Acholeplasma: A genus of gram-negative organisms including saprophytic and parasitic or pathogenic species.Mycoplasmatales: An order of highly pleomorphic, gram-negative bacteria including both pathogenic and saprophytic species.Acholeplasma laidlawii: An organism originally isolated from sewage, manure, humus, and soil, but recently found as a parasite in mammals and birds.Biohazard Release: Uncontrolled release of biological material from its containment. This either threatens to, or does, cause exposure to a biological hazard. Such an incident may occur accidentally or deliberately.Mycoplasma: A genus of gram-negative, mostly facultatively anaerobic bacteria in the family MYCOPLASMATACEAE. The cells are bounded by a PLASMA MEMBRANE and lack a true CELL WALL. Its organisms are pathogens found on the MUCOUS MEMBRANES of humans, ANIMALS, and BIRDS.Tenericutes: A phylum of gram-negative bacteria consisting of cells bounded by a plasma membrane. Its organisms differ from other bacteria in that they are devoid of cell walls. This phylum was formerly the class Mollicutes. Mollicutes is now the sole class in the phylum Tenericutes.Containment of Biohazards: Provision of physical and biological barriers to the dissemination of potentially hazardous biologically active agents (bacteria, viruses, recombinant DNA, etc.). Physical containment involves the use of special equipment, facilities, and procedures to prevent the escape of the agent. Biological containment includes use of immune personnel and the selection of agents and hosts that will minimize the risk should the agent escape the containment facility.Laboratory Infection: Accidentally acquired infection in laboratory workers.Spiroplasma: A genus of gram-negative, helical bacteria, in the family SPIROPLASMATACEAE, order Entomoplasmatales, causing disease in PLANTS. It has been isolated from TICKS; INSECTS; and PLANTS.Gentian Violet: A dye that is a mixture of violet rosanilinis with antibacterial, antifungal, and anthelmintic properties.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Sulfolobales: An order of CRENARCHAEOTA consisting of aerobic or facultatively aerobic, chemolithotrophic cocci which are extreme thermoacidophiles. They lack peptidoglycan in their cell walls.Thermoproteales: An order of CRENARCHAEOTA comprised of rod, disc, or spherical shaped, nonseptate, anaerobic, extreme thermophiles and found in solfataric hot waters, mud holes, and superheated submarine environments.Methanobacteriales: An order of anaerobic, coccoid to rod-shaped methanogens, in the kingdom EURYARCHAEOTA. They are nonmotile, do not catabolize carbohydrates, proteinaceous material, or organic compounds other than formate or carbon monoxide, and are widely distributed in nature.Thermococcales: An order of strictly anaerobic, thermophilic archaea, in the kingdom EURYARCHAEOTA. Members exhibit heterotropic growth by sulfur respiration. There is a single family THERMOCOCCACEAE.Prochloron: A genus of PROCHLOROPHYTES containing unicellular, spherical bacteria without a mucilaginous sheath. They are found almost exclusively as extracellular symbionts of colonial ASCIDIANS on subtropical or tropical marine shores.Thermoproteus: A genus of obligately anaerobic ARCHAEA, in the family THERMOPROTEACEAE. They are found in acidic hot springs and water holes.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Halobacteriales: An order of extremely halophilic archaea, in the kingdom EURYARCHAEOTA. They occur ubiquitously in nature where the salt concentration is high, and are chemoorganotrophic, using amino acids or carbohydrates as a carbon source.LouisianaCyclonic Storms: Non-frontal low-pressure systems over tropical or sub-tropical waters with organized convection and definite pattern of surface wind circulation.Disasters: Calamities producing great damage, loss of life, and distress. They include results of natural phenomena and man-made phenomena. Normal conditions of existence are disrupted and the level of impact exceeds the capacity of the hazard-affected community.Knowledge Management: The leveraging of collective wisdom within an organization as a catalyst to increase responsiveness and innovation.Medical Tourism: Travel to another country for the purpose of medical treatment.Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act: Public Law 104-91 enacted in 1996, was designed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the healthcare system, protect health insurance coverage for workers and their families, and to protect individual personal health information.Military ScienceTissue Banks: Centers for acquiring, characterizing, and storing organs or tissue for future use.Medical Informatics Applications: Automated systems applied to the patient care process including diagnosis, therapy, and systems of communicating medical data within the health care setting.Information Dissemination: The circulation or wide dispersal of information.Mauritius: One of the Indian Ocean Islands, east of Madagascar. Its capital is Port Louis. It was discovered by the Portuguese in 1505, occupied by the Dutch 1598-1710, held by the French 1715-1810 when the British captured it, formally ceded to the British in 1814, and became independent in 1968. It was named by the Dutch in honor of Maurice of Nassau, Prince of Orange (1567-1625). (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p742 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p341)Saccharum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE widely cultivated in the tropics for the sweet cane that is processed into sugar.Canes: Sticks used as walking aids. The canes may have three or four prongs at the end of the shaft.Indian Ocean Islands: Numerous islands in the Indian Ocean situated east of Madagascar, north to the Arabian Sea and east to Sri Lanka. Included are COMOROS (republic), MADAGASCAR (republic), Maldives (republic), MAURITIUS (parliamentary democracy), Pemba (administered by Tanzania), REUNION (a department of France), and SEYCHELLES (republic).Reunion: One of the Indian Ocean Islands, east of Madagascar. Its capital is Saint-Denis. It was discovered in 1507 by the Portuguese and claimed by France in 1638. It was first colonized in 1662 as Isle de Bourbon but renamed Reunion in 1793. In 1946 it was made an overseas department of France. The name commemorates the reunion of the revolutionaries from Marseilles with the National Guard in Paris in 1792. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1011; Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p454; French Embassy)Plants, Edible: An organism of the vegetable kingdom suitable by nature for use as a food, especially by human beings. Not all parts of any given plant are edible but all parts of edible plants have been known to figure as raw or cooked food: leaves, roots, tubers, stems, seeds, buds, fruits, and flowers. The most commonly edible parts of plants are FRUIT, usually sweet, fleshy, and succulent. Most edible plants are commonly cultivated for their nutritional value and are referred to as VEGETABLES.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Thimerosal: An ethylmercury-sulfidobenzoate that has been used as a preservative in VACCINES; ANTIVENINS; and OINTMENTS. It was formerly used as a topical antiseptic. It degrades to ethylmercury and thiosalicylate.Inventions: A novel composition, device, or process, independently conceived de novo or derived from a pre-existing model.Steam: Water in its gaseous state. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Preservatives, Pharmaceutical: Substances added to pharmaceutical preparations to protect them from chemical change or microbial action. They include ANTI-BACTERIAL AGENTS and antioxidants.Biotechnology: Body of knowledge related to the use of organisms, cells or cell-derived constituents for the purpose of developing products which are technically, scientifically and clinically useful. Alteration of biologic function at the molecular level (i.e., GENETIC ENGINEERING) is a central focus; laboratory methods used include TRANSFECTION and CLONING technologies, sequence and structure analysis algorithms, computer databases, and gene and protein structure function analysis and prediction.Colony Count, Microbial: Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.Food Preservatives: Substances capable of inhibiting, retarding or arresting the process of fermentation, acidification or other deterioration of foods.Asepsis: The prevention of access by infecting organisms to the locus of potential infection.Avihepadnavirus: A genus of HEPADNAVIRIDAE infecting birds but rarely causing clinical problems. Transmission is predominantly vertical. HEPATITIS B VIRUS, DUCK is the type species.Encephalitis Virus, Eastern Equine: A species of ALPHAVIRUS causing encephalomyelitis in Equidae and humans. The virus ranges along the Atlantic seaboard of the United States and Canada and as far south as the Caribbean, Mexico, and parts of Central and South America. Infections in horses show a mortality of up to 90 percent and in humans as high as 80 percent in epidemics.Rift Valley fever virus: A mosquito-borne species of the PHLEBOVIRUS genus found in eastern, central, and southern Africa, producing massive hepatitis, abortion, and death in sheep, goats, cattle, and other animals. It also has caused disease in humans.Rift Valley Fever: An acute infection caused by the RIFT VALLEY FEVER VIRUS, an RNA arthropod-borne virus, affecting domestic animals and humans. In animals, symptoms include HEPATITIS; abortion (ABORTION, VETERINARY); and DEATH. In humans, symptoms range from those of a flu-like disease to hemorrhagic fever, ENCEPHALITIS, or BLINDNESS.Norwalk virus: The type species in the genus NOROVIRUS, first isolated in 1968 from the stools of school children in Norwalk, Ohio, who were suffering from GASTROENTERITIS. The virions are non-enveloped spherical particles containing a single protein. Multiple strains are named after the places where outbreaks have occurred.Rotavirus: A genus of REOVIRIDAE, causing acute gastroenteritis in BIRDS and MAMMALS, including humans. Transmission is horizontal and by environmental contamination. Seven species (Rotaviruses A thru G) are recognized.Hepatitis B Virus, Duck: A DNA virus that closely resembles human hepatitis B virus. It has been recovered from naturally infected ducks.Hepatitis B virus: The type species of the genus ORTHOHEPADNAVIRUS which causes human HEPATITIS B and is also apparently a causal agent in human HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA. The Dane particle is an intact hepatitis virion, named after its discoverer. Non-infectious spherical and tubular particles are also seen in the serum.Rotavirus Infections: Infection with any of the rotaviruses. Specific infections include human infantile diarrhea, neonatal calf diarrhea, and epidemic diarrhea of infant mice.Encephalomyelitis, Eastern Equine: A form of arboviral encephalitis (primarily affecting equines) endemic to eastern regions of North America. The causative organism (ENCEPHALOMYELITIS VIRUS, EASTERN EQUINE) may be transmitted to humans via the bite of AEDES mosquitoes. Clinical manifestations include the acute onset of fever, HEADACHE, altered mentation, and SEIZURES followed by coma. The condition is fatal in up to 50% of cases. Recovery may be marked by residual neurologic deficits and EPILEPSY. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp9-10)
(1/18) The phytoplasma associated with ash yellows and lilac witches'-broom: 'Candidatus phytoplasma fraxini'.

Phytoplasmas associated with the plant diseases ash yellows (AshY, occurring in Fraxinus) and lilac witches'-broom (LWB, occurring in Syringa) represent a putative species-level taxon. Phytoplasmal DNA from 19 ash or lilac sources across the known geographic range of AshY (71-113 degrees W) was examined to determine if AshY and LWB phytoplasmas are a coherent group, if variability exists in both conserved and anonymous DNA, and if variability in 16S rDNA is related to host or geographic origin. The 16S rRNA gene and the 16S-23S spacer were amplified using primer pair P1/P7 and analysed using 15 restriction enzymes. RFLPs were detected in digests obtained with Alul, Hhal or Taql, for a total of four RFLP profile types. Sequencing of the amplimers from strains AshY1T, AshY3, AshY5 and LWB3 (which represent the four 16S rDNA RFLP profile types) revealed only three positions in the 16S rRNA gene and one position in the 16S-23S spacer at which differences occurred; these were single nucleotide substitutions. Sequence homology between any two strains was > 99.8%. A portion of a ribosomal protein operon, amplified with primer pair rpF1/R1 from each of the four strains noted above, was analysed with six restriction enzymes, resulting in the detection of two RFLP profiles with Msel. Southern analysis, utilizing two non-specific probes from other phytoplasma groups, revealed three RFLP profile types in anonymous chromosomal DNA of strains representing the four 16S rDNA genotypes. Two strains, AshY3 and LWB3, had unique combinations of characters in the various assays. On the basis of RFLP profiles, the strains from the other plants sampled comprised two groups. The grouping was not clearly related to host or geographic origin. The genome size of strain AshY3 was estimated from PFGE data to be 645 kbp. Phylogenetic analysis of a 1423 bp 16S rDNA sequence from strains AshY1T, AshY3, AshY5 and LWB3, together with sequences from 14 other mollicutes archived in GenBank, produced a tree on which the AshY and LWB strains clustered as a discrete group, consistent with previous analyses utilizing only type strain AshY1T. Thus, the AshY phytoplasma group is coherent but heterogeneous. The name 'Candidatus Phytoplasma fraxini' is proposed for this group.  (+info)

(2/18) Classification of aster yellows-group phytoplasmas based on combined analyses of rRNA and tuf gene sequences.

Seventy phytoplasma isolates, including 10 previously characterized reference strains, of the aster yellows group were examined by RFLP analysis of PCR-amplified rDNA and RFLP and sequence analysis of the tuf gene. On the basis of rDNA restriction profiles, seven previously proposed 16S rDNA subgroups (16SrI-A, -B, -C, -D, -E, -F and -K) were recognized in the material examined. In addition, three new subgroups that differ in the RFLP profiles were identified and designated 16SrI-L, 16SrI-M and 16SrI-N. Of the two types of rDNA sequences used, an 1800 bp fragment comprising the entire 16S rRNA gene and the 16S-23S rDNA spacer region proved more suitable for AY-group phytoplasma differentiation than a 1240 bp fragment of the 16S rRNA gene. Many differences in the rDNA profiles between the subgroups could be explained by sequence heterogeneity of the two phytoplasmal rRNA operons. The subgroups delineated by RFLP analysis of a 940 bp tuf gene fragment are consistent with subgroups defined on the basis of rDNA sequences. However, subgroups 16SrI-D, -L and -M showed the same tuf gene restriction profiles as subgroup 16SrI-B. This result was confirmed by sequence analysis in which these subgroups differed slightly in their tuf gene sequence, when compared with members of subgroup 16SrI-B. On the basis of combined analyses of rDNA and tuf gene sequences and in view of pathological aspects, the taxonomic distinction of AY-subgroups 16SrI-A, -B, -C, -D, -E, -F, -K and -N appears to be substantial.  (+info)

(3/18) The first phytoplasma RNase P RNA provides new insights into the sequence requirements of this ribozyme.

A high variability of RNase P RNA structures is seen among members of the Mycoplasma group. To gain further insight into the structure-function relations of this ribozyme, we have searched for the RNase P RNA gene from more distant relatives, the phytoplasmas. These mycoplasma-like organisms are the aetiological agents of many severe plant diseases. We report the sequence and catalytic properties of RNase P RNA from the phytoplasma causing apple proliferation disease. The primary and postulated secondary structure of this 443 nt long RNA are most similar to those of Acholeplasma, supporting the phylogenetic position of this pathogen. Remarkably, the extremely AT-rich (73.6%) phytoplasma RNA differs from the known bacterial consensus sequence by a single base pair, which is positioned close to the substrate cleavage site in current three-dimensional models. Phytoplasma RNase P RNA functions as an efficient ribozyme in vitro. Conversion of its sequence to the full consensus and kinetic analysis of the resulting mutant RNAs suggests that neither the sequence alone, nor the type of pairing at this position is crucial for substrate binding or catalysis by the RNase P ribozyme. These results refine the bacterial consensus structure close to the catalytic core and thus improve our understanding of RNase P RNA function.  (+info)

(4/18) 'Candidatus Phytoplasma brasiliense', a new phytoplasma taxon associated with hibiscus witches' broom disease.

Hibiscus rosa-sinensis is a valuable ornamental species widely planted in Brazil. Many plants are affected by witches' broom disease, which is characterized by excessive axillary branching, abnormally small leaves, and deformed flowers, symptoms that are characteristic of diseases attributed to phytoplasmas. A phytoplasma was detected in diseased Hibiscus by amplification of rRNA operon sequences by PCRs, and was characterized by RFLP and nucleotide sequence analyses of 16S rDNA. The collective RFLP patterns of amplified 16S rDNA differed from the patterns described previously for other phytoplasmas. On the basis of the RFLP patterns, the hibiscus witches' broom phytoplasma was classified in a new 16S rRNA RFLP group, designated group 16SrXV. A phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA sequences from this and other phytoplasmas identified the hibiscus witches' broom phytoplasma as a member of a distinct subclade (designated subclade xiv) of the class Mollicutes. A phylogenetic tree constructed on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences was consistent with the hypothesis that there was divergent evolution of hibiscus witches' broom phytoplasma and its closest relatives (members of 16S rRNA RFLP group 16SrII) from a common ancestor. On the basis of unique properties of the DNA from hibiscus witches' broom phytoplasma, it is proposed that it represents a new taxon, namely 'Candidatus Phytoplasma brasiliense'.  (+info)

(5/18) Cloning and expression analysis of Phytoplasma protein translocation genes.

Genes encoding SecA and SecY proteins, essential components of the Sec protein translocation system, were cloned from onion yellows phytoplasma, an unculturable plant pathogenic bacterium. The secA gene consists of 2,505 nucleotides encoding an 835 amino acid protein (95.7 kDa) and shows the highest similarity with SecA of Bacillus subtilis. Anti-SecA rabbit antibody was prepared from a purified partial SecA protein, with a histidine tag expressed in Escherichia coli. Western blot analysis confirmed that SecA protein (approximately 96 kDa) is produced in phytoplasma-infected plants. Immunohistochemical thin sections observed by optical microscopy showed that SecA is characteristically present in plant phloem tissues infected with phytoplasma. The secY gene consists of 1,239 nucleotides encoding a 413 amino acid protein (45.9 kDa) and shows the highest similarity with SecY of B. subtilis. These results suggest the presence of a functional Sec system in phytoplasmas. Because phytoplasmas are endocellular bacteria lacking cell walls, this system might secrete bacterial proteins directly into the host cytoplasm. This study is what we believe to be the first report of the sequence and expression analysis of phytoplasma genes encoding membrane proteins with a predicted function.  (+info)

(6/18) 'Candidatus Phytoplasma castaneae', a novel phytoplasma taxon associated with chestnut witches' broom disease.

In Korea, Japanese chestnut trees (Castanea crenata Sieb. and Zucc.) showing symptoms indicative of witches' broom disease, including abnormally small leaves and yellowing of young leaves, were examined. Since the symptoms were suggestive of a phytoplasma infection, tissues were assayed for phytoplasmas by PCR analysis using a pair of universal primers that amplify a 1.4-kbp phytoplasma 16S rDNA fragment. The phytoplasma-specific fragment was amplified from diseased plants, but not from healthy plants, indicating that a phytoplasma was the causal agent of the chestnut witches' broom (CnWB) disease. The phylogenetic relationship of the CnWB phytoplasma to other phytoplasmas was examined by sequence analysis of the 16S rDNA. A phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA sequences of the phytoplasmas placed the CnWB phytoplasma within a distinct subgroup in the phytoplasma clade of the class Mollicutes. The phylogenetic tree indicated that the CnWB phytoplasma is related most closely to coconut phytoplasmas and suggested that they share a common ancestor. The unique properties of the CnWB phytoplasma sequences clearly establish that it represents a novel taxon, 'Candidatus Phytoplasma castaneae'.  (+info)

(7/18) Identification of aster yellows phytoplasma in garlic and green onion by PCR-based methods.

In the summer of 1999, typical yellows-type symptoms were observed on garlic and green onion plants in a number of gardens and plots around Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. DNA was extracted from leaf tissues of evidently healthy and infected plants. DNA amplifications were conducted on these samples, using two primer pairs, R16F2n/R2 and R16(1)F1/R1, derived from phytoplasma rDNA sequences. DNA samples of aster yellows (AY), lime witches'-broom (LWB) and potato witches'-broom (PWB) phytoplasmas served as controls and were used to determine group relatedness. In a direct polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, DNA amplification with universal primer pair R16F2n/R2 gave the expected amplified products of 1.2 kb. Dilution (1/40) of each of the latter products were used as template and nested with specific primer pair R16(1)F1/R1. An expected PCR product of 1.1 kb was obtained from each phytoplasma-infected garlic and green onion samples, LWB and AY phytoplasmas but not from PWB phytoplasma. An aliquot from each amplification product (1.2 kb) with universal primers was subjected to PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) to identify phytoplasma isolates, using four restriction endonucleases (AluI, KpnI, MseI and RsaI). DNA amplification with specific primer pair R16(1)F1/R1 and RFLP analysis indicated the presence of AY phytoplasma in the infected garlic and green onion samples. These results suggest that AY phytoplasma in garlic and green onion samples belong to the subgroup 16Sr1-A.  (+info)

(8/18) 'Candidatus phytoplasma phoenicium' sp. nov., a novel phytoplasma associated with an emerging lethal disease of almond trees in Lebanon and Iran.

Almonds (Prunus amygdalus) represent an important crop in most Mediterranean countries. A new and devastating disease of almond trees in Lebanon was recently reported, characterized by the development of severe witches'-brooms on which no flowers or fruits developed, and leading to tree death within a few years. A phytoplasma was detected in diseased trees by PCR amplification of rRNA operon sequences, and RFLP patterns of amplified DNA indicated that the phytoplasma belonged to the pigeon pea witches'-broom (PPWB) group. In the present work, the presence of a phytoplasma in symptomatic plants was confirmed by electron microscopy; this phytoplasma was graft-transmissible to almond, plum and peach seedlings. The phytoplasma was characterized by sequence analysis of rRNA genes and was shown to be different from the phytoplasmas previously described in the PPWB group. A 16S rDNA phylogenetic tree identified the almond tree phytoplasma as a member of a distinct subclade of the class Mollicutes. Oligonucleotides have been defined for specific detection of the new phytoplasma. The almond phytoplasma from Lebanon was shown to be identical to a phytoplasma that induces a disease called 'almond brooming' in Iran, but different from another PPWB-group phytoplasma that infects herbaceous annual plants in Lebanon. Based on its unique properties, the name 'Candidatus Phytoplasma phoenicium' is proposed for the phytoplasma associated with almond witches'-broom in Lebanon and Iran.  (+info)

*  The mold, protozoan, and coelenterate mitochondrial code and the mycoplasma/spiroplasma code
... and the Acholeplasmataceae (Lim and Sears, 1992) and there seems to be only a single tRNA-CCA for tryptophan in Acholeplasma ...
*  Acholeplasmataceae
proposed in 1984 to elevate the family Acholeplasmataceae to the ordinal rank Acholeplasmatales, thus separating it from ... The Acholeplasmatales are an order in the class Mollicutes, containing only one family, Acholeplasmataceae, comprising the ... Proposal for elevation of the family Acholeplasmataceae to ordinal rank: Acholeplasmatales. Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol., 1984, 34 ... and the sterol-nonrequiring Acholeplasmataceae. In view of the many properties in which the acholeplasmas distinguish from ...
*  Candidatus Phytoplasma solani
Acholeplasmataceae 'Candidatus Phytoplasma solani', a novel taxon associated with stolbur- and bois noir-related diseases of ...
*  List of bacteria genera
Family Acholeplasmataceae Genus Acholeplasma Genus Phytoplasma (Candidatus) Family Fusobacteriaceae Genus Fusobacterium Species ...
*  List of MeSH codes (B03)
... acholeplasmataceae MeSH B03.440.560.074.150 --- Acholeplasma MeSH B03.440.560.074.150.500 --- Acholeplasma laidlawii MeSH ...
Acholeplasmataceae - oi  Acholeplasmataceae - oi
order Mycoplasmatales). A family of Gram-negative, chemo-organotrophic bacteria that do not require the presence of sterols (see steroid) for growth. Cells are spherical, pleomorphic, or filamentous. They are found as parasites in a variety of mammals and birds. There is 1 genus (Acholeplasma). ...
more infohttp://oxfordindex.oup.com/view/10.1093/oi/authority.20110803095347200
Acholeplasmataceae - Wikipedia  Acholeplasmataceae - Wikipedia
proposed in 1984 to elevate the family Acholeplasmataceae to the ordinal rank Acholeplasmatales, thus separating it from ... The Acholeplasmatales are an order in the class Mollicutes, containing only one family, Acholeplasmataceae, comprising the ... Proposal for elevation of the family Acholeplasmataceae to ordinal rank: Acholeplasmatales. Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol., 1984, 34 ... and the sterol-nonrequiring Acholeplasmataceae. In view of the many properties in which the acholeplasmas distinguish from ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acholeplasmataceae
amyA2 - Alpha-amylase - Acholeplasma laidlawii (strain PG-8A) - amyA2 gene & protein  amyA2 - Alpha-amylase - Acholeplasma laidlawii (strain PG-8A) - amyA2 gene & protein
cellular organisms › Bacteria › Terrabacteria group › Tenericutes › Mollicutes › Acholeplasmatales › Acholeplasmataceae › ...
more infohttps://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/A9NFZ4
Western Australian Organism List | Agriculture and Food  Western Australian Organism List | Agriculture and Food
Family: Acholeplasmataceae. Declared Pest, Prohibited - s12 (C1 Prohibited). Synonym: Phytoplasma Peach X-disease phytoplasma. ... Family: Acholeplasmataceae. Declared Pest, Prohibited - s12 (C1 Prohibited). Common name: apple proliferation phytoplasma (main ... Family: Acholeplasmataceae. Declared Pest, Prohibited - s12 (C1 Prohibited). Synonyms: Candidatus Phytoplasma prunorum ( ...
more infohttps://www.agric.wa.gov.au/organisms?search_string=%2A&%3Bamp%3Bref_code_name=PRO&%3Bamp%3Bregion=90&%3Bregion=136®ion=129&per-page=20&sort-by=taxon&order-by=asc&classification=2
Prokaryota - Wikispecies  Prokaryota - Wikispecies
Family Acholeplasmataceae [II] *Genus Acholeplasma [I]. *Family Mycoplasmataceae [I] *Genus Mycoplasma [I] ...
more infohttps://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Prokaryota
CAZy - Bacteria  CAZy - Bacteria
Lineage: cellular organisms; Bacteria; Terrabacteria group; Tenericutes; Mollicutes; Acholeplasmatales; Acholeplasmataceae; ...
more infohttp://www.cazy.org/b677.html
Acholeplasma modicum  Acholeplasma modicum
Bacteria; Tenericutes; Mollicutes; Acholeplasmatales; Acholeplasmataceae; Acholeplasma. Industrial uses or economic ...
more infohttp://thelabrat.com/protocols/Bacterialspecies/Acholeplasmamodicum.shtml
Acholeplasma multilocale  Acholeplasma multilocale
Bacteria; Tenericutes; Mollicutes; Acholeplasmatales; Acholeplasmataceae; Acholeplasma. Industrial uses or economic ...
more infohttp://thelabrat.com/protocols/Bacterialspecies/Acholeplasmamultilocale.shtml
Western Australian Organism List | Agriculture and Food  Western Australian Organism List | Agriculture and Food
Family: Acholeplasmataceae. Declared Pest, Prohibited - s12 (C1 Prohibited). Synonym: Phytoplasma Peach X-disease phytoplasma. ... Family: Acholeplasmataceae. Declared Pest, Prohibited - s12 (C1 Prohibited). Common name: apple proliferation phytoplasma (main ... Family: Acholeplasmataceae. Declared Pest, Prohibited - s12 (C1 Prohibited). Synonyms: Candidatus Phytoplasma prunorum ( ...
more infohttps://www.agric.wa.gov.au/organisms?search_string=%2A&%3Bamp%3Bregion=132%2C28&%3Bregion=17®ion=106%2C73%2C120&classification=2
JGI GOLD | Project  JGI GOLD | Project
Genome Determination and Analysis of Acholeplasma oculi Highlights Loss of Basic Genetic Features in the Acholeplasmataceae. ...
more infohttps://gold.jgi.doe.gov/project?id=95589
Acholeplasma oculi | Article about Acholeplasma oculi by The Free Dictionary  Acholeplasma oculi | Article about Acholeplasma oculi by The Free Dictionary
The single genus of the family Acholeplasmataceae, comprising spherical and filamentous cells Explanation of Acholeplasma oculi ... The single genus of the family Acholeplasmataceae, comprising spherical and filamentous cells. ...
more infohttps://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Acholeplasma+oculi
The Genetic Codes  The Genetic Codes
This code is not used in the Acholeplasmataceae and plant-pathogenic mycoplasma-like organisms (MLO) (Lim and Sears, 1992) 5. ...
more infohttp://www.bioinformatics.org/JaMBW/2/3/TranslationTables.html
MetaMIS: a metagenomic microbial interaction simulator based on microbial community profiles | BMC Bioinformatics | Full Text  MetaMIS: a metagenomic microbial interaction simulator based on microbial community profiles | BMC Bioinformatics | Full Text
The complexity and dynamics of microbial communities are major factors in the ecology of a system. With the NGS technique, metagenomics data provides a new way to explore microbial interactions. Lotka-Volterra models, which have been widely used to infer animal interactions in dynamic systems, have recently been applied to the analysis of metagenomic data. In this paper, we present the Lotka-Volterra model based tool, the Metagenomic Microbial Interacticon Simulator (MetaMIS), which is designed to analyze the time series data of microbial community profiles. MetaMIS first infers underlying microbial interactions from abundance tables for operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and then interprets interaction networks using the Lotka-Volterra model. We also embed a Bray-Curtis dissimilarity method in MetaMIS in order to evaluate the similarity to biological reality. MetaMIS is designed to tolerate a high level of missing data, and can estimate interaction information without the influence of rare microbes.
more infohttps://bmcbioinformatics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12859-016-1359-0
Onion yellows phytoplasma (strain OY-M)  Onion yellows phytoplasma (strain OY-M)
Bacteria; Tenericutes; Mollicutes; Acholeplasmatales; Acholeplasmataceae; Candidatus Phytoplasma; Candidatus Phytoplasma ...
more infohttps://omabrowser.org/cgi-bin/gateway.pl?f=DisplayOS&p1=ONYPE
Acholeplasmatales  Acholeplasmatales
Note: In violation of Rules 15 and 21a, Freundt et al. 1984 designate also a type family, Acholeplasmataceae Edward and Freundt ... Proposal for elevation of the family Acholeplasmataceae to ordinal rank: Acholeplasmatales. Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol., 1984, 34 ...
more infohttp://www.bacterio.net/acholeplasmatales.html
Candidatus Phytoplasma solani - Wikipedia  Candidatus Phytoplasma solani - Wikipedia
Acholeplasmataceae 'Candidatus Phytoplasma solani', a novel taxon associated with stolbur- and bois noir-related diseases of ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Candidatus_Phytoplasma_solani
in Taxonomy  in Taxonomy
Bacteria › Tenericutes › Mollicutes › Acholeplasmatales › Acholeplasmataceae › Candidatus Phytoplasma. 1 to 25 of 1,930,966 ...
more infohttp://ebi3.uniprot.org/taxonomy/
Acholeplasma | Article about Acholeplasma by The Free Dictionary  Acholeplasma | Article about Acholeplasma by The Free Dictionary
The single genus of the family Acholeplasmataceae, comprising spherical and filamentous cells Explanation of Acholeplasma ... The single genus of the family Acholeplasmataceae, comprising spherical and filamentous cells. ...
more infohttps://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Acholeplasma
Unique core genomes of the bacterial family vibrionaceae: Insights into niche adaptation and speciation  Unique core genomes of the bacterial family vibrionaceae: Insights into niche adaptation and speciation
... highlighting the loss of basic genetic features in the Acholeplasmataceae.. Siewert C, Hess WR, Duduk B, Huettel B, Reinhardt R ...
more infohttps://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/publication/2500959