A physiologically diverse phylum of acidophilic, gram-negative bacteria found in a wide variety of habitats, but particularly abundant in soils and sediments.
A class of BRYOPHYTA which is best known for Sphagnum forming PEAT bogs.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.
Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.
One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.
A phylum of bacteria consisting of the purple bacteria and their relatives which form a branch of the eubacterial tree. This group of predominantly gram-negative bacteria is classified based on homology of equivalent nucleotide sequences of 16S ribosomal RNA or by hybridization of ribosomal RNA or DNA with 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA.
The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.
The immediate physical zone surrounding plant roots that include the plant roots. It is an area of intense and complex biological activity involving plants, microorganisms, other soil organisms, and the soil.
DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
The spectrum of different living organisms inhabiting a particular region, habitat, or biotope.
The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
Genes, found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, which are transcribed to produce the RNA which is incorporated into RIBOSOMES. Prokaryotic rRNA genes are usually found in OPERONS dispersed throughout the GENOME, whereas eukaryotic rRNA genes are clustered, multicistronic transcriptional units.
A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
One of the three domains of life (the others being BACTERIA and Eukarya), formerly called Archaebacteria under the taxon Bacteria, but now considered separate and distinct. They are characterized by: (1) the presence of characteristic tRNAs and ribosomal RNAs; (2) the absence of peptidoglycan cell walls; (3) the presence of ether-linked lipids built from branched-chain subunits; and (4) their occurrence in unusual habitats. While archaea resemble bacteria in morphology and genomic organization, they resemble eukarya in their method of genomic replication. The domain contains at least four kingdoms: CRENARCHAEOTA; EURYARCHAEOTA; NANOARCHAEOTA; and KORARCHAEOTA.
A mass of organic or inorganic solid fragmented material, or the solid fragment itself, that comes from the weathering of rock and is carried by, suspended in, or dropped by air, water, or ice. It refers also to a mass that is accumulated by any other natural agent and that forms in layers on the earth's surface, such as sand, gravel, silt, mud, fill, or loess. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1689)
Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.
A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.
Ribonucleic acid in bacteria having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.
The study of the structure, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of bacteria, and BACTERIAL INFECTIONS.

Telmatobacter bradus gen. nov., sp. nov., a cellulolytic facultative anaerobe from subdivision 1 of the Acidobacteria, and emended description of Acidobacterium capsulatum Kishimoto et al. 1991. (1/22)

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Bryocella elongata gen. nov., sp. nov., a member of subdivision 1 of the Acidobacteria isolated from a methanotrophic enrichment culture, and emended description of Edaphobacter aggregans Koch et al. 2008. (2/22)

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Huanglongbing alters the structure and functional diversity of microbial communities associated with citrus rhizosphere. (3/22)

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Universally distributed single-copy genes indicate a constant rate of horizontal transfer. (4/22)

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Acidicapsa borealis gen. nov., sp. nov. and Acidicapsa ligni sp. nov., subdivision 1 Acidobacteria from Sphagnum peat and decaying wood. (5/22)

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Recovery of as-yet-uncultured soil acidobacteria on dilute solid media. (6/22)

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Biological consequences of ancient gene acquisition and duplication in the large genome of Candidatus Solibacter usitatus Ellin6076. (7/22)

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Ultrastructural analysis and identification of envelope proteins of "Candidatus Chloracidobacterium thermophilum" chlorosomes. (8/22)

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Acidobacteria is a phylum of bacteria that are widely distributed in various environments, including soil, freshwater, and marine habitats. They are characterized by their ability to tolerate and thrive in acidic conditions, with some species able to grow at pH levels as low as 3.0.

Members of the Acidobacteria phylum are gram-negative bacteria that typically have a rod or coccoid shape. They are slow-growing organisms and can be difficult to cultivate in the laboratory, which has limited our understanding of their physiology and metabolism. However, recent advances in genomic sequencing and analysis have revealed new insights into their genetic diversity and potential ecological roles.

Acidobacteria are believed to play important roles in biogeochemical cycling, particularly in the cycling of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur. Some species are capable of degrading complex organic matter, such as lignin and cellulose, making them important contributors to carbon cycling in soils. Additionally, some Acidobacteria species have been shown to oxidize manganese and iron, which can impact the availability of these elements in the environment.

Overall, while our understanding of Acidobacteria is still evolving, it is clear that they are important members of many ecosystems and play key roles in biogeochemical cycling.

Sphagnopsida is a division of non-vascular plants that are commonly known as peat mosses or bog mosses. These plants are characterized by their ability to absorb and retain large amounts of water, making them an important component of many wetland ecosystems. They have simple, branching structures with small, leaf-like appendages called pseudoparenchyma. Sphagnopsida species play a significant role in the global carbon cycle as they decompose very slowly and can accumulate over long periods of time to form peat deposits.

I apologize, but there seems to be a misunderstanding. "Soil microbiology" is not a medical term; rather, it is a branch of microbiology that deals with the study of microorganisms in soil. It involves understanding the diversity, ecology, and biochemistry of bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa, and other microscopic life forms found in soil. This field has applications in agriculture, environmental science, and waste management but is not directly related to medical definitions or human health.

Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is a type of RNA that combines with proteins to form ribosomes, which are complex structures inside cells where protein synthesis occurs. The "16S" refers to the sedimentation coefficient of the rRNA molecule, which is a measure of its size and shape. In particular, 16S rRNA is a component of the smaller subunit of the prokaryotic ribosome (found in bacteria and archaea), and is often used as a molecular marker for identifying and classifying these organisms due to its relative stability and conservation among species. The sequence of 16S rRNA can be compared across different species to determine their evolutionary relationships and taxonomic positions.

Bacteria are single-celled microorganisms that are among the earliest known life forms on Earth. They are typically characterized as having a cell wall and no membrane-bound organelles. The majority of bacteria have a prokaryotic organization, meaning they lack a nucleus and other membrane-bound organelles.

Bacteria exist in diverse environments and can be found in every habitat on Earth, including soil, water, and the bodies of plants and animals. Some bacteria are beneficial to their hosts, while others can cause disease. Beneficial bacteria play important roles in processes such as digestion, nitrogen fixation, and biogeochemical cycling.

Bacteria reproduce asexually through binary fission or budding, and some species can also exchange genetic material through conjugation. They have a wide range of metabolic capabilities, with many using organic compounds as their source of energy, while others are capable of photosynthesis or chemosynthesis.

Bacteria are highly adaptable and can evolve rapidly in response to environmental changes. This has led to the development of antibiotic resistance in some species, which poses a significant public health challenge. Understanding the biology and behavior of bacteria is essential for developing strategies to prevent and treat bacterial infections and diseases.

Proteobacteria is a major class of Gram-negative bacteria that includes a wide variety of pathogens and free-living organisms. This class is divided into six subclasses: Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, Epsilon, and Zeta proteobacteria. Proteobacteria are characterized by their single circular chromosome and the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in their outer membrane. They can be found in a wide range of environments, including soil, water, and the gastrointestinal tracts of animals. Some notable examples of Proteobacteria include Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, and Yersinia pestis.

Biodiversity is the variety of different species of plants, animals, and microorganisms that live in an ecosystem. It also includes the variety of genes within a species and the variety of ecosystems (such as forests, grasslands, deserts, and oceans) that exist in a region or on Earth as a whole. Biodiversity is important for maintaining the health and balance of ecosystems, providing resources and services such as food, clean water, and pollination, and contributing to the discovery of new medicines and other useful products. The loss of biodiversity can have negative impacts on the functioning of ecosystems and the services they provide, and can threaten the survival of species and the livelihoods of people who depend on them.

The rhizosphere is not a medical term per se, but it is a term used in the field of biology and agriculture. It refers to the narrow region of soil that is directly influenced by root secretions and associated microorganisms, typically including a zone of about 1-2 mm around the root surface. The rhizosphere is characterized by increased microbial activity due to the release of organic compounds from the roots, which can affect nutrient availability, plant growth, and disease suppression.

Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) refers to the specific regions of DNA in a cell that contain the genes for ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Ribosomes are complex structures composed of proteins and rRNA, which play a crucial role in protein synthesis by translating messenger RNA (mRNA) into proteins.

In humans, there are four types of rRNA molecules: 18S, 5.8S, 28S, and 5S. These rRNAs are encoded by multiple copies of rDNA genes that are organized in clusters on specific chromosomes. In humans, the majority of rDNA genes are located on the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes 13, 14, 15, 21, and 22.

Each cluster of rDNA genes contains both transcribed and non-transcribed spacer regions. The transcribed regions contain the genes for the four types of rRNA, while the non-transcribed spacers contain regulatory elements that control the transcription of the rRNA genes.

The number of rDNA copies varies between species and even within individuals of the same species. The copy number can also change during development and in response to environmental factors. Variations in rDNA copy number have been associated with various diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

'Biota' is a term that refers to the total collection of living organisms in a particular habitat, ecosystem, or region. It includes all forms of life such as plants, animals, fungi, bacteria, and other microorganisms. Biota can be used to describe the communities of living things in a specific area, like a forest biota or marine biota, and it can also refer to the study of these organisms and their interactions with each other and their environment. In medical contexts, 'biota' may specifically refer to the microorganisms that inhabit the human body, such as the gut microbiota.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "soil" is not a term that has a medical definition. Soil is defined as the top layer of earth in which plants grow, a mixture of organic material, clay, sand, and silt. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I would be happy to try to help answer them for you.

Bacterial DNA refers to the genetic material found in bacteria. It is composed of a double-stranded helix containing four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) - that are linked together by phosphodiester bonds. The sequence of these bases in the DNA molecule carries the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of bacteria.

Bacterial DNA is circular in most bacterial species, although some have linear chromosomes. In addition to the main chromosome, many bacteria also contain small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids that can carry additional genes and provide resistance to antibiotics or other environmental stressors.

Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA enclosed within a nucleus, bacterial DNA is present in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it is in direct contact with the cell's metabolic machinery. This allows for rapid gene expression and regulation in response to changing environmental conditions.

rRNA (ribosomal RNA) is not a type of gene itself, but rather a crucial component that is transcribed from genes known as ribosomal DNA (rDNA). In cells, rRNA plays an essential role in protein synthesis by assembling with ribosomal proteins to form ribosomes. Ribosomes are complex structures where the translation of mRNA into proteins occurs. There are multiple types of rRNA molecules, including 5S, 5.8S, 18S, and 28S rRNAs in eukaryotic cells, each with specific functions during protein synthesis.

In summary, 'Genes, rRNA' would refer to the genetic regions (genes) that code for ribosomal RNA molecules, which are vital components of the protein synthesis machinery within cells.

Cluster analysis is a statistical method used to group similar objects or data points together based on their characteristics or features. In medical and healthcare research, cluster analysis can be used to identify patterns or relationships within complex datasets, such as patient records or genetic information. This technique can help researchers to classify patients into distinct subgroups based on their symptoms, diagnoses, or other variables, which can inform more personalized treatment plans or public health interventions.

Cluster analysis involves several steps, including:

1. Data preparation: The researcher must first collect and clean the data, ensuring that it is complete and free from errors. This may involve removing outlier values or missing data points.
2. Distance measurement: Next, the researcher must determine how to measure the distance between each pair of data points. Common methods include Euclidean distance (the straight-line distance between two points) or Manhattan distance (the distance between two points along a grid).
3. Clustering algorithm: The researcher then applies a clustering algorithm, which groups similar data points together based on their distances from one another. Common algorithms include hierarchical clustering (which creates a tree-like structure of clusters) or k-means clustering (which assigns each data point to the nearest centroid).
4. Validation: Finally, the researcher must validate the results of the cluster analysis by evaluating the stability and robustness of the clusters. This may involve re-running the analysis with different distance measures or clustering algorithms, or comparing the results to external criteria.

Cluster analysis is a powerful tool for identifying patterns and relationships within complex datasets, but it requires careful consideration of the data preparation, distance measurement, and validation steps to ensure accurate and meaningful results.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Archaea are a domain of single-celled microorganisms that lack membrane-bound nuclei and other organelles. They are characterized by the unique structure of their cell walls, membranes, and ribosomes. Archaea were originally classified as bacteria, but they differ from bacteria in several key ways, including their genetic material and metabolic processes.

Archaea can be found in a wide range of environments, including some of the most extreme habitats on Earth, such as hot springs, deep-sea vents, and highly saline lakes. Some species of Archaea are able to survive in the absence of oxygen, while others require oxygen to live.

Archaea play important roles in global nutrient cycles, including the nitrogen cycle and the carbon cycle. They are also being studied for their potential role in industrial processes, such as the production of biofuels and the treatment of wastewater.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "geologic sediments" is not a term used in medical definitions. Geological sediments are deposits of material that accumulate over time, usually in layers, as a result of natural geological processes such as weathering, erosion, and deposition. These sediments can eventually become rock formations and provide important clues about the Earth's history, including information about past climates, environments, and life on Earth.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "trees" is not a medical term. It is a common term used in various fields, including biology, ecology, and dendrology, to refer to a woody perennial plant with a single stem or trunk that supports branches and leaves in most species.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, please provide more context so I can offer an accurate and helpful response.

An "ecosystem" is not a term that has a specific medical definition, as it is a concept that is more commonly used in the fields of ecology and environmental science. However, I can provide you with the general ecological definition of an ecosystem:

An ecosystem is a community of living organisms interacting with each other and their non-living environment, including both biotic factors (plants, animals, microorganisms) and abiotic factors (climate, soil, water, and air). These interactions create a complex network of relationships that form the foundation of ecological processes, such as energy flow, nutrient cycling, and population dynamics.

While there is no direct medical definition for an ecosystem, understanding the principles of ecosystems can have important implications for human health. For example, healthy ecosystems can provide clean air and water, regulate climate, support food production, and offer opportunities for recreation and relaxation, all of which contribute to overall well-being. Conversely, degraded ecosystems can lead to increased exposure to environmental hazards, reduced access to natural resources, and heightened risks of infectious diseases. Therefore, maintaining the health and integrity of ecosystems is crucial for promoting human health and preventing disease.

Fungi, in the context of medical definitions, are a group of eukaryotic organisms that include microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, as well as the more familiar mushrooms. The study of fungi is known as mycology.

Fungi can exist as unicellular organisms or as multicellular filamentous structures called hyphae. They are heterotrophs, which means they obtain their nutrients by decomposing organic matter or by living as parasites on other organisms. Some fungi can cause various diseases in humans, animals, and plants, known as mycoses. These infections range from superficial, localized skin infections to systemic, life-threatening invasive diseases.

Examples of fungal infections include athlete's foot (tinea pedis), ringworm (dermatophytosis), candidiasis (yeast infection), histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and aspergillosis. Fungal infections can be challenging to treat due to the limited number of antifungal drugs available and the potential for drug resistance.

Bacterial RNA refers to the genetic material present in bacteria that is composed of ribonucleic acid (RNA). Unlike higher organisms, bacteria contain a single circular chromosome made up of DNA, along with smaller circular pieces of DNA called plasmids. These bacterial genetic materials contain the information necessary for the growth and reproduction of the organism.

Bacterial RNA can be divided into three main categories: messenger RNA (mRNA), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and transfer RNA (tRNA). mRNA carries genetic information copied from DNA, which is then translated into proteins by the rRNA and tRNA molecules. rRNA is a structural component of the ribosome, where protein synthesis occurs, while tRNA acts as an adapter that brings amino acids to the ribosome during protein synthesis.

Bacterial RNA plays a crucial role in various cellular processes, including gene expression, protein synthesis, and regulation of metabolic pathways. Understanding the structure and function of bacterial RNA is essential for developing new antibiotics and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

"Terminology as a topic" in the context of medical education and practice refers to the study and use of specialized language and terms within the field of medicine. This includes understanding the meaning, origins, and appropriate usage of medical terminology in order to effectively communicate among healthcare professionals and with patients. It may also involve studying the evolution and cultural significance of medical terminology. The importance of "terminology as a topic" lies in promoting clear and accurate communication, which is essential for providing safe and effective patient care.

Bacteriology is the branch of biology that deals with the study of bacteria, including their classification, physiology, genetics, and ecology. It is a subset of microbiology, which is the broader field that includes the study of all microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites.

Bacteriologists use various techniques to isolate, culture, and identify different species of bacteria. They also study the interactions between bacteria and their hosts, as well as the role that bacteria play in disease processes. In addition, bacteriology involves research into the development of new antibiotics and other treatments for bacterial infections.

Overall, bacteriology is an important field of study that has contributed significantly to our understanding of infectious diseases and their prevention and treatment.

Acidobacteria phyl. Nov.", Bergey's Manual® of Systematic Bacteriology, Springer New York, pp. 725-735, doi:10.1007/978-0-387- ...
There is much that is unknown about Acidobacteria both in their form and function. Thus, this is a growing field of ... 2003). "Acidobacteria form a coherent but highly diverse group within the bacterial domain: evidence from environmental ... in the phylum 'Acidobacteria'". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 58 (Pt 11): 2597-2601. doi: ... The G+C content of Acidobacteria genomes are consistent within their subdivisions - above 60% for group V fragments and roughly ...
Dedysh SN, Yilmaz P. (2018). "Refining the taxonomic structure of the phylum Acidobacteria". Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 68: ... 4 (The Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetes, Tenericutes (Mollicutes), Acidobacteria, Fibrobacteres, Fusobacteria, Dictyoglomi, ...
nov., the first cultivated member of Acidobacteria subdivision 23, isolated from a hot spring". Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 63: ... Dedysh SN, Yilmaz P. (2018). "Refining the taxonomic structure of the phylum Acidobacteria". Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 68 (12 ...
Dedysh SN, Yilmaz P. (2018). "Refining the taxonomic structure of the phylum Acidobacteria". Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 68: ... "Novel isolates double the number of chemotrophic species and allow the first description of higher taxa in Acidobacteria ...
Dedysh SN, Yilmaz P. (2018). "Refining the taxonomic structure of the phylum Acidobacteria". Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 68: ... "Defining the taxonomic status of described subdivision 3 Acidobacteria: Proposal of Bryobacteraceae fam. nov". Int J Syst Evol ...
Dedysh SN, Yilmaz P. (2018). "Refining the taxonomic structure of the phylum Acidobacteria". Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 68: ... "Novel isolates double the number of chemotrophic species and allow the first description of higher taxa in Acidobacteria ...
Dedysh SN, Yilmaz P. (2018). "Refining the taxonomic structure of the phylum Acidobacteria". Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 68 (12 ...
nov., acidobacteria isolated from alpine and forest soils". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. ...
Dedysh SN, Yilmaz P. (2018). "Refining the taxonomic structure of the phylum Acidobacteria". Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 68 (12 ... nov., the first described family within the subdivision 6 Acidobacteria". Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 68 (7): 2331-2334. doi: ...
Dedysh SN, Yilmaz P. (2018). "Refining the taxonomic structure of the phylum Acidobacteria". Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 68: ...
in the phylum "Acidobacteria"". Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 58 (Pt 11): 2597-2601. doi:10.1099/ijs.0.65589-0. PMID 18984699. ... Dedysh SN, Yilmaz P. (2018). "Refining the taxonomic structure of the phylum Acidobacteria". Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 68 (12 ...
nov., acidobacteria isolated from alpine and forest soils". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. ...
Dedysh SN, Yilmaz P. (2018). "Refining the taxonomic structure of the phylum Acidobacteria". Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 68: ... Dedysh SN, Yilmaz P (2018). "Refining the taxonomic structure of the phylum Acidobacteria". Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 68: 3796 ...
nov., a novel heterotrophic thermophile within the phylum Acidobacteria from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimney in the ... Dedysh SN, Yilmaz P. (2018). "Refining the taxonomic structure of the phylum Acidobacteria". Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 68: ...
in the phylum "Acidobacteria"". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 58 (11): 2597-2601. doi: ...
nov.: novel acidobacteria isolated from metal-rich acidic waters". Extremophiles: Life Under Extreme Conditions. 21 (3): 459- ...
nov.: novel acidobacteria isolated from metal-rich acidic waters". Extremophiles: Life Under Extreme Conditions. 21 (3): 459- ... nov., subdivision 1 Acidobacteria from Sphagnum peat and decaying wood". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary ...
in the phylum "Acidobacteria"". Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 58 (11): 2597-2601. doi:10.1099/ijs.0.65589-0. PMID 18984699. Euzéby ...
Members of the phylum Acidobacteria are ubiquitous in various environments. Soil acidobacteria have been reported to present a ... Acanthopleuribacter pedis is one of only two species of acidobacteria to have been isolated from animals. Colonies on marine ... in the phylum "Acidobacteria"". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 58 (11): 2597-2601. doi: ...
nov.: novel acidobacteria isolated from metal-rich acidic waters". Extremophiles. 21 (3): 459-469. doi:10.1007/s00792-017-0916- ...
"Draft Genome Sequence of Acidobacteria Group 1 Acidipila sp.Strain EB88, Isolated from Forest Soil". Microbiology Resource ... nov., an acidophilic chemoorganotrophic bacterium belonging to the phylum Acidobacteria: Acidipila rosea gen. nov., sp. nov". ... nov., an acidophilic chemoorganotrophic bacterium belonging to the phylum Acidobacteria". FEMS Microbiology Letters. 317 (2): ...
nov., subdivision 1 Acidobacteria from Sphagnum peat and decaying wood". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary ...
nov., subdivision 1 Acidobacteria from Sphagnum peat and decaying wood". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary ...
nov., an acidophilic chemoorganotrophic bacterium belonging to the phylum Acidobacteria". FEMS Microbiology Letters. 317 (2): ...
"Persistence of the dominant soil phylum Acidobacteria by trace gas scavenging". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences ...
Anna M.Kielak; Matheus A.P.Cipriano; Eiko E. Kuramae (2016). "Acidobacteria strains from subdivision 1 act as plant growth‑ ... The polymer degrading properties reveal acidobacteria as decomposers in the soil that potentially participate in the cycling of ... nov., a cellulolytic facultative anaerobe from subdivision 1 of the Acidobacteria, and emended description of Acidobacterium ... "Three Genomes from the Phylum Acidobacteria Provide Insight into the Lifestyles of These Microorganisms in Soils". Applied and ...
"Recent Understanding of Soil Acidobacteria and Their Ecological Significance: A Critical Review". Frontiers in Microbiology. 11 ...
nov., a novel group 4 thermophilic member of the phylum Acidobacteria from geothermal soils". Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 64: ... three novel species of Acidobacteria subdivision 4 (class Blastocatellia) isolated from savanna soil and description of the ...
Acidobacteria) I: biochemical and biophysical characterization". Photosynthesis Research. 142 (1): 87-103. doi:10.1007/s11120- ...
The complete genomes of three strains from the phylum Acidobacteria were compared. Phylogenetic analysis placed them as a ... The abundance of acidobacteria in soils worldwide and the breadth of potential carbon use by the sequenced strains suggest ... Three genomes from the phylum Acidobacteria provide insight into the lifestyles of these microorganisms in soils Appl Environ ... The complete genomes of three strains from the phylum Acidobacteria were compared. Phylogenetic analysis placed them as a ...
Thus, only a low number of higher taxonomic ranks is currently distinguished within the Acidobacteria . Additionally, the ... To improve the existing acidobacterial taxonomy, we here formally describe the first family within sd6 Acidobacteria , the ... In contrast, culture-independent analysis of microbial communities worldwide revealed that sd6 Acidobacteria prevail in soils ... Acidobacteria constitute a globally widespread phylum and mainly inhabit soil environments. Despite their high abundance and ...
Acidobacteria phyl. Nov.", Bergeys Manual® of Systematic Bacteriology, Springer New York, pp. 725-735, doi:10.1007/978-0-387- ...
Acidobacteria. 7323. 4.18%. Verrucomicrobia. 6934. 3.96%. Actinobacteria. 5417. 3.09%. Chlorobi. 3561. 2.03%. ...
Acidobacteria sp.. 94. Afipia genosp. 12. 97. Sphingomonas sp.. 98. Pseudomonas stutzeri. 100. ...
in the phylum Acidobacteria. International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 58:2597-601. DOI: 10.1099/ijs. ... Phylum: Acidobacteria Classis: Holophagae Ordines: Acanthopleuribacterales - Holophagales - Thermotomaculales. Name[edit]. ...
Complete genome sequence of the thermophilic Acidobacteria, Pyrinomonas methylaliphatogenes type strain K22(T). Lee KC, Morgan ...
Acidobacteria (mainly Holophagae) and Alphaproteobacteria decrease, while those of Aminicenantes and Atribacteria increase with ...
... novel acidobacteria isolated from metal-rich acidic waters. Falagan, C., Foesel, B. & Johnson, B., Mai 2017, Yn: Extremophiles. ...
Acidobacteria. , Actinobacteria. , and Verrucomicrobia. were the bacterial phyla most affected in these soils. The authors ... Acidobacteria. Gp1 accounting for a higher abundance in green sugarcane and native forest soils than in burnt sugarcane soils. ... Acidobacteria. Gp3 and Gp4 were most abundant in the vinasse-amended soil. In addition, bacterial community members belonging ... Acidobacteria. classes being the groups most affected by sugarcane burning. In general, significant structural changes of the ...
Physiological and ecological strategies of Acidobacteria Project 2016-2020 Acidobacteria is among the most abundant phylum in ...
Novel Plant-Associated Acidobacteria Promotes Growth of Common Floating Aquatic Plants, Duckweeds. Microorganisms. 2021 May 24; ...
Typically, the study also showed that Gemmatimonadetes and Acidobacteria were found to be unique to TB patients. Besides, ...
Acidobacteria (0.33%), Tenericutes (0.15%), Fusobacteria (0.13%), Gemmatimonadetes (0.10%), and Spirochaetes (0.03%) were less ...
Molekular-ökologische und genomische Studien zur Charakterisierung von nicht-kultivierten Archaea und Acidobacteria. Technische ... Molekularbiologische Charakterisierung von nicht-kultivierten Crenarchaeota und Acidobacteria in Metagenombanken aus ...
Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria dominated the soil surface, Acidobacteria peaked in relative abundance at 10 cm, and ...
The dominant taxa within each group were the bacterial phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria; the fungi phyla ...
Kalam S, Basu A, Ahmad I, Sayyed RZ, El-Enshasy HA, Dailin DJ et al (2020) Recent Understanding of Soil Acidobacteria and Their ... Acidobacteria was very important for the environment to keep the structural stability of microorganism as it potentially ... 2015), and Bacteroidetes and Acidobacteria were increased, while Actinobacteria and Firmicutes decreased under antibiotics ... Kielak AM, Castellane TC, Campanharo JC, Colnago LA (2017) Characterization of novel Acidobacteria exopolysaccharides with ...
Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, Bacteriodetes and Thaumarchaeota were predominant phyla in saline and non-saline soils, whereas ... Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, Bacteriodetes and Thaumarchaeota were predominant phyla in saline and non-saline soils, whereas ...
Acidobacteria;Acidobacteria;Subgroup_4;DS-100;NA RSV_genus14 Bacteria;Acidobacteria;Acidobacteria;Subgroup_4;NA;NA RSV_genus15 ... Acidobacteria;Acidobacteria;Subgroup_2;NA;NA RSV_genus6 Bacteria;Acidobacteria;Acidobacteria;Subgroup_3;GOUTB8;NA RSV_genus7 ... Acidobacteria;Acidobacteria;Subgroup_5;NA;NA RSV_genus18 Bacteria;Acidobacteria;Acidobacteria;Subgroup_6;NA;NA RSV_genus19 ... Acidobacteria;Acidobacteria;Subgroup_3;PAUC26f;NA RSV_genus9 Bacteria;Acidobacteria;Acidobacteria;Subgroup_3;SJA-149;NA RSV_ ...
Gammaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria in warmed samples in 2014 compared to the control. By 2014, significantly (P , 0.05) more ...
We compared the NRPS with each phylum in the ERP003612 data and found that the Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Chlorobi were ...
Most of the members of Group 3 were Actinobacteria or Chloroflexi, but other phyla (e.g., Acidobacteria, Firmicutes, ...
Acidobacteria can be described as slow-growing oligotrophs and their abundance is negatively correlated with soil C contents [ ... 6). Lusaka soils had a significantly higher relative abundance of Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria, but a significantly lower ... 7 and Table S2). In contrast, Acidobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Proteobacteria increased the relative abundance on 126 days ... the CF treatment showed a significant higher relative abundance of Firmicutes and decreased that of Acidobacteria (Table S1). ...
The Acidobacteria is one of the most abundant phyla in most soil types. Fynbos plants are endemic to South Africa, and these ... Acidobacteria had a significantly positive correlation with pH, C, Ca2+, and P. In this study, we have shown the effect of ... Seasonal and Agricultural Response of Acidobacteria Present in Two Fynbos Rhizosphere Soils. (MDPI, 2020-07-10. ) Conradie, ... soils provide the ideal habitat for Acidobacteria, because of its low pH and oligotrophic properties. However, little is known ...
For example, in one library of Acidobacteria environmental clone sequences, 72 of 77 sequences were classified with less than ...
Acidobacteria Preferred Term Term UI T789328. Date04/19/2011. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (2012). ... Acidobacteria Preferred Concept UI. M0556930. Registry Number. txid57723. Scope Note. A physiologically diverse phylum of ... Acidobacteria. Tree Number(s). B03.026. B03.440.400.050. Unique ID. D061271. RDF Unique Identifier. http://id.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/ ...
Acidobacteria Agriculture & Biology 100% * soil bacteria Agriculture & Biology 80% * glycerol Agriculture & Biology 60% ...
  • Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria dominated the soil surface, Acidobacteria peaked in relative abundance at 10 cm, and Actinobacteria and unidentified taxa were greatest in relative abundance below 25 cm. (usda.gov)
  • 2015 ), and Bacteroidetes and Acidobacteria were increased, while Actinobacteria and Firmicutes decreased under antibiotics exposure (Uddin et al. (researchsquare.com)
  • These results contrast with older Icelandic lava of comparable mineralogy, in which phototrophs comprised a significant fraction of microbial communities, and the non-phototrophic community fractions were dominated by Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria . (matis.is)
  • Results: The short-term exposure of AgNP at environmentally relevant concentration of 0.01 mg AgNP/kg caused significant positive effects on Acidobacteria (44.0%), Actinobacteria (21.1%) and Bacteroidetes (14.6%), whereas beta-Proteobacteria population was minimized by 14.2% relative to the control (p ≤ 0.05). (hbz-nrw.de)
  • At the phylum level, Actinobacteria were the most abundant in rhizosphere at all growth stages, followed by Alphaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria and the phylum Bacteroidetes showed the greatest change. (preprints.org)
  • While the phyla for communities in closed landfill were dominated by phyla from Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria. (um.edu.my)
  • The complete genomes of three strains from the phylum Acidobacteria were compared. (nih.gov)
  • Acidobacteria constitute a globally widespread phylum and mainly inhabit soil environments. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Acidobacteria is among the most abundant phylum in soils, however, their physiological capabilities and co-occurrence with soil inhabitants are still unknown. (knaw.nl)
  • This organism belongs to the phylum Acidobacteria. (up.ac.za)
  • After 1 year of exposure to 0.01 mg AgNP/kg diminished Acidobacteria (p = 0.007), Bacteroidetes (p = 0.005) and beta-Proteobacteria (p = 0.000) by 14.5, 10.1 and 13.9%, respectively. (hbz-nrw.de)
  • Besides that, dry spell prompted decreases in labile carbon and nitrogen entering the rhizosphere may be a contributing variable in the deficiency of microbial phyla, for example, Verrucomicrobia, Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria which are heterotrophs and delicate to nitrogen proportions [ 2 ]. (alliedacademies.org)
  • Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria were identified as biomarkers to indicate Cd contamination. (bvsalud.org)
  • Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, Bacteriodetes and Thaumarchaeota were predominant phyla in saline and non-saline soils, whereas Cyanobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Gemmatimonadetes and the unclassified WPS-2 were less abundant. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • 0.05) more Firmicutes , and less D eltproteobacteria , Gammaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria in warmed samples in 2014 compared to the control. (confex.com)
  • These Acidobacteria represent indigenous cellulolytic members of the microbial community in acidic peat and are easily out-competed by Cytophaga-like bacteria under conditions of increased nitrogen availability. (mpg.de)
  • Among isolates obtained from this community only some subdivision 1 Acidobacteria were capable of degrading cellulose, albeit at a very slow rate. (mpg.de)
  • The abundance of acidobacteria in soils worldwide and the breadth of potential carbon use by the sequenced strains suggest significant and previously unrecognized contributions to the terrestrial carbon cycle. (nih.gov)
  • In contrast, culture-independent analysis of microbial communities worldwide revealed that sd6 Acidobacteria prevail in soils with neutral pH. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Expressed sequence tags affiliated with Acidobacteria and Chloroflexi were frequently detected in both oxygen zones. (mpg.de)
  • The indigenous bacterial community in peat was dominated by Alphaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria. (mpg.de)
  • In addition, this approach enabled insights into what the heck Acidobacteria might be doing. (microbomics.com)
  • The dominant bacterial phyla in the rhizosphere soil of both plant species were Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria. (ugent.be)
  • Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were found in all the soil. (um.edu.my)
  • Acidobacteria is among the most abundant phylum in soils, however, their physiological capabilities and co-occurrence with soil inhabitants are still unknown. (knaw.nl)
  • This organism is a member of the Acidobacteria which are abundant in slightly acidic soils. (up.ac.za)
  • www.cms.gov/OfficeofLegislation/Downloads/Accountable CareOrganization.pdf accessed 03/16/2011) HN - 2012 BX - Accountable Care Organization MH - Acidobacteria UI - D061271 MN - B3.26 MN - B3.440.400.50 MS - A physiologically diverse phylum of acidophilic, gram-negative bacteria found in a wide variety of habitats, but particularly abundant in soils and sediments. (nih.gov)
  • The Acidobacteria are an order of bacteria which are found in abundance in soils. (blogspot.com)
  • pH effects on bacterial composition were partly driven by the abundance of Acidobacteria. (westernag.ca)
  • Acidobacteria (negatively), Chlamydiae (negatively) and Nitrospirae (positively), in both plant species. (ugent.be)
  • Straw return resulted in significant increases in relative abundances of Proteobacteria , Nitrospirae , and Actinobacteria and significant decrease in that of Acidobacteria . (chinacrops.org)
  • Granulicella mallensis MP5ACTX8 T is a novel species of the genus Granulicella in subdivision 1of Acidobacteria . (biomedcentral.com)