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Cryptosporidiosis: Intestinal infection with organisms of the genus CRYPTOSPORIDIUM. It occurs in both animals and humans. Symptoms include severe DIARRHEA.Spiramycin: A macrolide antibiotic produced by Streptomyces ambofaciens. The drug is effective against gram-positive aerobic pathogens, N. gonorrhoeae, and staphylococci. It is used to treat infections caused by bacteria and Toxoplasma gondii.Cryptosporidium: A genus of coccidian parasites of the family CRYPTOSPORIDIIDAE, found in the intestinal epithelium of many vertebrates including humans.Cryptosporidium parvum: A species of parasitic protozoa that infects humans and most domestic mammals. Its oocysts measure five microns in diameter. These organisms exhibit alternating cycles of sexual and asexual reproduction.Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: An acquired defect of cellular immunity associated with infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a CD4-positive T-lymphocyte count under 200 cells/microliter or less than 14% of total lymphocytes, and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and malignant neoplasms. Clinical manifestations also include emaciation (wasting) and dementia. These elements reflect criteria for AIDS as defined by the CDC in 1993.Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Coccidia: A subclass of protozoans commonly parasitic in the epithelial cells of the intestinal tract but also found in the liver and other organs. Its organisms are found in both vertebrates and higher invertebrates and comprise two orders: EIMERIIDA and EUCOCCIDIIDA.FloridaSwimming PoolsQuinine: An alkaloid derived from the bark of the cinchona tree. It is used as an antimalarial drug, and is the active ingredient in extracts of the cinchona that have been used for that purpose since before 1633. Quinine is also a mild antipyretic and analgesic and has been used in common cold preparations for that purpose. It was used commonly and as a bitter and flavoring agent, and is still useful for the treatment of babesiosis. Quinine is also useful in some muscular disorders, especially nocturnal leg cramps and myotonia congenita, because of its direct effects on muscle membrane and sodium channels. The mechanisms of its antimalarial effects are not well understood.HIV-Associated Lipodystrophy Syndrome: Defective metabolism leading to fat maldistribution in patients infected with HIV. The etiology appears to be multifactorial and probably involves some combination of infection-induced alterations in metabolism, direct effects of antiretroviral therapy, and patient-related factors.Lipodystrophy: A collection of heterogenous conditions resulting from defective LIPID METABOLISM and characterized by ADIPOSE TISSUE atrophy. Often there is redistribution of body fat resulting in peripheral fat wasting and central adiposity. They include generalized, localized, congenital, and acquired lipodystrophy.Lipodystrophy, Congenital Generalized: Congenital disorders, usually autosomal recessive, characterized by severe generalized lack of ADIPOSE TISSUE, extreme INSULIN RESISTANCE, and HYPERTRIGLYCERIDEMIA.Lipodystrophy, Familial Partial: Inherited conditions characterized by the partial loss of ADIPOSE TISSUE, either confined to the extremities with normal or increased fat deposits on the face, neck and trunk (type 1), or confined to the loss of SUBCUTANEOUS FAT from the limbs and trunk (type 2). Type 3 is associated with mutation in the gene encoding PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR GAMMA.Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active: Drug regimens, for patients with HIV INFECTIONS, that aggressively suppress HIV replication. The regimens usually involve administration of three or more different drugs including a protease inhibitor.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Murine Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: Acquired defect of cellular immunity that occurs in mice infected with mouse leukemia viruses (MuLV). The syndrome shows striking similarities with human AIDS and is characterized by lymphadenopathy, profound immunosuppression, enhanced susceptibility to opportunistic infections, and B-cell lymphomas.HIV-1: The type species of LENTIVIRUS and the etiologic agent of AIDS. It is characterized by its cytopathic effect and affinity for the T4-lymphocyte.Alkaptonuria: An inborn error of amino acid metabolism resulting from a defect in the enzyme HOMOGENTISATE 1,2-DIOXYGENASE, an enzyme involved in the breakdown of PHENYLALANINE and TYROSINE. It is characterized by accumulation of HOMOGENTISIC ACID in the urine, OCHRONOSIS in various tissues, and ARTHRITIS.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Syphilis: A contagious venereal disease caused by the spirochete TREPONEMA PALLIDUM.Cerebral Infarction: The formation of an area of NECROSIS in the CEREBRUM caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).Syphilis Serodiagnosis: Serologic tests for syphilis.Vasculitis: Inflammation of any one of the blood vessels, including the ARTERIES; VEINS; and rest of the vasculature system in the body.Substance Abuse, Intravenous: Abuse, overuse, or misuse of a substance by its injection into a vein.Pericytes: Unique slender cells with multiple processes extending along the capillary vessel axis and encircling the vascular wall, also called mural cells. Pericytes are imbedded in the BASEMENT MEMBRANE shared with the ENDOTHELIAL CELLS of the vessel. Pericytes are important in maintaining vessel integrity, angiogenesis, and vascular remodeling.Arthritis, Reactive: An aseptic, inflammatory arthritis developing secondary to a primary extra-articular infection, most typically of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT or UROGENITAL SYSTEM. The initiating trigger pathogens are usually SHIGELLA; SALMONELLA; YERSINIA; CAMPYLOBACTER; or CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS. Reactive arthritis is strongly associated with HLA-B27 ANTIGEN.Remission, Spontaneous: A spontaneous diminution or abatement of a disease over time, without formal treatment.Tongue, FissuredArthralgia: Pain in the joint.Skin DiseasesVulvitis: Inflammation of the VULVA. It is characterized by PRURITUS and painful urination.HLA-B27 Antigen: A specific HLA-B surface antigen subtype. Members of this subtype contain alpha chains that are encoded by the HLA-B*27 allele family.Scalp: The outer covering of the calvaria. It is composed of several layers: SKIN; subcutaneous connective tissue; the occipitofrontal muscle which includes the tendinous galea aponeurotica; loose connective tissue; and the pericranium (the PERIOSTEUM of the SKULL).Spondylitis, Ankylosing: A chronic inflammatory condition affecting the axial joints, such as the SACROILIAC JOINT and other intervertebral or costovertebral joints. It occurs predominantly in young males and is characterized by pain and stiffness of joints (ANKYLOSIS) with inflammation at tendon insertions.Leukoencephalopathy, Progressive Multifocal: An opportunistic viral infection of the central nervous system associated with conditions that impair cell-mediated immunity (e.g., ACQUIRED IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME and other IMMUNOLOGIC DEFICIENCY SYNDROMES; HEMATOLOGIC NEOPLASMS; IMMUNOSUPPRESSION; and COLLAGEN DISEASES). The causative organism is JC Polyomavirus (JC VIRUS) which primarily affects oligodendrocytes, resulting in multiple areas of demyelination. Clinical manifestations include DEMENTIA; ATAXIA; visual disturbances; and other focal neurologic deficits, generally progressing to a vegetative state within 6 months. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp36-7)JC Virus: A species of POLYOMAVIRUS, originally isolated from the brain of a patient with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. The patient's initials J.C. gave the virus its name. Infection is not accompanied by any apparent illness but serious demyelinating disease can appear later, probably following reactivation of latent virus.Speech Disorders: Acquired or developmental conditions marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or generate spoken forms of language.Polyomavirus Infections: Infections with POLYOMAVIRUS, which are often cultured from the urine of kidney transplant patients. Excretion of BK VIRUS is associated with ureteral strictures and CYSTITIS, and that of JC VIRUS with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (LEUKOENCEPHALOPATHY, PROGRESSIVE MULTIFOCAL).Polyomavirus: A genus of potentially oncogenic viruses of the family POLYOMAVIRIDAE. These viruses are normally present in their natural hosts as latent infections. The virus is oncogenic in hosts different from the species of origin.Tumor Virus Infections: Infections produced by oncogenic viruses. The infections caused by DNA viruses are less numerous but more diverse than those caused by the RNA oncogenic viruses.AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections: Opportunistic infections found in patients who test positive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The most common include PNEUMOCYSTIS PNEUMONIA, Kaposi's sarcoma, cryptosporidiosis, herpes simplex, toxoplasmosis, cryptococcosis, and infections with Mycobacterium avium complex, Microsporidium, and Cytomegalovirus.T-Lymphocytopenia, Idiopathic CD4-Positive: Reproducible depletion of CD4+ lymphocytes below 300 per cubic millimeter in the absence of HIV infection or other known causes of immunodeficiency. This is a rare, heterogeneous syndrome and does not appear to be caused by a transmissible agent.Dictionaries, MedicalDictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Simian immunodeficiency virus: Species of the genus LENTIVIRUS, subgenus primate immunodeficiency viruses (IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUSES, PRIMATE), that induces acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in monkeys and apes (SAIDS). The genetic organization of SIV is virtually identical to HIV.HIV: Human immunodeficiency virus. A non-taxonomic and historical term referring to any of two species, specifically HIV-1 and/or HIV-2. Prior to 1986, this was called human T-lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV). From 1986-1990, it was an official species called HIV. Since 1991, HIV was no longer considered an official species name; the two species were designated HIV-1 and HIV-2.Meningoencephalitis: An inflammatory process involving the brain (ENCEPHALITIS) and meninges (MENINGITIS), most often produced by pathogenic organisms which invade the central nervous system, and occasionally by toxins, autoimmune disorders, and other conditions.Trypanosoma cruzi: The agent of South American trypanosomiasis or CHAGAS DISEASE. Its vertebrate hosts are man and various domestic and wild animals. Insects of several species are vectors.Myocarditis: Inflammatory processes of the muscular walls of the heart (MYOCARDIUM) which result in injury to the cardiac muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC). Manifestations range from subclinical to sudden death (DEATH, SUDDEN). Myocarditis in association with cardiac dysfunction is classified as inflammatory CARDIOMYOPATHY usually caused by INFECTION, autoimmune diseases, or responses to toxic substances. Myocarditis is also a common cause of DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY and other cardiomyopathies.Chagas Disease: Infection with the protozoan parasite TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI, a form of TRYPANOSOMIASIS endemic in Central and South America. It is named after the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas, who discovered the parasite. Infection by the parasite (positive serologic result only) is distinguished from the clinical manifestations that develop years later, such as destruction of PARASYMPATHETIC GANGLIA; CHAGAS CARDIOMYOPATHY; and dysfunction of the ESOPHAGUS or COLON.Calcium Sulfate: A calcium salt that is used for a variety of purposes including: building materials, as a desiccant, in dentistry as an impression material, cast, or die, and in medicine for immobilizing casts and as a tablet excipient. It exists in various forms and states of hydration. Plaster of Paris is a mixture of powdered and heat-treated gypsum.Trypanosomiasis, African: A disease endemic among people and animals in Central Africa. It is caused by various species of trypanosomes, particularly T. gambiense and T. rhodesiense. Its second host is the TSETSE FLY. Involvement of the central nervous system produces "African sleeping sickness." Nagana is a rapidly fatal trypanosomiasis of horses and other animals.Naegleria fowleri: A species of parasitic protozoa having both an ameboid and flagellate stage in its life cycle. Infection with this pathogen produces PRIMARY AMEBIC MENINGOENCEPHALITIS.Amebiasis: Infection with any of various amebae. It is an asymptomatic carrier state in most individuals, but diseases ranging from chronic, mild diarrhea to fulminant dysentery may occur.Aspergillosis: Infections with fungi of the genus ASPERGILLUS.Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis: Lung infections with the invasive forms of ASPERGILLUS, usually after surgery, transplantation, prolonged NEUTROPENIA or treatment with high-doses of CORTICOSTEROIDS. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis can progress to CHRONIC NECROTIZING PULMONARY ASPERGILLOSIS or hematogenous spread to other organs.Pulmonary Aspergillosis: Infections of the respiratory tract with fungi of the genus ASPERGILLUS. Infections may result in allergic reaction (ALLERGIC BRONCHOPULMONARY ASPERGILLOSIS), colonization in pulmonary cavities as fungus balls (MYCETOMA), or lead to invasion of the lung parenchyma (INVASIVE PULMONARY ASPERGILLOSIS).Lung Diseases, Fungal: Pulmonary diseases caused by fungal infections, usually through hematogenous spread.Aspergillus fumigatus: A species of imperfect fungi from which the antibiotic fumigatin is obtained. Its spores may cause respiratory infection in birds and mammals.Aspergillosis, Allergic Bronchopulmonary: Hypersensitivity reaction (ALLERGIC REACTION) to fungus ASPERGILLUS in an individual with long-standing BRONCHIAL ASTHMA. It is characterized by pulmonary infiltrates, EOSINOPHILIA, elevated serum IMMUNOGLOBULIN E, and skin reactivity to Aspergillus antigen.Aspergillus: A genus of mitosporic fungi containing about 100 species and eleven different teleomorphs in the family Trichocomaceae.Antifungal Agents: Substances that destroy fungi by suppressing their ability to grow or reproduce. They differ from FUNGICIDES, INDUSTRIAL because they defend against fungi present in human or animal tissues.Mannans: Polysaccharides consisting of mannose units.Amphotericin B: Macrolide antifungal antibiotic produced by Streptomyces nodosus obtained from soil of the Orinoco river region of Venezuela.Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome: A potentially fatal syndrome associated primarily with the use of neuroleptic agents (see ANTIPSYCHOTIC AGENTS) which are in turn associated with dopaminergic receptor blockade (see RECEPTORS, DOPAMINE) in the BASAL GANGLIA and HYPOTHALAMUS, and sympathetic dysregulation. Clinical features include diffuse MUSCLE RIGIDITY; TREMOR; high FEVER; diaphoresis; labile blood pressure; cognitive dysfunction; and autonomic disturbances. Serum CPK level elevation and a leukocytosis may also be present. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1199; Psychiatr Serv 1998 Sep;49(9):1163-72)Antipsychotic Agents: Agents that control agitated psychotic behavior, alleviate acute psychotic states, reduce psychotic symptoms, and exert a quieting effect. They are used in SCHIZOPHRENIA; senile dementia; transient psychosis following surgery; or MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; etc. These drugs are often referred to as neuroleptics alluding to the tendency to produce neurological side effects, but not all antipsychotics are likely to produce such effects. Many of these drugs may also be effective against nausea, emesis, and pruritus.Dantrolene: Skeletal muscle relaxant that acts by interfering with excitation-contraction coupling in the muscle fiber. It is used in spasticity and other neuromuscular abnormalities. Although the mechanism of action is probably not central, dantrolene is usually grouped with the central muscle relaxants.Mutism: The inability to generate oral-verbal expression, despite normal comprehension of speech. This may be associated with BRAIN DISEASES or MENTAL DISORDERS. Organic mutism may be associated with damage to the FRONTAL LOBE; BRAIN STEM; THALAMUS; and CEREBELLUM. Selective mutism is a psychological condition that usually affects children characterized by continuous refusal to speak in social situations by a child who is able and willing to speak to selected persons. Kussmal aphasia refers to mutism in psychosis. (From Fortschr Neurol Psychiatr 1994; 62(9):337-44)Loxapine: An antipsychotic agent used in SCHIZOPHRENIA.Haloperidol: A phenyl-piperidinyl-butyrophenone that is used primarily to treat SCHIZOPHRENIA and other PSYCHOSES. It is also used in schizoaffective disorder, DELUSIONAL DISORDERS, ballism, and TOURETTE SYNDROME (a drug of choice) and occasionally as adjunctive therapy in INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY and the chorea of HUNTINGTON DISEASE. It is a potent antiemetic and is used in the treatment of intractable HICCUPS. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p279)Isocarboxazid: An MAO inhibitor that is effective in the treatment of major depression, dysthymic disorder, and atypical depression. It also is useful in the treatment of panic disorder and the phobic disorders. (From AMA, Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p311)Chlorpromazine: The prototypical phenothiazine antipsychotic drug. Like the other drugs in this class chlorpromazine's antipsychotic actions are thought to be due to long-term adaptation by the brain to blocking DOPAMINE RECEPTORS. Chlorpromazine has several other actions and therapeutic uses, including as an antiemetic and in the treatment of intractable hiccup.Catatonia: A neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by one or more of the following essential features: immobility, mutism, negativism (active or passive refusal to follow commands), mannerisms, stereotypies, posturing, grimacing, excitement, echolalia, echopraxia, muscular rigidity, and stupor; sometimes punctuated by sudden violent outbursts, panic, or hallucinations. This condition may be associated with psychiatric illnesses (e.g., SCHIZOPHRENIA; MOOD DISORDERS) or organic disorders (NEUROLEPTIC MALIGNANT SYNDROME; ENCEPHALITIS, etc.). (From DSM-IV, 4th ed, 1994; APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Amoxapine: The N-demethylated derivative of the antipsychotic agent LOXAPINE that works by blocking the reuptake of norepinephrine, serotonin, or both. It also blocks dopamine receptors.Nontuberculous Mycobacteria: So-called atypical species of the genus MYCOBACTERIUM that do not cause tuberculosis. They are also called tuberculoid bacilli, i.e.: M. buruli, M. chelonae, M. duvalii, M. flavescens, M. fortuitum, M. gilvum, M. gordonae, M. intracellulare (see MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX;), M. kansasii, M. marinum, M. obuense, M. scrofulaceum, M. szulgai, M. terrae, M. ulcerans, M. xenopi.Mycobacterium: A genus of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria. Most species are free-living in soil and water, but the major habitat for some is the diseased tissue of warm-blooded hosts.Mycobacterium Infections, Nontuberculous: Infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria (atypical mycobacteria): M. kansasii, M. marinum, M. scrofulaceum, M. flavescens, M. gordonae, M. obuense, M. gilvum, M. duvali, M. szulgai, M. intracellulare (see MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX;), M. xenopi (littorale), M. ulcerans, M. buruli, M. terrae, M. fortuitum (minetti, giae), M. chelonae.Pneumonia, Pneumocystis: A pulmonary disease in humans occurring in immunodeficient or malnourished patients or infants, characterized by DYSPNEA, tachypnea, and HYPOXEMIA. Pneumocystis pneumonia is a frequently seen opportunistic infection in AIDS. It is caused by the fungus PNEUMOCYSTIS JIROVECII. The disease is also found in other MAMMALS where it is caused by related species of Pneumocystis.Mycolic AcidsPneumocystis: A genus of ascomycetous FUNGI, family Pneumocystidaceae, order Pneumocystidales. It includes various host-specific species causing PNEUMOCYSTIS PNEUMONIA in humans and other MAMMALS.Sulfamethoxazole: A bacteriostatic antibacterial agent that interferes with folic acid synthesis in susceptible bacteria. Its broad spectrum of activity has been limited by the development of resistance. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p208)Esophageal Diseases: Pathological processes in the ESOPHAGUS.Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A species of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria that produces TUBERCULOSIS in humans, other primates, CATTLE; DOGS; and some other animals which have contact with humans. Growth tends to be in serpentine, cordlike masses in which the bacilli show a parallel orientation.Virus Replication: The process of intracellular viral multiplication, consisting of the synthesis of PROTEINS; NUCLEIC ACIDS; and sometimes LIPIDS, and their assembly into a new infectious particle.Simian Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: Acquired defect of cellular immunity that occurs naturally in macaques infected with SRV serotypes, experimentally in monkeys inoculated with SRV or MASON-PFIZER MONKEY VIRUS; (MPMV), or in monkeys infected with SIMIAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS.tat Gene Products, Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Proteins encoded by the TAT GENES of the HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS.Anti-HIV Agents: Agents used to treat AIDS and/or stop the spread of the HIV infection. These do not include drugs used to treat symptoms or opportunistic infections associated with AIDS.HIV Seropositivity: Development of neutralizing antibodies in individuals who have been exposed to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/HTLV-III/LAV).HIV Envelope Protein gp120: External envelope protein of the human immunodeficiency virus which is encoded by the HIV env gene. It has a molecular weight of 120 kDa and contains numerous glycosylation sites. Gp120 binds to cells expressing CD4 cell-surface antigens, most notably T4-lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages. Gp120 has been shown to interfere with the normal function of CD4 and is at least partly responsible for the cytopathic effect of HIV.
(1/6107) Dysregulated production of interleukin-8 in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

Interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in vivo was monitored in four study groups: normal blood donors, patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, and dually infected (HIV/TB) patients. We show that whereas there was evidence of detectable levels of cell-associated IL-8 (mRNA and protein) in peripheral cells of healthy individuals, this was largely lost in the disease states studied. Coupled with this finding was significantly increased circulating levels of IL-8 in HIV-1-infected individuals with or without concomitant pulmonary TB (P < 0.001). On the other hand, the capacity of peripheral mononuclear cells to produce IL-8 spontaneously ex vivo was enhanced in HIV-1 and TB patients (P < 0.05) and many of the HIV/TB group, but their corresponding capacities to respond to various stimuli, in particular phytohemagglutinin, were significantly diminished compared to those of normal donors (P < 0.05). Circulating levels of IL-8 in a group of HIV/TB patients were significantly positively correlated with the percentage of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in the peripheral circulation (r = 0.65; P = 0.01), the proportions of IL-8 receptor A (IL-8RA)-expressing (r = 0.86; P < 0.01) and IL-8RB-expressing (r = 0.77; P < 0.01) PMN, and the capacity of PMN to migrate in response to IL-8 as chemoattractant (r = 0.68; P < 0. 01). IL-8RB fluorescence intensity, however, was negatively correlated with plasma IL-8 levels (r = -0.73; P < 0.01). Our results suggest that altered regulation of IL-8 in HIV-1 may have important implications for antimicrobial defenses and for normal immune processes.  (+info)

(2/6107) Incidence and duration of hospitalizations among persons with AIDS: an event history approach.

OBJECTIVE: To analyze hospitalization patterns of persons with AIDS (PWAs) in a multi-state/multi-episode continuous time duration framework. DATA SOURCES: PWAs on Medicaid identified through a match between the state's AIDS Registry and Medicaid eligibility files; hospital admission and discharge dates identified through Medicaid claims. STUDY DESIGN: Using a Weibull event history framework, we model the hazard of transition between hospitalized and community spells, incorporating the competing risk of death in each of these states. Simulations are used to translate these parameters into readily interpretable estimates of length of stay, the probability that a hospitalization will end in death, and the probability that a nonhospitalized person will be hospitalized within 90 days. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In multivariate analyses, participation in a Medicaid waiver program offering case management and home care was associated with hospital stays 1.3 days shorter than for nonparticipants. African American race and Hispanic ethnicity were associated with hospital stays 1.2 days and 1.0 day longer than for non-Hispanic whites; African Americans also experienced more frequent hospital admissions. Residents of the high-HIV-prevalence area of the state had more frequent admissions and stays two days longer than those residing elsewhere in the state. Older PWAs experienced less frequent hospital admissions but longer stays, with hospitalizations of 55-year-olds lasting 8.25 days longer than those of 25-year-olds. CONCLUSIONS: Much socioeconomic and geographic variability exists both in the incidence and in the duration of hospitalization among persons with AIDS in New Jersey. Event history analysis provides a useful statistical framework for analysis of these variations, deals appropriately with data in which duration of observation varies from individual to individual, and permits the competing risk of death to be incorporated into the model. Transition models of this type have broad applicability in modeling the risk and duration of hospitalization in chronic illnesses.  (+info)

(3/6107) Relative rates of AIDS among racial/ethnic groups by exposure categories.

The relative rates of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were calculated among racial/ethnic populations using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention HIV (human immunodeficiency virus)/Surveillance reports assuming that racial/ethnic distributions reflect that of the US Census Data from 1990. For comparison, a rate of 1 was assigned to whites in each calculation. The overall relative rates were whites--1, African Americans--4.7, Hispanics--3, Asian/Pacific Islanders--0.4, and Native Americans--0.5. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome surveillance data show higher rates of AIDS for African Americans and Hispanics compared with whites, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and Native Americans. The relative rates for African Americans and Hispanics compared with whites were highest for injecting drug users, heterosexual contact, and pediatric patients. These results led us to explore possible explanations for increased AIDS reporting in African Americans and Hispanics. We then explored available national datasets regarding those variables. The analyses indicate that variables such as access and receptivity to HIV prevention and treatment efforts, race/ethnicity, sexual behaviors, sexually transmitted diseases, socioeconomic status, and substance abuse interact in a complex fashion to influence HIV transmission and progression to AIDS in affected communities.  (+info)

(4/6107) Outcome and predictors of failure of highly active antiretroviral therapy: one-year follow-up of a cohort of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected persons.

The outcome and predictors of virologic treatment failure of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) were determined for 271 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected protease inhibitor-naive persons. During a follow-up of 48 weeks after the initiation of HAART, 6.3% of patients experienced at least one new AIDS-defining event, and 3.0% died. Virologic treatment failure occurred in 40% (indinavir, 27%; ritonavir, 30%; saquinavir, 59%; ritonavir plus saquinavir, 32%; chi2, P=.001). Risk factors for treatment failure were baseline plasma HIV-1 RNA (odds ratio [OR], 1.70 per log10 copies increase in plasma HIV-1 RNA), baseline CD4 cell count (OR, 1. 35 per 100 CD4 cells/mm3 decrease), and use of saquinavir versus other protease inhibitors (OR, 3.21). During the first year of treatment, 53% of all patients changed (part of) their original HAART regimen at least once. This was significantly more frequent for regimens containing saquinavir (62%; 27% for virologic failure) or ritonavir (64%; 55% for intolerance) as single protease inhibitor.  (+info)

(5/6107) Characterization of viral dynamics in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients treated with combination antiretroviral therapy: relationships to host factors, cellular restoration, and virologic end points.

Biphasic plasma viral decays were modeled in 48 patients treated with ritonavir, zidovudine, and lamivudine. Estimated first- and second-phase decay rates were d1 as 0.47/day and d2 as 0.04/day. Interpatient differences in both decay rates were significant. The d1 was directly correlated with baseline CD4+, CD4+CD28+, and CD8+CD28+ T lymphocyte counts (P<.05) and inversely correlated with baseline virus load (P=.044) and the magnitude of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte recovery (P<.01). The d2 was directly correlated with baseline percentage of CD8+ T lymphocytes (P=.023), the CD8+CD38+ cell number (P=.024), and the level of IgG that binds to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 gp120 (P=.02). Viral decay rates were not predictive of treatment failure or durability of viral suppression. These exploratory findings are consistent with a model in which immunologic factors contribute to elimination of HIV-infected cells and suggest a dynamic interplay between regulation of HIV expression and lymphocyte activation and recovery.  (+info)

(6/6107) Proliferative responses to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 peptides in HIV-1-infected individuals immunized with HIV-1 rgp120 or rgp160 compared with nonimmunized and uninfected controls.

The proliferative responses to a series of peptides constituting the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 sequence were evaluated in 19 HIV-1-infected rgp160 vaccine recipients, 17 HIV-1-infected rgp120 vaccine recipients, 15 HIV-1-infected placebo recipients, and 18 HIV-1-uninfected controls. Many regions of the gp120 molecule were found to contribute proliferative epitopes, although there were clearly regions of relative dominance and silence. Vaccine recipients tended to have broader, more robust, and more frequent peptide recognition than the placebo recipients. Despite the considerable variability in the pattern of peptide recognition among individuals, there was a striking similarity between the rgp160 and rgp120 vaccinee groups as a whole. Low-risk HIV-1-uninfected individuals may react to a few peptides within the gp120 sequence as well, despite a lack of significant response to the whole gp120 protein.  (+info)

(7/6107) No evidence for an effect of the CCR5 delta32/+ and CCR2b 64I/+ mutations on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 disease progression among HIV-1-infected injecting drug users.

The relationship between CCR5 and CCR2b genotypes and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 disease progression was studied among the 108 seroconverters of the Amsterdam cohort of injecting drug users (IDUs). In contrast to earlier studies among homosexual men, no effect on disease progression of the CCR5 Delta32/+ and the CCR2b 64I/+ genotypes was found, when progression to AIDS, death, or a CD4 cell count <200/microL was compared by a Cox proportional hazards model. Furthermore, CD4 cell decline (by a regression model for repeated measurements) and virus load in the first 3 years after seroconversion did not differ between the CCR5 and CCR2b wild type and heterozygous genotypes. A nested matched case-control study also revealed no significant effect of the CCR5 and CCR2b mutations. Immunologic differences between IDUs and homosexual men may account for the observed lack of effect. Alternatively, difference in transmission route or characteristics of the HIV-1 variants that circulate in IDUs could also explain this phenomenon.  (+info)

(8/6107) A randomized trial of high- versus low-dose subcutaneous interleukin-2 outpatient therapy for early human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

Forty-nine outpatients infected with human immunodeficiency virus with baseline CD4 cell counts >/=500/mm3, who were on stable antiretroviral therapy, were randomized to receive 5-day cycles of either low-dose (1.5 million IU [MIU] twice a day) or high-dose (7.5 MIU twice a day) subcutaneous (sc) interleukin (IL)-2 every 4 or every 8 weeks. High-dose recipients experienced mean slopes of +116.1 cells/month and +2.7 %/month in CD4 cells and percents, respectively, whereas low-dose recipients displayed mean slopes of +26.7 and +1.3% in the same parameters. At month 6, high-dose recipients achieved a 94.8% increase in mean CD4 cells over baseline compared with a 19.0% increase in low-dose recipients. While high-dose recipients encountered more constitutional side effects, these were generally not dose-limiting. High-dose scIL-2 therapy in outpatients with early HIV-1 infection was well tolerated and induced dramatic, sustained rises in CD4 cells.  (+info)

*  Division of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
The Division of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (DAIDS) is a division of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious ... on AIDS Women and Infants Transmission Study Women's Interagency HIV Study Division of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome ...
*  Misconceptions about HIV/AIDS
HIV is an acronym for human immunodeficiency virus, which is the virus that causes AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). ... "The Relationship Between the Human Immunodeficiency Virus and the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome", National Institute of ... Ammann, A.J.; Wara, D.W.; Cowan, M.J. (1984). "Pediatric acquired immunodeficiency syndrome". Annals of the New York Academy of ... "Impact of protease inhibitors and other antiretroviral treatments on acquired immunodeficiency syndrome survival in San ...
*  HIV/AIDS in Rwanda
Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a disease comprising associated conditions caused by a human immunodeficiency ... "Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Rwanda". Lancet. 2 (8394): 62-65. doi:10.1016/s0140-6736(84)90240-x. ISSN 0140-6736. PMID ... "Human immunodeficiency virus infection in urban Rwanda. Demographic and behavioral correlates in a representative sample of ...
*  Ken Strauss
Endocrine complications of the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. Archives of Internal Medicine, 1991; 151:1441-1444. A. Levin ... activation with cellular viremia and plasma HIV RNA levels in asymptomatic patients infected by human immunodeficiency virus ...
*  Measles
Gowda VK, Sukanya V (2012). "Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome with Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis". Pediatric Neurology ... Reye syndrome is a non-specific descriptive term covering a group of heterogeneous disorders. Moreover, not only the use of ... Reye's Syndrome at NINDS "Epidemiologic evidence indicates that aspirin (salicylate) is the major preventable risk factor for ... Casteels-Van Daele M, Van Geet C, Wouters C, Eggermont E (April 2000). "Reye syndrome revisited: a descriptive term covering a ...
*  Skin cancer
Chiao, EY; Krown, SE (September 2003). "Update on non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-defining malignancies". Current ... Some genetic syndromes including congenital melanocytic nevi syndrome which is characterized by the presence of nevi ( ...
*  Blood-brain barrier
Ivey, Nathan S; MacLean, Andrew G; Lackner, Andrew A (2009). "Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and the blood-brain barrier". ... De Vivo disease (also known as GLUT1 deficiency syndrome) is a rare condition caused by inadequate transportation of the sugar ... Klepper, Jörg; Voit, Thomas (June 2002). "Facilitated glucose transporter protein type 1 (GLUT1) deficiency syndrome: impaired ...
*  Balamuthia mandrillaris
"Acanthamoeba meningoencephalitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome". Archives of Pathology & Laboratory ... Patients experiencing this particular syndrome may report a skin lesion (often similar to those caused by MRSA), which does not ...
*  Simian immunodeficiency virus
King, N. W.; Hunt, R. D.; Letvin, N. L. (1983). "Histopathologic changes in macaques with an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome ... "Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in a colony of macaque monkeys". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the ... While human immunodeficiency virus has a limited number of subtypes, SIV is now known to infect a few dozen species of non- ... Simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) are retroviruses that cause persistent infections in at least 45 species of African non- ...
*  Anthony S. Fauci
Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: epidemiologic, clinical, immunologic, and therapeutic considerations". Ann. Intern. Med. ... Pantaleo G, Graziosi C, Fauci AS (Feb 1993). "New concepts in the immunopathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus infection ... link) Fauci AS (February 1988). "The human immunodeficiency virus: infectivity and mechanisms of pathogenesis". Science. 239 ( ... is an American immunologist who has made substantial contributions to HIV/AIDS research and other immunodeficiencies, both as a ...
*  Acanthamoeba
"Acanthamoeba meningoencephalitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome". Archives of Pathology & Laboratory ... Pure granulomatous lesions are rare in patients with AIDS and other related immunodeficiency states as the patients do not have ... A perivascular cuffing with amoebae in necrotic tissue is usual finding in the AIDS and related T-cell immunodeficiency ... Infection is generally associated with underlying conditions such as immunodeficiency, diabetes, malignancies, malnutrition, ...
*  Eosinophilic folliculitis
"Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome". International Journal of Dermatology. ... Fearfield, LA; Rowe, A; Francis, N; Bunker, CB; Staughton, RC (1999). "Itchy folliculitis and human immunodeficiency virus ... "Metronidazole for eosinophilic pustular folliculitis in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-positive patients". Archives of ...
*  Joseph Sonnabend
... ; Steven S Witkin; David T Purtilo (6 May 1983). "Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, opportunistic infections ...
*  Acute retinal necrosis
"Rapidly Progressive Outer Retinal Necrosis in the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome". American Journal of Ophthalmology. 110: ... Researchers have also looked at two cases of ARN in patients who have been diagnosed with an immunodeficiency virus. The ... Researchers are now wondering if this type of ARN is specific to those who have the immunodeficiency virus. Cytomegalovirus ...
*  History of HIV/AIDS
"The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in a cohort of homosexual men. A six-year follow-up study". Annals of Internal Medicine ... "The Origins of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Viruses: Where and When?" The Royal Society (2001): 867-76. Print. Marx PA, ... By August 1982, the disease was being referred to by its new CDC-coined name: Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). In ... "Isolation of a T-lymphotropic retrovirus from a patient at risk for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)". Science. 220 ( ...
*  Adenosine deaminase
"Elevated erythrocyte adenosine deaminase activity in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome". Proceedings of the ... The resulting deficiency is one cause of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), particularly of autosomal recessive ... gene implies a high incidence of ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in Somalia and a single, common ... understanding catalysis and immunodeficiency mutations". Science. 252 (5010): 1278-1284. doi:10.1126/science.1925539. PMID ...
*  Non-Hodgkin lymphoma
"Revision of the CDC surveillance case definition for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Council of State and Territorial ... Chédiak-Higashi syndrome, ataxia telangiectasia syndrome Autoimmune diseases, like Sjögren's syndrome, celiac disease, ... Medical treatments, like radiation therapy and chemotherapy Genetic diseases, like Klinefelter's syndrome, ...
*  Duesberg hypothesis
Duesberg P (1989). "Human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: correlation but not causation". Proc ... 2000). "Impact of protease inhibitors and other antiretroviral treatments on acquired immunodeficiency syndrome survival in San ... Update on Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS), United States. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Morbidity and ... Revision of the CDC Surveillance Case Definition of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome for National Reporting, United States. [ ...
*  Health in Turkey
"HIV/AIDS Also called: Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, AIDS, HIV, Human immunodeficiency virus". U.S. National Library of ... AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, it is the final stage of infection with HIV. Not everyone with HIV develops ... HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. This new disease of the human immuna system was named 'Acquired Immuno Deficiensy ...
*  HIV associated cardiomyopathy
Heart problems are very important in people with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) as Acquired ImmunoDeficiency Syndrome (AIDS ... Cardiac involvement in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a multicentre clinical-pathological study. AIDS Res Hum ... Cardiac involvement in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a multicentre clinical-pathological study. AIDS Res Hum ... Cardiac involvement in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: a multicentre clinical-pathological study. AIDS Res Hum ...
*  Amaurosis fugax
"Eosinophilic vasculitis leading to amaurosis fugax in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome". Arch. Intern. Med. ... Ocular ischemic syndrome Amaurosis Hemianopsia Fisher CM (December 1989). "'Transient monocular blindness' versus 'amaurosis ... Thrombocytosis Subclavian steal syndrome Malignant hypertension can cause ischemia of the optic nerve head leading to transient ... "Transient visual symptoms in systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome". Ocul. Immunol. Inflamm. 9 (1): 49-57 ...
*  Discovery and development of non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors
Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a leading cause of death in the world. It was identified as a disease in 1981. Two ... are antiretroviral drugs used in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). NNRTIs inhibit reverse transcriptase (RT ...
*  HIV Vaccine Trials Network
The HVTN collaborates with the Division of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (DAIDS). Funding comes from the National ... Vaccine Trials Network Hope Takes Action Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Division of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome ...
*  Penicillium decumbens
Alvarez, S. (1990). "Systemic Infection Caused by Penicillium decumbens in a Patient with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome". ...
*  Discrimination against people with HIV/AIDS
If left untreated, HIV can lead to the disease AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). HIV/AIDS is a sexually transmitted ...
*  GANC
Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. 2 (2): 163-9. PMID 2649653. Walker BD, Kowalski M, Goh WC, Kozarsky K, Krieger ... Land A, Braakman I (Aug 2001). "Folding of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein in the endoplasmic ... Dedera DA, Gu RL, Ratner L (Mar 1992). "Role of asparagine-linked glycosylation in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 ... Dewar RL, Vasudevachari MB, Natarajan V, Salzman NP (Jun 1989). "Biosynthesis and processing of human immunodeficiency virus ...
Update: Treatment of Cryptosporidiosis in Patients with
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS)  Update: Treatment of Cryptosporidiosis in Patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS)
Update: Treatment of Cryptosporidiosis in Patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) In November 1982, 21 patients ... with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and severe, protracted diarrhea caused by cryptosporidiosis were reported; the ... Cryptosporidiosis: assessment of chemotherapy of males with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). MMWR 1982;31:589-92. ... Two have subsequently died from causes related to their underlying immunodeficiency--one with Kaposi's sarcoma, the other with ...
more infohttps://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00000296.htm
International Notes Update: Acquired Immunodeficiency
Syndrome -- Europe  International Notes Update: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome -- Europe
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome -- Europe As of October 15, 1984, 559 cases of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) had ...
more infohttps://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00000469.htm
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Symptoms, Causes & Treatment  Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Symptoms, Causes & Treatment
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). *Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) facts. *What does AIDS stand for? What ... home/hiv health center/hiv a-z list/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome aids center /acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (aids) ... The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes HIV infection and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Symptoms and ... AIDS stands for 'acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.'. *AIDS is an advanced stage of infection with the human immunodeficiency ...
more infohttps://www.medicinenet.com/acquired_immunodeficiency_syndrome_aids/article.htm
Progress report on acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-AIDS  Progress report on acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-AIDS
1996)‎. Progress report on acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-AIDS. http://www.who.int/iris/handle/10665/121523 ...
more infohttps://apps.who.int/iris/handle/10665/121523
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) | Definition | AIDSinfo  Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) | Definition | AIDSinfo
Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is the most advanced stage of HIV infection. To be diagnosed with AIDS, a person with ... Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Speaker A disease of the immune system due to ... Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is the most advanced stage of HIV infection. To be diagnosed with AIDS, a person with ... Related Term(s): Acute HIV Infection, AIDS Case Definition, Chronic HIV Infection, HIV Progression, Human Immunodeficiency ...
more infohttps://aidsinfo.nih.gov/understanding-hiv-aids/glossary/3/acquired-immunodeficiency-syndrome?ref=oceancitycool
ACQUIRED IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME (‎AIDS)‎ = SYNDROME DIMMUNODÉFICIENCE ACQUISE (‎SIDA)‎  ACQUIRED IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME (‎AIDS)‎ = SYNDROME D'IMMUNODÉFICIENCE ACQUISE (‎SIDA)‎
... View/. Open. WER6336_273-273.PDF (‎ ... 1988)‎. ACQUIRED IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME (‎AIDS)‎ = SYNDROME D'IMMUNODÉFICIENCE ACQUISE (‎SIDA)‎. Weekly Epidemiological ...
more infohttp://apps.who.int/iris/handle/10665/226852
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: Anorexia  Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: Anorexia
Another name for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome is AIDS. Many patients with HIV infection and AIDS will suffer from ... Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Anorexia. Many patients with HIV infection and AIDS will suffer from anorexia.. Anorexia is ... PubMed Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome References *Aberg JA, Gallant JE, Anderson J, et al: Primary care guidelines for the ... Continue to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Depression Last Updated: Nov 16, 2010 References Authors: Stephen J. Schueler, ...
more infohttp://www.freemd.com/acquired-immunodeficiency-syndrome/home-care-anorexia.htm
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: Lipodystrophy Syndrome  Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: Lipodystrophy Syndrome
Lipodystrophy Syndrome Lipodystrophy syndrome is the abnormal distribution of fat in the ... ... Another name for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome is AIDS. ... PubMed Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome References *Aberg JA ... Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Lipodystrophy Syndrome. Lipodystrophy Syndrome. Lipodystrophy syndrome is the abnormal ... Continue to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Opportunistic Infections Last Updated: Nov 9, 2010 References Authors: Stephen J ...
more infohttp://www.freemd.com/acquired-immunodeficiency-syndrome/complications-lipodystrophy-syndrome.htm
Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) / Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) | CAUT  Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) / Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) | CAUT
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is medically treatable and is not transmitted by casual contact, and employees with ... Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) / Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). CAUT Policy Statement. Human Immunodeficiency ... Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is medically treatable and is not transmitted by casual contact, and employees with ... CAUT Policy Statement Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) / ...
more infohttps://www.caut.ca/about-us/caut-policy/lists/caut-policy-statements/policy-statement-on-human-immunodeficiency-virus-%28hiv%29-acquired-immunodeficiency-syndrome-%28aids%29
Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome Synonyms, Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome Antonyms | Thesaurus.com  Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome Synonyms, Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome Antonyms | Thesaurus.com
Synonyms for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome at Thesaurus.com with free online thesaurus, antonyms, and definitions. Find ... SEE DEFINITION OF acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. .css-1nq2eka{position:relative;overflow:hidden;height:30px;}. .css- ... Synonyms for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. .css-1lc0dpe{width:100%;list-style-type:none;word-wrap:break-word;-webkit- ... descriptive alternatives for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. ... ACQUIRED IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME. .css-10cokgy{display:block; ...
more infohttps://www.thesaurus.com/browse/acquired%20immunodeficiency%20syndrome
Delta Dental Mass - Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome  Delta Dental Mass - Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome The oral effects of systemic disease are by no means limited only to the periodontium. All ... Since the acquired immune deficiency syndrome was first recognized in the United States in 1981, the mouth has provided a ... The first clinical reports of this syndrome indicated that lesions in the oral cavity were common and often occurred early in ...
more infohttp://www.deltadentalma.com/your-oral-health/articles/acquired-immunodeficiency-syndrome/
The Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome | Annals of Internal Medicine | American College of Physicians  The Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome | Annals of Internal Medicine | American College of Physicians
The Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome CRAIG E. METROKA, M.D., PH.D.; JANET MOURADIAN, M.D.; SUSANNA CUNNINGHAM-RUNDLES, PH.D. ... The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome has been identified in male homosexuals (2), intravenous drug users (3), Haitians (4), ... METROKA CE, MOURADIAN J, CUNNINGHAM-RUNDLES S. The Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. Ann Intern Med. ;99:734-736. doi: ... We report a similar syndrome in wives of bisexual men with the syndrome, thereby expanding the group at risk. ...
more infohttp://annals.org/aim/article-abstract/697291/acquired-immunodeficiency-syndrome
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome and the Risk of Stroke | Stroke  Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome and the Risk of Stroke | Stroke
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome and the Risk of Stroke. John W. Cole, Amelia N. Pinto, J. Richard Hebel, David W. Buchholz, ... Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome and the Risk of Stroke. John W. Cole, Amelia N. Pinto, J. Richard Hebel, David W. Buchholz, ... Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome and the Risk of Stroke. John W. Cole, Amelia N. Pinto, J. Richard Hebel, David W. Buchholz, ... Revision of the CDC surveillance case definition for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1987; 36 ( ...
more infohttp://stroke.ahajournals.org/content/35/1/51
Histoplasmosis and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: A Study of Prognostic Factors  Histoplasmosis and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: A Study of Prognostic Factors
Histoplasmosis Cluster, Golf Course, Canada. Anderson, Heather; Honish, Lance; Taylor, Geoff; Johnson, Marcia; Tovstiuk, Chrystyna; Fanning, Anne; Tyrrell, Gregory; Rennie, Robert; Jaipaul, Joy; Sand, Crystal; Probert, Steven // Emerging Infectious Diseases;Jan2006, Vol. 12 Issue 1, p163 We report a cluster of 4 cases of acute histoplasmosis (1 culture proven and 3 with positive serology, of which 2 were symptomatic) associated with exposure to soil during a golf course renovation. Patients in western Canada with compatible symptoms should be tested for histoplasmosis,... ...
more infohttp://connection.ebscohost.com/c/reports/11791271/histoplasmosis-acquired-immunodeficiency-syndrome-study-prognostic-factors
Reiters Syndrome associated with the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: a case report  Reiter's Syndrome associated with the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: a case report
The association of Reiter's Syndrome (RS) with the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is seldom mentioned in the medical ... The co-occurrence of Reiter's Syndrome and Acquired Immunodeficiency. Ann Intern Med 1987;106:19-26. [ Links ]. 6. Medina- ... Males predominate at a 5:1 ratio [1,2]. The association between RS and the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) was first ... Reiter's syndrome and human immunodeficiency virus infection: case report and review of the literature. Cutis 1991;47(3):181-5 ...
more infohttp://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1413-86702002000100006
Genetics of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials...  Genetics of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials...
Genetics of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. The safety and scientific ... Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV Infections. Leukoencephalopathy, Progressive Multifocal. Lentivirus Infections. ... in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). PML is a life-threatening infection of the brain that affects about ... Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes. Immune System Diseases. Encephalitis, Viral. Central Nervous System Viral Diseases. ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00342602?order=737
Genetics of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials...  Genetics of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials...
Genetics of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. The safety and scientific ... Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. HIV Infections. Leukoencephalopathy, Progressive Multifocal. Lentivirus Infections. ... in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). PML is a life-threatening infection of the brain that affects about ... Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes. Immune System Diseases. Encephalitis, Viral. Central Nervous System Viral Diseases. ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00342602?order=48
Pictorial Essay: Thoracic Cardiovascular Complications of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome  Pictorial Essay: Thoracic Cardiovascular Complications of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome often demonstrate enlargement of the cardiac silhouette on the chest ... Patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome frequently develop complications of cardiac, pericardial, and thoracic ...
more infohttps://insights.ovid.com/jthim/199804000/00005382-199804000-00006
Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome financial definition of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome  Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome financial definition of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome
What is acquired immunodeficiency syndrome? Meaning of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome as a finance term. What does acquired ... Definition of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in the Financial Dictionary - by Free online English dictionary and ... Related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: STD, Ebola AIDS. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Persons who are HIV- ... Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome financial definition of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome https://financial-dictionary. ...
more infohttp://financial-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/acquired+immunodeficiency+syndrome
Information for Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome - Biology-Online Dictionary | Biology-Online Dictionary  Information for "Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome" - Biology-Online Dictionary | Biology-Online Dictionary
Biology-online is a completely free and open Biology dictionary with over 60,000 biology terms. It uses the wiki concept, so that anyone can make a contribution.
more infohttps://www.biology-online.org/dictionary/index.php?title=Acquired_immunodeficiency_syndrome&action=info
Pulmonary aspergillosis in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome | Aspergillus & Aspergillosis Website  Pulmonary aspergillosis in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome | Aspergillus & Aspergillosis Website
Pulmonary aspergillosis in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Submitted by Michael on Tue, 11/19/2013 - 14:18. ... Symptomatic pulmonary aspergillosis has rarely been reported in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). We ... all of whom had human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and 12 of whom had AIDS.!,br,!!,br,!RESULTS: Pulmonary ...
more infohttp://aspergillus.org.uk/content/pulmonary-aspergillosis-acquired-immunodeficiency-syndrome-0
  • A non-AIDS patient with chronic cryptosporidiosis, acquired after receiving a bone marrow transplant, also improved with spiramycin therapy. (cdc.gov)
  • The rapidly increasing prevalence of HTLV-III antibodies in populations at risk for the syndrome (3) argues for the spreading of a "new" virus. (annals.org)
  • A literature review of publically available information was undertaken to summarize current understanding and gaps in knowledge about Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus [‎MERS-CoV]‎, including its origin, transmission, effective control measures and management. (who.int)