Acidosis: A pathologic condition of acid accumulation or depletion of base in the body. The two main types are RESPIRATORY ACIDOSIS and metabolic acidosis, due to metabolic acid build up.Acidosis, Lactic: Acidosis caused by accumulation of lactic acid more rapidly than it can be metabolized. It may occur spontaneously or in association with diseases such as DIABETES MELLITUS; LEUKEMIA; or LIVER FAILURE.Acidosis, Respiratory: Respiratory retention of carbon dioxide. It may be chronic or acute.Acidosis, Renal Tubular: A group of genetic disorders of the KIDNEY TUBULES characterized by the accumulation of metabolically produced acids with elevated plasma chloride, hyperchloremic metabolic ACIDOSIS. Defective renal acidification of URINE (proximal tubules) or low renal acid excretion (distal tubules) can lead to complications such as HYPOKALEMIA, hypercalcinuria with NEPHROLITHIASIS and NEPHROCALCINOSIS, and RICKETS.Acid-Base Equilibrium: The balance between acids and bases in the BODY FLUIDS. The pH (HYDROGEN-ION CONCENTRATION) of the arterial BLOOD provides an index for the total body acid-base balance.Bicarbonates: Inorganic salts that contain the -HCO3 radical. They are an important factor in determining the pH of the blood and the concentration of bicarbonate ions is regulated by the kidney. Levels in the blood are an index of the alkali reserve or buffering capacity.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Sodium Bicarbonate: A white, crystalline powder that is commonly used as a pH buffering agent, an electrolyte replenisher, systemic alkalizer and in topical cleansing solutions.Alkalosis: A pathological condition that removes acid or adds base to the body fluids.Ammonium Chloride: An acidifying agent that has expectorant and diuretic effects. Also used in etching and batteries and as a flux in electroplating.MELAS Syndrome: A mitochondrial disorder characterized by focal or generalized seizures, episodes of transient or persistent neurologic dysfunction resembling strokes, and ragged-red fibers on muscle biopsy. Affected individuals tend to be normal at birth through early childhood, then experience growth failure, episodic vomiting, and recurrent cerebral insults resulting in visual loss and hemiparesis. The cortical lesions tend to occur in the parietal and occipital lobes and are not associated with vascular occlusion. VASCULAR HEADACHE is frequently associated and the disorder tends to be familial. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch56, p117)Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Acid-Base Imbalance: Disturbances in the ACID-BASE EQUILIBRIUM of the body.Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus, primarily of TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS with severe INSULIN deficiency and extreme HYPERGLYCEMIA. It is characterized by KETOSIS; DEHYDRATION; and depressed consciousness leading to COMA.Lactates: Salts or esters of LACTIC ACID containing the general formula CH3CHOHCOOR.Hypercapnia: A clinical manifestation of abnormal increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in arterial blood.Alkalosis, Respiratory: A state due to excess loss of carbon dioxide from the body. (Dorland, 27th ed)Lactic Acid: A normal intermediate in the fermentation (oxidation, metabolism) of sugar. The concentrated form is used internally to prevent gastrointestinal fermentation. (From Stedman, 26th ed)Blood Gas Analysis: Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.Potassium Citrate: A powder that dissolves in water, which is administered orally, and is used as a diuretic, expectorant, systemic alkalizer, and electrolyte replenisher.Phenformin: A biguanide hypoglycemic agent with actions and uses similar to those of METFORMIN. Although it is generally considered to be associated with an unacceptably high incidence of lactic acidosis, often fatal, it is still available in some countries. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p290)Sodium-Hydrogen Antiporter: A plasma membrane exchange glycoprotein transporter that functions in intracellular pH regulation, cell volume regulation, and cellular response to many different hormones and mitogens.Ammonia: A colorless alkaline gas. It is formed in the body during decomposition of organic materials during a large number of metabolically important reactions. Note that the aqueous form of ammonia is referred to as AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE.Sodium-Bicarbonate Symporters: Proteins that cotransport sodium ions and bicarbonate ions across cellular membranes.Acids: Chemical compounds which yield hydrogen ions or protons when dissolved in water, whose hydrogen can be replaced by metals or basic radicals, or which react with bases to form salts and water (neutralization). An extension of the term includes substances dissolved in media other than water. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Hydrochloric Acid: A strong corrosive acid that is commonly used as a laboratory reagent. It is formed by dissolving hydrogen chloride in water. GASTRIC ACID is the hydrochloric acid component of GASTRIC JUICE.Hypokalemia: Abnormally low potassium concentration in the blood. It may result from potassium loss by renal secretion or by the gastrointestinal route, as by vomiting or diarrhea. It may be manifested clinically by neuromuscular disorders ranging from weakness to paralysis, by electrocardiographic abnormalities (depression of the T wave and elevation of the U wave), by renal disease, and by gastrointestinal disorders. (Dorland, 27th ed)Hyperkalemia: Abnormally high potassium concentration in the blood, most often due to defective renal excretion. It is characterized clinically by electrocardiographic abnormalities (elevated T waves and depressed P waves, and eventually by atrial asystole). In severe cases, weakness and flaccid paralysis may occur. (Dorland, 27th ed)Fanconi Syndrome: A hereditary or acquired form of generalized dysfunction of the PROXIMAL KIDNEY TUBULE without primary involvement of the KIDNEY GLOMERULUS. It is usually characterized by the tubular wasting of nutrients and salts (GLUCOSE; AMINO ACIDS; PHOSPHATES; and BICARBONATES) resulting in HYPOKALEMIA; ACIDOSIS; HYPERCALCIURIA; and PROTEINURIA.RNA, Transfer, Leu: A transfer RNA which is specific for carrying leucine to sites on the ribosomes in preparation for protein synthesis.Acid Sensing Ion Channels: A family of proton-gated sodium channels that are primarily expressed in neuronal tissue. They are AMILORIDE-sensitive and are implicated in the signaling of a variety of neurological stimuli, most notably that of pain in response to acidic conditions.Partial Pressure: The pressure that would be exerted by one component of a mixture of gases if it were present alone in a container. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)GlutaminaseKidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Dichloroacetic Acid: A derivative of ACETIC ACID that contains two CHLORINE atoms attached to its methyl group.Nephrocalcinosis: A condition characterized by calcification of the renal tissue itself. It is usually seen in distal RENAL TUBULAR ACIDOSIS with calcium deposition in the DISTAL KIDNEY TUBULES and the surrounding interstitium. Nephrocalcinosis causes RENAL INSUFFICIENCY.Rumen: The first stomach of ruminants. It lies on the left side of the body, occupying the whole of the left side of the abdomen and even stretching across the median plane of the body to the right side. It is capacious, divided into an upper and a lower sac, each of which has a blind sac at its posterior extremity. The rumen is lined by mucous membrane containing no digestive glands, but mucus-secreting glands are present in large numbers. Coarse, partially chewed food is stored and churned in the rumen until the animal finds circumstances convenient for rumination. When this occurs, little balls of food are regurgitated through the esophagus into the mouth, and are subjected to a second more thorough mastication, swallowed, and passed on into other parts of the compound stomach. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)
(1/290) Decreased lactic acidosis and anemia after transfusion of o-raffinose cross-linked and polymerized hemoglobin in severe murine malaria.

Severe anemia is a major cause of death in falciparum malaria. Blood transfusion increases survival in humans and in animal models of this disease. Because of logistic constraints and viral contamination of the blood supply, transfusions are frequently not practical in endemic regions. Modified hemoglobin is an effective O2 carrier in hemorrhagic shock. It is free of infectious contamination, may not require refrigeration, and because of its nitric oxide scavenging and small size, may have pharmacologic benefits in malaria. The effects of transfusions of modified hemoglobin in rats with high-grade parasitemia were evaluated. Modified hemoglobin decreased lactic acidosis and corrected anemia as well as transfusions with red blood cells; these findings may correlate with improved survival and suggest a possible proerythropoietic effect. Further study of this novel therapy is warranted.  (+info)

(2/290) Incidence of lactic acidosis in metformin users.

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of lactic acidosis in a geographically defined population of metformin users. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The study was based on a historical cohort from the Saskatchewan Health administrative databases. Individuals with a metformin prescription dispensed between 1980 and 1995 inclusive were eligible for the cohort. Person-years of exposure were calculated. Cases were defined by hospital discharge with a diagnosis of acidosis (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code: 276.2) and confirmation by chart review of a blood lactate level > or = 5 mmol/l. Death registrations of individuals dying within 120 days of a metformin prescription were also reviewed. RESULTS: During the study period, 11,797 residents received one or more metformin prescriptions, resulting in 22,296 person-years of exposure. There were 10 subjects who had hospital discharges with a diagnosis of acidosis. However, primary record review revealed only two cases with laboratory findings of elevated blood lactate levels, for an incidence rate of 9 cases per 100,000 person-years of metformin exposure. In both cases, other factors besides metformin could have contributed to the lactic acidosis. No additional cases were found on review of death registrations. CONCLUSIONS: From 1980 through 1995, the incidence rate of lactic acidosis was 9 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI 0-21) in patients dispensed metformin in Saskatchewan, Canada. This incidence rate was derived from a population with complete ascertainment of hospitalizations and deaths associated with lactic acidosis in metformin users. It is similar to previously published rates based on passive reporting of cases, and it is well below the lactic acidosis rate of 40-64 per 100,000 patient-years in patients prescribed phenformin.  (+info)

(3/290) Nuclear DNA origin of mitochondrial complex I deficiency in fatal infantile lactic acidosis evidenced by transnuclear complementation of cultured fibroblasts.

We have studied complex I (NADH-ubiquinone reductase) defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in 2 infants who died in the neonatal period from 2 different neurological forms of severe neonatal lactic acidosis. Specific and marked decrease in complex I activity was documented in muscle, liver, and cultured skin fibroblasts. Biochemical characterization and study of the genetic origin of this defect were performed using cultured fibroblasts. Immunodetection of 6 nuclear DNA-encoded (20, 23, 24, 30, 49, and 51 kDa) and 1 mitochondrial DNA-encoded (ND1) complex I subunits in fibroblast mitochondria revealed 2 distinct patterns. In 1 patient, complex I contained reduced amounts of the 24- and 51-kDa subunits and normal amounts of all the other investigated subunits. In the second patient, amounts of all the investigated subunits were severely decreased. The data suggest partial or extensive impairment of complex I assembly in both patients. Cell fusion experiments between 143B206 rho degrees cells, fully depleted of mitochondrial DNA, and fibroblasts from both patients led to phenotypic complementation of the complex I defects in mitochondria of the resulting cybrid cells. These results indicate that the complex I defects in the 2 reported cases are due to nuclear gene mutations.  (+info)

(4/290) Blood lactate accumulation and muscle deoxygenation during incremental exercise.

Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) could allow insights into controversial issues related to blood lactate concentration ([La](b)) increases at submaximal workloads (). We combined, on five well-trained subjects [mountain climbers; peak O(2) consumption (VO(2peak)), 51.0 +/- 4.2 (SD) ml. kg(-1). min(-1)] performing incremental exercise on a cycle ergometer (30 W added every 4 min up to voluntary exhaustion), measurements of pulmonary gas exchange and earlobe [La](b) with determinations of concentration changes of oxygenated Hb (Delta[O(2)Hb]) and deoxygenated Hb (Delta[HHb]) in the vastus lateralis muscle, by continuous-wave NIRS. A "point of inflection" of [La](b) vs. was arbitrarily identified at the lowest [La](b) value which was >0.5 mM lower than that obtained at the following. Total Hb volume (Delta[O(2)Hb + HHb]) in the muscle region of interest increased as a function of up to 60-65% of VO(2 peak), after which it remained unchanged. The oxygenation index (Delta[O(2)Hb - HHb]) showed an accelerated decrease from 60- 65% of VO(2 peak). In the presence of a constant total Hb volume, the observed Delta[O(2)Hb - HHb] decrease indicates muscle deoxygenation (i.e., mainly capillary-venular Hb desaturation). The onset of muscle deoxygenation was significantly correlated (r(2) = 0.95; P < 0.01) with the point of inflection of [La](b) vs., i.e., with the onset of blood lactate accumulation. Previous studies showed relatively constant femoral venous PO(2) levels at higher than approximately 60% of maximal O(2) consumption. Thus muscle deoxygenation observed in the present study from 60-65% of VO(2 peak) could be attributed to capillary-venular Hb desaturation in the presence of relatively constant capillary-venular PO(2) levels, as a consequence of a rightward shift of the O(2)Hb dissociation curve determined by the onset of lactic acidosis.  (+info)

(5/290) Hypoxia-activated apoptosis of cardiac myocytes requires reoxygenation or a pH shift and is independent of p53.

Ischemia and reperfusion activate cardiac myocyte apoptosis, which may be an important feature in the progression of ischemic heart disease. The relative contributions of ischemia and reperfusion to apoptotic signal transduction have not been established. We report here that severe chronic hypoxia alone does not cause apoptosis of cardiac myocytes in culture. When rapidly contracting cardiac myocytes were exposed to chronic hypoxia, apoptosis occurred only when there was a decrease in extracellular pH ([pH](o)). Apoptosis did not occur when [pH](o) was neutralized. Addition of acidic medium from hypoxic cultures or exogenous lactic acid stimulated apoptosis in aerobic myocytes. Hypoxia-acidosis-mediated cell death was independent of p53: equivalent apoptosis occurred in cardiac myocytes isolated from wild-type and p53 knockout mice, and hypoxia caused no detectable change in p53 abundance or p53-dependent transcription. Reoxygenation of hypoxic cardiac myocytes induced apoptosis in 25-30% of the cells and was also independent of p53 by the same criteria. Finally, equivalent levels of apoptosis, as demonstrated by DNA fragmentation, were induced by ischemia-reperfusion, but not by ischemia alone, of Langendorff-perfused hearts from wild-type and p53 knockout mice. We conclude that acidosis, reoxygenation, and reperfusion, but not hypoxia (or ischemia) alone, are strong stimuli for programmed cell death that is substantially independent of p53.  (+info)

(6/290) Actively phosphorylating mitochondria are more resistant to lactic acidosis than inactive mitochondria.

Oxidative phosphorylation of isolated rat skeletal muscle mitochondria after exposure to lactic acidosis in either phosphorylating or nonphosphorylating states has been evaluated. Mitochondrial respiration and transmembrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)) were measured with pyruvate and malate as the substrates. The addition of lactic acid decreased the pH of the reaction medium from 7.5 to 6.4. When lactic acid was added to nonphosphorylating mitochondria, the subsequent maximal ADP-stimulated respiration decreased by 27% compared with that under control conditions (P < 0.05), and the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)) for ADP decreased to 10 microM vs. 20 microM (P < 0.05) in controls. In contrast, maximal respiration and ADP sensitivity were not affected when mitochondria were exposed to acidosis during active phosphorylation in state 3. Acidosis significantly increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption in state 4 (post-state 3), irrespective of when acidosis was induced. This effect of acidosis was attenuated in the presence of oligomycin. The addition of lactic acid during state 4 respiration decreased DeltaPsi(m) by 19%. The ratio between added ADP and consumed oxygen (P/O) was close to the theoretical value of 3 in all conditions. The addition of potassium lactate during state 3 (i.e., medium pH unchanged) had no effect on the parameters measured. It is concluded that lactic acidosis has different effects when induced on nonphosphorylating vs. actively phosphorylating mitochondria. On the basis of these results, we suggest that the influence of lactic acidosis on muscle aerobic energy production depends on the physiological conditions at the onset of acidity.  (+info)

(7/290) A novel deficiency of mitochondrial ATPase of nuclear origin.

We report a new type of fatal mitochondrial disorder caused by selective deficiency of mitochondrial ATP synthase (ATPase). A hypotrophic newborn from a consanguineous marriage presented severe lactic acidosis, cardiomegaly and hepatomegaly and died from heart failure after 2 days. The activity of oligomycin-sensitive ATPase was only 31-34% of the control, both in muscle and heart, but the activities of cytochrome c oxidase, citrate synthase and pyruvate dehydrogenase were normal. Electrophoretic and western blot analysis revealed selective reduction of ATPase complex but normal levels of the respiratory chain complexes I, III and IV. The same selective deficiency of ATPase was found in cultured skin fibroblasts which showed similar decreases in ATPase content, ATPase hydrolytic activity and level of substrate-dependent ATP synthesis (20-25, 18 and 29-33% of the control, respectively). Pulse-chase labelling of patient fibroblasts revealed low incorporation of [(35)S]methionine into assembled ATPase complexes, but increased incorporation into immunoprecipitated ATPase subunit beta, which had a very short half-life. In contrast, no difference was found in the size and subunit composition of the assembled and newly produced ATPase complex. Transmitochondrial cybrids prepared from enucleated fibroblasts of the patient and rho degrees cells derived from 143B. TK(-)human osteosarcoma cells fully restored the ATPase activity, ATP synthesis and ATPase content, when compared with control cybrids. Likewise, the pattern of [(35)S]methionine labelling of ATPase was found to be normal in patient cybrids. We conclude that the generalized deficiency of mitochondrial ATPase described is of nuclear origin and is caused by altered biosynthesis of the enzyme.  (+info)

(8/290) A missense mutation of cytochrome oxidase subunit II causes defective assembly and myopathy.

We report the first missense mutation in the mtDNA gene for subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase (COX). The mutation was identified in a 14-year-old boy with a proximal myopathy and lactic acidosis. Muscle histochemistry and mitochondrial respiratory-chain enzymology demonstrated a marked reduction in COX activity. Immunohistochemistry and immunoblot analyses with COX subunit-specific monoclonal antibodies showed a pattern suggestive of a primary mtDNA defect, most likely involving CO II, for COX subunit II (COX II). mtDNA-sequence analysis demonstrated a novel heteroplasmic T-->A transversion at nucleotide position 7,671 in CO II. This mutation changes a methionine to a lysine residue in the middle of the first N-terminal membrane-spanning region of COX II. The immunoblot studies demonstrated a severe reduction in cross-reactivity, not only for COX II but also for the mtDNA-encoded subunit COX III and for nuclear-encoded subunits Vb, VIa, VIb, and VIc. Steady-state levels of the mtDNA-encoded subunit COX I showed a mild reduction, but spectrophotometric analysis revealed a dramatic decrease in COX I-associated heme a3 levels. These observations suggest that, in the COX protein, a structural association of COX II with COX I is necessary to stabilize the binding of heme a3 to COX I.  (+info)

*  Delta ratio
Lactic acidosis usually causes a ratio of 1.6 Result 2: if the delta ratio is somewhere between low (. ... This means a combined high anion gap metabolic acidosis and a pre-existing either respiratory acidosis or metabolic alkalosis ( ... Result 4: if the result of the ratio is greater than 2 in a high anion gap metabolic acidosis, it is usually because there was ... Delta ratio is a formula that can be used to assess elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis and to evaluate whether a mixed acid ...
*  Congenital lactic acidosis
... can be caused by mutations on the X chromosome or in mitochondrial DNA. Congenital lactic acidosis ... Congenital lactic acidosis (CLA) is a rare disease caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) that affect the ability of ... Though lactic acidosis can be a complication of other congenital diseases, when it occurs in isolation it is typically caused ... There is no proven treatment for congenital lactic acidosis. Treatments that are occasionally used or that are under ...
*  Tumor lysis syndrome
Lactic acidosis. Pretreatment spontaneous tumor lysis syndrome. This entity is associated with acute kidney failure due to uric ... result in severe metabolic derangements (e.g., hyperuricemia, hypocalcemia, lactic aci- dosis, and the acute tumor lysis ...
*  Ringer's lactate solution
It may also be used to treat metabolic acidosis in cases other than those caused by lactic acidosis and to wash the eye ... Kraut, JA; Madias, NE (11 December 2014). "Lactic acidosis". The New England Journal of Medicine. 371 (24): 2309-19. doi: ... Ringer's lactate solution has a lower rate of acidosis as compared with normal saline. Use is generally safe in pregnancy and ... Ringer's lactate solution is used because the by-products of lactate metabolism in the liver counteract acidosis, which is a ...
*  Exercise intolerance
Haller, R.G (1989). "Exercise intolerance, lactic acidosis, and abnormal cardiopulmonary regulation in exercise associated with ... muscle fatigue and lactic acidosis. Exercise tolerance reflects the combined capacity of components in the oxygen cascade to ... Since lactic acid stimulates respiration, after rehabilitative training exercising, ventilation is lower, respiration is slowed ... High intensity rehabilitative exercise training Increasing the fitness of muscles decreases the amount of lactic acid released ...
*  List of OMIM disorder codes
CPT2 Myopathy with lactic acidosis, hereditary; 255125; ISCU Myopathy, actin, congenital, with excess of thin myofilaments; ... MCM6 Lactic acidosis, fatal infantile; 245400; SUCLG1 Lacticacidemia due to PDX1 deficiency; 245349; PDX1 LADD syndrome; 149730 ... SLC5A2 Renal tubular acidosis with deafness; 267300; ATP6B1 Renal tubular acidosis, distal, AD; 179800; SLC4A1 Renal tubular ... SLC4A1 Renal tubular acidosis, distal, autosomal recessive; 602722; ATP6V0A4 Renal tubular acidosis, proximal, with ocular ...
*  Adverse effect
Lactic acidosis associated with the use of stavudine (Zerit, for HIV therapy) or metformin (for diabetes) Mania caused by ... "Metformin and Fatal Lactic Acidosis". Archived from the original on April 5, 2013. Retrieved March 20, 2013. Patten, S. B.; ... Mokrzycki, M. H.; Harris, C.; May, H.; Laut, J.; Palmisano, J. (2000). "Lactic Acidosis Associated with Stavudine ...
*  GRACILE syndrome
Other names for this syndrome include Finnish lethal neonatal metabolic syndrome (FLNMS); lactic acidosis, Finnish, with ... GRACILE is an acronym for growth retardation, amino aciduria (amino acids in the urine), cholestasis, iron overload, lactic ...
*  Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome
Stage 4 the patient is vasopressor dependent and oliguric or anuric; subsequently develops ischemic colitis and lactic acidosis ...
*  Glycogen storage disease type I
Lactic acidosis arises from impairment of gluconeogenesis. Lactic acid is generated both in the liver and muscle and is ... A further effect of chronic lactic acidosis in GSD I is hyperuricemia, as lactic acid and uric acid compete for the same renal ... For mild acidosis, an effective fluid is 10% dextrose in ½ normal saline with 20 mEq/l KCl, but if acidosis is severe, 75-100 ... The inability to generate and release glucose soon results in hypoglycemia, and occasionally in lactic acidosis fulminant ...
*  Glycogen storage disease type VI
Lactic acid and uric acid levels may be normal. However, lactic acidosis may occur during fasting. Phosphorylase kinase ...
*  Pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency
... patients usually show severe hyperventillation due to profound metabolic acidosis mostly related to lactic acidosis. Metabolic ... Resolution of lactic acidosis is observed in patients with E1 alpha enzyme subunit mutations that reduce enzyme stability. ... It is expected that most cases will be of mild severity and have a clinical presentation involving lactic acidosis. Prenatal ... The metabolic form appears as lactic acidosis. The neurological form of PDCD contributes to hypotonia, poor feeding, lethargy ...
*  Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex
Its primary clinical finding is lactic acidosis. Pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency Izard T, Aevarsson A, Allen MD, Westphal AH ...
*  Sodium lactate
However, the use in lactic acidosis is contraindicated. It can cause panic attacks in patients with existing panic disorder. ... and potassium lactate are salts derived from the neutralization of lactic acid and most commercially used lactic acids are ... Such dairy-type lactic acid generally goes back into dairy products, such as ice cream and cream cheese, rather than into non- ... Moreover, although the lactic-acid starter culture to ferment corn or beets may contain milk, sodium lactate does not contain ...
*  Glycogen storage disease type 0
... the presence or absence of lactic acidosis; (4) any associated hyperketosis or hypoketosis; and (5) any associated liver ... Serum electrolytes calculate the anion gap to determine presence of metabolic acidosis; typically, patients with glycogen- ... storage disease type 0 (GSD-0) have an anion gap in the reference range and no acidosis. See the Anion Gap calculator. Serum ... with hyperglycemia and lactic acidemia. Serum glucose levels are measured to document the degree of hypoglycemia. ...
*  Buformin
The lactic acidosis occurred only in patients with a buformin plasma level of greater than 0.60 µg/ml and was rare in patients ... In one report, the toxic oral dose was 329 ± 30 mg/day in 24 patients who developed lactic acidosis on buformin. Another group ... Buformin was withdrawn from the market in many countries due to an elevated risk of causing lactic acidosis (although not the ... 28 Jan 2007 Wittmann P, Haslbeck M, Bachmann W, Mehnert H. [Lactic acidosis in diabetics on biguanides (author's translation)] ...
*  Wernicke's encephalopathy
Heart failure with lactic acidosis syndrome has been observed. Cardiac abnormalities are an aspect of the WE, which was not ... Focal lactic acidosis also causes secondary oedema, oxidative stress, inflammation and white matter damage. Despite its name, ... Rosen A, van Kuilenburg A, Assmann B, Kuhlen M, Borkhardt A (May 2011). "Severe encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, vegetative ... epilepsy and stupor lactic acidosis memory impairment, amnesia, depression, psychosis hypothermia, polyneuropathy, ...
*  Anti-diabetic medication
"Phenformin-induced lactic acidosis in an older diabetic patient: a recurrent drama (phenformin and lactic acidosis)". Diabetes ... but was withdrawn due to lactic acidosis risk. Buformin also was withdrawn due to lactic acidosis risk. Metformin is usually ... as patients are at an increased risk of lactic acidosis. Phenformin (DBI) was used from 1960s through 1980s, ... "Buformin concentrations in a case of fatal lactic acidosis". Diabetologia. 20 (1): 45-6. doi:10.1007/BF01789112. PMID 7202882. ...
*  TPK1
2005). "Thiamine-responsive congenital lactic acidosis: clinical and biochemical studies". Pediatr. Neurol. 33 (2): 98-104. doi ...
*  Positional asphyxia
Alshayeb H (2010) Lactic Acidosis in Restrained Cocaine Intoxicated Patients. Tennessee Medicine. Nov-Dec. 37-39. Chan TC, ... 25(5) 710-12 Hick, J.L., Smith, S.W., Lynch, M.T. (1999) 'Metabolic Acidosis In Restraint Associated Cardiac Arrest: A Case ... One group of doctors has presented a method of resuscitation, correcting acidosis in the blood of the victim, which proved ...
*  Potassium cyanide
Lactic acidosis then occurs as a consequence of anaerobic metabolism. Initially, acute cyanide poisoning causes a red or ruddy ...
*  Aldehyde dehydrogenase 6 family, member A1
Laboratory studies showed 3-hydroxyisobutyric aciduria and mild lactic acidosis. Many case studies since then have presented ...
*  Sodium cyanide
Lactic acidosis then occurs as a consequence of anaerobic metabolism. An oral dosage as small as 200-300 mg can be fatal. ...
*  Acute liver failure
Lactic acidosis occurs predominantly in paracetomol (also known as acetaminophen) overdose. Hyperdynamic circulation, with ... resulting in tissue hypoxia and lactic acidosis. Pulmonary complications occur in up to 50% of patients. Severe lung injury and ...
*  MELAS syndrome
Most people with MELAS have a buildup of lactic acid in their bodies, a condition called lactic acidosis. Increased acidity in ... Mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is one of the family of mitochondrial ... Pavlakis SG, Phillips PC, DiMauro S, De Vivo DC, Rowland LP (1984). "Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, ... Hirano M, Pavlakis SG (1994). "Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes (MELAS): ...
*  Mitochondrial myopathy
... lactic acidosis, and stroke-like syndrome (MELAS) Varying degrees of cognitive impairment and dementia Lactic acidosis Strokes ...
*  Abacavir
The use of nucleoside drugs such as abacavir can very rarely cause lactic acidosis. Signs of lactic acidosis include fast or ... More severe side effects include hypersensitivity, liver damage, and lactic acidosis. Genetic testing can indicate whether a ... lactic acidosis, hypertriglyceridemia, and lipodystrophy. People with liver disease should be cautious about using abacavir ...
Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episode (MELAS) | Radiology Case | Radiopaedia.org  Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episode (MELAS) | Radiology Case | Radiopaedia.org
Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is a rare inherited disorder that results in ... Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episode (MELAS). Case contributed by Dr Oyedepo Victor ... Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is a rare inherited disorder that results in ... 2. Henry C, Patel N, Shaffer W, Murphy L, Park J, Spieler B. Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy With Lactic Acidosis and Stroke- ...
more infohttps://radiopaedia.org/cases/mitochondrial-encephalomyopathy-lactic-acidosis-and-stroke-like-episode-melas
Diabetic ketoacidosis facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Diabetic ketoacidosis  Diabetic ketoacidosis facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Diabetic ketoacidosis
Lactic acidosis- A serious condition caused by the build up of lactic acid in the blood, causing it to become excessively ... Lactic acid is a by-product of glucose metabolism.. Metabolism- The sum of all chemical reactions that occur in the body ... Acidosis- A condition that causes the pH of the blood to drop and become more acidic. ... ketoacidosis (kee-toh-asid-oh-sis) n. a condition in which acidosis is accompanied by ketosis, such as occurs in type 1 ...
more infohttps://www.encyclopedia.com/medicine/diseases-and-conditions/pathology/diabetic-ketoacidosis
What is D-lactic acidosis?  What is D-lactic acidosis?
D-lactic acidosis is a form of lactic acidosis that occurs from overproduction of D-lactate by intestinal bacteria. It is ... encoded search term (What is D-lactic acidosis?) and What is D-lactic acidosis? What to Read Next on Medscape. Medscape Consult ... D-lactic acidosis is a form of lactic acidosis that occurs from overproduction of D-lactate by intestinal bacteria. It is ... What is D-lactic acidosis?. Updated: Oct 10, 2018 * Author: Christie P Thomas, MBBS, FRCP, FASN, FAHA; Chief Editor: Vecihi ...
more infohttps://www.medscape.com/answers/242975-154610/what-is-d-lactic-acidosis
Lactic Acidosis  | Definition | AIDSinfo  Lactic Acidosis | Definition | AIDSinfo
If left untreated, lactic acidosis can be fatal. Symptoms, if any, can include nausea, abdominal pain, muscle ache and weakness ... Lactic acidosis may be caused by advanced HIV infection or antiretroviral (ARV) drugs. ... A condition in which lactic acid builds up in the blood. ... Lactic Acidosis Lactic Acidosis Speaker A condition in which ... If left untreated, lactic acidosis can be fatal. Symptoms, if any, can include nausea, abdominal pain, muscle ache and weakness ...
more infohttps://aidsinfo.nih.gov/understanding-hiv-aids/glossary/797/lactic-acidosis
Phenformin and lactic acidosis. | The BMJ  Phenformin and lactic acidosis. | The BMJ
... which supported a multifactorial aetiology for lactic acidosis. Advanced age and cardiovascular and renal disease are absolute ... Phenformin and lactic acidosis.. Br Med J 1976; 1 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.1.6001.70 (Published 10 January 1976) Cite ... patients who presented with diabetes and a changed state of consciousness satisfied the criteria for lactic acidosis. Sixteen ...
more infohttp://www.bmj.com/content/1/6001/70
Metformin and Fatal Lactic Acidosis  Metformin and Fatal Lactic Acidosis
Lactic acidosis is an uncommon but potentially fatal adverse effect. The reported frequency of lactic acidosis is 0.06 per 1000 ... Biguanide-associated lactic acidosis. Arch Intern Med 1992;152:2333-6. *Gowardman JR, Havill J. Fatal metformin induced lactic ... Doctors should suspect lactic acidosis in patients presenting with acidosis, but without evidence of hypoperfusion or hypoxia. ... Post-surgical lactic acidosis caused the death of a 70-year-old man whose metformin was not withdrawn at the time of surgery. ...
more infohttp://www.medsafe.govt.nz/profs/PUarticles/5.htm
Lactic acidosis, prostaglandin E1, and colchicine. | The BMJ  Lactic acidosis, prostaglandin E1, and colchicine. | The BMJ
Lactic acidosis, prostaglandin E1, and colchicine. Br Med J 1978; 1 :651 ... Lactic acidosis, prostaglandin E1, and colchicine.. Br Med J 1978; 1 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.1.6113.651-a (Published ...
more infohttp://www.bmj.com/content/1/6113/651.2
How does lactic acidosis affect diabetes? | Reference.com  How does lactic acidosis affect diabetes? | Reference.com
Lactic acidosis can cause potentially fatal symptoms of metabolic acidosis, a dangerous condition that diabetics with poorly ... Whether caused by low blood sugar levels or medication, lactic acidosis in diabetics is life-threatening. Both lactic acidosis ... This is called lactic acidosis.. Diabetics are especially prone to another subtype of metabolic acidosis, called diabetic ... Lactic acidosis can cause potentially fatal symptoms of metabolic acidosis, a dangerous condition that diabetics with poorly ...
more infohttps://www.reference.com/health/lactic-acidosis-affect-diabetes-3ee92c2f9edb59fc
What is Lactic Acidosis Treatment? (with pictures)  What is Lactic Acidosis Treatment? (with pictures)
Lactic acidosis treatment is a method of treating a condition in which lactic acid levels in a person's bloodstream rise too ... In some cases, lactic acidosis treatment is necessary. For example, a person may develop lactic acidosis because of a genetic ... Lactic acidosis is a condition in which lactic acid levels in a person's bloodstream rise at too fast a rate. When this happens ... Some patients with lactic acidosis may have pain and bloating in the abdominal area.. ...
more infohttps://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-lactic-acidosis-treatment.htm
D-lactic acidosis: pathologic consequence of saprophytism.  - PubMed - NCBI  D-lactic acidosis: pathologic consequence of saprophytism. - PubMed - NCBI
D-Lactic acidosis was diagnosed on the basis of a D-lactate level of 8.2 mmol/L (normal, 0 to 0.25) obtained during an episode ... D-Lactic acidosis is a potentially fatal clinical condition seen in patients with a short small intestine and an intact colon. ... D-lactic acidosis: pathologic consequence of saprophytism.. Vella A1, Farrugia G. ... Increased awareness of D-lactic acidosis is necessary for prompt and appropriate treatment. The pathophysiology and treatment ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9581587
Lactic Acidosis | TheBodyPro  Lactic Acidosis | TheBodyPro
Although lactic acidosis is very rare, people who de ... The term lactic acidosis describes high levels of lactate in ... Are women more at risk of lactic acidosis? In one British study in 2003, being female carried a 2.5 x risk of lactic acidosis ... The term lactic acidosis describes high levels of lactate in the blood. Lactate is a by-product of the breakdown of sugar in ... Lactic acidosis is a side-effect of the long term use of the reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) class of HIV drugs (AZT, 3TC ...
more infohttps://www.thebodypro.com/article/lactic-acidosis
Lactic acidosis - ONA  Lactic acidosis - ONA
Rapidly clearing lactic acidosis may have been the result of a seizure or occult hypoglycemia. For persistent lactic acidosis ... Prognosis of lactic acidosis depends on the etiology, duration and resolution of lactic acidosis. The underlying health state ... Good review of pathophysiology of lactic acidosis.) Grunert, S, Schmidts, M, Kenzel, S. "D-lactic acidosis: 'right-left ... The clinical features of lactic acidosis are similar to other forms of metabolic acidoses. These may include respiratory ...
more infohttp://www.oncologynurseadvisor.com/critical-care-medicine/lactic-acidosis/article/586232/
Mitochondrial Toxicity and Lactic Acidosis Fact Sheet - TheBody.com  Mitochondrial Toxicity and Lactic Acidosis Fact Sheet - TheBody.com
Mitochondrial toxicity and one of its symptoms called lactic acidosis have been highlighted recently as a previously ... can lead to lactic acidosis, a life-threatening condition caused by too much lactate. In early stages of lactic acidosis, ... Mitochondrial Toxicity and Lactic Acidosis. Healthy cells normally produce lactate, it's a natural by-product when mitochondria ... Mitochondrial toxicity and one of its symptoms called lactic acidosis have been highlighted recently as a previously ...
more infohttp://www.thebody.com/content/art5026.html
Incidence of lactic acidosis in metformin users. | Diabetes Care  Incidence of lactic acidosis in metformin users. | Diabetes Care
It is similar to previously published rates based on passive reporting of cases, and it is well below the lactic acidosis rate ... In both cases, other factors besides metformin could have contributed to the lactic acidosis. No additional cases were found on ... OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of lactic acidosis in a geographically defined population ... CONCLUSIONS: From 1980 through 1995, the incidence rate of lactic acidosis was 9 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI 0-21) in ...
more infohttp://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/22/6/925
Lactic Acidosis Rates in Type 2 Diabetes | Diabetes Care  Lactic Acidosis Rates in Type 2 Diabetes | Diabetes Care
CONCLUSIONS Lactic acidosis occurs regularly, although infrequently, among persons with type 2 diabetes, at rates similar to ... OBJECTIVE To provide a context for the interpretation of lactic acidosis risk among patients using metformin, we measured rates ... The medical conditions with which both metformin-associated and naturally occurring lactic acidosis cooccur are also its ... The observed association between metformin and lactic acidosis may be coincidental rather than causal. This possibility merits ...
more infohttp://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/21/10/1659?ijkey=b431a0351d083820a9987fd2b986c26f8ccda888&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha
Congenital Lactic Acidosis - NORD (National Organization for Rare Disorders)  Congenital Lactic Acidosis - NORD (National Organization for Rare Disorders)
Congenital lactic acidosis is a rare form of lactic acidosis. The word "congenital" means that the underlying condition that ... Congenital lactic acidosis affects males and females in equal numbers. The exact incidence of congenital lactic acidosis is ... increases risk of developing lactic acidosis is present at birth. In most cases, the cause of congenital lactic acidosis is due ... Lactic acidosis can have many different causes and is often present in severely ill patients hospitalized in intensive care ...
more infohttps://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/congenital-lactic-acidosis/
Metformin - Renal Impairment and Risk of Lactic Acidosis  Metformin - Renal Impairment and Risk of Lactic Acidosis
... which may in turn result in lactic acidosis. The difficulty in determining the cause of lactic acidosis in some cases has led ... to debate about the existence of metformin associated lactic acidosis (MALA). However, the occurrence of lactic acidosis in ... Lactic acidosis. Lactate is produced by most tissues and is rapidly cleared by the liver. Levels of lactate increase as a ... Metformin and Fatal Lactic Acidosis. Prescriber Update 16: 22-24.URL: www.medsafe.govt.nz/profs/PUarticles/5.htm (accessed 18 ...
more infohttps://medsafe.govt.nz/profs/PUArticles/December2015/Metformin.htm
Metformin-Associated Lactic Acidosis EMRA  Metformin-Associated Lactic Acidosis EMRA
Metformin-Associated Lactic Acidosis. 8/14/2014 Jenelle Holst, MD , Jason Hoppe, DO ... Lactic acidosis is typically categorized in two distinct subgroups: types A and B. Type A is caused by impairment in tissue ... Metformin toxicity is an easily-missed clinical diagnosis in a patient with severe lactic acidosis and a severely depressed pH ... While this particular patient's presentation is likely multi-factorial, she also has metformin-associated lactic acidosis (MALA ...
more infohttps://www.emra.org/emresident/article/metformin-associated-lactic-acidosis/
Lactic acidosis - Renal and Urology News  Lactic acidosis - Renal and Urology News
Rapidly clearing lactic acidosis may have been the result of a seizure or occult hypoglycemia. For persistent lactic acidosis ... Prognosis of lactic acidosis depends on the etiology, duration and resolution of lactic acidosis. The underlying health state ... Good review of pathophysiology of lactic acidosis.) Grunert, S, Schmidts, M, Kenzel, S. "D-lactic acidosis: 'right-left ... The clinical features of lactic acidosis are similar to other forms of metabolic acidoses. These may include respiratory ...
more infohttps://www.renalandurologynews.com/critical-care-medicine/lactic-acidosis/article/586231/
Refractory Lactic Acidosis in Small Cell Carcinoma of the Lung  Refractory Lactic Acidosis in Small Cell Carcinoma of the Lung
B lactic acidosis from her malignancy and hepatic dysfunction contributing a significant role in her refractory lactic acidosis ... Refractory Lactic Acidosis in Small Cell Carcinoma of the Lung. Daniel J. Oh,1 Ellen Dinerman,1 Andrew H. Matthews,1 Abraham W. ... Her lactic acidosis worsened in the setting of subsequent septic and hypovolemic shock but, even after successful resuscitation ... K. S. Rao, R. Mehta, and J. Ferlinz, "Unusual presentation of cancer-induced lactic acidosis," Postgraduate Medical Journal, ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/cricc/2017/6148350/
  • For example, a person may develop lactic acidosis because of a genetic condition, a condition that deprives the body of oxygen, excessive bleeding, a severe infection, and sometimes diabetes . (wisegeek.com)
  • MALA is extremely rare when prescribed to a low-risk groups less inclined to develop lactic acidosis and avoided in those with alcoholism, heart failure and significant respiratory disease. (calpoison.org)
  • Lactic acidosis appears to result from biguanide interference causing an increase in production and decrease in clearance of lactate leading to higher cellular lactate levels. (medsafe.govt.nz)
  • Routine monitoring for elevated lactate levels is not cost-effective ($11,268 was spent to detect one severe hyperlactataemic episode at $20/test) and does not adequately predict lactic acidosis, according to a large observational study. (thebodypro.com)
  • We present the case of a 73-year-old Caucasian woman with type 2 diabetes and hypertension who presented with abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, nonbloody diarrhea, and weight loss over five weeks and was found to have unexplained refractory lactic acidosis despite fluids and antibiotics. (hindawi.com)
  • Of interest, of the 9 individuals identified through this process with severe hyperlactatemia, 4 individuals had evidence of acidosis, and interestingly all 4 had evidence of an infectious process (3 respiratory and 1 urinary). (natap.org)
  • Whereas some individuals may have persistently elevated levels of lactic acid in blood, cerebrospinal fluid and urine, other persons may have only occasional increases in lactic acid that are brought on by another illness, such as an infection, a seizure or an asthmatic attack. (rarediseases.org)
  • Gracile Syndrome is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder presenting with fetal growth retardation, Fanconi type aminoaciduria, cholestasis, iron overload (liver hemosiderosis), profound lactic acidosis, and early death. (dmoztools.net)
  • Treatment involves biguanide withdrawal, adequate hydration/circulatory support and correction of the acidosis. (medsafe.govt.nz)
  • Significant mortality (reported as high as 50% 3 ) is associated with biguanide-induced lactic acidosis and attention should be focused on prevention through awareness of the risk factors. (medsafe.govt.nz)
  • The first signs of having Lactic Acidosis are gastrointestinal problems such as vomiting, bloating, loss in appetite and abdominal pains. (diabeticlive.com)
  • A condition in which lactic acid builds up in the blood. (nih.gov)
  • In the absence of enough oxygen to process lactic acid, the acid builds up in the bloodstream, causing shortness of breath and a burning, fatigued sensation in the muscles. (wisegeek.com)
  • Lactic acidosis associated with critical illness is commonly a byproduct of a much larger problem. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Finally, the possible role of intercurrent illness in the pathogenesis of lactic acidosis clearly needs to be studied as such information may have direct clinical relevance. (natap.org)
  • Should future research suggest that intercurrent illness superimposed on a background of mild lactate elevation is adequate to "tip over" an individual into fulminant lactic acidosis, a case could be made for routine lactate monitoring with the intent that extra vigilance for infectious processes would be desirable in those individuals identified to have mild to moderate lactate elevations. (natap.org)
  • Continuous veno-venous hemofiltration may be used if the patient is hemodynamically unstable, but standard hemodialysis will correct the acidosis more quickly. (emra.org)