Acinetobacter baumannii: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria, commonly found in the clinical laboratory, and frequently resistant to common antibiotics.Acinetobacter Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus ACINETOBACTER.Acinetobacter: A genus of gram-negative bacteria of the family MORAXELLACEAE, found in soil and water and of uncertain pathogenicity.Carbapenems: A group of beta-lactam antibiotics in which the sulfur atom in the thiazolidine ring of the penicillin molecule is replaced by a carbon atom. THIENAMYCINS are a subgroup of carbapenems which have a sulfur atom as the first constituent of the side chain.Acinetobacter calcoaceticus: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria found in soil and water. Although considered to be normally nonpathogenic, this bacterium is a causative agent of nosocomial infections, particularly in debilitated individuals.Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to several structurally and functionally distinct drugs simultaneously. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Colistin: Cyclic polypeptide antibiotic from Bacillus colistinus. It is composed of Polymyxins E1 and E2 (or Colistins A, B, and C) which act as detergents on cell membranes. Colistin is less toxic than Polymyxin B, but otherwise similar; the methanesulfonate is used orally.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Imipenem: Semisynthetic thienamycin that has a wide spectrum of antibacterial activity against gram-negative and gram-positive aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, including many multiresistant strains. It is stable to beta-lactamases. Clinical studies have demonstrated high efficacy in the treatment of infections of various body systems. Its effectiveness is enhanced when it is administered in combination with CILASTATIN, a renal dipeptidase inhibitor.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Cross Infection: Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.beta-Lactamases: Enzymes found in many bacteria which catalyze the hydrolysis of the amide bond in the beta-lactam ring. Well known antibiotics destroyed by these enzymes are penicillins and cephalosporins.beta-Lactam Resistance: Nonsusceptibility of bacteria to the action of the beta-lactam antibiotics. Mechanisms responsible for beta-lactam resistance may be degradation of antibiotics by BETA-LACTAMASES, failure of antibiotics to penetrate, or low-affinity binding of antibiotics to targets.Drug Resistance, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Minocycline: A TETRACYCLINE analog, having a 7-dimethylamino and lacking the 5 methyl and hydroxyl groups, which is effective against tetracycline-resistant STAPHYLOCOCCUS infections.Thienamycins: Beta-lactam antibiotics that differ from PENICILLINS in having the thiazolidine sulfur atom replaced by carbon, the sulfur then becoming the first atom in the side chain. They are unstable chemically, but have a very broad antibacterial spectrum. Thienamycin and its more stable derivatives are proposed for use in combinations with enzyme inhibitors.Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field: Gel electrophoresis in which the direction of the electric field is changed periodically. This technique is similar to other electrophoretic methods normally used to separate double-stranded DNA molecules ranging in size up to tens of thousands of base-pairs. However, by alternating the electric field direction one is able to separate DNA molecules up to several million base-pairs in length.Sulbactam: A beta-lactamase inhibitor with very weak antibacterial action. The compound prevents antibiotic destruction of beta-lactam antibiotics by inhibiting beta-lactamases, thus extending their spectrum activity. Combinations of sulbactam with beta-lactam antibiotics have been used successfully for the therapy of infections caused by organisms resistant to the antibiotic alone.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Molecular Typing: Using MOLECULAR BIOLOGY techniques, such as DNA SEQUENCE ANALYSIS; PULSED-FIELD GEL ELECTROPHORESIS; and DNA FINGERPRINTING, to identify, classify, and compare organisms and their subtypes.Intensive Care Units: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.DNA Fingerprinting: A technique for identifying individuals of a species that is based on the uniqueness of their DNA sequence. Uniqueness is determined by identifying which combination of allelic variations occur in the individual at a statistically relevant number of different loci. In forensic studies, RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM of multiple, highly polymorphic VNTR LOCI or MICROSATELLITE REPEAT loci are analyzed. The number of loci used for the profile depends on the ALLELE FREQUENCY in the population.Bacterial Typing Techniques: Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.Integrons: DNA elements that include the component genes and insertion site for a site-specific recombination system that enables them to capture mobile gene cassettes.Multilocus Sequence Typing: Direct nucleotide sequencing of gene fragments from multiple housekeeping genes for the purpose of phylogenetic analysis, organism identification, and typing of species, strain, serovar, or other distinguishable phylogenetic level.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Molecular Epidemiology: The application of molecular biology to the answering of epidemiological questions. The examination of patterns of changes in DNA to implicate particular carcinogens and the use of molecular markers to predict which individuals are at highest risk for a disease are common examples.Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.Gram-Negative Bacteria: Bacteria which lose crystal violet stain but are stained pink when treated by Gram's method.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections: Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Pneumonia, Bacterial: Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by bacterial infections.Bacteremia: The presence of viable bacteria circulating in the blood. Fever, chills, tachycardia, and tachypnea are common acute manifestations of bacteremia. The majority of cases are seen in already hospitalized patients, most of whom have underlying diseases or procedures which render their bloodstreams susceptible to invasion.beta-Lactams: Four-membered cyclic AMIDES, best known for the PENICILLINS based on a bicyclo-thiazolidine, as well as the CEPHALOSPORINS based on a bicyclo-thiazine, and including monocyclic MONOBACTAMS. The BETA-LACTAMASES hydrolyze the beta lactam ring, accounting for BETA-LACTAM RESISTANCE of infective bacteria.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Disk Diffusion Antimicrobial Tests: A method where a culturing surface inoculated with microbe is exposed to small disks containing known amounts of a chemical agent resulting in a zone of inhibition (usually in millimeters) of growth of the microbe corresponding to the susceptibility of the strain to the agent.Amikacin: A broad-spectrum antibiotic derived from KANAMYCIN. It is reno- and oto-toxic like the other aminoglycoside antibiotics.Polymyxin B: A mixture of polymyxins B1 and B2, obtained from Bacillus polymyxa strains. They are basic polypeptides of about eight amino acids and have cationic detergent action on cell membranes. Polymyxin B is used for infections with gram-negative organisms, but may be neurotoxic and nephrotoxic.Monobactams: Monocyclic, bacterially produced or semisynthetic beta-lactam antibiotics. They lack the double ring construction of the traditional beta-lactam antibiotics and can be easily synthesized.Microbial Viability: Ability of a microbe to survive under given conditions. This can also be related to a colony's ability to replicate.Polymyxins: Basic lipopeptide antibiotic group obtained from Bacillus polymyxa. They affect the cell membrane by detergent action and may cause neuromuscular and kidney damage. At least eleven different members of the polymyxin group have been identified, each designated by a letter.Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated: Serious INFLAMMATION of the LUNG in patients who required the use of PULMONARY VENTILATOR. It is usually caused by cross bacterial infections in hospitals (NOSOCOMIAL INFECTIONS).Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Genome, Bacterial: The genetic complement of a BACTERIA as represented in its DNA.Equipment and Supplies, Hospital: Any materials used in providing care specifically in the hospital.Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A species of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria commonly isolated from clinical specimens (wound, burn, and urinary tract infections). It is also found widely distributed in soil and water. P. aeruginosa is a major agent of nosocomial infection.Biofilms: Encrustations, formed from microbes (bacteria, algae, fungi, plankton, or protozoa) embedding in extracellular polymers, that adhere to surfaces such as teeth (DENTAL DEPOSITS); PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; and catheters. Biofilms are prevented from forming by treating surfaces with DENTIFRICES; DISINFECTANTS; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS; and antifouling agents.Housekeeping, Hospital: Hospital department which manages and provides the required housekeeping functions in all areas of the hospital.DNA Transposable Elements: Discrete segments of DNA which can excise and reintegrate to another site in the genome. Most are inactive, i.e., have not been found to exist outside the integrated state. DNA transposable elements include bacterial IS (insertion sequence) elements, Tn elements, the maize controlling elements Ac and Ds, Drosophila P, gypsy, and pogo elements, the human Tigger elements and the Tc and mariner elements which are found throughout the animal kingdom.Siderophores: Low-molecular-weight compounds produced by microorganisms that aid in the transport and sequestration of ferric iron. (The Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994)Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Drug Resistance, Microbial: The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Aminoglycosides: Glycosylated compounds in which there is an amino substituent on the glycoside. Some of them are clinically important ANTIBIOTICS.Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins: Proteins isolated from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria.Hospitals, Military: Hospitals which provide care for the military personnel and usually for their dependents.Rifampin: A semisynthetic antibiotic produced from Streptomyces mediterranei. It has a broad antibacterial spectrum, including activity against several forms of Mycobacterium. In susceptible organisms it inhibits DNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity by forming a stable complex with the enzyme. It thus suppresses the initiation of RNA synthesis. Rifampin is bactericidal, and acts on both intracellular and extracellular organisms. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 9th ed, p1160)Genomic Islands: Distinct units in some bacterial, bacteriophage or plasmid GENOMES that are types of MOBILE GENETIC ELEMENTS. Encoded in them are a variety of fitness conferring genes, such as VIRULENCE FACTORS (in "pathogenicity islands or islets"), ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE genes, or genes required for SYMBIOSIS (in "symbiosis islands or islets"). They range in size from 10 - 500 kilobases, and their GC CONTENT and CODON usage differ from the rest of the genome. They typically contain an INTEGRASE gene, although in some cases this gene has been deleted resulting in "anchored genomic islands".Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction: Methods for using more than one primer set in a polymerase chain reaction to amplify more than one segment of the target DNA sequence in a single reaction.Burn Units: Specialized hospital facilities which provide intensive care for burn patients.Infection Control: Programs of disease surveillance, generally within health care facilities, designed to investigate, prevent, and control the spread of infections and their causative microorganisms.Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.TaiwanDrug Resistance, Multiple: Simultaneous resistance to several structurally and functionally distinct drugs.Pediculus: Lice of the genus Pediculus, family Pediculidae. Pediculus humanus corporus is the human body louse and Pediculus humanus capitis is the human head louse.Bacterial Processes: The functions, behavior, and activities of bacteria.Hospitals, University: Hospitals maintained by a university for the teaching of medical students, postgraduate training programs, and clinical research.Tertiary Care Centers: A medical facility which provides a high degree of subspecialty expertise for patients from centers where they received SECONDARY CARE.Klebsiella pneumoniae: Gram-negative, non-motile, capsulated, gas-producing rods found widely in nature and associated with urinary and respiratory infections in humans.Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.IraqWound Infection: Invasion of the site of trauma by pathogenic microorganisms.Colony Count, Microbial: Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.Meningitis, Bacterial: Bacterial infections of the leptomeninges and subarachnoid space, frequently involving the cerebral cortex, cranial nerves, cerebral blood vessels, spinal cord, and nerve roots.Czech Republic: Created 1 January 1993 as a result of the division of Czechoslovakia into the Czech Republic and Slovakia.Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Technique: Technique that utilizes low-stringency polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification with single primers of arbitrary sequence to generate strain-specific arrays of anonymous DNA fragments. RAPD technique may be used to determine taxonomic identity, assess kinship relationships, analyze mixed genome samples, and create specific probes.

Distribution of beta-lactamases in Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates and the effect of Syn 2190 (AmpC inhibitor) on the MICs of different beta-lactam antibiotics. (1/853)

The distribution of beta-lactamases in a group of 20 epidemiologically well defined Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates and the in vitro activity of Syn 2190, a novel beta-lactamase AmpC inhibitor, were determined. Twenty-five per cent of the strains carried and expressed a TEM-type beta-lactamase, whereas 35% had an OXA-type beta-lactamase. In nine out of 11 (82%) ceftazidime-resistant and four out of 13 (30.7%) cefepime-resistant strains, the MIC of these beta-lactam antibiotics decreased when determined in the presence of Syn 2190. Thus, our results suggest that in a high percentage of A. baumannii clinical isolates the increased production of AmpC, in combination or not with other resistance mechanisms, contributes to the resistance pattern in A. baumannii to beta-lactams.  (+info)

Molecular characterization of integrons in epidemiologically unrelated clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii from Italian hospitals reveals a limited diversity of gene cassette arrays. (2/853)

Integron carriage by 36 epidemiologically unrelated Acinetobacter baumannii isolates collected over an 11-year period from patients in six different Italian hospitals was investigated. Sixteen type 1 integron-positive isolates (44%) were found, 13 of which carried the same array of cassettes, i.e., aacC1, orfX, orfX', and aadA1a. As ribotype analysis of the isolates demonstrated a notable genetic diversity, horizontal transfer of the entire integron structure or ancient acquisition was hypothesized.  (+info)

Genetic and phenotypic analysis of Acinetobacter baumannii insertion derivatives generated with a transposome system. (3/853)

Acinetobacter baumannii is a metabolically versatile pathogen that causes severe infections in compromised patients. However, little is known about the genes and factors involved in its basic physiology and virulence properties. Insertion mutagenesis was used to initiate the identification and characterization of some of these factors and genes in the prototype strain 19606. The utilization of the pLOFKm suicide delivery vector, which harbors a suicide mini-Tn10 derivative, proved to be unsuccessful for this purpose. The EZ::TN Tnp transposome system available from Epicentre was then used in conjunction with electroporation to generate isogenic insertional derivatives of A. baumannii 19606. Replica plating showed that 2% of the colonies that grew after electroporation on agar plates without antibiotics also grew in the presence of 40 micro g of kanamycin per ml. DNA hybridization proved that all of the kanamycin-resistant derivatives contained the EZ::TN insertion element, which was mapped to different genomic locations. Replica plating on Simmons citrate agar and microtiter plate-plastic tube assays identified growth- and biofilm-defective derivatives, respectively. The location of the insertion in several of these derivatives was determined by self-ligation of NdeI- or EcoRI-digested genomic DNA and electroporation of Escherichia coli TransforMax EC100D (pir(+)). Sequence analysis of the recovered plasmids showed that some of the A. baumannii 19606 growth-defective derivatives contain insertions within genes encoding activities required for the generation of energy and cell wall components and for the biosynthesis of amino acids and purines. A gene encoding a protein similar to the GacS sensor kinase was interrupted in four derivatives, while another had an insertion in a gene coding for a hypothetical sensor kinase. A. baumannii 19606 derivatives with defective attachment or biofilm phenotypes had insertions within genes that appear to be part of a chaperone-usher transport system described for other bacteria. DNA hybridization experiments showed that the presence of strain 19606 genes encoding regulatory and attachment or biofilm functions is widespread among other A. baumannii clinical isolates.  (+info)

Comparison of a repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence-based PCR method and clinical and microbiological methods for determining strain sources in cases of nosocomial Acinetobacter baumannii bacteremia. (4/853)

Using a repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (REP-PCR), we genotypically characterized strains causing nosocomial Acinetobacter baumannii infections and analyzed the source of bacteremia in 67 patients from an institution in which infections by this bacterium were endemic. Six different genotypes were found, including 21, 27, 3, 9, 3, and 4 strains. The probable source of bacteremia, according to clinical and/or microbiological criteria, was known in 42 patients (63%): respiratory tract (n = 19), surgical sites (n = 12), intravascular catheters (n = 5), burns (n = 3), and urinary tract (n = 3). The definite source of bacteremia, according to REP-PCR, could be established in 30 (71%) out of the 42 patients with strains from blood and other sites; in these cases clinical and microbiological criteria for the source of bacteremia were thus confirmed. In the remaining 12 patients (29%) the probable source was refuted by the REP-PCR method. The definite sources of bacteremia according to genotype were as follows: respiratory tract in 13 patients (31%), surgical sites in 8 (19%), intravascular catheters in 4 (9%), burns in 3 (7%), and urinary tract in 2 (5%). A comparison of strains from blood cultures and other sites with regard to their REP-PCR and antimicrobial resistance profiles was also made. Taking the REP-PCR as the "gold standard," the positive predictive value of antibiotype was 77% and the negative predictive value was 42%. In summary, the utility of the diagnosis of the source of nosocomial A. baumannii bacteremia using clinical and/or microbiological criteria, including antibiotyping, is limited, as demonstrated by REP-PCR.  (+info)

Endemic carbapenem resistance associated with OXA-40 carbapenemase among Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from a hospital in northern Spain. (5/853)

Eighty-two carbapenem-resistant isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii from a single hospital in Bilbao were typed into two major clusters and several subclusters. Disk synergy tests and PCR indicated the production of a zinc-independent OXA-class carbapenemase. Sequencing identified this enzyme, OXA-40, as a variant of the OXA-24-OXA-25-OXA-26 cluster.  (+info)

Loss of a 29-kilodalton outer membrane protein in Acinetobacter baumannii is associated with imipenem resistance. (6/853)

We analyzed the possible causes of imipenem (IPM) resistance in multidrug-resistant isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii. Comparison of the outer membrane protein (OMP) profiles of two genomically related strains (Ab288 [IPM sensitive] and Ab242 [IPM resistant]) indicated the conspicuous loss of a 29-kDa polypeptide in the Ab242 strain. No carbapenemase activity was detected in any of these strains. The treatment of Ab288 with sodium salicylate resulted in IPM resistance and the loss of the 29-kDa OMP. In addition, IPM-resistant clones of Ab288 which were selected by repetitive culturing in increasing concentrations of this antibiotic also showed the absence of this 29-kDa OMP.  (+info)

Genetic and functional analysis of the chromosome-encoded carbapenem-hydrolyzing oxacillinase OXA-40 of Acinetobacter baumannii. (7/853)

Clinical isolate Acinetobacter baumannii CLA-1 was resistant to a series of antibiotic molecules, including carbapenems. Cloning and expression of the beta-lactamase gene content of this isolate in Escherichia coli DH10B identified a chromosome-encoded oxacillinase, OXA-40, that differed by one or two amino acid changes from OXA-24, -25, and -26 and an AmpC-type cephalosporinase. The OXA-40 beta-lactamase had a mainly narrow-spectrum hydrolytic profile, but it included ceftazidime and imipenem. Its activity was resistant to inhibition by clavulanic acid, tazobactam, sulbactam, and, like most of the other carbapenem-hydrolyzing oxacillinases, NaCl. OXA-40 had an FGN triad replacing a YGN motif at class D beta-lactamase (DBL) positions 144 to 146. Site-directed DNA mutagenesis leading to a Phe-to-Tyr change at DBL position 144 in OXA-40 gave a mutant enzyme with increased hydrolytic activity against most beta-lactams, including imipenem. Conversely, with a gene encoding the narrow-spectrum oxacillinase OXA-1 as the template, a nucleotide substitution leading to a Tyr-to-Phe change in the YGN motif of OXA-1 gave a mutant enzyme with decreased hydrolytic activity without an increase in carbapenem-hydrolyzing activity. Thus, the Phe residue in the FGN motif was not associated with carbapenem-hydrolyzing activity by itself but instead was associated with weak overall hydrolytic activity. Finally, this Phe residue in OXA-40 explained resistance to inhibition by NaCl whereas a Tyr residue in motif YGN was related to susceptibility to NaCl.  (+info)

Relationship between beta-lactamase production, outer membrane protein and penicillin-binding protein profiles on the activity of carbapenems against clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii. (8/853)

Twenty blood isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii were studied, representing eight pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns and all different antimicrobial susceptibility patterns observed during 1995-97 at the University Hospital Virgen Macarena, Seville, Spain. The MIC(90)s (mg/L) of imipenem and meropenem decreased from 16 to 0.5 and from 8 to 4, respectively, in the presence of BRL 42715 (BRL) but not clavulanic acid. Hydrolysing activity (nmol/min/mg) of bacterial supernatants against cefaloridine ranged from 8.8 to 552.3 for A. baumannii type I (imipenem MICs < or = 2), which expressed only a beta-lactamase of pI > or = 9, and from 12.3 to 1543.5 for A. baumannii type II (imipenem MICs > or = 4), which expressed a beta-lactamase of pI > or = 9 and two others of pI 6.3 and 7. The hydrolysing activities of A. baumannii type II against imipenem, meropenem and oxacillin were higher than those observed for A. baumannii type I. Ten outer membrane protein (OMP) profiles (A. baumannii types I and II) were visualized on 10% SDS-PAGE gels with 6 M urea, whereas only five OMP profiles (A. baumannii types I and II) were differentiated in 12% SDS-PAGE gels. Five A. baumannii with OMP profile type B, characterized by the absence of a 22.5 kDa OMP, were resistant to meropenem and/or imipenem. Twelve penicillin-binding protein (PBP) patterns were observed. PBP patterns of A. baumannii type II were characterized by the absence of a 73.2 kDa band (PBP 2). We concluded that production of beta-lactamases of pI 6.3 and 7.0 and reduced expression of PBP 2 are the most frequently observed mechanisms of resistance to carbapenems. In some isolates, loss of a 22.5 kDa OMP is also related to resistance to carbapenems.  (+info)

Objectives. Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter strain HK302 was isolated from an outbreak of nosocomial infections in Switzerland in 1977. The aim of the present study was to assess whether this archive strain belongs to one of the known international clonal lineages of Acinetobacter baumannii and whether it harbours a genomic structure related to the AbaR1-like resistance islands.. Methods. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and HindIII ribotyping were used to determine the taxonomic position of HK302 at the species and subspecies (clonal) levels. The position and structure of the putative resistance island were investigated by AbaR1-based PCR mapping followed by restriction analysis and partial sequencing of amplicons. A. baumannii AYE harbouring AbaR1 was used as a positive control for PCR mapping.. Results. The MLST allelic profile (1-1-1-1-5-1-1) and HindIII ribotype of HK302 were typical of A. baumannii European (EU) clone I. In addition, an AbaR1-related region inserted into the ATPase gene ...
Nosocomial pathogens can be associated with a variety of infections, particularly in intensive care units (ICUs) and in immunocompromised patients. Usually these pathogens are resistant to multiple drugs and pose therapeutic challenges. Among these organisms, Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most frequent being encountered in the clinical setting. Carbapenems are very useful to treat infections caused by these drug-resistant Gram-negative bacilli, but carbapenem resistance is increasing globally. Combination therapy is frequently given empirically for hospital-acquired infections in critically ill patients and is usually composed of an adequate beta-lactam and an aminoglycoside. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of plazomicin against carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Amikacin was used as a comparator. The activity of plazomicin in combination with several different antibiotics was tested by disk diffusion, the checkerboard method, and time-kill ...
Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infection has presented a global medical challenge. The antibiograms of paired colistin-susceptible and -resistant strains revealed increased susceptibility of colistin-resistant strains to most tested antibiotics, including those that are active against only gram-positive bacteria. Synergy between colistin and rifampicin was observed in the colistin-susceptible strains. The ability to form biofilm in the colistin-resistant strains was significantly lower (P , .001) than in the parent strains. Our study provides valuable information for potential expansion of our current therapeutic options against colistin-resistant A. baumannii infection.. ...
TY - CHAP. T1 - Desiccation tolerance assays for acinetobacter baumannii. AU - Wang, Xun. AU - Trent, M. Stephen. AU - Davies, Bryan William. PY - 2019/1/1. Y1 - 2019/1/1. N2 - Acinetobacter baumannii is a hospital-associated pathogen of growing importance and is a paradigm for endemic hospital contamination. Desiccation tolerance has been implicated as an important characteristic that potentiates the spread of A. baumannii in clinical settings through contaminated healthcare equipment and personnel. Desiccation is a multifaceted stress, and many physiological and environmental factors can influence its impact on bacterial survival. This chapter provides a protocol for assessing desiccation survival that facilitates comparisons among A. baumannii strains under various environmental conditions.. AB - Acinetobacter baumannii is a hospital-associated pathogen of growing importance and is a paradigm for endemic hospital contamination. Desiccation tolerance has been implicated as an important ...
Carbapenem resistance in A. baumannii is most often associated with class D β-lactamases (OXA-23-like, OXA-40-like and OXA-58-like) and MBLs. OXA-type carbapenemases are predominant in A. baumannii, particularly in worldwide outbreaks of OXA-23 [24]. The molecular analysis of the isolates tested in this study revealed that 14 strains (51.8 %) carried the blaOXA-23-like gene and that two strains carried a blaOXA-24-like gene. All of the strains had a blaOXA-51-like gene, and four strains had a blaOXA-58 gene. In this study, the OXA-58 isolates presented lower MIC values for meropenem than OXA-23-like-positive isolates, which systematically exhibited higher MIC values (Table 1). The isolates with non-acquired OXA genes displayed a marked variation and included some carbapenem-resistant genes. Naturally occurring OXA carbapenemases, such as OXA-51-like enzymes (e.g., OXA 64-66, OXA 68-71, OXA 78-80, OXA-82, OXA-86, OXA-92 and OXA104-112), have been identified in A. baumannii isolates worldwide. In ...
Acinetobacter baumannii has been increasingly reported in the outbreak of nosocomial infections in the intensive care units, which not only prolong the length of hospital stay but result in high attributable mortality. With its intrinsic resistance to many antimicrobial agents and rapid acquirement of resistance mechanism, resistance to carbapenems, which is often accompanied with resistance to multiple drugs, has emerged worldwide. The limited treatment choice included tigecycline, colistin, and sulbactam. However, the low serum level and bacteriostatic nature of tigecycline hamper its application in blood stream infection, one of the most common presentations of A. baumannii infections. The nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity of intravenous colistin have caused great concerns in critically ill patients whereas immediate bronchospasm after inhalation and significant clinical consequences have been reported. Sulbactam has been used for decades in combination of ampicillin and well tolerated. ...
Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC ® 43498™ Designation: S2 TypeStrain=False Application: Assay of cefoperazone Assay of sulbactam Quality control of cefoperazone/sulbactam
TY - JOUR. T1 - Integron-associated imipenem resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from a regional hospital in Taiwan. AU - Liu, S. Y.. AU - Lin, J. Y.. AU - Chu, C.. AU - Su, L. H.. AU - Lin, T. Y.. AU - Chiu, C. H.. PY - 2006/1. Y1 - 2006/1. N2 - We investigated the genetic properties of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii collected from a regional hospital in Taiwan. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis demonstrated that the isolates were genetically diverse. Polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing, and DNA-DNA hybridisation showed that the blaIMP-1 gene resided as a cassette in a plasmid-borne class 1 integron in two isolates. The majority of the resistant isolates were plasmid-less and carried no blaIMP, blaVIM or bla CFI genes, indicating that other uncharacterised metallo-β- lactamases or mechanisms other than enzyme production are involved in carbapenem resistance in this group of A. baumannii. We conclude that multidrug resistance of A. baumannii was a combined effect of ...
In February 2006, a patient colonized with a multidrug-resistant sequence type 56 Acinetobacter baumannii strain was admitted to a hospital in Madrid, Spain. This strain spread rapidly and caused a large outbreak in the hospital. Clinicians should be ...
PubMedID: 24985124 | Successful management of an outbreak due to carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in a neonatal intensive care unit. | European journal of pediatrics | 7/2/2014
Identifying Risk Factors for Healthcare-Associated Infections Caused by Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
Acinetobactin is a major siderophore utilized by the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii. The rapid acquisition of drug resistance by A. baumannii has garnered concern globally. Herein, acinetobactin and systematically generated analogues were prepared and characterized; the binding and cellular delivery of Fe(III) by the analogues were evaluated. This investigation not only led to the clarification of the physiologically relevant acinetobactin structure but also revealed several key structural elements for its functionality as a siderophore.. ...
Acinetobacter baumannii is nowadays a relevant nosocomial pathogen characterized by multidrug resistance (MDR) and concomitant difficulties to treat infections. OmpA is the most abundant A. baumannii outer membrane (OM) protein, and is involved in virulence, host-cell recognition, biofilm formation, regulation of OM stability, permeability and antibiotic resistance. OmpA members are two‐domain proteins with an N‐terminal eight‐stranded β‐barrel domain with four external loops (ELs) interacting with the environment, and a C‐terminal periplasmic domain binding non‐covalently to the peptidoglycan. Here, we combined data from genome sequencing, phylogenetic and multilocus sequence analyses from 975 strains/isolates of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus/Acinetobacter baumannii complex (ACB), 946 from A. baumannii, to explore ompA microevolutionary divergence. Five major ompA variant groups were identified (V1 to V5) in A. baumannii, encompassing 52 different alleles coding for 23 different ...
Acinetobacter baumannii causes severe nosocomial infections such as pneumonia, meningitis and sepsis with high mortality rates. This organism represents an increasing danger for immunocompromised adults, especially since there are an increasing number of resistances against antibiotics. Until now, scientific investigation was mainly focused on taxonomy and antibiotic resistance mechanisms. The goal of this project was to analyse the interaction between clinical strains of Acinetobacter baumannii and human cells in order to address the molecular mechanisms causing pathogenicity. Adherence is the first step in colonization of human tissue, and therefore a key event in pathogenesis. To demonstrate the adhesion of bacteria to human cells, a colony counting assay has been established. These experiments used the the type strain of A. baumannii ATCC 19606, as well as clinical isolates. All A. baumannii strains investigated showed adhesion to the lung epithelial cells A549, but the adhesion capacity was ...
Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC ® 19606D-5™ Designation: Genomic DNA from Acinetobacter baumannii strain 2208 TypeStrain=True Application: Food testing
Fig. 1. (a) PFGE analysis of Acinetobacter baumannii strains. (b) Plasmid identification by digestion with S1 nuclease. (c) Hybridization with blaNDM-1 probe. Lanes: 1, A. baumannii AB-I1; 2, AB-I2; 3, AB-I3; 4, AB-I4; 5, AB-I5. Lanes 6 to 8, A. baumannii European clones EC-I (strain RUH-875), EC-II (strain RUH-134), and EC-III (strain RUH-5875), respectively. Bands with white arrows indicate the presence of plasmids without signal hybridization with the blaNDM-1 probe; black arrow indicates the chromosomal position with positive hybridization with the blaNDM-1 probe. ...
Acinetobacter baumannii is currently one of the key nosocomial pathogens causing severe infections; of special concern is its resistance to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs) and carbapenems, often associated with the few so-called European clones (6, 7, 19). It has two natural -lactamases, an AmpC-like enzyme (Acinetobacter-derived cephalosporinase [ADC]) (10) and a carbapenem-hydrolyzing class D -lactamase (CHDL; the OXA-51 type) (15), which affect susceptibility upon increased expression due to ISAba1 insertion upstream of their genes (9, 18). Moreover, acquired -lactamases, including metallo-lactamases (MBLs) and four CHDL types, the OXA-23, OXA-24/40, OXA-58, and OXA-143 types, are observed (15). Knowledge of A. baumannii in Poland has been limited to single isolates (9, 14, 21); our aim was to analyze a bigger group of A. baumannii strains. (Part of this work was presented at the 22nd European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, London, United Kingdom, 31 March to 3
To understand the epidemiology of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii and define individual risk factors for MDR, we used epidemiologic methods, performed organism typing by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and conducted a matched case-control retrospective study. We investigated 118 patients, on 27 wards, in whom MDR A. baumannii was isolated from clinical cultures. Each case-patient had a control without MDR A. baumannii and was matched for hospital length of stay, ward, and calendar time. The epidemiologic investigation found small clusters of up to 6 patients each with no common identified source. Ten different PFGE clones were found, of which 2 dominated. The PFGE pattern differed within temporospatial clusters, and antimicrobial drug susceptibility patterns varied within and between clones. Multivariate analysis identified the following significant risk factors: male sex, cardiovascular disease, having undergone mechanical ventilation, and having been treated with
Hospital-acquired infections due to Acinetobacter baumannii have become problematic because of high rates of drug resistance. A. baumannii is usually harmless, but it causes sepsis resulting in a high mortality rate in compromised hosts. Therefore, we must consider its interaction with host cells to understand diseases resulting from A. baumannii infection. Neutrophils play a critical role in infective protection against the extracellular growth of bacteria. However, their interactions with A. baumannii remain largely unknown. Recently, a new biological defense mechanism called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) has been attracting attention. In the present study, we investigated the responsiveness of human neutrophils to A. baumannii focusing on NET formation. The results demonstrated that infective protection against Pseudomonas aeruginosa via NETs formation was observed, but for A. baumannii NETs formation did not occur. It seems that the innate infective protection against A. baumannii ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Preclinical advantages of intramuscularly administered peptide A3-APO over existing therapies in Acinetobacter baumannii wound infections. AU - Ostorhazi, Eszter. AU - Rozgonyi, Ferenc. AU - Sztodola, Andras. AU - Harmos, Ferenc. AU - Kovalszky, Ilona. AU - Szabo, Dora. AU - Knappe, Daniel. AU - Hoffmann, Ralf. AU - Cassone, Marco. AU - Wade, John D.. AU - Bonomo, Robert A.. AU - Otvos, Laszlo. PY - 2010/9/1. Y1 - 2010/9/1. N2 - Objectives: The designer antibacterial peptide A3-APO is efficacious in mouse models of Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter baumannii systemic infections. Here we compare the efficacy of the peptide with that of imipenem and colistin in A. baumannii wound infections after burn injury. Methods: CD-1 mice were inflicted with burn wounds and different inocula of A. baumannii, isolated from an injured soldier, were placed into the wound sites. The antibiotics were given intramuscularly (im) one to five times. Available free peptide in the blood and the ...
Sigma-Aldrich offers abstracts and full-text articles by [Danielle M Stacy, Michael A Welsh, Philip N Rather, Helen E Blackwell].
Introduction: Acinetobacter baumannii is opportunistic in debilitated hospitalised patients. Because information from some South American countries was previously lacking, this study examined the emergence of multi-resistant A. baumannii in three hospitals in Cochabamba, Bolivia, from 2008 to 2009. Methodology: Multiplex PCR was used to identify the main resistance genes in 15 multi-resistant A. baumannii isolates. RT-PCR was used to measure gene expression. The genetic environment of these genes was also analysed by PCR amplification and sequencing. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined for key antibiotics and some were determined in the presence of an efflux pump inhibitor, 1-(1-napthylmethyl) piperazine. Results: Fourteen strains were found to be multi-resistant. Each strain was found to have the bla(OXA-58) gene with the ISAba3-like element upstream, responsible for over-expression of the latter and subsequent carbapenem resistance. Similarly, ISAba1, upstream of the bla(ADC) ...
Acinetobacter baumannii is a strain of bacteria in the Acinetobacter genus. This genome was published to the ATCC Genome Portal on 2020-08-03
Objective To investigate the in vitro and in vivo antibacterial activities of tigecycline and other 13 common antimicrobial agents, alone or in combination, against multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.MethodsAn in vitro susceptibility test of 101 Acinetobacter baumannii was used to detect minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). A mouse lung infection model of multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii,established by the ultrasonic atomization method, was used to define in vivo antimicrobial activities.Results Multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii showed high sensitivity to tigecycline (98% inhibition), polymyxin B (78.2% inhibition), and minocycline (74.2% inhibition). However, the use of these antimicrobial agents in combination with other antimicrobial agents produced synergistic or additive effects. In vivo data showed that white blood cell (WBC) counts in drug combination groups C (minocycline + amikacin) and D (minocycline + rifampicin) were significantly higher than in groups A
Patients with AB bacteremia receiving antimicrobial therapy are eligible for this multicenter study. Antimicrobial agents are decided at the discretion of the attending clinical team. Clinical data to be collected include patient demographics (age, gender, underlying diseases, Pitt Bacteremia Score [20], duration of ICU stay and hospitalization before the day of first positive blood culture, central venous catheterization), antimicrobial agents on the day of bacteremia, regimens and durations of combination therapy after enrollment, and outcomes (sequential quantification change of blood A. baumannii polymerase chain reaction [PCR], survival at day 30 after enrollment, and adverse drug reactions of antimicrobial agents). Blood sample will be collected on the day of enrollment (Day 0), Day 1, 2, 3 and 7 for PCR quantification of A. baumannii and for genospecies identification. Primary end points are the interval from study enrollment to negative blood A. baumannii PCR and blood sterilization. ...
In recent years, the number of nosocomial infections caused byAcinetobacter baumannii has increased significantly (4). Many outbreaks have been reported, especially among patients confined to hospital intensive care units, where the widespread use of antibiotics may select multidrug-resistant strains. The difficulty of treating A. baumannii nosocomial infection is associated with the high resistance to a wide range of antimicrobial agents frequently observed in this species (8). Often, imipenem remains one of the few therapeutic alternatives. Fortunately, imipenem resistance is relatively rare among Acinetobacter clinical isolates. Carbapenem resistance can arise by a decrease in expression of an outer membrane protein (3) or by alteration in penicillin-binding proteins (5). In general, the emergence of carbapenem-hydrolyzing enzymes has been limited compared to the prevalence of other β-lactamases (1). However, in 1985 in Scotland, anA. baumannii strain that produced a plasmid-mediated ...
Background & objective: Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDR-AB) is an important nosocomial pathogen which is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, particularly in high-risk populations. Aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs) and 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) methylation are two important mechanisms of resistance to aminoglycosides. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of 16S rRNA methylase (armA, rmtA, rmtB, rmtC, and rmtD), and the AME genes [aac(6′)-Ib, aac(3)-I, ant(3′′)-I, aph(3′)-I and aac(6)-Id], among clinical isolates of A. baumannii in Tehran, Iran. Methods: Between November 2015 to July 2016, a total of 110 clinical strains of A. baumannii were isolated from patients in two teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. The presence of genes encoding the AMEs and16S rRNA methylases responsible for resis-tance was investigated by
Molecular characterization and antimicrobial susceptibility of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates obtained from two hospital outbreaks in Los Angeles County, California, USA
This unit describes basic protocols for infecting mice through intranasal and intraperitoneal routes with Acinetobacter baumannii to induce associated pneumonia and sepsis, the two most common manifestations of clinical infections with this pathogen
Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging nosocomial pathogen, responsible for infection outbreaks worldwide. The pathogenicity of this bacterium is mainly due to its multidrug-resistance and ability to form biofilm on abiotic surfaces, which facilitate long-term persistence in the hospital setting. Given the crucial role of iron in A. baumannii nutrition and pathogenicity, iron metabolism has been considered as a possible target for chelation-based antibacterial chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of iron restriction on A. baumannii growth and biofilm formation using different iron chelators and culture conditions. We report substantial inter-strain variability and growth medium-dependence for biofilm formation by A. baumannii isolates from veterinary and clinical sources. Neither planktonic nor biofilm growth of A. baumannii was affected by exogenous chelators. Biofilm formation was either stimulated by iron or not responsive to iron in the majority of isolates tested, ...
Acinetobacter baumannii outer membrane protein A targets the nucleus and induces cytotoxicity.: Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging opportunistic pathogen re
Title:Prevalence of Metallo-β-Lactamases in Acinetobacter Baumannii in Iran: A Review and Meta-Analysis. VOLUME: 19 ISSUE: 4. Author(s):Bashir Mohammadpour*, Samaneh Rouhi, Masoud Moradi, Rashid Ramazanzadeh, Ebrahim Saniyi, Sairan Zandi and Himen Salimizand. Affiliation:Student Research Committee, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Lung Diseases and Allergy Research Center, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Vice Chancellor for Research and Technology, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Research Institute for Health Development, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Watershed Management, Gorgan University of Agricultural Science and Natural Resource, Gorgan, Student Research Committee, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Liver and Digestive Research Center, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj. Keywords:Metallo-β-Lactamases, Acinetobacter baumannii, Iran, ...
Since their identification in bacteria 30 years ago, MITEs have been reported in a multitude of species, displaying significant diversity in their nucleotide sequence and functional properties (44). In this study, a novel MITE was identified in environmental and clinical isolates of Acinetobacter species, including A. baumannii, one of the leading bacterial organisms threatening human health (2). This novel element lacked any CDS that could produce a functional transposase, inferring that like other MITEs, MITEAba12 is activated in trans. Given the high similarity between the TIR sequences of MITEAba12 and those of ISAba12 (Fig. 2D), we propose the transposase from ISAba12 elements were responsible for MITEAba12 mobilization in the A. baumannii ΔygiW strain. Whether ISAba12, or another IS with a TIR similar to that of MITEAba12 (Table 2), can mobilize MITEAba12 will need to be experimentally examined.. With the addition of MITEAba12, the list of nonautonomous elements reported in Acinetobacter ...
A series of clinical isolates of drug-resistant (DR) Acinetobacter baumannii with diverse drug susceptibility was detected from eight patients in the emergency intensive care unit of Tokai University Hospital. The initial isolate was obtained in March 2010 (A. baumannii Tokai strain 1); subsequently, seven isolates were obtained from patients (A. baumannii Tokai strains 2-8) and one isolate was obtained from an air-fluidized bed used by five of the patients during the 3 months from August to November 2011. The isolates were classified into three types of antimicrobial drug resistance patterns (RRR, SRR and SSR) according to their susceptibility (S) or resistance (R) to imipenem, amikacin and ciprofloxacin, respectively. Genotyping of these isolates by multilocus sequence typing revealed one sequence type, ST208, whilst that by a DiversiLab analysis revealed two subtypes. All the isolates were positive for bla OXA-51-like and bla OXA-66, as assessed by PCR and DNA sequencing. A. baumannii Tokai strains 1
Multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii bacteria inside biofilm, computer illustration. A. baumannii is a Gram-negative, oxidase negative, aerobic, coccobacillus. It has always been naturally resistant to multiple antibiotics. It can be especially resistant to penicillin and chloramphenicol. It causes various nosocomial infections, including, skin and wound infections, pneumonia, meningitis, septicaemia, urinary tract infection and endocarditis. It is commonly found in soil, water, sewage, and normal skin and gastrointestinal tract flora. It is the most frequently encountered species in the clinical laboratory. Species found in soil can colonize root nodule systems and oxidize the hydrogen produced by nitrogen fixing bacteria. The illustration shows morphology of Acinetobacter such as short rods and sometimes long filamentous cells. - Stock Image F018/1264
Introduction: Acinetobacter baumannii is an important cause of nosocomial infections worldwide. It is difficult to control, and the infections caused by it are difficult to treat, because it is multidrug resistant. Objectives: This retrospective study was conducted to determine the prevalence and antibiotic resistance pattern of A. baumannii at Royal Care International Hospital, Khartoum, Sudan over a 37 month period. Methodology: Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of the isolates was performed by the disk diffusion method as recommended by Clinical Laboratory and Standards Institute CLSI [1]. Result: Non duplicate 275 A. baumannii were isolated out of a total 2899 pathogenic Gram negative isolates (9.5% prevalence). The most frequently isolated A. baumannii was from ICU patients (72%) followed by inpatients (24%) and outpatients (4%). The greatest number of isolates were recovered from sputum (61%) followed by wound (19%). The Resistance rates were higher than most of the internationally reported
Rates of A. baumannii bacteraemia significantly increased between 2005 and 2009, from 0.1 to 3.2 cases/100,000 inhabitants per year. The observed increase was due to carbapenem-resistant isolates, while the number of carbapenem-susceptible isolates remained substantially stable over the study period. Importantly, the occurrence of carbapenem-resistant isolates showed a steep five-fold increase between 2008 and 2009. These isolates belonged to an epidemic strain detected in several departments of 4 hospital trusts in the Region. Similar trends were observed for urine and respiratory isolates. The total number of isolates in blood, urine and respiratory specimens, including both colonizing and infecting strains, increased from 51 in 2005 to 826 in 2009, with rates rising from 1.5 to 19.0 isolates/100,000 inhabitants per year. ...
Acinetobacter baumannii may exhibit phenotypic heterogeneous growth under exposure to antibiotics. We investigated the in vitro characteristics of A. baumannii isolates grown heterogeneously in the presence of meropenem and their virulence evaluated in experimental infections treated with meropenem. Five clinical A. baumannii isolates and the respective heterogeneously grown subpopulations were tested by agar dilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) testing, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), population analysis using meropenem and growth curves. The virulence of isolates and the therapeutic efficacy of three meropenem dosing schemes was evaluated in a neutropenic murine thigh infection model. The clinical isolates were meropenem-susceptible (MICs 1 to 4 mg/liter) and exhibited three distinct PFGE patterns. In all clinical isolates, population analysis yielded heterogeneously grown colonies. After seven subcultures in antibiotic-free media, resistant MIC levels were retained in two isolates
INTRODUCTION: The incidence of multidrug resistant microorganisms worldwide is increasing. The aim of the study was to present institutional experience with the multidrug resistant microorganism colonization patterns observed in children with congenital heart diseases hospitalized in a hybrid pediatric cardiac surgery center. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Microbiological samples were routinely collected in all children admitted to our department. All microbiological samples were analyzed with regard to multidrug resistant microorganisms: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), Gram-negative rods producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL), multidrug resistant Gram-negative rods (MDR-GNRs), carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC), carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (CRPA ...
Background Acinetobacter baumannii has become one of the most serious causative agents of nosocomial infections due to its significant ability to survive on hospital surfaces. It is mainly an emerging opportunistic pathogen infecting patients in intensive care units. This study was aimed to identify the clinical isolates of A. baumannii and to investigate their heterogeneity using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based typing methods. Methods A total of 197 nonduplicate isolates recovered from a wide range of clinical samples were subjected to conventional cultural and biochemical tests. For those isolates that were preliminary identified as A. baumannii, rpoB-based PCR with subsequent restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) using two restriction enzymes (TagI and HaeIII) was performed to investigate the genetic diversity of the strains and their presumptive relationships with different clinical presentation of the disease caused by this pathogen. Results In total, 50 isolates (25.4%) ...
Motility plays an essential role in the host–parasite relationship of pathogenic bacteria, and is often associated with virulence. While many pathogenic bacteria use flagella for locomotion, Acinetobacter baumannii strains do not have flagella, but have other features that aid in their motility. To study the genes involved in motility, transposon mutagenesis was performed to construct A. baumannii mutant strains. Mutant strain MR14 was found to have reduced motility, compared to wild-type ATCC 17978. NCBI BLAST analysis revealed that the Tn10 transposon in the MR14 genome is integrated into the gene that encodes for carboxy-terminal processing protease (Ctp). Additionally, MR14 exhibits a mucoidy, sticky phenotype as the result of increased extracellular DNA (eDNA) caused by bacterial autolysis. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy revealed cytoplasmic content leaving the cell and multiple cell membrane depressions, respectively. MR14 showed higher sensitivity to environmental stressors.
Minimal inhibition concentration (MIC) is the lowest concentration of an antimicrobial agent that can inhibit the visible growth of a microorganism after overnight incubation. MIC determination is used as not only a diagnostic tool in treating bacterial infections for clinicians but also a research method in evaluating the efficacy of an antimicrobial. Multidrug resistance Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) has emerged in recent years. Accurate determination of resistance by MIC assay is important in coping with this superbug. Here we described a protocol for determining MIC for A. baumannii in hope of assisting researchers and physicians in confirming resistance of clinical isolates correctly.
A. baumannii is commonly involved in nosocomial infections, but few therapeutic options are available. Find out what there is to know.
Acinetobacter baumannii bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). This bacterium has developed resistance to a number of antibiotics and is increasingly seen in opportunistic infections in hospitals. It typically infects the lungs, leading to a form of pneumonia. It can develop resistance to antibiotics even as they are being used to treat an infection. Because of this, and because it is generally found in weakened patients, the mortality rate for infections with A. baumannii is high. In healthy individuals, however, it is a normal part of the skin flora. Magnification: x11,000 when printed 10 centimetres wide. - Stock Image B220/1513
In view of the large outbreaks of infection by Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, researchers sought to determine risk factors for the occurrence and appropriate infection control measures. They observed that Acinetobacter outbreaks were mainly reported from intensive care units, after use of
Scientists have recently identified a resistance protein that allows acinetobacter baumannii bacteria to survive chlorhexidine, an antiseptic commonly used in wipes, cleansers and mouthwashes in hospitals. The resistance protein has been called Acinetobacter Chlorhexidine Efflux, abbreviated to Ace.
BioAssay record AID 534361 submitted by ChEMBL: Antibacterial activity against Acinetobacter baumannii GIL1 isolate harboring intrinsic blaOXA-51/69-like gene by Etest method.
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Acinetobacter infections Acinetobacter baumannii Actinomycosis Actinomyces israelii, Actinomyces gerencseriae and ...
Used to treat XDR Acinetobacter baumannii infections. Tolcapone - used in patients with Parkinson's disease who are not ...
"Deciphering the Multifactorial Nature of Acinetobacter baumannii Pathogenicity". PLoS ONE. 6 (8): e22674. doi:10.1371/journal. ...
It also demonstrates potent in vitro activity versus carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. In 2012, U.S. Food and Drug ... "Can Plazomicin Alone or in Combination Be a Therapeutic Option against Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii?" (PDF). ...
"Medscape abstract on Acinetobacter baumannii: Acinetobacter baumannii: An Emerging Multidrug-resistant Threat". membership only ... Centers for Disease Control Prevention (CDC). (2004). "Acinetobacter baumannii infections among patients at military medical ... reported an increasing number of Acinetobacter baumannii bloodstream infections in patients at military medical facilities in ... Acinetobacter is a gram-negative bacteria that causes pneumonia or bloodstream infections in critically ill patients. Multidrug ...
Use of colistin to treat Acinetobacter baumannii infections has led to the development of resistant bacterial strains. which ... Colistimethate sodium has also been given intrathecally and intraventricularly in Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas ... Towner K J (2008). "Molecular Basis of Antibiotic Resistance in Acinetobacter spp.". Acinetobacter Molecular Biology. www. ... "In-vitro activity of the combination of colistin and rifampicin against multidrug-resistant strains of Acinetobacter baumannii ...
Successful Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Ventriculitis with Intravenous and Intraventricular ...
IV phage drip therapy was successfully used to treat a patient with MDR Acinetobacter baumannii in Thornton Hospital at UC San ... "Bacteriophage therapy treats patient near death with MDR Acinetobacter baumannii - Outbreak News Today". 25 April 2017. Keen, E ...
"Overexpression of resistance-nodulation-cell division pump AdeFGH confers multidrug resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii." ...
"Isolation and Characterization of Antimicrobial Compounds in Plant Extracts against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii ...
"Activity of eravacycline against Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii, including multidrug-resistant isolates, from ... Non-lactose fermenting Gram-negative bacteria Acinetobacter baumannii Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Haemophilus influenzae ...
"Challenges in identifying new antimicrobial agents effective for treating infections with Acinetobacter baumannii and ... It lacks useful activity against the P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter species, both of which are important causes of hospital- ... Antibiotics cross the outer membrane of Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter approximately 100 times more slowly than they cross the ... Infections caused by the non-fermenting gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumanni are most ...
In July 2010, a team in New Delhi reported a cluster of three cases of Acinetobacter baumannii bearing blaNDM-1 that were found ... "Coexistence of blaOXA-23 with blaNDM-1 and armA in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii from India". J Antimicrob ... The patient was also found to be carrying an Acinetobacter strain. The patient contracted the bacteria after another patient, ...
... outbreaknewstoday.com/bacteriophage-therapy-treats-patient-near-death-mdr-acinetobacter-baumannii-45488/ Wommack, K. E.; ...
2011). "Whole-genome comparison of two Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from a single patient, where resistance developed ... 2014). "Genomic epidemiology of a protracted hospital outbreak caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in ...
2005). "Ethanol-induced virulence of Acinetobacter baumannii". American Society for Microbiology meeting. Volume 1 June 5 - ...
... and Acinetobacter baumannii". Int. J. Antimicrob. Agents. 34 (5): 395-401. doi:10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2009.06.021. PMID 19665876 ... It may be used to treat certain strains of MRSA infection and a disease caused by drug resistant Acinetobacter. Both ...
4-diaminobutyrate decarboxylase of Acinetobacter baumannii". FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 124 (2): 225-8. doi:10.1111/j.1574-6968.1994 ... 3-diaminopropane production pathway in Acinetobacter baumannii". J. Bacteriol. 179 (16): 5118-25. PMC 179370 . PMID 9260954. ... 4-diaminobutyrate decarboxylase from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus". J. Gen. Microbiol. 138 (7): 1461-5. doi:10.1099/00221287-138 ...
Acinetobacter baumannii was isolated from a patient in a burn unit and two clinical strains of MTB were collected and tested. ... Acinetobacter baumanii, Enterococcus spp., and Candida albicans on the copper alloy surfaces versus the non-copper standard ...
Acinetobacterസംക്രമണം Acinetobacter baumannii ആക്റ്റിനോ മൈക്കോസിസ് Actinomyces israelii, Actinomyces gerencseriae and ...
Acinetobacter baumannii, and E. coli. As a tetracycline derivative antibiotic, its structural modifications has expanded its ... and multi-drug resistant strains of Acinetobacter baumannii. It has no activity against Pseudomonas spp. or Proteus spp. The ...
... associated with hospital-acquired infections include Acinetobacter baumannii, which cause bacteremia, ... It has also been studied in gram-negative species found in soil such as Pseudomonas stutzeri, Acinetobacter baylyi, and gram- ...
3-diaminopropane production pathway in Acinetobacter baumannii". J. Bacteriol. 179 (16): 5118-25. PMC 179370 . PMID 9260954. ...
MDR strains of Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii have become of most concern because they ... Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Also, there has been interest in the drug ...
... while Acinetobacter baumannii, some Acinetobacter spp., Bacteroides fragilis, and Enterococcus faecalis have developed ... Acinetobacter anitratus, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Actinomyces odontolyticus, Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacteroides distasonis, ...
Acinetobacter baumannii. Xanthomonadaceae. *Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Cardiobacteriaceae. *Cardiobacterium hominis *HACEK. ...
The antibiotic susceptibility of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex strains recovered from the ... Outbreak of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex harboring different carbapenemase ... Spread of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii of European clone II in Western China. Chao He, Yi Xie, Hong Fan, Mei Kang ... Dissemination of imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains carrying the ISAba1 blaOXA-23 genes in a Chinese hospital. ...
Lastly, the presence of Acinetobacter baumannii DNA was demonstrated by qPCR and sequencing in four head lice remains belonging ...
... baumannii is commonly involved in nosocomial infections, but few therapeutic options are available. Find out what there is to ... Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most frequently isolated bacteria in the ICU but significant regional differences exist. ... Acinetobacter baumannii is a gram-negative aerobic bacillus that primarily causes hospital-acquired infections affecting ... Purpose of review: We reviewed recent data about epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii, resistance mechanisms, and ...
ECDC highlights need for increased efforts to prevent carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii outbreaks Acinetobacter baumannii is ...
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... Designation: S2 TypeStrain=False Application: Assay of cefoperazone Assay of sulbactam ... Acinetobacter baumannii (ATCC® 43498™) Strain Designations: S2 / Type Strain: no / Biosafety Level: 2 ...
Each antibiotic is presented in three columns. The first column lists the name of the antibiotic. The middle column represents susceptibility in percent to that antibiotic. The 3rd column represents the number of isolates tested for that specific antibiotic ...
Inactivation of phospholipase D diminishes Acinetobacter baumannii pathogenesis.. Jacobs AC1, Hood I, Boyd KL, Olson PD, ... Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging bacterial pathogen of considerable health care concern. Nonetheless, relatively little ... B) Chromosomal organization of A. baumannii strain ATCC 17978 locus A1S_2989 with the strain ACJ2 transposon EZ-Tn5 ,R6Kγori/ ... Plotted are the numbers of CFU ml of A. baumannii−1 internalized following 4 h of incubation. (B) Internalization properties of ...
Genomic DNA from Acinetobacter baumannii strain AYE (ATCC ® BAA-1710™) TypeStrain=False Application: ... Acinetobacter baumannii (ATCC® BAA-1710D-5™) Strain Designations: Genomic DNA from Acinetobacter baumannii strain AYE (ATCC® ... Acinetobacter baumannii plasmid p2ABAYE, complete sequence Nucleotide (GenBank) : NC_010410 Acinetobacter baumannii AYE, ... Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC® BAA-1710D-5™ freeze-dried Total DNA: At least 5 µg in 1X TE buffer. OD260/OD280: 1.6 to 2.0 ...
Objectives: The objectives of this study were to study the presence of mutators in a set of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates ... Prevalence of hypermutators among clinical Acinetobacter baumannii isolates. Komp Lindgren, Patricia Uppsala University, ... Methods: The variation in mutation rate was evaluated for 237 clinical A. baumannii isolates by determining the frequency of ...
Genomic DNA from Acinetobacter baumannii strain 2208 TypeStrain=True Application: Food testing ... Acinetobacter baumannii Bouvet and Grimont (ATCC® 19606D-5™) Strain Designations: Genomic DNA from Acinetobacter baumannii ... Acinetobacter baumannii Bouvet and Grimont ATCC® 19606D-5™ dried At least 5 µg in 1X TE buffer ... Nucleotide (GenBank) : AF100557 Acinetobacter baumannii DNA gyrase A (gyrA) gene, partial cds. ...
A. baumannii is an opportunistic infection that commonly "enters" through a vent, open wound (usually dressed/covered in ... acinetobacter baumannii epidemic in Maryland hospital. page: 1 #liveFeed1, #liveFeed2, #liveFeed3 { margin: 40px 2px 50px 4px; ...
This topic contains 2 study abstracts on Acinetobacter baumannii infection indicating that the following substances may be ... 1 Abstracts with Acinetobacter baumannii infection & Raspberry root Research. [x] Remove Focus on Raspberry root. Filter by ... Diseases : Anthrax, Bacillus anthracis, Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB), MRSA. Pharmacological Actions : ... 1 Problem Substances Researched for Acinetobacter baumannii infection Name. AC. CK. Focus. ...
Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB)Anti-Tumor,Tumors,Iodine,Lectin-Induced Cancer,Vegetables: All,Thyroid ... Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) is a Sub of the following Topics. *Acinetobacter baumannii infection ... Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) Related Articles. Could Turmeric Save Us From The CDCs Nightmare Bacteria ... 1 Abstracts with Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) Research. Filter by Study Type. In Vitro Study. ...
Background We describe the prevalence of invasive carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp. isolated from 2005 to 2016 in ... Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex with the proposal ... formerly Acinetobacter genomic species 3) and Acinetobacter nosocomialis sp. nov. (formerly Acinetobacter genomic species 13TU ... which belong to the so-called Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii (ACB) complex. Generally, these four species ...
3ZPG: Structure of Diaminohydroxyphosphoribosylaminopyrimidine Deaminase/5-Amino-6-(5-Phosphoribosylamino)Uracil Reductase from Acinetobacter Baumannii.
T. D. Gootz and A. Marra, "Acinetobacter baumannii: an emerging multidrug-resistant threat," Expert Review of Anti-Infective ... B. A. Eijkelkamp, K. A. Hassan, I. T. Paulsen, and M. H. Brown, "Investigation of the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii ... Cloning, Expression, and Purification of Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase from Acinetobacter baumannii. Juhi Sikarwar, Sanket ... A. Howard, M. ODonoghue, A. Feeney, and R. D. Sleator, "Acinetobacter baumannii: an emerging opportunistic pathogen," ...
... industrial applications and more information for Acinetobacter baumannii. ... Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen and is a problem in the hospital setting in US and Europe. Many strains ... Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadales; Moraxellaceae; Acinetobacter. Industrial uses or economic ...
KEGG Orthology (KO) - Acinetobacter baumannii AYE [ Brite menu , Organism menu , Download htext , Download json ] ...
... E. ... "Mutant Prevention Concentrations of Imipenem and Meropenem against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii," The ...
... Michal Jarmoluk / Pixabay ... Acinetobacter baumannii bacteria is known to cause pneumonia or serious blood or wound infections. ... Following the childs death, the state Department of Health also discovered four cases of Acinetobacter baumannii infection in ... Wade said that acinetobacter is a hospital-acquired infection with no community transmission, which means that it does not pose ...
In laboratory experiments, we compared the abilities of five Acinetobacter baumannii strains, three Acinetobacter sp. strains ... Survival of Acinetobacter baumannii on dry surfaces. Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a page to you from Journal of ... Survival of Acinetobacter baumannii on dry surfaces.. C Wendt, B Dietze, E Dietz, H Rüden ... Acinetobacter spp. have frequently been reported to be the causative agents of hospital outbreaks. The circumstances of some ...
Inhaled colistin on Acinetobacter baumannii treatment. Gustavo Coimbra dos Reis, Ana Martins, Luís Bento ... Inhaled colistin on Acinetobacter baumannii treatment Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a message from European ... A. baumannii was extensively resistant in all cases, being sensible only to polymyxins in 20 (87%). Mean inhaled colistin diary ... Conclusions: On critical patients, inhaled colistin was effective treating PAV/TAV due to extensively resistant A. baumannii. ...
KEGG Orthology (KO) - Acinetobacter baumannii MDR-TJ [ Brite menu , Organism menu , Download htext , Download json ] ...
  • These findings indicate a situation of increasing resistance and wide distribution of class D β-lactamase genes, especially the acquired ISAba1-associated blaOXA-23 gene, in A. baumannii isolates in the ICU of West China Hospital, probably caused by expansion of the CC92 clone. (qxmd.com)
  • Emergence of OXA-carbapenemase- and 16S rRNA methylase-producing international clones of Acinetobacter baumannii in Norway. (qxmd.com)
  • Z96926 Acinetobacter baumannii waaA gene, strain ATCC 19606. (atcc.org)
  • These bacterial responses depend on the expression of the A. baumannii ATCC 17978 A1S_2225 gene, which codes for an 18.6-kDa protein that contains an N-terminal b lue- l ight-sensing- u sing f lavin (BLUF) domain and lacks a detectable output domain(s). (asm.org)
  • In the present study, we investigated the role of Omp33 in fitness and virulence of A. baumannii by using an isogenic knockout strain deficient in the omp33 gene (JPAB02), derived from the ATCC 17978 wild-type (wt). (nih.gov)
  • Transcriptional analyses of Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 17978 showed that the expression of A1S_2091 was enhanced in cells cultured in darkness at 24°C through a process that depended on the BlsA photoreceptor. (asm.org)
  • This concentration significantly reduced bacterial viability, while 40 μg/ml killed all cells of the A. baumannii ATCC 19606(T) and ACICU MDR isolate after 24-h incubation. (iupui.edu)
  • Fetch the A. baumannii ATCC 17978 stock stored at -80 °C, scrape the surface of the frozen stock, and plate it on a LB agar. (bio-protocol.org)
  • Acinetobacter baumannii Gastrointestinal Colonization Is Facilitated by Secretory IgA Which Is Reductively Dissociated by Bacterial Thioredoxin A . mBio, Vol. 9, Issue. (cambridge.org)
  • Our analyses reveal that AA and DHA incorporate into the A. baumannii bacterial membrane and impact bacterial fitness and membrane integrity, with DHA having a more pronounced effect. (asm.org)
  • Through transcriptional profiling and mutant analyses, we show that the A. baumannii β-oxidation pathway plays a protective role against AA and DHA, by limiting their incorporation into the phospholipids of the bacterial membrane. (asm.org)
  • We found that mucin, either admixed with or separately injected with the challenge bacterial inoculum, was able to enhance the tissue and blood burdens of A. baumannii strains of different virulence. (asm.org)
  • The results demonstrated that silver nanoparticles synthesized with E. critriodora leaf extract triggered MDR A. baumannii DNA condensation, induced bacterial cell death and had a significant effect on biofilm formation, biofilm-grown cells, bacterial attachment and invasion of human lung cells in a concentration dependent manner. (eurekamag.com)
  • The results of this study showed that the lowest inhibitory concentration of the C. spinose ethanolic extract against A. baumannii was 25 ppm in which two bacterial strains were inhibited while the highest inhibitory concentration was 50 ppm and the highest concentration of fecundity was equal to 100 ppm. (alliedacademies.org)
  • We proved that the pectate lyase domain is responsible for phage depolymerase activity and binding to specific Acinetobacter bacterial capsules. (uminho.pt)
  • These signals affect A. baumannii 's ability to interact with the host, form biofilms on abiotic surfaces, and display motility on semisolid media ( 18 - 21 ). (asm.org)
  • Carbapenems, including meropenem, are currently considered the first-line agents for the treatment of infections caused by Acinetobacter spp. (asm.org)
  • The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing this public workshop regarding the current state and further development of animal models for serious infections caused by Acinetobacter baumanii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa . (fda.gov)
  • Al-Anazi K, Al-Jasser A. Infections caused by Acinetobacter baumannii in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. (medigraphic.com)
  • E. Dahdouh, S. H. Shoucair, S. E. Salem, and Z. Daoud, "Mutant Prevention Concentrations of Imipenem and Meropenem against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii ," The Scientific World Journal , vol. 2014, Article ID 979648, 7 pages, 2014. (hindawi.com)
  • The University Hospital and the New Jersey Department of Health are working together to control acinetobacter and are employing all possible methods to control any issue that may arise. (inquisitr.com)
  • Methods: Here, we used CADY, a secondary amphipathic peptide of 20 residues that could successfully carry siRNA into mammalian cells, to prepare CADY/ASOs nanoparticles (CADY-NPs) targeting acpP (encoding acyl carrier protein), and evaluated the uptake features, the inhibitory effects of CADY-NPs on gene expression and the growth of MDR-A. baumannii. (eurekaselect.com)
  • A total of 40 A. baumannii strains, identified using the Phoenix Automated Microbiology System (Becton, Dickinson and Co., Franklin Lakes, NJ, USA) by conventional methods, were included in this study. (medsci.org)
  • Methods In total, 815 clinical strains [E. faecalis (n = 135), E. faecium (n = 227), P. aeruginosa (n = 295) and A. baumannii (n = 158)] were included in this study. (deepdyve.com)
  • Methods: Twelve strains of A. baumannii were isolated from patients who referred to hospitals in Zabol. (alliedacademies.org)
  • Methods: A total of 88 Acinetobacter baumannii samples were collected from the Mubarak Al- Kabeer Hospital, over a three year period, 2006-2008, and they were identified phenotypically, by Vitek-2 systems, and then genotypically by PCR amplification of blaOXA-51-like gene. (ed.ac.uk)
  • The aim of the present work was to study the endemic and epidemic clones of A. baumannii in a not previously studied single hospital over a long period, and to compare them, using the aforementioned genotyping methods, with other nosocomial clones circulating in Spain. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Septicemia and ventilator-associated pneumonia are two of the more severe forms of A. baumannii disease. (nih.gov)
  • The results revealed that disruption of A. baumannii phospholipase D (PLD) caused a reduction in the organism's ability to thrive in serum, a deficiency in epithelial cell invasion, and diminished pathogenesis in a murine model of pneumonia. (nih.gov)
  • Although the pneumonia showed radiographic response to the antimicrobial drug therapy, A . baumannii continued to be isolated from respiratory secretions on numerous occasions. (cdc.gov)
  • Community-acquired Acinetobacter pneumonia: a case report. (ajtmh.org)
  • Objective To observe and compare the clinical efficacy of tigecyclinc combined with imipenem/cilastation,imipenem/cilastation combined with cefoperazone sulbacta,prolonging intravenous infusion of imipenem/cilastatin combined with cefoperazone sulbactam on severe pan-resistance Acinetobacter baumannii. (cnki.com.cn)
  • Genome sequencing revealed that most were Acinetobacter baumannii , whereas seven represented other Acinetobacter spp. (asm.org)
  • Here, we report a strategic approach with the 3766 proteins from the whole genome of A. baumannii ATCC19606 (AB) to rationally identify plausible. (medworm.com)
  • A bioinformatics analysis showed that the whole genome sequence of phage Βϕ-R3177 exhibited 62% sequence similarity to that of Acinetobacter phage Βϕ-B1252, but there was no homology seen with other phages. (jcvi.org)
  • Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and multiple locus variable number tandem repeat sequence (VNTR) analysis (MLVA), the present work examines the genetic diversity of the endemic and epidemic A. baumannii clones isolated in a single hospital over a twelve-year period. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Acinetobacter baumannii is a gram-negative aerobic bacillus that primarily causes hospital-acquired infections affecting specially to debilitated patients with prolonged hospitalization and with long-term exposition to antimicrobials. (medscape.com)
  • This prospective study was initiated to identify risk factors for the nosocomial acquisition of A. baumannii in patients admitted into a medical intensive care unit (MICU). (koreamed.org)
  • Over the last 20 years a worldwide expansion in Acinetobacter infections has been observed associated with intensive care units (ICUs), long term care facilities and wounded armed forces personnel. (hud.ac.uk)
  • Acinetobacter baumannii causes severe infections that primarily affect intensive care unit (ICU) patients. (jidc.org)
  • In July 2010, a team in New Delhi reported a cluster of three cases of Acinetobacter baumannii bearing blaNDM-1 that were found in the intensive care unit of a hospital in Chennai, India, in April 2010. (wikipedia.org)
  • RÉSUMÉ La présente étude a été menée pour déterminer la prévalence et l'antibiogramme local des isolats d'Acinetobacter baumannii multirésistants à l'hôpital Al-Hussein du Centre médical Roi Hussein à Amman (Jordanie). (who.int)