Dictionaries, MedicalMacula Lutea: An oval area in the retina, 3 to 5 mm in diameter, usually located temporal to the posterior pole of the eye and slightly below the level of the optic disk. It is characterized by the presence of a yellow pigment diffusely permeating the inner layers, contains the fovea centralis in its center, and provides the best phototropic visual acuity. It is devoid of retinal blood vessels, except in its periphery, and receives nourishment from the choriocapillaris of the choroid. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Dictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Dictionaries, ChemicalCorpus Luteum: The yellow body derived from the ruptured OVARIAN FOLLICLE after OVULATION. The process of corpus luteum formation, LUTEINIZATION, is regulated by LUTEINIZING HORMONE.Acoustic Maculae: The sensory areas on the vertical wall of the saccule and in the floor of the utricle. The hair cells in the maculae are innervated by fibers of the VESTIBULAR NERVE.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Myosins: A diverse superfamily of proteins that function as translocating proteins. They share the common characteristics of being able to bind ACTINS and hydrolyze MgATP. Myosins generally consist of heavy chains which are involved in locomotion, and light chains which are involved in regulation. Within the structure of myosin heavy chain are three domains: the head, the neck and the tail. The head region of the heavy chain contains the actin binding domain and MgATPase domain which provides energy for locomotion. The neck region is involved in binding the light-chains. The tail region provides the anchoring point that maintains the position of the heavy chain. The superfamily of myosins is organized into structural classes based upon the type and arrangement of the subunits they contain.Factor VIIa: Activated form of factor VII. Factor VIIa activates factor X in the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation.Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).Antibody Specificity: The property of antibodies which enables them to react with some ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS and not with others. Specificity is dependent on chemical composition, physical forces, and molecular structure at the binding site.Antibodies, Viral: Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Antibodies, Bacterial: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.Antibody Formation: The production of ANTIBODIES by proliferating and differentiated B-LYMPHOCYTES under stimulation by ANTIGENS.Antibodies, Neutralizing: Antibodies that reduce or abolish some biological activity of a soluble antigen or infectious agent, usually a virus.Thromboplastin: Constituent composed of protein and phospholipid that is widely distributed in many tissues. It serves as a cofactor with factor VIIa to activate factor X in the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation.Endolymphatic Hydrops: An accumulation of ENDOLYMPH in the inner ear (LABYRINTH) leading to buildup of pressure and distortion of intralabyrinthine structures, such as COCHLEA and SEMICIRCULAR CANALS. It is characterized by SENSORINEURAL HEARING LOSS; TINNITUS; and sometimes VERTIGO.Neuroma, Acoustic: A benign SCHWANNOMA of the eighth cranial nerve (VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE), mostly arising from the vestibular branch (VESTIBULAR NERVE) during the fifth or sixth decade of life. Clinical manifestations include HEARING LOSS; HEADACHE; VERTIGO; TINNITUS; and FACIAL PAIN. Bilateral acoustic neuromas are associated with NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 2. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p673)Neuroma: A tumor made up of nerve cells and nerve fibers. (Dorland, 27th ed)Meniere Disease: A disease of the inner ear (LABYRINTH) that is characterized by fluctuating SENSORINEURAL HEARING LOSS; TINNITUS; episodic VERTIGO; and aural fullness. It is the most common form of endolymphatic hydrops.Ear, Inner: The essential part of the hearing organ consists of two labyrinthine compartments: the bony labyrinthine and the membranous labyrinth. The bony labyrinth is a complex of three interconnecting cavities or spaces (COCHLEA; VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH; and SEMICIRCULAR CANALS) in the TEMPORAL BONE. Within the bony labyrinth lies the membranous labyrinth which is a complex of sacs and tubules (COCHLEAR DUCT; SACCULE AND UTRICLE; and SEMICIRCULAR DUCTS) forming a continuous space enclosed by EPITHELIUM and connective tissue. These spaces are filled with LABYRINTHINE FLUIDS of various compositions.Hydrops Fetalis: Abnormal accumulation of serous fluid in two or more fetal compartments, such as SKIN; PLEURA; PERICARDIUM; PLACENTA; PERITONEUM; AMNIOTIC FLUID. General fetal EDEMA may be of non-immunologic origin, or of immunologic origin as in the case of ERYTHROBLASTOSIS FETALIS.Aquaporins: A class of porins that allow the passage of WATER and other small molecules across CELL MEMBRANES.Endolymph: The lymph fluid found in the membranous labyrinth of the ear. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Endolymphatic Duct: The part of the membranous labyrinth that traverses the bony vestibular aqueduct and emerges through the bone of posterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR) where it expands into a blind pouch called the endolymphatic sac.Autopsy: Postmortem examination of the body.Search Engine: Software used to locate data or information stored in machine-readable form locally or at a distance such as an INTERNET site.Blogging: Using an INTERNET based personal journal which may consist of reflections, comments, and often hyperlinks.Convolvulaceae: The morning glory family of flowering plants, of the order Solanales, which includes about 50 genera and at least 1,400 species. Leaves are alternate and flowers are funnel-shaped. Most are twining and erect herbs, with a few woody vines, trees, and shrubs.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Gasoline: Volative flammable fuel (liquid hydrocarbons) derived from crude petroleum by processes such as distillation reforming, polymerization, etc.Information Storage and Retrieval: Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.Vehicle Emissions: Gases, fumes, vapors, and odors escaping from the cylinders of a gasoline or diesel internal-combustion engine. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed & Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Great BritainSoftware: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.
(1/15) Age-related blood flow and capillary changes in the rat utricular macula: a quantitative stereological and microsphere study.

Vascular change may contribute to age-related vestibular dysfunction. Previously, we reported a significant age-related decrease in blood flow (BF) and mean capillary diameter (D(cap)) in the rat posterior canal crista. The purpose of this study was to examine an otolith organ, the utricle, for similar changes. Old male Fischer 344 rats (O; 28-31 mos) were anesthetized, and the left cardiac ventricle was transcutaneously injected with radioactive microspheres to determine BF. The temporal bones were removed, fixed, and decalcified. The utricles were dissected free and placed into a gamma counter with the reference samples. The specimens were then plastic embedded and serially sectioned at 1 microm according to the vertical section technique. Microsphere surface counts were made and neuroepithelial BF calculated. A systematic random set of sections was sampled and analyzed using stereological techniques for estimates of D(cap), capillary surface area/unit volume (S(v,cap)), capillary length/ unit volume (L(v,cap)), and volume of utricular neuroepithelium (V(ut)). Using these data, total capillary surface (S(cap)) and total length (L(cap)) were calculated. Statistical comparisons were made with data from our previous study of young animals (Y; 3-6 mos). Results indicate a significant age-related decrease in BF (Y = 0.125 microL/min, O = 0.062 microL/min; P = 0.003), D(cap) (Y = 5.95 micro, O = 4.57 microm; P = 0.0002), S(vcap) (Y = 12.33 mm2/mm3, = 9.87 mm2/mm3, P = 0.016), S(cap) (Y = 0.178 mm2, O = 0.129 mm2; p = 0.01), and V(ut) (Y = 0.014 mm3, O = 0.013 mm3; P = 0.04) with no significant change in L(v,cap) (Y = 655 mm/mm3, O = 686 mm/mm3, P = 0.41) or L(cap) (Y = 9.47 mm, O = 8.96 mm; P = 0.49). These age-related vascular changes are likely to have a significant impact on utricular physiological and thus, dysequilibrium.  (+info)

(2/15) Afferent innervation patterns of the saccule in pigeons.

The innervation patterns of vestibular saccular afferents were quantitatively investigated in pigeons using biotinylated dextran amine as a neural tracer and three-dimensional computer reconstruction. Type I hair cells were found throughout a large portion of the macula, with the highest density observed in the striola. Type II hair cells were located throughout the macula, with the highest density in the extrastriola. Three classes of afferent innervation patterns were observed, including calyx, dimorph, and bouton units, with 137 afferents being anatomically reconstructed and used for quantitative comparisons. Calyx afferents were located primarily in the striola, innervated a number of type I hair cells, and had small innervation areas. Most calyx afferent terminal fields were oriented parallel to the anterior-posterior axis and the morphological polarization reversal line. Dimorph afferents were located throughout the macula, contained fewer type I hair cells in a calyceal terminal than calyx afferents and had medium sized innervation areas. Bouton afferents were restricted to the extrastriola, with multi-branching fibers and large innervation areas. Most of the dimorph and bouton afferents had innervation fields that were oriented dorso-ventrally but were parallel to the neighboring reversal line. The organizational morphology of the saccule was found to be distinctly different from that of the avian utricle or lagena otolith organs and appears to represent a receptor organ undergoing evolutionary adaptation toward sensing linear motion in terrestrial and aerial species.  (+info)

(3/15) Hair bundle heights in the utricle: differences between macular locations and hair cell types.

Hair bundle structure is a major determinant of bundle mechanics and thus of a hair cell's ability to encode sound and head movement stimuli. Little quantitative information about bundle structure is available for vestibular organs. Here we characterize hair bundle heights in the utricle of a turtle, Trachemys scripta. We visualized bundles from the side using confocal images of utricular slices. We measured kinocilia and stereocilia heights and array length (distance from tall to short end of bundle), and we calculated a KS ratio (kinocilium height/height of the tallest stereocilia) and bundle slope (height fall-off from tall to short end of bundle). To ensure that our measurements reflect in vivo dimensions as closely as possible, we used fixed but undehydrated utricular slices, and we measured heights in three dimensions by tracing kinocilia and stereocilia through adjacent confocal sections. Bundle heights vary significantly with position on the utricular macula and with hair cell type. Type II hair cells are found throughout the macula. We identified four subgroups that differ in bundle structure: zone 1 (lateral extrastriola), striolar zone 2, striolar zone 3, and zone 4 (medial extrastriola). Type I hair cells are confined to striolar zone 3. They have taller stereocilia, longer arrays, lower KS ratios, and steeper slopes than do neighboring (zone 3) type II bundles. Models and experiments suggest that these location- and type-specific differences in bundle heights will yield parallel variations in bundle mechanics. Our data also raise the possibility that differences in bundle structure and mechanics will help explain location- and type-specific differences in the physiological profiles of utricular afferents, which have been reported in frogs and mammals.  (+info)

(4/15) Regeneration of vestibular otolith afferents after ototoxic damage.

Regeneration of receptor cells and subsequent functional recovery after damage in the auditory and vestibular systems of many vertebrates is well known. Spontaneous regeneration of mammalian hair cells does not occur. However, recent approaches provide hope for similar restoration of hearing and balance in humans after loss. Newly regenerated hair cells receive afferent terminal contacts, yet nothing is known about how reinnervation progresses or whether regenerated afferents finally develop normal termination fields. We hypothesized that neural regeneration in the vestibular otolith system would recapitulate the topographic phenotype of afferent innervation so characteristic of normal development. We used an ototoxic agent to produce complete vestibular receptor cell loss and epithelial denervation, and then quantitatively examined afferent regeneration at discrete periods up to 1 year in otolith maculas. Here, we report that bouton, dimorph, and calyx afferents all regenerate slowly at different time epochs, through a progressive temporal sequence. Furthermore, our data suggest that both the hair cells and their innervating afferents transdifferentiate from an early form into more advanced forms during regeneration. Finally, we show that regeneration remarkably recapitulates the topographic organization of afferent macular innervation, comparable with that developed through normative morphogenesis. However, we also show that regenerated terminal morphologies were significantly less complex than normal fibers. Whether these structural fiber changes lead to alterations in afferent responsiveness is unknown. If true, adaptive plasticity in the central neural processing of motion information would be necessitated, because it is known that many vestibular-related behaviors fully recover during regeneration.  (+info)

(5/15) Zebrafish pax5 regulates development of the utricular macula and vestibular function.

The zebrafish otic vesicle initially forms with only two sensory epithelia, the utricular and saccular maculae, which primarily mediate vestibular and auditory function, respectively. Here, we test the role of pax5, which is preferentially expressed in the utricular macula. Morpholino knockdown of pax5 disrupts vestibular function but not hearing. Neurons of the statoacoustic ganglion (SAG) develop normally. Utricular hair cells appear to form normally but a variable number subsequently undergo apoptosis and are extruded from the otic vesicle. Dendrites of the SAG persist in the utricle but become disorganized after hair cell loss. Hair cells in the saccule develop and survive normally. Otic expression of pax5 requires pax2a and fgf3, mutations in which cause vestibular defects, albeit by distinct mechanisms. Thus, pax5 works in conjunction with fgf3 and pax2a to establish and/or maintain the utricular macula and is essential for vestibular function.  (+info)

(6/15) Architecture of the mouse utricle: macular organization and hair bundle heights.

Hair bundles are critical to mechanotransduction by vestibular hair cells, but quantitative data are lacking on vestibular bundles in mice or other mammals. Here we quantify bundle heights and their variation with macular locus and hair cell type in adult mouse utricular macula. We also determined that macular organization differs from previous reports. The utricle has approximately 3,600 hair cells, half on each side of the line of polarity reversal (LPR). A band of low hair cell density corresponds to a band of calretinin-positive calyces, i.e., the striola. The relation between the LPR and the striola differs from previous reports in two ways. First, the LPR lies lateral to the striola instead of bisecting it. Second, the LPR follows the striolar trajectory anteriorly, but posteriorly it veers from the edge of the striola to reach the posterior margin of the macula. Consequently, more utricular bundles are oriented mediolaterally than previously supposed. Three hair cell classes are distinguished in calretinin-stained material: type II hair cells, type ID hair cells contacting calretinin-negative (dimorphic) afferents, and type IC hair cells contacting calretinin-positive (calyceal) afferents. They differ significantly on most bundle measures. Type II bundles have short stereocilia. Type IC bundles have kinocilia and stereocilia of similar heights, i.e., KS ratios (ratio of kinocilium to stereocilia heights) approximately 1, unlike other receptor classes. In contrast to these class-specific differences, bundles show little regional variation except that KS ratios are lowest in the striola. These low KS ratios suggest that bundle stiffness is greater in the striola than in the extrastriola.  (+info)

(7/15) Resting discharge patterns of macular primary afferents in otoconia-deficient mice.

 (+info)

(8/15) Immunohistochemical localization and mRNA expression of aquaporins in the macula utriculi of patients with Meniere's disease and acoustic neuroma.

 (+info)

*  List of MeSH codes (A09)
... acoustic maculae MeSH A09.246.631.909.625.125.340 --- hair cells, vestibular MeSH A09.246.631.909.625.125.680 --- otolithic ... macula lutea MeSH A09.371.729.522.436 --- fovea centralis MeSH A09.371.729.690 --- optic disk MeSH A09.371.729.727 --- ...
*  AQP6
... localization and mRNA expression of aquaporins in the macula utriculi of patients with Meniere's disease and acoustic neuroma ...
*  Macula of saccule
... or saccular macula), to which are distributed the saccular filaments of the acoustic nerve. The vestibule is a region of the ... The macula of saccule lies in a nearly vertical position. Its function is to detect vertical linear acceleration. It is a 2 mm ... The macula of the utricle is in a horizontal position and detects horizontal acceleration. The coordinated sensory perception ... Each hair cell of the macula contains 40 to 70 stereocilia and one true cilia, called a kinocilium. A gelatinous cover called ...
*  Utricle (ear)
Within the utricle is a small 2 by 3 mm patch of hair cells called the macula of utricle. The macula of utricle, which lies ... which receives the utricular filaments of the acoustic nerve. The cavity of the utricle communicates behind with the ... The macula consists of three layers. The bottom layer is made of sensory hair cells which are embedded in the bottom of a ... The macula of utricle is a thickening in the wall of the utricle where the epithelium contains vestibular hair cells that ...
*  Vestibule of the ear
... macula cribrosa media) for the passage of filaments of the acoustic nerve to the saccule; and behind this depression is an ... The pyramid and adjoining part of the recessus ellipticus are perforated by a number of holes (macula cribosa superior). The ... which is perforated by a number of holes for the passage of filaments of the acoustic nerve which supply the vestibular end of ...
*  Vestibulocochlear nerve
The other two sensory organs supplied by the vestibular neurons are the maculae of the saccule and utricle. Hair cells of the ... Some older texts call the nerve the acoustic or auditory nerve, but these terms have fallen out of widespread use because they ... It emerges from the pontomedullary junction and exits the inner skull via the internal acoustic meatus (or internal auditory ... maculae in the utricle activate afferent receptors in response to linear acceleration while hair cells of the maculae in the ...
*  Tusk of Jaguar
"Macula (Far from Mother Land)" (Takasaki) - 4:46 "Ebony Eyes" (Takasaki, Milky Way) - 5:31 Side two "Wild Boogie Run" (Sasaji ... electric and acoustic guitars, lead vocals on track 4, backing vocals, producer Masanori Sasaji - keyboards and synthesizers, ...
*  Outline of human anatomy
Inner layer of eyeball Retina Ora serrata Optic disc Macula Fovea centralis Optic nerve (see nervous system) Retinal blood ... Tragicus Pyramidal muscle of auricle Antitragicus Transverse muscle of auricle Oblique muscle of auricle External acoustic ... tube Inner ear Bony labyrinth Semicircular canals Cochlea Modiolus Scala vestibuli Helicotrema Scala tympani Internal acoustic ...
*  Inner ear
The macula sacculi detects vertical acceleration while the macula utriculi is responsible for horizontal acceleration. These ... acoustic hair cells, auditory cells or cells of Corti. The organ of Corti is lined with a single row of inner hair cells and ... They contain the sensory hair cells and otoliths of the macula of utricle and of the saccule, respectively, which respond to ... bony fish contain a sensory cluster called the macula neglecta in the utricle that may have this function. Although fish have ...
*  Index of anatomy articles
... macroscopic macula macular sparing magnocellular nuclei main pulmonary artery major duodenal papilla malleolus malleus ... accessory cuneate nucleus accessory nerve accessory olivary nucleus accommodation reflex acetabulum Achilles tendon acoustic ... interhemispheric fissure intermediate horn cell intermediolateral cell column intermediolateral nucleus internal acoustic ...
*  Rock music in Albania
Linda went on to release her single acoustic album "Jam" (I am) in 2011 which was written and composed by her. She was the ... In 1978 the famous guitarist & composer Nexhat Macula formed one of the best Albanian rock bands of all time, called "TNT" in ...
*  Swim bladder
In some deep sea fishes like the Antimora, the swim bladder maybe also connected to the Macula of saccule in order for the ... It simulates high-energy sound waves in aquatic far-field, plane-wave acoustic conditions. Siphonophores have a special swim ...
Macula lutea | definition of macula lutea by Medical dictionary  Macula lutea | definition of macula lutea by Medical dictionary
... macula lutea explanation free. What is macula lutea? Meaning of macula lutea medical term. What does macula lutea mean? ... Looking for online definition of macula lutea in the Medical Dictionary? ... 4. macula lutea. adj., adj mac´ular, mac´ulate.. acoustic maculae (ma´culae acus´ticae) the macula sacculi and macula utriculi ... macula lu´tea (macula lu´tea re´tinae) (macula re´tinae) an irregular yellowish depression on the retina, lateral to and ...
more infohttp://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/macula+lutea
Macula | definition of macula by Medical dictionary  Macula | definition of macula by Medical dictionary
... macula explanation free. What is macula? Meaning of macula medical term. What does macula mean? ... Looking for online definition of macula in the Medical Dictionary? ... 4. macula lutea. adj., adj mac´ular, mac´ulate.. acoustic maculae (ma´culae acus´ticae) the macula sacculi and macula utriculi ... Related to macula: macula densa, macula adherens. macula. [mak´u-lah] (L.) 1. a stain, spot, or thickening; in anatomy, an area ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/macula
List of MeSH codes (A09) - Wikipedia  List of MeSH codes (A09) - Wikipedia
... acoustic maculae MeSH A09.246.631.909.625.125.340 --- hair cells, vestibular MeSH A09.246.631.909.625.125.680 --- otolithic ... macula lutea MeSH A09.371.729.522.436 --- fovea centralis MeSH A09.371.729.690 --- optic disk MeSH A09.371.729.727 --- ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_MeSH_codes_(A09)
MeSH Semantic Type: Cell [T025]  MeSH Semantic Type: Cell [T025]
Mechanoreceptors located in the acoustic maculae and the semicircular canals that mediate the sense of balance, movement, and ...
more infohttp://www.slicksurface.com/medical-thesaurus/semantic-type/cell.htm
cell | Tabers Medical Dictionary  cell | Taber's Medical Dictionary
A supporting cell, as in the acoustic macula, organ of Corti, olfactory epithelium, taste buds, or testes. ... An epithelial cell possessing stereocilia in the maculae, cristae ampullaris, and organ of Corti. These cells are receptors for ...
more infohttps://nursing.unboundmedicine.com/nursingcentral/view/Tabers-Dictionary/734233/all/cell?q=center
cell | Tabers Medical Dictionary  cell | Taber's Medical Dictionary
A supporting cell, as in the acoustic macula, organ of Corti, olfactory epithelium, taste buds, or testes. ... An epithelial cell possessing stereocilia in the maculae, cristae ampullaris, and organ of Corti. These cells are receptors for ...
more infohttps://nursing.unboundmedicine.com/nursingcentral/view/Tabers-Dictionary/734233/58/cell
Cochlea | Article about cochlea by The Free Dictionary  Cochlea | Article about cochlea by The Free Dictionary
... have a special organ of hearing in the sacculus-the lagena with a macula distinct from the original acoustic macula. ... It is believed that the macula of the lagena takes part in the functioning of the vestibule and that the macula is sensitive to ... they retain a vestige of the lagena and its macula. In birds, the functions of the macula are associated with flight, as well ... The sacculus of some fishes has only one sensory patch, or macula. Most fishes, with the exception of those of the order ...
more infohttps://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/cochlea
AQP6 - Wikipedia  AQP6 - Wikipedia
... localization and mRNA expression of aquaporins in the macula utriculi of patients with Meniere's disease and acoustic neuroma ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AQP6
Frontiers | Identification of New Signaling Components in the Sensory Epithelium of Human Saccule | Neurology  Frontiers | Identification of New Signaling Components in the Sensory Epithelium of Human Saccule | Neurology
... localization and mRNA expression of aquaporins in the macula utriculi of patients with Meniere's disease and acoustic neuroma. ... Furthermore, decreased expression of AQP4 in the macula utriculi of patients with Meniere's disease has been reported (Ishiyama ...
more infohttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fneur.2011.00048/full
Anti-Myosin VIIa antibody (ab3481) References | Abcam  Anti-Myosin VIIa antibody (ab3481) References | Abcam
... localization and mRNA expression of aquaporins in the macula utriculi of patients with Meniere's disease and acoustic neuroma. ...
more infohttp://www.abcam.com/myosin-viia-antibody-ab3481-references.html
Wind Turbine Syndrome |   Massive acoustic trauma incompatible with life (Spain)  Wind Turbine Syndrome | "Massive acoustic trauma incompatible with life" (Spain)
Immediately after exposure, damage was observed in the macula statica princeps and on the crista sensory epithelia. Kinocilia ... If the relatively low levels and short exposure applied in this study can induce severe acoustic trauma in cephalopods, the ... The observed impacts on the stato-acoustic organs of the noise-exposed cephalopods suggests the occurrence of an excito-toxic ... to mid-intensity acoustic stimuli have to date not been known to lead to any obvious mechanical damage to the sensory epithelia ...
more infohttps://www.windturbinesyndrome.com/2011/massive-acoustic-trauma-incompatible-with-life-spain/?var=wts
Transcriptomic analysis of the zebrafish inner ear points to growth hormone mediated regeneration following acoustic trauma |...  Transcriptomic analysis of the zebrafish inner ear points to growth hormone mediated regeneration following acoustic trauma |...
Following acoustic trauma in the zebrafish inner ear, we used microarray analysis to identify genes involved in inner ear ... since GH was significantly up-regulated following acoustic trauma. Microarray analysis, validated with the aid of quantitative ... repair following acoustic exposure. Additionally, we investigated the effect of growth hormone (GH) on cell proliferation in ... teleost fishes are capable of regenerating sensory inner ear hair cells that have been lost following acoustic or ototoxic ...
more infohttps://bmcneurosci.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2202-12-88
https://refubium.fu-berlin.de/handle/fub188/6191  https://refubium.fu-berlin.de/handle/fub188/6191
The acoustic stimulation of the saccular macula leads to microcontractions in the sternocleidomastoid muscle, which can be ... Mainly the acoustic air-conducted click and toneburst stimuli are of clinical relevance. In 2006 a non-commercial measuring ... The origin of these potentials is a disynaptic reflex arc, which originates in the receptor cells of the saccular macula of the ...
more infohttps://refubium.fu-berlin.de/handle/fub188/6191
JoVE Author Search: Ishiyama A  JoVE Author Search: Ishiyama A
Acoustic Neuroma, Aquaporins, Atpase, Autopsy, Blood, Blood Vessels, Cell, Cytoplasm, Endolymphatic Hydrops ... localization and mRNA expression of aquaporins in the macula utriculi of patients with Meniere's disease and acoustic neuroma. ... Research Interests: Patients, Antibodies, Cells, Disease, Ear, Hearing, Inner Ear, Menieres Disease, Water, Lead, Acoustic, ... Acoustic Neuroma, Aquaporins, Atpase, Autopsy, Blood, Blood Vessels, Cell, Cytoplasm, Endolymphatic Hydrops. ...
more infohttp://labindex.jove.com/author/Ishiyama-A
View source for BGDB Face and Ear - Late Embryo - Embryology  View source for BGDB Face and Ear - Late Embryo - Embryology
... and form the macula acustica utriculi, which receives the utricular filaments of the acoustic nerve. The cavity of the utricle ... Its anterior part exhibits an oval thickening, the macula acustica sacculi, to which are distributed the saccular filaments of ... The membranous labyrinth contains fluid, the endolymph, and on its walls the ramifications of the acoustic nerve are ... File:Streeter1906 plate02.jpg,400px]] Membranous labyrinth and acoustic complex model reconstructed from week 8 human embryo ( ...
more infohttps://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php?title=BGDB_Face_and_Ear_-_Late_Embryo&action=edit
Learn: USMLE Metabolic Disorders (by mebewisa) - Memorize.com - Remember and Understand  Learn: USMLE Metabolic Disorders (by mebewisa) - Memorize.com - Remember and Understand
absent startle reflex with acoustic stimuli. None. Krabbes. Galactocerebrosidase def. Galactocerebroside acc. None. Autosomal ... Progressive neurodegeneration/developmental delay/cherry red spot on macula/lysosomes with onion skin/ NO hepatosplenomegaly. ... Progressive neurodegeneration/hepatosplenomegaly ( sphingomyelin accumulated in liver and brain)/cherry red spot macula/foam ...
more infohttp://memorize.com/usmle-metabolic-disorders/mebewisa
Difference between revisions of Hearing - Outer Ear Development - Embryology  Difference between revisions of "Hearing - Outer Ear Development" - Embryology
saccular macula - (macula of saccule) thickened anterior part of the saccule containing the saccular filaments of the acoustic ... internal auditory meatus - (internal acoustic meatus, IAM) Anatomical canal in which CN VII and CN VIII ganglia reside and pass ... Also associated clinically with the site where acoustic neuromas may occur. (More? inner ear) ... meatus - anatomical opening, cavity or space (external acoustic meatus, internal auditory meatus) ...
more infohttps://embryology.med.unsw.edu.au/embryology/index.php?title=Hearing_-_Outer_Ear_Development&diff=339226&oldid=43761
Acoustic microscope | Article about acoustic microscope by The Free Dictionary  Acoustic microscope | Article about acoustic microscope by The Free Dictionary
Find out information about acoustic microscope. An instrument which employs acoustic radiation at microwave frequencies to ... allow visualization of the microscopic detail exhibited in elastic properties of... Explanation of acoustic microscope ... acoustic Mach meter. *acoustic maculae. *acoustic maculae. *acoustic maculae. *acoustic maculae. *acoustic maculae ... Related to acoustic microscope: electron microscope, acoustic lens. acoustic microscope. [ə′küs·tik ′mīk·rə‚skōp] (optics) An ...
more infohttp://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/acoustic+microscope
AQP1 | Cancer Genetics Web  AQP1 | Cancer Genetics Web
Vestibular maculae utriculi were acquired from patients undergoing surgery for Meniere's disease and acoustic neuroma and from ... localization and mRNA expression of aquaporins in the macula utriculi of patients with Meniere's disease and acoustic neuroma. ... AQP6-IR occurred in the sub-apical vestibular supporting cells in acoustic neuroma and autopsy samples. However, in Meniere's ... mRNA was extracted from the surgically acquired utricles from subjects with Meniere's disease and acoustic neuroma to conduct ...
more infohttp://cancer-genetics.org/AQP1.htm
Structural and functional effects of acoustic exposure in goldfish: evidence for tonotopy in the teleost saccule | BMC...  Structural and functional effects of acoustic exposure in goldfish: evidence for tonotopy in the teleost saccule | BMC...
One or more of these end organs serves as a sound detector, depending upon the species [14]. Each ear organ has a macula of ... A decrease in both hair cell loss and hearing loss is seen with an increase in the frequency of acoustic exposure (N = 23). (B ... Platt C, Popper AN: Variation in lengths of ciliary bundles on hair cells along the maculae of the sacculus in two species of ... Fay RR, Ream TJ: Acoustic response and tuning in saccular nerve fibers of the goldfish (Carassius auratus). J Acoust Soc Am. ...
more infohttps://bmcneurosci.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2202-12-19
  • The high resolution and in-depth imaging enables to detect and follow the macula diseases in quantitative templates. (koruhastanesi.com)
  • Comparison with maculae that have been 3D reconstructed based on histological serial sections and phalloidin-stained maculae showed high congruence in overall shape of the maculae studied here. (biomedcentral.com)
  • PTA staining and subsequent high-resolution contrast enhanced microCT imaging is a powerful method to obtain 3D models of fish inner ears and maculae in a fast and more reliable manner. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Our results indicate that reliable 3D reconstructions of inner ears including otoliths and maculae can be obtained by using high-resolution microCT imaging of specimens stained with phosphotungstic acid. (biomedcentral.com)
  • 2 ]). These reconstructions based on histological serial sections were labor-intensive and results were in part uneven as maculae were prone to distortion or artifacts such as disruption during dehydration or embedding procedures. (biomedcentral.com)
  • macula sac´culi a thickening on the wall of the saccule where the epithelium contains hair cells that receive and transmit vestibular impulses. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • macula utri´culi a thickening in the wall of the utricle where the epithelium contains hair cells that are stimulated by linear acceleration and deceleration and by gravity. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Maculae are characterized by orientation patterns of ciliary bundles of the sensory hair cells, i.e. the morphologically and physiologically polarized ciliary bundles form differently oriented groups on the macula. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The recently developed scanning laser acoustic microscope (SLAM), which finds applications as a nondestructive testing technique, is applied here to measure the acoustic attenuation changes during water sorption of crosslinked poly(HEMA) films. (thefreedictionary.com)