Acidosis: A pathologic condition of acid accumulation or depletion of base in the body. The two main types are RESPIRATORY ACIDOSIS and metabolic acidosis, due to metabolic acid build up.Acidosis, Lactic: Acidosis caused by accumulation of lactic acid more rapidly than it can be metabolized. It may occur spontaneously or in association with diseases such as DIABETES MELLITUS; LEUKEMIA; or LIVER FAILURE.Acidosis, Respiratory: Respiratory retention of carbon dioxide. It may be chronic or acute.Acidosis, Renal Tubular: A group of genetic disorders of the KIDNEY TUBULES characterized by the accumulation of metabolically produced acids with elevated plasma chloride, hyperchloremic metabolic ACIDOSIS. Defective renal acidification of URINE (proximal tubules) or low renal acid excretion (distal tubules) can lead to complications such as HYPOKALEMIA, hypercalcinuria with NEPHROLITHIASIS and NEPHROCALCINOSIS, and RICKETS.Acid-Base Equilibrium: The balance between acids and bases in the BODY FLUIDS. The pH (HYDROGEN-ION CONCENTRATION) of the arterial BLOOD provides an index for the total body acid-base balance.Bicarbonates: Inorganic salts that contain the -HCO3 radical. They are an important factor in determining the pH of the blood and the concentration of bicarbonate ions is regulated by the kidney. Levels in the blood are an index of the alkali reserve or buffering capacity.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Sodium Bicarbonate: A white, crystalline powder that is commonly used as a pH buffering agent, an electrolyte replenisher, systemic alkalizer and in topical cleansing solutions.Alkalosis: A pathological condition that removes acid or adds base to the body fluids.Ammonium Chloride: An acidifying agent that has expectorant and diuretic effects. Also used in etching and batteries and as a flux in electroplating.MELAS Syndrome: A mitochondrial disorder characterized by focal or generalized seizures, episodes of transient or persistent neurologic dysfunction resembling strokes, and ragged-red fibers on muscle biopsy. Affected individuals tend to be normal at birth through early childhood, then experience growth failure, episodic vomiting, and recurrent cerebral insults resulting in visual loss and hemiparesis. The cortical lesions tend to occur in the parietal and occipital lobes and are not associated with vascular occlusion. VASCULAR HEADACHE is frequently associated and the disorder tends to be familial. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch56, p117)Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Acid-Base Imbalance: Disturbances in the ACID-BASE EQUILIBRIUM of the body.Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus, primarily of TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS with severe INSULIN deficiency and extreme HYPERGLYCEMIA. It is characterized by KETOSIS; DEHYDRATION; and depressed consciousness leading to COMA.Lactates: Salts or esters of LACTIC ACID containing the general formula CH3CHOHCOOR.Hypercapnia: A clinical manifestation of abnormal increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in arterial blood.Alkalosis, Respiratory: A state due to excess loss of carbon dioxide from the body. (Dorland, 27th ed)Lactic Acid: A normal intermediate in the fermentation (oxidation, metabolism) of sugar. The concentrated form is used internally to prevent gastrointestinal fermentation. (From Stedman, 26th ed)Blood Gas Analysis: Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.Potassium Citrate: A powder that dissolves in water, which is administered orally, and is used as a diuretic, expectorant, systemic alkalizer, and electrolyte replenisher.Phenformin: A biguanide hypoglycemic agent with actions and uses similar to those of METFORMIN. Although it is generally considered to be associated with an unacceptably high incidence of lactic acidosis, often fatal, it is still available in some countries. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p290)Sodium-Hydrogen Antiporter: A plasma membrane exchange glycoprotein transporter that functions in intracellular pH regulation, cell volume regulation, and cellular response to many different hormones and mitogens.Ammonia: A colorless alkaline gas. It is formed in the body during decomposition of organic materials during a large number of metabolically important reactions. Note that the aqueous form of ammonia is referred to as AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE.Sodium-Bicarbonate Symporters: Proteins that cotransport sodium ions and bicarbonate ions across cellular membranes.Acids: Chemical compounds which yield hydrogen ions or protons when dissolved in water, whose hydrogen can be replaced by metals or basic radicals, or which react with bases to form salts and water (neutralization). An extension of the term includes substances dissolved in media other than water. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Hydrochloric Acid: A strong corrosive acid that is commonly used as a laboratory reagent. It is formed by dissolving hydrogen chloride in water. GASTRIC ACID is the hydrochloric acid component of GASTRIC JUICE.Hypokalemia: Abnormally low potassium concentration in the blood. It may result from potassium loss by renal secretion or by the gastrointestinal route, as by vomiting or diarrhea. It may be manifested clinically by neuromuscular disorders ranging from weakness to paralysis, by electrocardiographic abnormalities (depression of the T wave and elevation of the U wave), by renal disease, and by gastrointestinal disorders. (Dorland, 27th ed)Hyperkalemia: Abnormally high potassium concentration in the blood, most often due to defective renal excretion. It is characterized clinically by electrocardiographic abnormalities (elevated T waves and depressed P waves, and eventually by atrial asystole). In severe cases, weakness and flaccid paralysis may occur. (Dorland, 27th ed)Fanconi Syndrome: A hereditary or acquired form of generalized dysfunction of the PROXIMAL KIDNEY TUBULE without primary involvement of the KIDNEY GLOMERULUS. It is usually characterized by the tubular wasting of nutrients and salts (GLUCOSE; AMINO ACIDS; PHOSPHATES; and BICARBONATES) resulting in HYPOKALEMIA; ACIDOSIS; HYPERCALCIURIA; and PROTEINURIA.RNA, Transfer, Leu: A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying leucine to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.Acid Sensing Ion Channels: A family of proton-gated sodium channels that are primarily expressed in neuronal tissue. They are AMILORIDE-sensitive and are implicated in the signaling of a variety of neurological stimuli, most notably that of pain in response to acidic conditions.Partial Pressure: The pressure that would be exerted by one component of a mixture of gases if it were present alone in a container. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)GlutaminaseKidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Dichloroacetic Acid: A derivative of ACETIC ACID that contains two CHLORINE atoms attached to its methyl group.Nephrocalcinosis: A condition characterized by calcification of the renal tissue itself. It is usually seen in distal RENAL TUBULAR ACIDOSIS with calcium deposition in the DISTAL KIDNEY TUBULES and the surrounding interstitium. Nephrocalcinosis causes RENAL INSUFFICIENCY.Rumen: The first stomach of ruminants. It lies on the left side of the body, occupying the whole of the left side of the abdomen and even stretching across the median plane of the body to the right side. It is capacious, divided into an upper and a lower sac, each of which has a blind sac at its posterior extremity. The rumen is lined by mucous membrane containing no digestive glands, but mucus-secreting glands are present in large numbers. Coarse, partially chewed food is stored and churned in the rumen until the animal finds circumstances convenient for rumination. When this occurs, little balls of food are regurgitated through the esophagus into the mouth, and are subjected to a second more thorough mastication, swallowed, and passed on into other parts of the compound stomach. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)
(1/246) Hypokalaemic paralysis revealing Sjogren syndrome in an elderly man.

A 73 year old white man presented with life threatening hypokalaemic paralysis requiring admission to an intensive care unit. Biochemical investigations showed severe hypokalaemia with hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis, a spot urine pH of 6.5, and a positive urinary anion gap, establishing the diagnosis of distal renal tubular acidosis. Autoimmune tests revealed Sjogren syndrome as the underlying cause of the distal renal tubular acidosis. Full recovery followed potassium and alkali replacement. This dramatic presentation of Sjogren syndrome has not previously been reported in an elderly man.  (+info)

(2/246) The occurrence of renal involvement in primary Sjogren's syndrome: a study of 78 patients.

OBJECTIVE: To ascertain the occurrence of renal involvement in patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome (pSS). METHODS: Urinary total protein excretion from 24 h urine collection, as well as urinary excretion rates of albumin, alpha-1 microglobulin (alpha1m) and IgG from overnight 8 h collections, were determined from 78 pSS patients (75 females, three males). Urine acidification capacity after oral ammonium chloride load was tested in 55 of these patients. RESULTS: Mild proteinuria (0.15-0.42 g/24 h) was observed in 34 patients (44%). Increased urinary excretion rates of albumin (>/=20 microgram/min), alpha1m (>/=7.0 microgram/min) or IgG (>/=5.0 microgram/min) were detected in nine (12%), nine (12%) and 11 patients (14%), respectively. Latent or overt distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) was observed in 18 out of 55 patients with pSS (33%). These patients had a longer duration of the disease (10+/-4 vs 8+/-4 yr; P+info)

(3/246) Autosomal recessive distal renal tubular acidosis associated with Southeast Asian ovalocytosis.

BACKGROUND: A defect in the anion exchanger 1 (AE1) of the basolateral membrane of type A intercalated cells in the renal collecting duct may result in a failure to maintain a cell-to-lumen H+ gradient, leading to distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). Thus, dRTA may occur in Southeast Asian ovalocytosis (SAO), a common AE1 gene abnormality observed in Southeast Asia and Melanesia. Our study investigated whether or not this renal acidification defect exists in individuals with SAO. METHODS: Short and three-day NH4Cl loading tests were performed in 20 individuals with SAO and in two subjects, including their families, with both SAO and dRTA. Mutations of AE1 gene in individuals with SAO and members of the two families were also studied. RESULTS: Renal acidification in the 20 individuals with SAO and in the parents of the two families was normal. However, the two clinically affected individuals with SAO and dRTA had compound heterozygosity of 27 bp deletion in exon 11 and missense mutation G701D resulting from a CGG-->CAG substitution in exon 17 of the AE1 gene. Red cells of the two subjects with dRTA and SAO and the family members with SAO showed an approximate 40% reduction in sulfate influx with normal 4,4'-di-isothiocyanato-stilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid sensitivity and pH dependence. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that compound heterozygosity of abnormal AE1 genes causes autosomal recessive dRTA in SAO.  (+info)

(4/246) Localization of a gene for autosomal recessive distal renal tubular acidosis with normal hearing (rdRTA2) to 7q33-34.

Failure of distal nephrons to excrete excess acid results in the "distal renal tubular acidoses" (dRTA). Early childhood features of autosomal recessive dRTA include severe metabolic acidosis with inappropriately alkaline urine, poor growth, rickets, and renal calcification. Progressive bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is evident in approximately one-third of patients. We have recently identified mutations in ATP6B1, encoding the B-subunit of the collecting-duct apical proton pump, as a cause of recessive dRTA with SNHL. We now report the results of genetic analysis of 13 kindreds with recessive dRTA and normal hearing. Analysis of linkage and molecular examination of ATP6B1 indicated that mutation in ATP6B1 rarely, if ever, accounts for this phenotype, prompting a genomewide linkage search for loci underlying this trait. The results strongly supported linkage with locus heterogeneity to a segment of 7q33-34, yielding a maximum multipoint LOD score of 8.84 with 68% of kindreds linked. The LOD-3 support interval defines a 14-cM region flanked by D7S500 and D7S688. That 4 of these 13 kindreds do not support linkage to rdRTA2 and ATP6B1 implies the existence of at least one additional dRTA locus. These findings establish that genes causing recessive dRTA with normal and impaired hearing are different, and they identify, at 7q33-34, a new locus, rdRTA2, for recessive dRTA with normal hearing.  (+info)

(5/246) NH4+ secretion in inner medullary collecting duct in potassium deprivation: role of colonic H+-K+-ATPase.

NH4+ secretion in inner medullary collecting duct in potassium deprivation: Role of colonic H+-K+-ATPase. BACKGROUND: In K+ deprivation (KD), gastric (g) H+-K+-ATPase (HKA) is suppressed, whereas colonic (c) HKA is induced in the terminal inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD). We hypothesized that in KD, cHKA is induced and can mediate the secretion of NH4+. METHODS: Rats were sacrificed after 2, 3, 6, or 14 days on regular (NML) or K+-free (KD) diet. mRNA expression of HKA isoforms in terminal inner medulla was examined and correlated with NH4+ secretion in perfused IMCD in vitro. RESULTS: Urinary NH4+ excretion increased after K+-free diet for six days. In terminal inner medulla, cHKA expression was strongly induced, whereas gHKA expression was decreased. NH4+ secretion increased by 62% in KD (JtNH4+ 0.57 vs. 0.92 pmol/min/mm tubule length, P < 0.001). Ouabain (1 mM) in perfusate inhibited NH4+ secretion in KD by 45% (P < 0.002) but not in NML. At luminal pH 7.7, which inhibits NH3 diffusion, NH4+ secretion in IMCD was 140% higher in KD (0.36 vs. 0.15, P < 0.03) and was sensitive to ouabain. ROMK-1 mRNA expression was induced in parallel with cHKA in inner medulla. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that in KD, cHKA replaces gHKA and mediates enhanced secretion of NH4+ (and H+) into the lumen facilitated by K+ recycling through ROMK-1.  (+info)

(6/246) Study of urinary acidification in patients with idiopathic hypocitraturia.

Hypocitraturia (HCit) is one of the most remarkable features of renal tubular acidosis, but an acidification defect is not seen in the majority of hypocitraturic patients, whose disease is denoted idiopathic hypocitraturia. In order to assess the integrity of urinary acidification mechanisms in hypocitraturic idiopathic calcium stone formers, we studied two groups of patients, hypocitraturic (HCit, N = 21, 39.5 +/- 11.5 years, 11 females and 10 males) and normocitraturic (NCit, N = 23, 40.2 +/- 11.7 years, 16 females and 7 males) subjects, during a short ammonium chloride loading test lasting 8 h. During the baseline period HCit patients showed significantly higher levels of titratable acid (TA). After the administration of ammonium chloride, mean urinary pH (3rd to 8th hour) and TA and ammonium excretion did not differ significantly between groups. Conversely, during the first hour mean urinary pH was lower and TA and ammonium excretion was higher in HCit. The enhanced TA excretion by HCit during the baseline period and during the first hour suggests that the phosphate buffer mechanism is activated. The earlier response in ammonium excretion by HCit further supports other evidence that acidification mechanisms react promptly. The present results suggest that in the course of lithiasic disease, hypocitraturia coexists with subtle changes in the excretion of hydrogen ions in basal situations.  (+info)

(7/246) Hypokalaemic paralysis.

Hypokalaemic paralysis is a relatively uncommon but potentially life-threatening clinical syndrome. If recognised and treated appropriately, patients recover without any clinical sequellae. The syndrome of hypokalaemic paralysis represents a heterogeneous group of disorders characterised clinically by hypokalaemia and acute systemic weakness. Most cases are due to familial or primary hypokalaemic periodic paralysis; sporadic cases are associated with numerous other conditions including barium poisoning, hyperthyroidism, renal disorders, certain endocrinopathies and gastrointestinal potassium losses. The age of onset, race, family history, medications, and underlying disease states can help in identifying the cause of hypokalaemic paralysis. Initial therapy of the patient with hypokalaemic paralysis includes potassium replacement and search for underlying aetiology. Further management depends on the aetiology of hypokalaemia, severity of symptoms, and duration of disease. This review presents the differential diagnosis for hypokalaemic paralysis and discusses management of the syndrome.  (+info)

(8/246) Renal involvement in primary Sjogren's syndrome.

Renal involvement was evaluated in 62 patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome, classified according to criteria proposed by The European Classification Criteria Group. Urine concentration capacity was tested using intranasal 1-desamino-8-D-arginine-vasopressin. For patients with urine pH>5.5 without metabolic acidosis (n=28), an acidification test with ammonium chloride was performed. Urinary citrate, albumin, NAG, ALP and beta2-microglobulin were measured and creatinine clearance was calculated. Maximum urine concentration capacity and creatinine clearance were reduced in 13 (21%). Albumin excretion was >30 microg/min in only one patient (1.6%). Seven patients (11.3%) had complete or incomplete distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA), four had reduced creatinine clearance and five had reduced maximum urine concentration capacity. The ratio of citrate/creatinine in spot urine was below the 2.5 percentile in all patients with complete or incomplete dRTA. The prevalence of dRTA was lower than in previous studies. There were also few patients with signs of glomerular disease (1.6%). The use of citrate:creatinine ratio in spot urine can be a helpful method in identifying patients with complete or incomplete dRTA.  (+info)

*  Distal renal tubular acidosis
Renal tubular acidosis Proximal renal tubular acidosis Ifosfamide Laing CM, Toye AM, Capasso G, Unwin RJ (2005). "Renal tubular ... Distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) or Type 1 renal tubular acidosis (RTA) is the classical form of RTA, being the first ... 1997). "Familial distal renal tubular acidosis is associated with mutations in the red cell anion exchanger (Band 3, AE1) gene ... 2000). "Band 3 mutations, renal tubular acidosis and South-East Asian ovalocytosis in Malaysia and Papua New Guinea: loss of up ...
*  Renal tubular acidosis
... (RTA) is a medical condition that involves an accumulation of acid in the body due to a failure of the ... It was included in the classification of renal tubular acidoses as it is associated with a mild (normal anion gap) metabolic ... Donald L. Lewis postulated the character Tiny Tim, of A Christmas Carol, was suffering from renal tubular acidosis. Researchers ... Rodriguez Soriano J, Boichis H, Stark H, Edelmann CM (1967). "Proximal renal tubular acidosis. A defect in bicarbonate ...
*  Proximal renal tubular acidosis
... (pRTA) or Type 2 Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) is a type of RTA caused by a failure of the ... Renal tubular acidosis Distal renal tubular acidosis Rodriguez Soriano J, Boichis H, Stark H, Edelmann CM (1967). "Proximal ... "Adult Fanconi's syndrome with renal tubular acidosis in association with renal amyloidosis: occurrence in a patient with ... McSherry E (1981). "Renal tubular acidosis in childhood". Kidney Int. 20 (6): 799-809. doi:10.1038/ki.1981.213. PMID 7038264. ...
*  Hyperkalemia
PMC 3894511 . Karet, FE (February 2009). "Mechanisms in Hyperkalemic Renal Tubular Acidosis". Journal of American Society of ... Type IV renal tubular acidosis (aldosterone resistance of the kidney's tubules) Gordon's syndrome (pseudohypoaldosteronism type ... However, in organic acidosis such as lactic acidosis, ketoacidosis, the effect on serum potassium levels are absent possibly ... Metabolic acidosis is a cause of hyperkalemia because increase in hydrogen ions in the cells can displace potassium out of the ...
*  Inborn errors of renal tubular transport
This results in disruptions of renal reabsorption. Examples of these disorders include Iminoglycinuria, renal tubular acidosis ... Inborn errors of renal tubular transport are metabolic disorders which lead to impairment in the ability of solutes, such as ... salts or amino acids, to be transported across the brush border of the renal tubule. ...
*  Lightwood-Albright syndrome
... is a form of renal tubular acidosis. It is also known as Lightwood syndrome. It is named for ...
*  Hyperchloremic acidosis
DDB 11673 NIH - Renal Tubular Acidosis Kellum JA (February 2002). "Fluid resuscitation and hyperchloremic acidosis in ... and loss of alkaline proximal small bowel secretions Chronic laxative abuse Renal causes Proximal renal tubular acidosis with ... 3 resorption Distal renal tubular acidosis with failure of H+ secretion Long-term use of a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor such as ... In general, the cause of a hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis is a loss of base, either a gastrointestinal loss or a renal loss ...
*  Southeast Asian ovalocytosis
... distal renal tubular acidosis, and Southeast Asian ovalocytosis". Kidney International. 62 (1): 10-19. doi:10.1046/j.1523- ...
*  Carbonic anhydrase II
Defects in this enzyme are associated with osteopetrosis and renal tubular acidosis. Renal carbonic anhydrase allows the ... Carbonic anhydrase II deficiency syndrome (osteopetrosis associated with renal tubular acidosis and cerebral calcification)". ... recessive osteopetrosis with renal tubular acidosis and cerebral calcification". Pediatrics. 77 (3): 371-81. PMID 3081869. ...
*  SLC4A4
Other NBCe1 mutations disrupt kidney bicarbonate transport and cause proximal renal tubular acidosis. NBCe1-A aka kNBC1 (mainly ... 1999). "Mutations in SLC4A4 cause permanent isolated proximal renal tubular acidosis with ocular abnormalities". Nat. Genet. 23 ... "Topological location and structural importance of the NBCe1-A residues mutated in proximal renal tubular acidosis". J. Biol. ... 2003). "Localization of NBC-1 variants in human kidney and renal cell carcinoma". Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 310 (4): 1213- ...
*  Oliver Wrong
... renal tubular acidosis then and now". QJM. 105: 915-916. doi:10.1093/qjmed/hcs134. Fry, AC; Karet FE (2007). "Inherited renal ... 2012). "Tropical distal renal tubular acidosis: clinical and epidemiological studies in 78 patients". QJM. 105: 861-877. doi: ... 2012). "Tropical distal renal tubular acidosis: clinical and epidemiological studies in 78 patients". QJM. 105: 861-877. doi: ... A key insight was that in the group of diseases termed 'Renal Tubular Acidosis' (RTA), urinary excretion of ammonium was ...
*  ATP6V1B1
"Entrez Gene: ATP6V1B1 ATPase, H+ transporting, lysosomal 56/58kDa, V1 subunit B1 (Renal tubular acidosis with deafness)". Human ... Mutations in this gene cause distal renal tubular acidosis associated with sensorineural deafness. GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ... "Mutations in the gene encoding B1 subunit of H+-ATPase cause renal tubular acidosis with sensorineural deafness". Nat Genet. 21 ...
*  Fanconi syndrome
The loss of bicarbonate results in type 2 or proximal renal tubular acidosis. The loss of phosphate results in the bone ... 2006). "Fanconi's syndrome and distal (Type 1) renal tubular acidosis in a patient with primary Sjögren′s Syndrome with ... The clinical features of proximal renal tubular acidosis are: Polyuria, polydipsia and dehydration Hypophosphatemic rickets (in ... 2007). "Combined proteomic and metabonomic studies in three genetic forms of the renal Fanconi syndrome". AJP: Renal Physiology ...
*  Type I tyrosinemia
The kidney dysfunction presents as Fanconi syndrome: Renal tubular acidosis, hypophosphatemia and aminoaciduria. Cardiomyopathy ... Fumarylacetoacetate accumulates in hepatocytes and proximal renal tubal cells and causes oxidative damage and DNA damage ...
*  Vici syndrome
In 2007 the renal tubular acidosis was another clinical complication described in only one case report of two brothers with ... 2007) Sibling cases of Vici syndrome: sleep abnormalities and complications of renal tubular acidosis. Am J Med Genet A 143(2 ... Renal abnormalities (15%) Infections of the gastrointestinal and urinary tracts are common. Swallowing and feeding difficulties ...
*  SLC12A7
Boettger T, Hübner CA, Maier H, Rust MB, Beck FX, Jentsch TJ (April 2002). "Deafness and renal tubular acidosis in mice lacking ...
*  ATP6V0A4
Mutations in this gene are associated with renal tubular acidosis associated with preserved hearing. ATP6V0A4 has been shown to ... cause recessive distal renal tubular acidosis with preserved hearing". Nat. Genet. 26 (1): 71-5. doi:10.1038/79208. PMID ... "Localization of a gene for autosomal recessive distal renal tubular acidosis with normal hearing (rdRTA2) to 7q33-34". Am. J. ...
*  Laxative
For example, severe hypokalaemia has been associated with distal renal tubular acidosis from laxative abuse. Metabolic ... Copeland PM; Molina, H.; Ohye, Ch.; MacIas, R.; Alaminos, A.; Alvarez, L.; Teijeiro, J.; Muñoz, J.; Ortega, I. (1994). "Renal ... Wright LF, DuVal JW (1987). "Renal injury associated with laxative abuse". South Med J. 80 (10): 1304-6. doi:10.1097/00007611- ... renal failure, factitious diarrhea and other problems. Although patients with eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and ...
*  Ifosfamide
... may also cause a normal anion gap acidosis, specifically renal tubular acidosis type 2. "Ifosfamide". The American ...
*  Expiration date
A rare exception is a case of renal tubular acidosis purportedly caused by expired tetracycline. A study conducted by the U.S. ...
*  V-ATPase
There are four types of renal tubular acidosis. Type 1 is distal renal tubular acidosis and results from a failure of the ... In all cases, renal tubular acidosis results from a failure of the normal renal mechanisms that regulate systemic pH. ... One gene is carbonic anhydrase II (CAII), which, when mutated, causes osteopetrosis with renal tubular acidosis(type 3) {Sly, ... January 1999). "Mutations in the gene encoding B1 subunit of H+ -ATPase cause renal tubular acidosis with sensorineural ...
*  Enlarged vestibular aqueduct
... s can also occur in Branchio-oto-renal syndrome, CHARGE syndrome and Renal Tubular Acidosis. ...
*  Multiple myeloma
Light chains produce myriad effects which can manifest as the Fanconi syndrome (type II renal tubular acidosis). The most ... "The diagnosis and characteristics of renal heavy-chain and heavy/light-chain amyloidosis and their comparison with renal light- ... Johnson WJ, Kyle RA, Pineda AA, O'Brien PC, Holley KE (April 1990). "Treatment of renal failure associated with multiple ... Renal insufficiency attributable to myeloma Anemia (hemoglobin 30 g/l (3 g/dL) or Clonal plasma cells >10% on bone marrow ...
*  Band 3
Mutations of kidney AE1 cause distal (type 1) renal tubular acidosis, which is an inability to acidify the urine, even if the ... exchanger associated with inherited distal renal tubular acidosis". Clin. Exp. Nephrol. 8 (1): 1-11. doi:10.1007/s10157-003- ...
*  Oculocerebrorenal syndrome
Lowe syndrome can be considered a cause of Fanconi syndrome (bicarbonaturia, renal tubular acidosis, potassium loss, and sodium ... is known as Fanconi-type renal tubular dysfunction.[medical citation needed] This syndrome is caused by mutations in the OCRL1 ... proximal tubular acidosis, aminoaciduria, and low-molecular-weight proteinuria. ... Renal pathology is characterized by an abnormal loss of certain substances into the urine, including bicarbonate, sodium, ...
*  Nephron
... renal tubular diseases include acute tubular necrosis, renal tubular acidosis, and polycystic kidney disease. Distribution of ... It is composed of a renal corpuscle and a renal tubule. The renal corpuscle consists of a tuft of capillaries called a ... renal tubular diseases include acute tubular necrosis and polycystic kidney disease. The nephron is the functional unit of the ... The renal tubule is the portion of the nephron containing the tubular fluid filtered through the glomerulus. After passing ...
Acidosis, Renal Tubular - DrugBank  Acidosis, Renal Tubular - DrugBank
Also known as: Renal tubular acidosis / RTA / Renal acidosis tubular / Hypokalemic nephropathy / Acidosis renal tubular ... Potassium citrate is used to treat a kidney stone condition called renal tubular acidosis. Potassium Citrate is indicated also ... It reduces the reabsorption of electrolytes from the renal tubules. This results in increased excretion of water and ...
more infohttps://www.drugbank.ca/indications/DBCOND0001374
Distal renal tubular acidosis - Wikipedia  Distal renal tubular acidosis - Wikipedia
Renal tubular acidosis Proximal renal tubular acidosis Ifosfamide Laing CM, Toye AM, Capasso G, Unwin RJ (2005). "Renal tubular ... Distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) or Type 1 renal tubular acidosis (RTA) is the classical form of RTA, being the first ... 1997). "Familial distal renal tubular acidosis is associated with mutations in the red cell anion exchanger (Band 3, AE1) gene ... 2000). "Band 3 mutations, renal tubular acidosis and South-East Asian ovalocytosis in Malaysia and Papua New Guinea: loss of up ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distal_renal_tubular_acidosis
distal Renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) - Medical Need  distal Renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) - Medical Need
distal Renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) SLC4A1-associated distal renal tubular acidosis is a kidney (renal) disorder that ... Often, people who initially have incomplete distal renal tubular acidosis develop metabolic acidosis later in life. ... In addition, most children and adults with SLC4A1-associated distal renal tubular acidosis have excess calcium in the urine ( ... The prevalence of SLC4A1-associated distal renal tubular acidosis is unknown. The condition is most common in Southeast Asia, ...
more infohttp://medicalneed.com/patients/renal-tubular-acidosis/
distal Renal Tubular Acidosis (dRTA) - Medical Need  distal Renal Tubular Acidosis (dRTA) - Medical Need
distal Renal Tubular Acidosis (dRTA). SLC4A1-associated distal renal tubular acidosis is a kidney (renal) disorder that ... Often, people who initially have incomplete distal renal tubular acidosis develop metabolic acidosis later in life. ... leading to metabolic acidosis and the other features of complete distal renal tubular acidosis. It is not clear why some people ... SLC4A1-associated distal renal tubular acidosis can have different patterns of inheritance. It is usually inherited in an ...
more infohttp://medicalneed.com/healthcare-professionals/renal-tubular-acidosis/
Proximal Renal Tubular Acidosis (Type II)Medvin2u.net  Proximal Renal Tubular Acidosis (Type II)Medvin2u.net
Proximal Renal Tubular Acidosis (Type II),Causes of PRTA, Clinical Features and Symptoms of PRTA, Diagnosis and treatment of ... Proximal Renal Tubular Acidosis, Proximal Renal Tubular Acidosis (Type II), Proximal RTA Type II, proximal tubule, Sjogren ... Post Tagged with acid remains in the blood, Acidic urine., acidosis, Causes of Proximal Renal Tubular Acidosis, Clinical ... Causes of Proximal Renal Tubular Acidosis. When the body performs its normal functions, it produces acid. If this acid is not ...
more infohttp://medvin2u.net/proximal-renal-tubular-acidosis-type-ii/
Renal tubular acidosis, food allergy, IgA and IgG deficiency in Mexican children | Clinical and Translational Allergy | Full...  Renal tubular acidosis, food allergy, IgA and IgG deficiency in Mexican children | Clinical and Translational Allergy | Full...
29 patients had distal renal tubular acidosis (96%) 1 patient with proximal renal tubular acidosis. About food allergies, cow's ... There is quite a few reports about food allergy and renal tubular acidosis, as an allergen trigger of the mechanism of acidosis ... In Mexican children population we have found a link between food allergy and renal tubular acidosis, being a food allergen as ... To describe the association between food allergy, renal tubular acidosis and IgA and IgG deficiency, there is a serial case ...
more infohttps://ctajournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/2045-7022-1-S1-P111
Potassium Citrate - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses  Potassium Citrate - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses
Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) with calcium stones. Potassium Citrate is indicated for the management of renal tubular acidosis [ ... Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) with calcium stones. The effect of oral Potassium Citrate therapy in a non-randomized, non-placebo ... In patients with renal tubular acidosis in whom urinary pH may be high, Potassium Citrate produces a relatively small rise in ... In patients with severe renal tubular acidosis or chronic diarrheal syndrome where urinary citrate may be very low (,100 mg/day ...
more infohttps://www.drugs.com/pro/potassium-citrate.html
Bicarbonate Supplementation  Bicarbonate Supplementation
Type 1 Renal Tubular Acidosis Type 2 Renal Tubular Acidosis Sodium Bicarbonate Type 4 Renal Tubular Acidosis ... Oral Preparations for Renal Tubular Acidosis * Potassium Citrate (Polycitra). *Concentration: 500 mg per 5 ml ... Oral Dosing in Renal Tubular Acidosis * Distal RTA (low dose): 1-2 meq/kg/day ... Renal Glomerular Disorders Chapter Renal Tubule Disorders Chapter Rheumatology Chapter Sodium Disorders Chapter Sports Medicine ...
more infohttp://www.fpnotebook.com/Renal/Pharm/BcrbntSplmntn.htm
Potassium Citrate: The Contributions of Dr. Charles Pak | Kidney Stone Evaluation And Treatment Program  Potassium Citrate: The Contributions of Dr. Charles Pak | Kidney Stone Evaluation And Treatment Program
Renal Tubular Acidosis. I have far more often read about, or talked about, or taught about this disease than encountered it in ... I cannot but believe these plugs will reduce the ability of the kidneys to make an acid urine, so the renal tubular acidosis is ... I do not believe that incomplete renal tubular acidosis is a coherent clinical entity. Patients with calcium phosphate stones ... But calcium phosphate stone formers frequently plug their renal tubules with crystals, and these plugs cause cell damage and ...
more infohttps://kidneystones.uchicago.edu/potassium-citrate-the-contributions-of-charles-pak-md/
Potassium Citrate - DrugBank  Potassium Citrate - DrugBank
Potassium citrate is used to treat a kidney stone condition called renal tubular acidosis. Potassium Citrate is indicated also ... Potassium citrate is used to treat a kidney stone condition called renal tubular acidosis. Potassium Citrate is indicated also ... For the management of renal tubular acidosis, hypocitraturic calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis, and uric acid lithiasis with or ... Bone Diseases / Metabolic Acidosis / Mineral Metabolism / Physical Capacity / Renal Transplant Patients. 1. ...
more infohttps://www.drugbank.ca/drugs/DB09125
Renal Tubular Acidosis  Renal Tubular Acidosis
... Resources. Please Note: By clicking a link to any resource listed on this page, you will be leaving ...
more infohttp://kidshealth.org/WillisKnighton/en/parents/renal-tubular-acidosis.html?view=rr
Renal Tubular Acidosis  Renal Tubular Acidosis
Acidosis tubular renal. Each time our internal organs do something, such as digesting food or healing damaged tissue, chemical ... Type 1 RTA, or distal renal tubular acidosis, is the most common kind of RTA. Distal means that the defect is relatively far ... Type 2 RTA, or proximal renal tubular acidosis, happens when the damage or defect is relatively close to the start of the ... When this happens, it's called renal tubular acidosis (RTA).. Without treatment, RTA can affect a child's growth and cause ...
more infohttp://kidshealth.org/KidsHealthDemo/en/parents/renal-tubular-acidosis.html
Renal Tubular Acidosis  Renal Tubular Acidosis
... is a diverse group of tubular transport disorders that involve defects in the reabsorption of bicarbonate or the excretion of ... Renal tubular acidosis. IVaW Nephrol. 1 990:4:268275.. 6. Davidman M, Schmit2 V. Renal tubular acidosis: a pathophysiologic ... Renal tubular acidosis. IVaW Nephrol. 1 990:4:268275.. 6. Davidman M, Schmit2 V. Renal tubular acidosis: a pathophysiologic ... Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) is a diverse group of tubular transport disorders that involve defects in the reabsorption of ...
more infohttps://www.healio.com/pediatrics/journals/pedann/1995-1-24-1/%7Bd854280d-0d82-4f0a-9c07-5b3d7a01b899%7D/renal-tubular-acidosis
Renal Tubular Acidosis  Renal Tubular Acidosis
... Each time our internal organs do something, such as digesting food or healing damaged tissue, chemical ... Type 1 RTA, or distal renal tubular acidosis, is the most common kind of RTA. Distal means that the defect is relatively far ... Type 2 RTA, or proximal renal tubular acidosis, happens when the damage or defect is relatively close to the start of the ... When this happens, it's called renal tubular acidosis (RTA).. Without treatment, RTA can affect a child's growth and cause ...
more infohttps://www.rchsd.org/health-articles/renal-tubular-acidosis/
Renal tubular acidosis | Define Renal tubular acidosis at Dictionary.com  Renal tubular acidosis | Define Renal tubular acidosis at Dictionary.com
Renal tubular acidosis definition at Dictionary.com, a free online dictionary with pronunciation, synonyms and translation. ... renal tubular acidosis. .css-7w6khc{padding-top:20px;}. .css-1oucjfz{list-style-type:none;line-height:22px;}. *renal papilla ... renal tubular acidosis. .css-xojh1k{position:relative;height:auto;overflow:hidden;padding-bottom:0px;margin-bottom:0px;}. .css- ...
more infohttps://www.dictionary.com/browse/renal-tubular-acidosis
Renal tubular acidosis - wikidoc  Renal tubular acidosis - wikidoc
Renal failure (Acute renal failure, Chronic renal failure). Vascular. Renal artery stenosis · Hypertensive nephropathy · ... Differentiating Renal tubular acidosis from other Diseases. Epidemiology and Demographics. Risk Factors. Screening. Natural ... Articles on Renal tubular acidosis in N Eng J Med, Lancet, BMJ ... Renal tubular acidosis en Espanol Renal tubular acidosis en ... Retrieved from "https://www.wikidoc.org/index.php?title=Renal_tubular_acidosis&oldid=1487100" ...
more infohttps://www.wikidoc.org/index.php/Renal_tubular_acidosis
Renal Tubular Acidosis (RTA)-Causes-Types-Diagnosis-Treatment-Complications  Renal Tubular Acidosis (RTA)-Causes-Types-Diagnosis-Treatment-Complications
Renal tubular acidosis causes include Addison s disease, drugs, mineralcorticoid deficiency. ... Renal tubular acidosis/RTA results in acid content of the blood being higher than normal and that of the urine lower than ... Renal Tubular Acidosis is treated using alkaline agents like sodium bicarbonate and sodium citrate or potassium citrate. In ... Renal tubular acidosis is a condition where the kidneys are unable to maintain the acid base balance in the body due to defect ...
more infohttp://www.medindia.net/patients/patientinfo/renal-tubular-acidosis.htm
Distal renal tubular acidosis  Distal renal tubular acidosis
N25.89 - Other disorders resulting from impaired renal tubular function. SNOMEDCT:. 236461000 - Distal renal tubular acidosis. ... Distal, or type 1, renal tubular acidosis (RTA) leads to a non-anion gap metabolic acidosis due to impaired distal ... Distal renal tubular acidosis. Subscriber Sign In VisualDx Mobile Feedback Select Language Share ... Distal renal tubular acidosis Print Images (3) Other Resources UpToDate PubMed Alerts and Notices. Synopsis.   Adult. ...
more infohttps://www.visualdx.com/visualdx/diagnosis/distal%20renal%20tubular%20acidosis?diagnosisId=55040&moduleId=101
SLC4A1-associated distal renal tubular acidosis - Genetics Home Reference - NIH  SLC4A1-associated distal renal tubular acidosis - Genetics Home Reference - NIH
Genetic Testing Registry: Renal tubular acidosis, distal, autosomal dominant. *Genetic Testing Registry: Renal tubular acidosis ... SLC4A1-associated distal renal tubular acidosis is a kidney (renal) disorder that sometimes includes blood cell abnormalities. ... Often, people who initially have incomplete distal renal tubular acidosis develop metabolic acidosis later in life. ... leading to metabolic acidosis and the other features of complete distal renal tubular acidosis. It is not clear why some people ...
more infohttps://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/slc4a1-associated-distal-renal-tubular-acidosis
RENAL TUBULAR ACIDOSIS | Annals of Internal Medicine | American College of Physicians  RENAL TUBULAR ACIDOSIS | Annals of Internal Medicine | American College of Physicians
There is another and less common type of renal acidosis that has come to be labeled renal tubular acidosis. In this syndrome ... Thyrotoxicosis Associated with Renal Tubular Acidosis and Acute Pancreatitis: A Case Report Annals of Internal Medicine; 84 (5 ... Thyrotoxic Hypercalcemia, Renal Tubular Acidosis, and Pancreatitis Annals of Internal Medicine; 85 (3): 404 ... Fanconi's Syndrome and Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis After Glue Sniffing Annals of Internal Medicine; 92 (1): 69-70 ...
more infohttp://annals.org/aim/article-abstract/1032586/renal-tubular-acidosis
  • Monitor serum electrolytes (sodium, potassium, chloride and carbon dioxide), serum creatinine and complete blood counts every four months and more frequently in patients with cardiac disease, renal disease or acidosis. (drugs.com)
  • Nephrocalcinosis (deposition of calcium in the substance of the kidney) Bone demineralisation (causing rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults) The symptoms and sequelae of dRTA are variable and range from being completely asymptomatic, to loin pain and hematuria from kidney stones, to failure to thrive and severe rickets in childhood forms as well as possible renal failure and even death. (wikipedia.org)
  • It reduces the reabsorption of electrolytes from the renal tubules. (drugbank.ca)
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