available in various forms, including tablets, suppositories, and injectable solutions. They can be taken orally, rectally, or intravenously, depending on the severity of the symptoms and the patient's medical history. Ergotamines should be used with caution, as they can cause serious side effects such as nausea, vomiting, muscle pain, and weakness.

Ergotamines are also used in the treatment of other conditions, including postpartum hemorrhage, heart failure, and high blood pressure during pregnancy. However, their use in these conditions is typically reserved for cases where other treatments have been ineffective or contraindicated.

It's important to note that ergotamines can interact with a variety of medications, including certain antidepressants, antibiotics, and HIV medications. Therefore, it's essential to inform your healthcare provider about all the medications you are taking before starting treatment with ergotamines.

Hypocreales is an order of fungi in the class Sordariomycetes. This group includes many species that are saprophytic (growing on dead or decaying organic matter) as well as pathogenic, causing various diseases in plants and animals. Some notable members of Hypocreales include the genera Trichoderma, Hypocrea, Nectria, and Fusarium. These fungi are characterized by their perithecial ascomata (sexual fruiting bodies) and often produce colorful, flask-shaped structures called ascostromata. Some species in this order produce toxic compounds known as mycotoxins, which can have harmful effects on humans and animals if ingested or inhaled.

"Penicillium chrysogenum" is a species of filamentous fungi that is commonly found in the environment, particularly in soil and decaying vegetation. It is a member of the genus Penicillium, which includes several species that are known for their ability to produce penicillin, a group of antibiotics used to treat various bacterial infections.

"Penicillium chrysogenum" is one of the most important industrial producers of penicillin. It was originally identified as a separate species from "Penicillium notatum," which was the first species discovered to produce penicillin, but it is now considered to be a strain or variety of "Penicillium rubrum" or "Penicillium camemberti."

The fungus produces penicillin as a secondary metabolite, which means that it is not essential for the growth and development of the organism. Instead, penicillin is produced under certain conditions, such as nutrient limitation, to help the fungus compete with other microorganisms in its environment.

In addition to its medical importance, "Penicillium chrysogenum" also has industrial applications in the production of enzymes and other biomolecules. However, it can also cause food spoilage and allergic reactions in some individuals, so it is important to handle this organism with care.

Norleucine is not typically defined in a medical context, but it is a chemical compound used in research and biochemistry. It is an unnatural amino acid that is sometimes used as a substitute for the naturally occurring amino acid methionine in scientific studies. Norleucine has a different side chain than methionine, which can affect the properties of proteins when it is substituted for methionine.

In terms of its chemical structure, norleucine is a straight-chain aliphatic amino acid with a four-carbon backbone and a carboxyl group at one end and an amino group at the other end. It has a branched side chain consisting of a methyl group and an ethyl group.

While norleucine is not typically used as a therapeutic agent in medicine, it may have potential applications in the development of new drugs or in understanding the functions of proteins in the body.

2-Aminoadipic acid (2-AAA) is a type of amino acid that is formed as a byproduct of the metabolism of lysine, which is an essential amino acid. It is not commonly considered a building block of proteins, but it does play a role in various biochemical pathways in the body.

Abnormally high levels of 2-AAA have been found in certain medical conditions, such as genetic disorders of lysine metabolism and in some neurodegenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. However, it is not currently clear whether elevated levels of 2-AAA are a cause or a consequence of these conditions.

Research is ongoing to better understand the role of 2-AAA in human health and disease.

Fungi, in the context of medical definitions, are a group of eukaryotic organisms that include microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, as well as the more familiar mushrooms. The study of fungi is known as mycology.

Fungi can exist as unicellular organisms or as multicellular filamentous structures called hyphae. They are heterotrophs, which means they obtain their nutrients by decomposing organic matter or by living as parasites on other organisms. Some fungi can cause various diseases in humans, animals, and plants, known as mycoses. These infections range from superficial, localized skin infections to systemic, life-threatening invasive diseases.

Examples of fungal infections include athlete's foot (tinea pedis), ringworm (dermatophytosis), candidiasis (yeast infection), histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and aspergillosis. Fungal infections can be challenging to treat due to the limited number of antifungal drugs available and the potential for drug resistance.

Gliocladium is a genus of fungi that belongs to the family Hypocreaceae. It includes several species that are found in various environments, such as soil, decaying plant material, and insects. Some species of Gliocladium are known to produce a variety of bioactive compounds with potential applications in medicine, agriculture, and industry.

One notable species is Gliocladium roseum (also known as Trichoderma roseum), which has been studied for its ability to produce enzymes that break down cellulose and lignin, making it useful in the bioremediation of pollutants and the production of biofuels.

However, it's worth noting that some species of Gliocladium can also be opportunistic pathogens, causing infections in immunocompromised individuals. Therefore, it's important to handle these fungi with care and avoid exposure when possible.

... acutatum Acremonium alabamense Acremonium alcalophilum Acremonium alternatum Acremonium antarcticum Acremonium apii ... Acremonium arxii Acremonium atrogriseum Acremonium bacillisporum Acremonium bactrocephalum Acremonium biseptum Acremonium ... blochii Acremonium borodinense Acremonium brachypenium Acremonium breve Acremonium brunnescens Acremonium byssoides Acremonium ... Acremonium curvulum Acremonium cymosum Acremonium dichromosporum Acremonium diospyri Acremonium domschii Acremonium egyptiacum ...
Cases involving different species of Acremonium are often reported as simply as an Acremonium species, which reduces the amount ... Acremonium strictum grows readily at 30 °C on glucose peptone agar, showing mycelium of approximately 50mm in size in 7 days. ... The genus Acremonium is a large polyphyletic genus of approximately 150 species, many of which are derived from a closely ... In Maclura cochinchinensis, Acremonium strictum acts as an endophytic fungi that infects primarily the leaves of the plant. In ...
The species was first named as Acremonium atrum in 1837 by Corda. Then in 1871, Harz named it Monosporium acremonioides. In ... "Acremonium atrum". www.mycobank.org. "Monosporium acremonioides". www.mycobank.org. Hotson, John William (1912). "Culture ...
John F. Peberdy (1987). Penicillium and Acremonium. Springer Science & Business Media. ISBN 0306423456. Visagie, C. M.; ...
John F. Peberdy (2013). Penicillium and Acremonium. Springer Science & Business Media. ISBN 1489919864. John I. Pitt (1979). ...
doi:10.1016/S0007-1536(70)80016-X. John F. Peberdy (1987). Penicillium and Acremonium. Springer Science & Business Media. ISBN ...
John F. Peberdy (1987). Penicillium and Acremonium. Springer Science & Business Media. ISBN 0306423456. Scott, D. B.; Stolk, A ...
ISBN 978-3-13-179282-2. John F. Peberdy (2013). Penicillium and Acremonium. Springer Science & Business Media. ISBN 978-1-4899- ...
John F. Peberdy (1987). Penicillium and Acremonium. Springer Science & Business Media. ISBN 0306423456. Q. Ashton Acton (2013 ...
MycoBank Straininfo of Penicillium humuli UniProt ATCC John F. Peberdy (1987). Penicillium and Acremonium. Springer Science & ...
Peberdy, John F (1987). Penicillium and Acremonium. New York: Plenum Press. ISBN 978-0306423451. Georghiou, G. P. (2012). Pest ...
John F. Peberdy (1987). Penicillium and Acremonium. Springer Science & Business Media. ISBN 0306423456. (Articles with short ...
John F. Peberdy (2013). Penicillium and Acremonium. Springer Science & Business Media. ISBN 978-1489919861. MycoBank UniProt D. ...
Gams divided Acremonium into three major sections: Acremonium, Gliomastix, and Nectriodea. Acremonium comprises four major ... Moreover, since S. kiliense use to belong to the genus Acremonium, it was noted that species from this genus can degrade ... Khosla, K.; Gupta, A.K. (4 April 2016). "First report of Acremonium kiliense causing fruit rot of pears in India". New Disease ... Penicillium and Acremonium. Peberdy, John F., 1937-. New York: Plenum Press. 1987. ISBN 978-0306423451. OCLC 15696667.{{cite ...
John F. Peberdy (2013). Penicillium and Acremonium. Springer Science & Business Media. ISBN 1489919864. V. Betina (1993). ...
John F. Peberdy (2013). Penicillium and Acremonium. Springer Science & Business Media. ISBN 9058231593. (Articles with short ...
Peberdy JF (2013). Penicillium and Acremonium. Springer Science & Business Media. ISBN 1489919864. (Articles with short ...
John F. Peberdy (2013). Penicillium and Acremonium. Springer Science & Business Media. ISBN 1489919864. John I. Pitt, Ailsa D. ...
John F. Peberdy (1987). Penicillium and Acremonium. Springer Science & Business Media. ISBN 0306423456. (Articles with short ...
Sigler, Lynne; Zuccaro, Alga; Summerbell, Richard C.; Mitchell, Julian; Paré, Jean A. (2004). "Acremonium exuviarum sp. nov., a ... Zuccaro, Alga; Summerbell, Richard C.; Gams, Walter; Schroers, Hans-Josef; Mitchell, Julian I. (2004). "A new Acremonium ... Teberdinia hygrophila a northern and alpine soil fungus Acremonium fuci, an endophyte of brown marine algae in the genus Fucus ... Acremonium exuviarum, from shed skin of lizard Fusarium delphinoides, from diseased succulent plant Hoodia gordonii and from ...
Peberdy, John F. (11 November 2013). Penicillium and Acremonium. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 222. ISBN 978-1-4899- ...
John F. Peberdy (2013). Penicillium and Acremonium. Springer Science & Business Media. ISBN 978-1489919861. MycoBank Straininfo ...
of the order microascales). The mitosporic Acremonium spp. degrade PAhs and Royal Demolition Explosive (RDX), and Graphium spp ...
2011). Gams (1971) placed Gliomastix in a section of Acremonium. Matsushima (1975) placed Acremonium masseei and Acremonium ... 2011) agreed with Gams's concept and accepted Gliomastix as a section of Acremonium. However, Summerbell et al. (2011) did not ... Acremonium cerealis and A. inflatum. Maharachchikumbura et al. (2015), and Hyde et al. (2020a) followed the treatment of ... "Acremonium phylogenetic overview and revision of Gliomastix, Sarocladium, and Trichothecium". SIM. 68: 139-162. doi:10.3114/sim ...
Acremonium/grass interactions: plenary papers. (Hume, D.E.; Latch, G.C.M. & Easton, H.S., eds.) Palmerston North, NZ: ... West, C.P. & Gwinn, K.D. (1993). Role of Acremonium in drought, pest and disease tolerance of grasses. In: Proc. 2nd Int. Symp ... Acremonium/Grass interactions (Quisenberry, S.S. & Joost, R.E., eds.) Baton Rouge: Louisiana Agriculture Experiment Station. ... West, C.P.; Izekor, E.; Oosterhuis, D.M.; Robbins, R.T. (1988). "The effect of Acremonium coenophialum on the growth and ...
Ceccherelli P, Fringuelli R, Madruzza GF (1975). "Cerevisterol and ergosterol peroxide from Acremonium luzulae". Phytochemistry ... Acremonium luzulae, and Pencillium herquei, as well as the lichens Ramalina hierrensis and Stereocaulon azoreum. It has also ...
These include the cephalosporin producing Acremonium chrysogenum. Geldanamycin is produced by Streptomyces hygroscopicus. ...
A fungus of the genus Cephalosporium (now renamed Acremonium strictum) was able to decrease the dissemination of silver scurf ... "Mycoparasitism of Helminthosporium solani by Acremonium strictum". Phytopathology. 97 (10): 1331-1337. doi:10.1094/PHYTO-97-10- ...
"Acremonium uncinatum, a new endophyte in Festuca pratensis". Mycotaxon. 37: 67-71. (Articles with short description, Short ...
An endophyte of Festuca arundinacea and the anamorph of Epichloe typhina, new taxa in one of two new sections of Acremonium". ... Glenn AE, Bacon CW, Price R, Hanlin RT (1996). "Molecular phylogeny of Acremonium and its taxonomic implications". Mycologia. ... of genus Acremonium. In a molecular phylogenetic study in 1996, Glenn and colleagues found the genus to be polyphyletic and ...
Acremonium acutatum Acremonium alabamense Acremonium alcalophilum Acremonium alternatum Acremonium antarcticum Acremonium apii ... Acremonium arxii Acremonium atrogriseum Acremonium bacillisporum Acremonium bactrocephalum Acremonium biseptum Acremonium ... blochii Acremonium borodinense Acremonium brachypenium Acremonium breve Acremonium brunnescens Acremonium byssoides Acremonium ... Acremonium curvulum Acremonium cymosum Acremonium dichromosporum Acremonium diospyri Acremonium domschii Acremonium egyptiacum ...
Taxonomy information for Acremonium charticola. Find diseases associated with this biological target and compounds tested ...
Klein RE Acremonium Isolates From Stipa Robusta Mycologia 1996 88(4):539-547 ... The Acremonium isolates from Stipa robusta are slow growing and spores produced by these fungi exhibited considerable variation ... The endophytic fungus belongs to the genus Acremonium. Plants infected with these endophytic fungi are known to have a narcotic ... Serological tests demonstrated that the Stipa endophytes were related to Acremonium endophytes from other grasses. ...
Recent advances in molecular phylogenies, revealed that Acremonium is highly polyphyletic and members of Acremonium s. lat. ... Acremonium has been recognised as a taxonomically difficult group of ascomycetes, due to the reduced and high plasticity of ... Acremonium is acknowledged as a highly ubiquitous genus including saprobic, parasitic, or endophytic fungi that inhabit a ... A total of 633 cultures with acremonium-like morphology, including 261 ex-type cultures from 89 countries and a variety of ...
Acremonium chrysogenum. A moderately rapid growing fungus that produces a yellow colony when incubated at 25oC (77oF). It is a ...
Acremonium mould is one of the most common mould species with the potential to cause serious health concerns. Learn More here. ... What causes Acremonium mould? Acremonium and most other mould types that grow in Australian homes need three things to survive ... Where can Acremonium grow in the house? If you suspect Acremonium mould in your home, chances are moisture is the culprit. ... Acremonium Species There are around 150 species in the Acremonium genus and find their habitat in decaying plant material. Some ...
the Mycocentral database contains centralized and combined informations on mycotoxins and fungis.
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General information about Acremonium byssoides (ACREBY)
ACREMONIUM STRICTUM injection, solution. ALTERNARIA TENUIS (alternaria tenuis a alternata) injection, solution. ASPERGILLUS ...
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In addition, the protease secreted by Acremonium sp. L1-4B presented a combination of biochemical characteristics that grants a ... Acremonium sp. L1-4B isolated from lichen in Antarctica was used to produce extracellular proteases through submerged ... Acremonium sp. L1-4B isolated from lichen in Antarctica was used to produce extracellular proteases through submerged ... In addition, the protease secreted by Acremonium sp. L1-4B presented a combination of biochemical characteristics that grants a ...
Kim, BM, Kim, SW & Yang, DR 2003, Cybernetic modeling of the cephalosporin C fermentation process by Cephalosporium acremonium ... Cybernetic modeling of the cephalosporin C fermentation process by Cephalosporium acremonium. Byung Min Kim, Seung Wook Kim, ... Cybernetic modeling of the cephalosporin C fermentation process by Cephalosporium acremonium. / Kim, Byung Min; Kim, Seung Wook ... Cybernetic modeling of the cephalosporin C fermentation process by Cephalosporium acremonium. Biotechnology letters. 2003 Apr; ...
Stand persistence of tall fescue pasture cultivars free of or infested with Acremonium coenophialum HA Fribourg, JC Waller, JH ...
1 Aspergillus/Acremonium. Controversy has existed over whether the disease is infectious or allergic. Manning and Holman ...
Over the past 2 decades, allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) has become increasingly defined. Historically mistaken for a paranasal sinus tumor, allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) now is believed to be an allergic reaction to aerosolized environmental fungi, usually of the dematiaceous species, in an immunocompetent host.
Acremonium lolii. in vitro: cytotoxic, cytostatic, genotoxic effects in lymphocytes [85]; 2 mM (24h) damages DNA in HepG2, A549 ...
Acremonium alcalophilum is the only known cellulolytic fungus that thrives in alkaline conditions and can be cultured readily ... We identified a lipA gene in the genome sequence of Acremonium alcalophilum, encoding a protein with a predicted lipase domain ... The genome sequence of Acremonium alcalophilum has revealed a large number of genes encoding biomass-degrading enzymes. Among ... Identification of the Acremonium alcalophilum lipase. With the recent genome sequencing of the alkaliphilic fungus Acremonium ...
i,Acremonium lolii,/i,, ergovaline and peramine production in endophyte-infected perennial ryegrass Authors. * O.J-P. Ball ... O.J-P. Ball, R.A. Prestidge, The effect of the endophytic fungus Acremonium lolii on adult black beetle (Heteronychus arator) ... O.J-P. Ball, M.J. Christensen, R.A. Prestidge, Effect of selected isolates of Acremonium endophytes on adult black beetle ( ...
Acremonium. Acremonium is a type of mold that can commonly be found in bathrooms. While it is not as dangerous as some other ...
Pseudo-outbreak of Lecanicillium and Acremonium species in orthopedic surgery patients. J Clin Microbiol 2012; 50(12): 4103-6. ...
ACREMONIUM. Acremonium mold is a very toxigenic mold type that results in its appearance over time. It first starts as a little ... Acremonium mold is more often pink, grey, orange, or white. Acremonium grows in household systems and areas such as compression ... 5 common types of mold in homes, Building health design tips, Property acremonium toxic advice ... Exposure to acremonium is hazardous, and it can lead to infection in the bone marrow, immune system, and even other organs. ...
Acremonium, and Fusarium spp. (5,7). F. oxysporum, the causative agent in the outbreak we report, occurs in plants and soil and ... Acremonium in 4 cases, Exophiala in 1 case, and an undetermined type in 1 case. In addition, 93 cases had negative cultures and ...
and Acremonium sp., with the ambrosia beetle Euwallacea nr. fornicatus in avocado. VIII World Avocado Congress. Lima, Peru. ... and Acremonium sp., in symbiosis with the ambrosia beetle Euwallacea nr. fornicates. 35th Israeli Phytopathological Society ...
Categories: Acremonium Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, CopyrightRestricted 16 ...
Acremonium). N. coenophialum. Tall fescue toxins (endophyte toxins): ergot alkaloids, lolines, N. lolli. Tall fescue toxins ( ...
A novel compound called sesquiterpene isolated from Acremonium sp. also showed strong antioxidant activity (Elfita et al., 2012 ... Elfita, E., Muharni, M., Munawar, M., and Rizki, R. (2012). Isolation of antioxidant compound from endophytic fungi Acremonium ...
Type Acremonium alternatum Link 1809 (Designated by Clements & Shear, Gen. fung., Edn 2 (Minneapolis): 386. 1931). Registration ... Acremonium Link, Mag. Gesell. naturf. Freunde, Berlin 3(1-2): 15 (1809) ...
  • Cephalosporium acremonium var. (nih.gov)
  • Acremonium, like Fusarium, thrives in moist conditions. (cnbusinessnews.com)
  • OTUs belonging to the orders Hypocreales and Pleosporales comprised the majority of samples (45% and 34% respectively) and the five most common taxa isolated were Acremonium strictum (32.7%), Alternaria alternata (13.7%), Fusarium sporotrichoides (7.3%), Phoma sp. (confex.com)
  • We report on a four-month-old child with pneumonia caused by the fungus Acremonium kiliense as the first clinical manifestation of chronic granulomatous disease. (nih.gov)
  • Many tall fescue pastures in Alabama, Tennessee and most of the United States are infected with a systemic fungus, Acremonium coenophialum. (mold-help.org)
  • Cefaclor is a second generation cephalosporin antibiotic isolated from the Acremonium fungus. (goldbio.com)
  • Acremonium is a type of fungus that can commonly be found indoors, and its powdery texture and pink-orange or white colour makes it easy to identify. (puremaintenanceuk.com)
  • Penicillin biosynthesis: intermediates of biosynthesis of delta-L-alpha-aminoadipyl-L-cysteinyl-D-valine formed by ACV synthetase from Acremonium chrysogenum. (mpg.de)
  • The spores of Aspergillus and Penicillium (and others such as Acremonium, Paceilomyces ) are small and round with very few distinguishing characteristics. (nih.gov)
  • Acremonium is a genus of fungi in the family Hypocreaceae. (wikipedia.org)
  • Two fungi involved in vine declines are Acremonium cucurbitacearum and Plectosporium tabacinum. (usda.gov)
  • Acremonium cucurbitaceaum and Plectosporium tabacinum are two of the fungi implicated in this disease. (usda.gov)
  • Acremonium is a toxigenic variety of mold that is very harmful to humans. (moldremovalcalgary.ca)
  • Acremonium is a toxigenic mold that also likes to thrive in air conditioner condensation. (incredibleplanet.net)
  • Acremonium is one of the many different types of mold that exist today. (findingfarina.com)
  • 18. Cutaneous infection due to acremonium. (nih.gov)
  • Acremonium species are usually slow-growing and are initially compact and moist. (wikipedia.org)
  • Epichloë species are closely related and were once included in Acremonium, but were later split off into a new genus Neotyphodium, which has now been restructured within the genus Epichloë. (wikipedia.org)
  • The genus Acremonium contains about 100 species, of which most are saprophytic, being isolated from dead plant material and soil. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other unpigmented species include Scopulariopsis candida, S. koningii , S. acremonium and S. flava . (bustmold.com)
  • Whilst acremonium isn't considered harmful by itself, it can cause infections in people with weakened immune systems. (puremaintenanceuk.com)
  • Acremonium typically has a white, powdery appearance and can produce mycotoxins that cause health issues. (findingfarina.com)
  • Acremonium kiliense: reappraisal of its clinical significance. (nih.gov)
  • Acremonium can also grow on various types of insulation and indoor plants, making it challenging to eradicate. (findingfarina.com)
  • Sequences of Acretocins, Peptaibiotics Containing the Rare 1-Aminocyclopropanecarboxylic Acid, from Acremonium crotocinigenum CBS 217.70. (uni-giessen.de)