Hyperostosis: Increase in the mass of bone per unit volume.Acquired Hyperostosis Syndrome: Syndrome consisting of SYNOVITIS; ACNE CONGLOBATA; PALMOPLANTAR PUSTULOSIS; HYPEROSTOSIS; and OSTEITIS. The most common site of the disease is the upper anterior chest wall, characterized by predominantly osteosclerotic lesions, hyperostosis, and arthritis of the adjacent joints. The association of sterile inflammatory bone lesions and neutrophilic skin eruptions is indicative of this syndrome.Hyperostosis, Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal: A disease of elderly men characterized by large osteophytes that bridge vertebrae and ossification of ligaments and tendon insertions.Hyperostosis Frontalis Interna: Thickening of the inner table of the frontal bone, which may be associated with hypertrichosis and obesity. It most commonly affects women near menopause.Hyperostosis, Sternocostoclavicular: A rare, benign rheumatologic disorder or syndrome characterized by hyperostosis and soft tissue ossification between the clavicles and the anterior part of the upper ribs. It is often associated with the dermatologic disorder palmoplantar pustulosis, particularly in Japan. Careful diagnosis is required to distinguish it from psoriatic arthritis, OSTEITIS DEFORMANS, and other diseases. Spondylitis of pustulosis palmaris et plantaris is one of the possible causes; also, evidence suggests one origin may be bone infection. Bone imaging is especially useful for diagnosis. It was originally described by Sonozaki in 1974.Exostoses: Benign hypertrophy that projects outward from the surface of bone, often containing a cartilaginous component.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Melorheostosis: A form of osteosclerosis extending in a linear track mainly through one of the long bones of the upper and lower limbs.Ankylosis: Fixation and immobility of a joint.Paleopathology: The study of disease in prehistoric times as revealed in bones, mummies, and archaeologic artifacts.Papilloma, Inverted: A mucosal tumor of the urinary bladder or nasal cavity in which proliferating epithelium is invaginated beneath the surface and is more smoothly rounded than in other papillomas. (Stedman, 25th ed)Osteitis: Inflammation of the bone.Hyperostosis, Cortical, Congenital: A disease of young infants characterized by soft tissue swellings over the affected bones, fever, and irritability, and marked by periods of remission and exacerbation. (Dorland, 27th ed)Spinal Osteophytosis: Outgrowth of immature bony processes or bone spurs (OSTEOPHYTE) from the VERTEBRAE, reflecting the presence of degenerative disease and calcification. It commonly occurs in cervical and lumbar SPONDYLOSIS.Paranasal Sinuses: Air-filled spaces located within the bones around the NASAL CAVITY. They are extensions of the nasal cavity and lined by the ciliated NASAL MUCOSA. Each sinus is named for the cranial bone in which it is located, such as the ETHMOID SINUS; the FRONTAL SINUS; the MAXILLARY SINUS; and the SPHENOID SINUS.Skull: The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.Cervical Vertebrae: The first seven VERTEBRAE of the SPINAL COLUMN, which correspond to the VERTEBRAE of the NECK.Bone Diseases, DevelopmentalMeningioma: A relatively common neoplasm of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that arises from arachnoidal cells. The majority are well differentiated vascular tumors which grow slowly and have a low potential to be invasive, although malignant subtypes occur. Meningiomas have a predilection to arise from the parasagittal region, cerebral convexity, sphenoidal ridge, olfactory groove, and SPINAL CANAL. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2056-7)Spinal DiseasesFibula: The bone of the lower leg lateral to and smaller than the tibia. In proportion to its length, it is the most slender of the long bones.Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PARANASAL SINUSES.Sternum: A long, narrow, and flat bone commonly known as BREASTBONE occurring in the midsection of the anterior thoracic segment or chest region, which stabilizes the rib cage and serves as the point of origin for several muscles that move the arms, head, and neck.Longitudinal Ligaments: Two extensive fibrous bands running the length of the vertebral column. The anterior longitudinal ligament (ligamentum longitudinale anterius; lacertus medius) interconnects the anterior surfaces of the vertebral bodies; the posterior longitudinal ligament (ligamentum longitudinale posterius) interconnects the posterior surfaces. The commonest clinical consideration is OSSIFICATION OF POSTERIOR LONGITUDINAL LIGAMENT. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Meningeal Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplastic processes that arise from or secondarily involve the meningeal coverings of the brain and spinal cord.Skull Base Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the base of the skull specifically, differentiated from neoplasms of unspecified sites or bones of the skull (SKULL NEOPLASMS).Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Nose Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the NOSE.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Down Syndrome: A chromosome disorder associated either with an extra chromosome 21 or an effective trisomy for chromosome 21. Clinical manifestations include hypotonia, short stature, brachycephaly, upslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthus, Brushfield spots on the iris, protruding tongue, small ears, short, broad hands, fifth finger clinodactyly, Simian crease, and moderate to severe INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY. Cardiac and gastrointestinal malformations, a marked increase in the incidence of LEUKEMIA, and the early onset of ALZHEIMER DISEASE are also associated with this condition. Pathologic features include the development of NEUROFIBRILLARY TANGLES in neurons and the deposition of AMYLOID BETA-PROTEIN, similar to the pathology of ALZHEIMER DISEASE. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p213)
(1/31) SAPHO syndrome of the temporomandibular joint associated with sudden deafness.

We report a case of arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) associated with sclerosing osteomyelitis of the mandible and temporal bone, causing deafness. The presence of a palmoplantar pustulosis established the diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome. SAPHO (an acronym referring to synovitis, acne, palmoplantar pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis) syndrome is defined by the association of characteristic osteoarticular and dermatologic manifestations, with diffuse sclerosing osteomyelitis of the mandible being a part of this entity. We review the literature of SAPHO syndrome with mandibular manifestations and discuss the mechanisms of inflammatory spread from the TMJ to the cochlea. To our knowledge, this is the first description of skull base involvement in a patient with SAPHO syndrome leading to sudden deafness.  (+info)

(2/31) SAPHO syndrome or psoriatic arthritis? A familial case study.

OBJECTIVE: To discuss the relationships between SAPHO (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis) syndrome and the group of spondylarthropathies. METHODS: Few reports of familial SAPHO have been published. We describe three children, two sisters and one brother, whose clinical and radiological presentation was in accordance with SAPHO syndrome. RESULTS: Two children developed psoriasis, and one child palmoplantar pustulosis. Both sacroiliac and sternoclavicular joints were involved in these three cases. Some features in our observations are also common to psoriatic arthritis. No association was found with HLA antigens, but a history of trauma preceding the onset of symptoms was present in all three children. CONCLUSIONS: We can consider that SAPHO is nosologically related to spondylarthropathies. Psoriatic arthritis could be the missing link between SAPHO and spondylarthropathies. It is likely that both genetic and environmental factors are involved.  (+info)

(3/31) Diagnostic points and possible origin of osteomyelitis in synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome: a radiographic study of 77 mandibular osteomyelitis cases.

OBJECTIVES: To find diagnostic points and to identify the origin of osteomyelitis in synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome. METHODS: Fifty-two patients with mandibular suppurative osteomyelitis and 25 patients with mandibular osteomyelitis in SAPHO syndrome were included in the study. Radiographic patterns of the lesion, types of periosteal reaction and the presence of external bone resorption and bone enlargement were investigated in each case and compared between the two entities. RESULTS: Suppurative osteomyelitis demonstrated an osteolytic pattern and a lamellated type of periosteal reaction, whereas SAPHO syndrome revealed a mixed-pattern, solid-type periosteal reaction, external bone resorption and bone enlargement. CONCLUSIONS: Radiographic examination is suggested to be convenient and a useful diagnostic method of differentiating osteomyelitis in SAPHO syndrome from suppurative osteomyelitis. The periosteum is suspected to be the original site of osteomyelitic lesions in SAPHO syndrome.  (+info)

(4/31) SAPHO syndrome treated with pamidronate: an open-label study of 10 patients.

BACKGROUND: In recent years the SAPHO syndrome (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis) has been encountered more frequently. However, clinical evidence indicating superiority of a specific therapeutic modality is still absent. Pamidronate, a second-generation bisphosphonate, has a pronounced effect on bone metabolism by suppressing bone resorption. We report our clinical experience with intravenous pamidronate in SAPHO syndrome. METHODS: Between the years 1999 and 2003 we treated 10 patients with the SAPHO syndrome who did not respond to NSAIDs, oral corticosteroids, colchicine, methotrexate, sulphasalazine or infliximab. All patients were treated with 60 mg pamidronate, given intravenously within an hour. In cases of no response a subsequent dose was given within a month and if there was a partial response an additional infusion was given after 4 months. The primary endpoint was the disappearance of recurrent bouts of bone pain, osteitis or hyperostosis, or recurrent synovitis. Reduction of the frequency of attacks by 50% was regarded as a partial response. RESULTS: Seven of the patients were females and three were males. The age at diagnosis ranged from 26 to 68 yr. All patients had axial or peripheral arthritis and cutaneous involvement; three had severe acne, eight had pustulosis and two had concomitant psoriasis vulgaris. Hyperostosis of the anterior chest wall involving either sternocostal or sternoclavicular joints, as seen on technetium 99 bone scintigraphy, was detected in all patients. Complete remission was observed following therapy in six patients, three others partially responded and only one patient had no response. Two patients needed four cycles of pamidronate infusion, one patient needed three, six needed two infusions and one patient remitted following a single pamidronate infusion. In all but one patient pamidronate was effective in preventing recurrent bouts of pustulosis. CONCLUSION: Pamidronate seems to be a very effective mode of therapy for patients with the SAPHO syndrome, by promoting remission in all components of the disorder, such as bone, joint and skin involvement, and ceases the bouts that characterize this disorder.  (+info)

(5/31) Pamidronate in the treatment of childhood SAPHO syndrome.

BACKGROUND: SAPHO syndrome is increasingly recognized within the paediatric population. Conventional therapeutic approaches have often not been effective. Pamidronate is a second-generation bisphosphonate that affects bone turnover and demonstrates anti-inflammatory properties. In small case series it has given symptomatic relief to adults with this condition. OBJECTIVES: To report the clinical experience with pamidronate in childhood SAPHO syndrome. METHODS: A retrospective observational study of all children with SAPHO syndrome treated with pamidronate between 1996 and 2003 at a tertiary rheumatology centre. The standard dosing regime for pamidronate was 1 mg/kg to a maximum of 30 mg, administered daily for three consecutive days, repeated 3-monthly as required. Response to treatment was determined by clinical observation, patient subjective response and reduction in other treatments RESULTS: Seven girls were treated, with a median (range) age at diagnosis of 11 yr (9-15 yr). All patients demonstrated a beneficial clinical response, with relief of pain, increased activity and improved well-being. Subsequent courses of pamidronate were used in all patients. Other medications including corticosteroids and methotrexate could subsequently be stopped. Transient symptoms were associated with the initial course of pamidronate in some patients. No serious adverse events were reported. CONCLUSIONS: Pamidronate was associated with a marked improvement in function and well-being, and a reduction of pain and use of other medications in all patients, with no significant adverse effects. This study represents preliminary clinical data. A prospective multicentre study is necessary to assess the role and long-term safety of pamidronate in the management of childhood SAPHO syndrome  (+info)

(6/31) Successful treatment of SAPHO syndrome with zoledronic acid.

The SAPHO syndrome (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis) is a chronic, relapsing, inflammatory condition with skin and osteoarticular manifestations. Its etiology remains unclear, and various treatment regimens with steroids and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs frequently fail to control the disease, while exposing patients to the side effects of these drugs. Because the SAPHO syndrome manifests as a destructive inflammatory bone disease, use of bisphosphonates that possess antiosteoclastic and probably antiinflammatory properties has been suggested to be helpful. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of successful treatment with zoledronic acid of SAPHO syndrome that was resistant to conventional treatment.  (+info)

(7/31) Isolated thoracic spine lesion: is this the presentation of a SAPHO syndrome? A case report.

A case of an isolated lesion of the thoracic spine attributed to SAPHO syndrome is presented. A 51-year-old man was referred for inflammatory pain in the thoracic spine. The general examination was normal (especially cutaneous and rheumatologic examinations). Laboratory analysis showed only a mild inflammatory reaction. Standard radiographs showed partial condensation of T8. Computed tomography showed osteolysis of the anterior corner of T8, and MRI revealed an abnormal signal of T8, with enlargement of the prevertebral soft tissue. Percutaneous and thoracoscopic biopsies showed a nonspecific inflammatory process, and cultures were sterile. Initially, several diagnoses were advanced: infectious spondylitis, malignant tumor, lymphomas, Paget disease, seronegative spondyloarthropathies and finally atypical SAPHO syndrome. Three months later, the patient experienced more pain. General examination was still normal. The radiological findings worsened, while the inflammatory blood tests were normal. A new thoracoscopic biopsy revealed a nonspecific inflammatory process. A diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome was made, despite the lack of typical lesions. Dramatically improving with anti-inflammatory therapy, the patient's condition was favorable at 3-year follow-up. This atypical presentation of an isolated lesion in the spine makes the diagnosis of a SAPHO syndrome difficult but possible. Spine surgeons must be aware of this rare entity, to avoid misdiagnosis and unnecessary repeated surgical biopsies.  (+info)

(8/31) The usefulness of bone remodelling markers in predicting the efficacy of pamidronate treatment in SAPHO syndrome.

OBJECTIVES: Pamidronate has recently been used in SAPHO syndrome due to its anti-osteoclastic effect. The aim of this study is to determine the usefulness of bone remodelling markers for determining the efficacy of pamidronate treatment. METHODS: Thirteen patients with SAPHO syndrome were treated with pamidronate. The treatment evaluation was done using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and also erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, serum crosslaps (sCTX) and osteocalcin initially and after 3 months. A relevant clinical response was defined as an improvement in VAS of at least 40%. RESULTS: At 3 months, 7 of 13 patients had a good clinical response, as previously defined. Five of the seven patients maintained the good response over 6 months. Before the first perfusion 6 of the 13 patients had increased sCTX (upper 3250 pmol/l). In this small cohort we tried to analyse whether the increase in bone remodelling markers was associated with a good clinical response. In the responders group the mean levels of sCTX and osteocalcin at baseline were 6783.17 and 24.66, respectively, and in the non-responders group the levels were 2152 and 11.8, respectively. There was a significant difference in sCTX between the responders and the non-responders (P = 0.0044). CONCLUSION: Infusion of pamidronate is effective in SAPHO in some patients. Increased sCTX might be a prognostic marker for a good clinical response but results have to be confirmed in a larger cohort.  (+info)

*  List of MeSH codes (C05)
... acquired hyperostosis syndrome MeSH C05.116.099.708.857 --- short rib-polydactyly syndrome MeSH C05.116.099.708.914 --- ... hyperostosis frontalis interna MeSH C05.116.099.708.582 --- langer-giedion syndrome MeSH C05.116.099.708.670 --- osteochondroma ... hajdu-cheney syndrome MeSH C05.116.099.105 --- basal cell nevus syndrome MeSH C05.116.099.343 --- dwarfism MeSH C05.116.099.343 ... goldenhar syndrome MeSH C05.116.099.370.380 --- focal dermal hypoplasia MeSH C05.116.099.370.535 --- klippel-feil syndrome MeSH ...
*  Thoracic outlet syndrome
Rarer acquired causes include tumors, hyperostosis, and osteomyelitis Adson's sign and the costoclavicular maneuver lack ... Cervical rib syndrome (compression on brachial plexus and/or subclavian artery caused by bone growth). Costoclavicular syndrome ... Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a condition in which there is compression of the nerves, arteries, or veins in the passageway ... May-Thurner syndrome - a similar compressive pathology involving the left common iliac vein Backpack palsy - a similar ...
*  List of ICD-9 codes 710-739: diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue
738) Other acquired deformity (738.0) Acquired deformity of nose (738.1) Other acquired deformity of head (738.2) Acquired ... Cervicocranial syndrome (723.3) Cervicobrachial syndrome (diffuse) (723.4) Brachial neuritis or radiculitis nos (723.5) ... Hyperostosis of skull (733.4) Aseptic necrosis of bone (733.5) Osteitis condensans (733.6) Tietze's disease Costochondritis ( ... Acquired deformities of other parts of limbs (736.81) Unequal leg length (acquired) (736.89) Other acquired deformity of other ...
*  ICD-10 Chapter XIII: Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue
Other specified disorders of bone density and structure Hyperostosis of bones, except skull Osteosclerosis, acquired (M85.9) ... Sjögren's syndrome (Sicca syndrome) (M35.1) Other overlap syndromes Mixed connective tissue disease (M35.2) Behçet's disease ( ... acquired) Hallux varus (M20.4) Other hammer toe(s) (acquired) (M20.5) Other deformities of toe(s) (acquired) (M20.6) Acquired ... acquired) (M21.4) Flat foot (pes planus) (acquired) (M21.5) Acquired clawhand, clubhand, clawfoot and clubfoot (M21.6) Other ...
*  Propionibacterium acnes
... hyperostosis, osteitis) syndrome, sarcoidosis and sciatica. It is also suspected a main bacterial source of neuroinflammation ... The antibiotic families that P. acnes are most likely to acquire resistance to are the macrolides (e.g., erythromycin and ...
*  List of cutaneous conditions
Acquired generalized lipodystrophy (Lawrence syndrome, Lawrence-Seip syndrome) Adiposis dolorosa (Dercum's disease) Alpha-1 ... Rosacea conglobata Synovitis-acne-pustulosis-hyperostosis-osteomyelitis syndrome (SAPHO syndrome) Steroid rosacea Tar acne ... Turner syndrome Ulnar-mammary syndrome Van Der Woude syndrome Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome Watson syndrome Werner syndrome (adult ... Freeman-Sheldon syndrome, Windmill-Vane-Hand syndrome) Wilson-Turner syndrome Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (4p- syndrome) X-linked ...
*  List of diseases (A)
Acquired central hypoventilation syndrome Acquired hypoprothrombinemia Acquired immune deficiency syndrome Acquired ichthyosis ... Ankyloglossia heterochromia clasped thumbs Ankylosing spondylarthritis Ankylosing spondylitis Ankylosing vertebral hyperostosis ... syndrome Aarskog-Ose-Pande syndrome Aarskog syndrome Aase-Smith syndrome Anti amnistic syndrome Aase syndrome ABCD syndrome ... syndrome Akesson syndrome Aksu-Stckhausen syndrome Al Awadi Teebi Farag syndrome Al Frayh Facharzt Haque syndrome Al Gazali Al ...
*  Chiari malformation
... tethered spinal cord syndrome, and connective tissue disorders such as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and Marfan syndrome. Chiari ... Congenital causes include hydrocephalus, craniosynostosis (especially of the lambdoid suture), hyperostosis (such as ... Acquired disorders include space occupying lesions due to one of several potential causes ranging from brain tumors to ... Chiari malformation or Arnold-Chiari malformation should not be confused with Budd-Chiari syndrome, a hepatic condition also ...
*  List of diseases (H)
... homocitrullinuria syndrome Hyperostosid corticalis deformans juvenilis Hyperostosis cortical infantile Hyperostosis corticalis ... acquired Hypertrichosis retinopathy dysmorphism Hypertrichosis, anterior cervical Hypertrichotic osteochondrodysplasia ... Mcdonald syndrome Hunter-Jurenka-Thompson syndrome Hunter-Macpherson syndrome Hunter-Mcalpine syndrome Hunter-Mcdonald syndrome ... child Heavy metal poisoning HEC syndrome Hecht-Scott syndrome Heckenlively syndrome Heide syndrome Heliophobia HELLP syndrome ...
*  List of diseases (D)
... chronic spasmodic Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica Dysplasia Dysplastic cortical hyperostosis Dysplastic nevus syndrome ... acquired Dysgerminoma Dysgraphia Dysharmonic skeletal maturation muscular fiber disproportion Dyskeratosis congenita of Zinsser ... syndrome Daneman-Davy-Mancer syndrome Darier's disease Davenport-Donlan syndrome David syndrome Davis-Lafer syndrome De Barsy ... D ercole syndrome Daentl Towsend Siegel syndrome Dahlberg Borer Newcomer syndrome Daish-Hardman-Lamont syndrome Dandy-Walker ...
*  Norton Priory
Towards the end of the 14th century, the abbey acquired a "giant" statue of Saint Christopher. Three wills from members of the ... The only major congenital abnormality found consisted of bony changes resulting from a possible case of Down's syndrome. ... Other diseases specific to bones and joints were osteoarthritis, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH), and possible ... and three crania had features of hyperostosis frontalis interna, a metabolic condition affecting post-menopausal women. ...
*  List of OMIM disorder codes
MAT1A Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinemia syndrome; 238970; SLC25A15 Hyperostosis, endosteal; 144750; LRP5 ... acquired; 608709; LMNB2 Lipoid adrenal hyperplasia; 201710; STAR Lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia; 201710; CYP11A Lipoid ... AKAP9 Long QT syndrome-3; 603830; SCN5A Long QT syndrome-4; 600919; ANK2 Long QT syndrome-7; 170390; KCNJ2 Long QT syndrome-9; ... TGFBR2 Long QT syndrome 12; 612955; SNT1 Long QT syndrome 13; 613485; KCNJ5 Long QT syndrome-1; 192500; KCNQ1 Long QT syndrome- ...
The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Human Paleopathology - Cambridge University Press - Literati by Credo  The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Human Paleopathology - Cambridge University Press - Literati by Credo
Hyperostosis frontalis interna. *Generalized hyperostosis with pachydermia (pachydermo-hyperostosis). *Fibrous dysplasia of ... Jarcho-Levin syndrome of vertebral anomalies. *Congenital absence of the odontoid process ... Acquired hemochromatosis. *Paleopathology. *Part Seven: Infectious diseases. *Infectious Diseases: Introduction. *Bacterial ...
more infohttp://corp.credoreference.com/component/booktracker/edition/9253.html
Acquired Hyperostosis Syndrome | CTD  Acquired Hyperostosis Syndrome | CTD
Acquired Hyperostosis Syndrome Synonyms Acquired Hyperostosis Syndromes , Hyperostosis Syndrome, Acquired , Hyperostosis ... Acquired , SAPHO Syndrome , SAPHO Syndromes , Syndrome, Acquired Hyperostosis , Syndromes, Acquired Hyperostosis , Syndrome, ... SAPHO , Syndromes, SAPHO , Synovitis, Acne, Pustlosis, Hyperostosis, and Osteomyelitis Definition Syndrome consisting of ... The association of sterile inflammatory bone lesions and neutrophilic skin eruptions is indicative of this syndrome.. ...
more infohttp://ctdbase.org/detail.go?type=disease&acc=MESH%3AD020083
Sapho Syndrome disease: Malacards - Research Articles, Drugs, Genes, Clinical Trials  Sapho Syndrome disease: Malacards - Research Articles, Drugs, Genes, Clinical Trials
MalaCards based summary : Sapho Syndrome, also known as acquired hyperostosis syndrome, is related to osteomyelitis and ... Synovitis, Acne, Pustulosis, Hyperostosis, and Osteitis Syndrome 73 Synovitis, Acne, Pustlosis, Hyperostosis, and Osteomyelitis ... MalaCards integrated aliases for Sapho Syndrome:. Name: Sapho Syndrome 12 76 53 59 15 ... Synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome - AA challenging diagnosis not to be missed. ( ...
more infohttps://www.malacards.org/card/sapho_syndrome
SAPHO syndrome             | Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) - an NCATS Program  SAPHO syndrome | Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) - an NCATS Program
... information resources and questions answered by our Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Specialists for SAPHO syndrome ... SAPHO syndrome Title Other Names:. Acquired hyperostosis syndrome; Synovitis, Acne, Pustlosis, Hyperostosis, and Osteomyelitis ... Visit the following Facebook groups related to SAPHO syndrome:. SAPHO Syndrome Support. Sapho syndrome. SAPHO Syndrome UK. ... syndrome. involves any combination of: Synovitis (inflammation of the joints), Acne, Pustulosis (thick yellow blisters ...
more infohttps://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/7606/index
Rebecca Jackson MD | Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center  Rebecca Jackson MD | Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center
Acquired Hyperostosis Syndrome. *Fibrous Dysplasia, Monostotic. *Cherubism. *Osteolysis, Essential. *Turner Syndrome. *Female ...
more infohttps://wexnermedical.osu.edu/find-a-doctor/rebecca-jackson-md-1315
amhe.org  amhe.org
SAPHO Syndrome. SAPHO Syndrome (Acquired Hyperostosis Syndrome, Pustulosis, Hyperostosis and Osteomyelitis, Synovitis acne ... The term SAPHO Syndrome (Synovitis, Acne, pustulosis, Hyperostosis osteitis) was coined in 1987 by Chamot to describe this ... 8- Charmot AM, Benhamou CL, Khan MF, Baraneck L, Kaplan G, Prost A. (1987). "Acne-Pustulosis-Hyperostosis-osteitis Syndrome. ... Hyperostosis (increase in bone substance) and Osteitis (inflammation of the bone). The cause of Sapho syndrome is unknown, but ...
more infohttp://amhe.org/journal/?page_id=1779
List of MeSH codes (C05) - Wikipedia  List of MeSH codes (C05) - Wikipedia
... acquired hyperostosis syndrome MeSH C05.116.099.708.857 --- short rib-polydactyly syndrome MeSH C05.116.099.708.914 --- ... hyperostosis frontalis interna MeSH C05.116.099.708.582 --- langer-giedion syndrome MeSH C05.116.099.708.670 --- osteochondroma ... hajdu-cheney syndrome MeSH C05.116.099.105 --- basal cell nevus syndrome MeSH C05.116.099.343 --- dwarfism MeSH C05.116.099.343 ... goldenhar syndrome MeSH C05.116.099.370.380 --- focal dermal hypoplasia MeSH C05.116.099.370.535 --- klippel-feil syndrome MeSH ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_MeSH_codes_(C05)
Osteochondrodysplasias - Dyschondroplasias - information page with HONselect  Osteochondrodysplasias - Dyschondroplasias - information page with HONselect
Acquired Hyperostosis Syndrome. Camurati-Engelmann Syndrome. Cleidocranial Dysplasia. Ellis-Van Creveld Syndrome. ... Hyperostosis, Cortical, Congenital. Hyperostosis Frontalis Interna. Langer-Giedion Syndrome. Osteogenesis Imperfecta. Short Rib ... Hyperostosis, Cortical, Congenital - Hyperostosis Frontalis Interna - Langer-Giedion Syndrome - Osteochondroma - Osteogenesis ... Synonym(s): Dyschondroplasias / Hyperostosis Corticalis Generalisata / Melnick-Needles Syndrome / Multiple Epiphyseal Dysplasia ...
more infohttp://www.hon.ch/HONselect/RareDiseases/EN/C05.116.099.708.html
Peptides and Proteins: Novus Biologicals  Peptides and Proteins: Novus Biologicals
Acquired Hyperostosis Syndrome (2). *. Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (1). *. Acquired Kyphosis (2). *. Acute Basophilic ...
more infohttps://www.novusbio.com/product-type/peptides-and-proteins?related_diseases=Inflammatory%20Disorder
TP53 polyclonal antibody - (PAB24778) - Products - Abnova  TP53 polyclonal antibody - (PAB24778) - Products - Abnova
Acquired Hyperostosis Syndrome. *Acute Disease. *Adenocarcinoma. *Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell. *Adenocarcinoma, Follicular. * ... but also as germline mutations in some cancer-prone families with Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Multiple p53 variants due to ...
more infohttp://www.abnova.com/products/products_detail.asp?catalog_id=PAB24778
TP53 (phospho S15) monoclonal antibody, clone 1C11 (PE) - (MAB18999) - Products - Abnova  TP53 (phospho S15) monoclonal antibody, clone 1C11 (PE) - (MAB18999) - Products - Abnova
Acquired Hyperostosis Syndrome. *Acute Disease. *Adenocarcinoma. *Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell. *Adenocarcinoma, Follicular. * ... but also as germline mutations in some cancer-prone families with Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Multiple p53 variants due to ...
more infohttp://www.abnova.com/products/products_detail.asp?catalog_id=MAB18999
Thoracic outlet syndrome - Wikipedia  Thoracic outlet syndrome - Wikipedia
Rarer acquired causes include tumors, hyperostosis, and osteomyelitis Adson's sign and the costoclavicular maneuver lack ... Cervical rib syndrome (compression on brachial plexus and/or subclavian artery caused by bone growth). Costoclavicular syndrome ... Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a condition in which there is compression of the nerves, arteries, or veins in the passageway ... May-Thurner syndrome - a similar compressive pathology involving the left common iliac vein Backpack palsy - a similar ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thoracic_outlet_syndrome
New Insights into Autism Found Via Research on Rare Bone Disorder  New Insights into Autism Found Via Research on Rare Bone Disorder
Autism Infantile Cortical Hyperostosis Rett Syndrome Acquired Epileptiform Aphasia Renal Osteodystrophy / Mineral Bone Disorder ... Acquired Epileptiform Aphasia. Acquired Epileptiform Aphasia or Landau Kleffner Syndrome (LKS) is a rare childhood disorder in ... Infantile Cortical Hyperostosis. Infantile Cortical Hyperostosis is a disease of unknown cause, where bizarre thickening of the ... Rett Syndrome. Rett Syndrome is a neurological disorder that affects development. It mostly affects the girl child. ...
more infohttps://www.medindia.net/news/new-insights-into-autism-found-via-research-on-rare-bone-disorder-98772-1.htm
Acquired Group Membership financial definition of Acquired Group Membership  Acquired Group Membership financial definition of Acquired Group Membership
What is Acquired Group Membership? Meaning of Acquired Group Membership as a finance term. What does Acquired Group Membership ... Definition of Acquired Group Membership in the Financial Dictionary - by Free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. ... acquired hyperlipoproteinaemia. *acquired hyperlipoproteinemia. *Acquired hyperostosis syndrome. *acquired ... Acquired Group Membership. Acquired Group Membership. An affiliation with a club, church, professional organization, or any ...
more infohttps://financial-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Acquired+Group+Membership
Hyper IgD - The Clinical Advisor  Hyper IgD - The Clinical Advisor
Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), Behcet's disease, Crohn's disease, Macrophage activation syndrome, Hereditary or acquired ... Hyperostosis, Osteitis (SAPHO). ... Adverse effects of therapies used for Hyper IgD Syndrome. ... "Pathogenesis of familial periodic fever syndromes or hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes". Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp ... Systemic autoinflammatory syndromes that mimic HIDS. Systemic autoinflammatory syndromes that mimic HIDS include the following ...
more infohttp://www.clinicaladvisor.com/pediatrics/hyper-igd/article/619768/
Diagnostic Radiology/Musculoskeletal Imaging/Joint Disorders - Wikibooks, open books for an open world  Diagnostic Radiology/Musculoskeletal Imaging/Joint Disorders - Wikibooks, open books for an open world
Arthropathy associated with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. *Hemophilic arthropathy. *Pigmented villonodular synovitis ... 2. Inflammatory joint diseases a. Rheumatoid arthritis b. Psoriatic arthritis c. Reiter syndrome d. Ankylosing spondylitis e. ... Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. *Tumoral calcinosis. *Sarcoidosis. Retrieved from "https://en.wikibooks.org/w/index. ...
more infohttps://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Diagnostic_Radiology/Musculoskeletal_Imaging/Joint_Disorders
Muckle-Wells syndrome - The Clinical Advisor  Muckle-Wells syndrome - The Clinical Advisor
Hereditary or acquired angioedema.. *. Gout.. *. Autoimmune bone diseases: *. CRMO (chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis ... SAPHO (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteiitis).. What caused this disease to develop at this time?. Triggers may ... Systemic autoinflammatory syndromes that mimic Muckle-Wells syndrome:. *. Systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, adult ... "Pathogenesis of familial periodic fever syndromes or hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes". Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp ...
more infohttps://www.clinicaladvisor.com/pediatrics/muckle-wells-syndrome/article/619834/
HLA and Disease Associations  HLA and Disease Associations
Syndrome.- Vertebral Ankylosing Hyperostosis (Forestier's Disease).- Sacroiliitis.- Polyarthrosis of Hands.- Mechanical ... Sexually Acquired Reactive Arthritis.- Pseudopolyarthritis of the Spine.- Ankylosing Spondylitis.- Ankylosing Spondylitis in ... Hutchinson-Guilford Progeria Syndrome.- Werner's Syndrome.- Keratoacanthoma.- Felty's Syndrome.- Goltz-Gorlin Syndrome (Dermal ... West's Syndrome).- Epilepsy.- Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome.- Paraplegia and/or. Klappentext. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) or ...
more infohttps://www.moluna.de/buch/4196310-hla+and+disease+associations/
Hereditary Pediatric Fever Syndromes - Cancer Therapy Advisor  Hereditary Pediatric Fever Syndromes - Cancer Therapy Advisor
Autoimmune bone diseases: CRMO (chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis), SAPHO (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, ... Systemic autoinflammatory syndromes that mimic hereditary periodic fever syndromes:. *. Systemic onset juvenile idiopathic ... "Pathogenesis of familial periodic fever syndromes or hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes". Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp ... What are the possible outcomes of inherited pediatric fever syndromes? * Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes (CAPS) ...
more infohttps://www.cancertherapyadvisor.com/pediatrics/hereditary-pediatric-fever-syndromes/article/622893/
  • The cause of SAPHO syndrome is unknown and treatment is focused on managing symptoms. (malacards.org)
  • An important gene associated with Sapho Syndrome is LPIN2 (Lipin 2), and among its related pathways/superpathways are Cytokine Signaling in Immune system and Corticotropin-releasing hormone signaling pathway . (malacards.org)
  • There is no specific treatment plan for SAPHO syndrome . (nih.gov)
  • SAPHO Syndrome occurs also in other spondyloarthropathies like psoriatic arthritis, idiopathic ankylosing spondyloarthropathy, spondylopathy associated with inflammatory bowel syndrome. (amhe.org)
  • Recently a curvilinear or semicircular pattern was described in the vertebral body segments helping in differentiating SAPHO Syndrome from Metastatic disease of the spine. (amhe.org)
  • SAPHO Syndrome cannot be diagnosed hystopathologically. (amhe.org)
  • A painful, swollen and blue arm, particularly when occurring after strenuous physical activity, could be the first sign of a subclavian vein compression related with an unknown TOS and complicated by thrombosis (blood clots), the so-called Paget-Schroetter syndrome or effort-induced thrombosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alterations of this gene occur not only as somatic mutations in human malignancies, but also as germline mutations in some cancer-prone families with Li-Fraumeni syndrome. (abnova.com)
  • The association of sterile inflammatory bone lesions and neutrophilic skin eruptions is indicative of this syndrome. (ctdbase.org)