An organism originally isolated from sewage, manure, humus, and soil, but recently found as a parasite in mammals and birds.
A genus of gram-negative organisms including saprophytic and parasitic or pathogenic species.
A genus of gram-negative, mostly facultatively anaerobic bacteria in the family MYCOPLASMATACEAE. The cells are bounded by a PLASMA MEMBRANE and lack a true CELL WALL. Its organisms are pathogens found on the MUCOUS MEMBRANES of humans, ANIMALS, and BIRDS.
An order of highly pleomorphic, gram-negative bacteria including both pathogenic and saprophytic species.
A phylum of gram-negative bacteria consisting of cells bounded by a plasma membrane. Its organisms differ from other bacteria in that they are devoid of cell walls. This phylum was formerly the class Mollicutes. Mollicutes is now the sole class in the phylum Tenericutes.
A genus of gram-negative, helical bacteria, in the family SPIROPLASMATACEAE, order Entomoplasmatales, causing disease in PLANTS. It has been isolated from TICKS; INSECTS; and PLANTS.
Lipids, predominantly phospholipids, cholesterol and small amounts of glycolipids found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. These lipids may be arranged in bilayers in the membranes with integral proteins between the layers and peripheral proteins attached to the outside. Membrane lipids are required for active transport, several enzymatic activities and membrane formation.
Any compound containing one or more monosaccharide residues bound by a glycosidic linkage to a hydrophobic moiety such as an acylglycerol (see GLYCERIDES), a sphingoid, a ceramide (CERAMIDES) (N-acylsphingoid) or a prenyl phosphate. (From IUPAC's webpage)
A genus of gram-negative, nonmotile bacteria which are common parasitic inhabitants of the urogenital tracts of humans, cattle, dogs, and monkeys.
Viruses whose hosts are bacterial cells.
A plant genus of the family APOCYNACEAE. Vinca rosea has been changed to CATHARANTHUS roseus.
Ribose substituted in the 1-, 3-, or 5-position by a phosphoric acid moiety.
The etiological agent of contagious pleuropneumonia (PLEUROPNEUMONIA, CONTAGIOUS) of cattle and goats.
A nitrogen-free class of lipids present in animal and particularly plant tissues and composed of one mole of glycerol and 1 or 2 moles of phosphatidic acid. Members of this group differ from one another in the nature of the fatty acids released on hydrolysis.

Detection of serum proteins in the electrophoretic patterns of total proteins of mycoplasma cells. (1/194)

The contamination of mycoplasma cell preparations by serum proteins originating from culture medium was studied. A. laidlawii and M. arthritidis cells were grown in the presence of [14C]-aminoacids, and the cells were washed with 0-9% NaC1 by threefold centrifugation. Total proteins of the washed cells were analysed by SDS gel electrophoresis. Coomassie-stained electrophoretic patterns were compared with autoradiographs of the same gels. The stained electrophoretic pattern of washed A. laidlawii grown without serum was identical with autoradiographs of the same cells grown without or with serum. That of washed A. laidlawii grown with serum differed from the corresponding autoradiography by the presence of extra protein bands I, II, III, and IV with molecular weights of over 160,000, 80,000-87,000, 55,000 and 25,000, respectively. The same extra bands were found in stained electrophoretic patterns of washed: (a) A. laidlawii cells grown without serum and mixed with serum in the stationary phase, (b) M. arthritidis cells, as compared with their autoradiographs, (c) serum precipitate. The bands III and IV may be due to the heavy and light chains of gamma-globulin, the band II might belong to transferrin or to some component of complement. Acidification of serum to pH 5 brought about 100-fold rise of amount of serum precipitate, the number of bands in the electrophoretic pattern of the precipitate being also increased. Stained electrophoretic patterns of cells purified by twofold centrifugation in step sucrose density gradient (1-20-1-27 g./cm.3 for A. laidlawii, and 1-15-1-25 for M. arthritidis) contained no extra bands and matched completely with their autoradiographs. It was concluded that contamination of washed mycoplasma cells by serum proteins is mainly due to co-precipitation of aggregated serum proteins together with cells during centrifugation rather than to adsorption of serum proteins on the cell surface.  (+info)

Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein inhibits growth of a strain of Acholeplasma laidlawii and L forms of the gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. (2/194)

Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) inhibited growth of cell wall-deficient Acholeplasma laidlawii and L forms of certain strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. However, the same strains of S. aureus and S. pyogenes with intact cell walls were not susceptible to the growth-inhibitory effects of BPI.  (+info)

Replication of mycoplasmavirus MVL51: attachment of MVL51 parental DNA to host cell membrane. (3/194)

The replication of the single-stranded circular DNA of MVL51 mycoplasmavirus has been studied with respect to the roles of free and membrane-associated viral DNA intermediates. Replication involves the formation of parental replicative intermediate (RF) molecules on, at most, two to three membrane sites per cell, symmetric RF replication at the membrane and apparent asymmetric RF replication in the cytoplasm leading to single-stranded progeny chromosomes.  (+info)

The nonbilayer/bilayer lipid balance in membranes. Regulatory enzyme in Acholeplasma laidlawii is stimulated by metabolic phosphates, activator phospholipids, and double-stranded DNA. (4/194)

In membranes of Acholeplasma laidlawii a single glucosyltransferase step between the major, nonbilayer-prone monoglucosyl-diacylglycerol (MGlcDAG) and the bilayer-forming diglucosyl-diacylglycerol (DGlcDAG) is important for maintenance of lipid phase equilibria and curvature packing stress. This DGlcDAG synthase is activated in a cooperative fashion by phosphatidylglycerol (PG), but in vivo PG amounts are not enough for efficient DGlcDAG synthesis. In vitro, phospholipids with an sn-glycero-3-phosphate backbone, and no positive head group charge, functioned as activators. Different metabolic, soluble phosphates could supplement PG for activation, depending on type, amount, and valency. Especially efficient were the glycolytic intermediates fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and ATP, active at cellular concentrations on the DGlcDAG but not on the preceding MGlcDAG synthase. Potencies of different phosphatidylinositol (foreign lipid) derivatives differed with numbers and positions of their phosphate moieties. A selective stimulation of the DGlcDAG, but not the MGlcDAG synthase, by minor amounts of double-stranded DNA was additive to the best phospholipid activators. These results support two types of activator sites on the enzyme: (i) lipid-phosphate ones close to the membrane interphase, and (ii) soluble (or particulate)-phosphate ones further out from the surface. Thereby, the nonbilayer (MGlcDAG) to bilayer (DGlcDAG) lipid balance may be integrated with the metabolic status of the cell and potentially also to membrane and cell division.  (+info)

Binding of glycoglycerolipid derived from membranes of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8 and synthetic analogues to lymphoid cells. (5/194)

A component that binds to human lymphoid cells was isolated from the membranes of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8. The component was extracted using the Bligh-Dyer method and purified using a silica-gel column and TLC. The active component was identified as 3-O:-[2'-O-(alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)- 6'-O-acyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl]-1,2-di-O- acyl-sn-glycerol (GAGDG) using (1)H- and (13)C-NMR and GC-MS. The compositions of the major saturated fatty acids were nC (14) (17.8%), isoC(14) (10.7%) and nC (16) (34.9%) as determined by GC-MS. The amounts of unsaturated species were less than 10% of those of the corresponding saturated acids. GAGDGs which have three tetradecanoyl groups were synthesized. These synthetic GAGDGs, as well as GAGDGs derived from A. laidlawii membranes, had a high binding affinity for MOLT-4 and HUT-78 (human T cell lines), Raji (a B cell line), HL-60 (a monoblastoid cell line) and primary cultured human T cells. The binding affinities of GAGDGs with an isoC(14) acyl group was higher than those with nC(14) and nC(16) acyl groups. The binding to lymphoid cells reveals a novel biological activity of GAGDGs.  (+info)

Survival of frozen mycoplasmas. (6/194)

Cooling to -70 C killed a higher percentage of Acholeplasma laidlawii and Mycoplasma mycoides var. capri cells than cooling to -20 C. However, to preserve cell viability for prolonged periods storage at -70 C was much more preferable. The percentage of cells surviving freezing could be increased by increasing the initial cell concentration or by the addition of dimethyl sulfoxide or glycerol as cryoprotective agents. In the presence of 1.5 M of any one of these agents survival rates of up to 100% could be obtained. The optimal cooling rates for maximal survival of A. laidlawii under the experimental conditions tested were 11 C/min for cooling to -20 C and about 15 C/min for cooling to -70 C. Increasing the warming rate during thawing from 0.6 to 67 C/min increased survival by 3 log. Oleic acid enrichment of A. laidlawii membrane lipids, or reduction in the cholesterol content of M. mycoides var. capri membranes, increased the percentage of organisms surviving freezing. Hence, the composition of membrane lipids appears to have a marked influence on the susceptibility of mycoplasmas to freezing injury.  (+info)

Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidase activity in membranes and cytoplasm of Acholeplasma laidlawii and Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri. (7/194)

The properties of the membrane-bound reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) oxidase of Acholeplasma laidlawii were compared with those of the corresponding cytoplasmic activity of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri. The striking differences in pH optima, susceptibility to inhibitors and detergents, and heat inactivation between the NADH oxidase activity, with oxygen as an electron acceptor, and the NADH oxidoreductase activity, with dichlorophenol indophenol (DCPIP) as an alternate electron acceptor, support the presence of more than one catalytic protein in both the membrane-bound and soluble enzyme systems. The detection of more than one band positive for the NADH-nitroblue tetrazolium oxidoreductase reaction on electrophoresis of either the membranes of A. laidlawii or the cytoplasm of M mycoides subsp. capri also points in the same direction. The membrane-bound enzyme system differed, however, form the soluble one because it had a lower ratio of oxidase activity to oxidoreductase activity, and because it was less susceptible to heat inactivation and more readily incorporated incorporated into reaggregated membranes. In addition, the specific activity of the membrane-bound enzyme system increased as the culture aged, whereas that of the soluble system decreased as the culture aged. It is suggested that the different location in the cell could be responsible for some of the differences between the membrane-bound NADH oxidase activity of A. laidlawii and that found in the cytoplasm of M. mycoides subsp. capri.  (+info)

Microcalorimetric detection of growth of Mycoplasmatales. (8/194)

A static ampoule microcalorimeter was used to study the growth of mycoplasmas, acholeplasmas and ureaplasmas. Growth as indicated by thermograms was compared with the results of conventional methods, namely, terminal dilution counts, plate counts, turbidimetric measurements, glucose consumption and pH changes. Removal of oxygen had little effect on mycoplasma growth. The microcalorimetric method is potentially useful for identifying and enumerating the members of the Mycoplasmatales.  (+info)

*Acholeplasma laidlawii* is a species of bacteria that belongs to the class Mollicutes. It is a wall-less, pleomorphic organism that can exist in various shapes such as coccoid, rod-like, or filamentous. This bacterium is commonly found in the environment, including water, soil, and plants, and can also be part of the normal microbiota of animals, including humans.

*Acholeplasma laidlawii* is an obligate parasite, meaning it requires a host to survive and reproduce. It is typically associated with causing opportunistic infections in immunocompromised individuals or as a contaminant in laboratory settings. This bacterium can be difficult to culture and identify due to its small size and lack of a cell wall.

It's worth noting that *Acholeplasma laidlawii* is not considered a significant human pathogen, and infections caused by this organism are rare and usually mild. However, it has been used as a model organism in various research studies, including those investigating the mechanisms of bacterial cell division, membrane composition, and interactions with host cells.

Acholeplasma is a genus of bacteria that are characterized by their lack of a cell wall and their ability to grow in the absence of cholesterol, which is required for the growth of related genera such as Mycoplasma. These organisms are commonly found in various environments, including water, soil, and animals, and can cause opportunistic infections in humans and other animals.

Acholeplasma species are small, pleomorphic bacteria that lack a cell wall and therefore do not stain with Gram's stain. They are typically spherical or coccoid in shape, but can also appear as rods or filaments. These organisms are resistant to many antibiotics due to their lack of a cell wall and the absence of a peptidoglycan layer.

In humans, Acholeplasma species have been associated with respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, and bloodstream infections, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. However, these organisms are often considered to be commensals or colonizers rather than true pathogens, as they can also be found in healthy individuals without causing any symptoms.

Overall, Acholeplasma species are important bacteria that can cause opportunistic infections in humans and other animals, but their role in health and disease is still not fully understood.

Mycoplasma: A type of bacteria that lack a cell wall and are among the smallest organisms capable of self-replication. They can cause various infections in humans, animals, and plants. In humans, they are associated with respiratory tract infections (such as pneumonia), urogenital infections (like pelvic inflammatory disease), and some sexually transmitted diseases. Mycoplasma species are also known to contaminate cell cultures and can interfere with research experiments. Due to their small size and lack of a cell wall, they are resistant to many common antibiotics, making them difficult to treat.

Mycoplasmatales is an order of bacteria that lack a cell wall and are characterized by their small size and simple genome. They are commonly found in various environments, including the human body, where they can be part of the normal flora or associated with diseases. The order Mycoplasmatales contains several genera, including Mycoplasma, Ureaplasma, and Acholeplasma, among others. These bacteria can cause a variety of infections, such as respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, and sexually transmitted diseases. Due to their small size and lack of a cell wall, they can be resistant to many antibiotics, making them difficult to treat in some cases.

Tenericutes is a taxonomic class of bacteria that lack a cell wall and have a reduced genome. They were previously classified as a subphylum within the phylum Firmicutes but are now considered a separate phylum. The most well-known member of this group is the genus Mycoplasma, which includes several species that can cause diseases in humans, animals, and plants.

Mycoplasmas are known for their small size, simple structure, and ability to exist as parasites or commensals in various host organisms. They lack a cell wall, which makes them resistant to many antibiotics that target the cell wall synthesis of other bacteria. Mycoplasma species can cause a variety of diseases, including respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, and sexually transmitted infections in humans. In animals, they can cause pneumonia, mastitis, and arthritis, among other conditions.

It's worth noting that the classification of Tenericutes has been debated, as some researchers argue that they should be considered a group of wall-less bacteria rather than a distinct phylum. Nonetheless, Tenericutes remains a widely recognized and studied taxonomic class in bacteriology.

Spiroplasma is a genus of wall-less, helical-shaped bacteria belonging to the class Mollicutes. These microorganisms lack a cell wall and have a unique method of movement through a characteristic corkscrew-like motion. Spiroplasmas are primarily known as insect symbionts, often living within the cells of their hosts without causing apparent disease. However, some species can be pathogenic to insects, plants, and even animals, including humans. They are transmitted through insect vectors or via plant sap.

In medical contexts, Spiroplasma spp. have been associated with certain animal diseases, such as citrus stubborn disease in plants and bruscellosis-like syndrome in sheep and goats. In humans, there is some evidence suggesting that Spiroplasma may be involved in the development of arthritis, although more research is needed to establish a definitive link.

To diagnose Spiroplasma infections, specific molecular techniques such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction) or serological methods like ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) are typically employed. Treatment options for Spiroplasma infections are limited due to their atypical cell structure and resistance to many antibiotics, but tetracyclines have shown some efficacy in treating these infections.

Membrane lipids are the main component of biological membranes, forming a lipid bilayer in which various cellular processes take place. These lipids include phospholipids, glycolipids, and cholesterol. Phospholipids are the most abundant type, consisting of a hydrophilic head (containing a phosphate group) and two hydrophobic tails (composed of fatty acid chains). Glycolipids contain a sugar group attached to the lipid molecule. Cholesterol helps regulate membrane fluidity and permeability. Together, these lipids create a selectively permeable barrier that separates cells from their environment and organelles within cells.

Glycolipids are a type of lipid (fat) molecule that contain one or more sugar molecules attached to them. They are important components of cell membranes, where they play a role in cell recognition and signaling. Glycolipids are also found on the surface of some viruses and bacteria, where they can be recognized by the immune system as foreign invaders.

There are several different types of glycolipids, including cerebrosides, gangliosides, and globosides. These molecules differ in the number and type of sugar molecules they contain, as well as the structure of their lipid tails. Glycolipids are synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus of cells, and they are transported to the cell membrane through vesicles.

Abnormalities in glycolipid metabolism or structure have been implicated in a number of diseases, including certain types of cancer, neurological disorders, and autoimmune diseases. For example, mutations in genes involved in the synthesis of glycolipids can lead to conditions such as Tay-Sachs disease and Gaucher's disease, which are characterized by the accumulation of abnormal glycolipids in cells.

Ureaplasma is a genus of bacteria that are commonly found in the lower reproductive tract of humans. They belong to the family Mycoplasmataceae and are characterized by their small size and lack of a cell wall. Ureaplasmas are unique because they have the ability to metabolize urea, which they use as a source of energy for growth.

There are several species of Ureaplasma that can infect humans, including Ureaplasma urealyticum and Ureaplasma parvum. These bacteria can cause a variety of clinical syndromes, particularly in individuals with compromised immune systems or underlying respiratory or genitourinary tract disorders.

Infections caused by Ureaplasma are often asymptomatic but can lead to complications such as urethritis, cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, and pneumonia. In newborns, Ureaplasma infections have been associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, a chronic lung disorder that can lead to long-term respiratory problems.

Diagnosis of Ureaplasma infections typically involves the use of nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Treatment usually consists of antibiotics such as macrolides or fluoroquinolones, which are effective against these bacteria.

Bacteriophages, often simply called phages, are viruses that infect and replicate within bacteria. They consist of a protein coat, called the capsid, that encases the genetic material, which can be either DNA or RNA. Bacteriophages are highly specific, meaning they only infect certain types of bacteria, and they reproduce by hijacking the bacterial cell's machinery to produce more viruses.

Once a phage infects a bacterium, it can either replicate its genetic material and create new phages (lytic cycle), or integrate its genetic material into the bacterial chromosome and replicate along with the bacterium (lysogenic cycle). In the lytic cycle, the newly formed phages are released by lysing, or breaking open, the bacterial cell.

Bacteriophages play a crucial role in shaping microbial communities and have been studied as potential alternatives to antibiotics for treating bacterial infections.

"Vinca" is not a medical term itself, but it refers to a group of plants that belong to the genus Vinca or the family Apocynaceae. Some species of Vinca are used in medicine and are known as "vinca alkaloids." These alkaloids include vincristine and vinblastine, which have been isolated from the Madagascar periwinkle (Vinca rosea) plant.

Vincristine and vinblastine are antimicrotubule agents that disrupt microtubule function during mitosis, leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis (programmed cell death). They have been used in the treatment of various types of cancer, including leukemias, lymphomas, and testicular cancer.

Therefore, when referring to "Vinca" in a medical context, it typically means the use of vinca alkaloids as anticancer agents.

Ribose monophosphates are organic compounds that play a crucial role in the metabolism of cells, particularly in energy transfer and nucleic acid synthesis. A ribose monophosphate is formed by the attachment of a phosphate group to a ribose molecule, which is a type of sugar known as a pentose.

In biochemistry, there are two important ribose monophosphates:

1. Alpha-D-Ribose 5-Phosphate (ADP-Ribose): This compound serves as an essential substrate in various cellular processes, including DNA repair, chromatin remodeling, and protein modification. The enzyme that catalyzes the formation of ADP-ribose is known as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP).
2. Ribulose 5-Phosphate: This compound is a key intermediate in the Calvin cycle, which is the process by which plants and some bacteria convert carbon dioxide into glucose during photosynthesis. Ribulose 5-phosphate is formed from ribose 5-phosphate through a series of enzymatic reactions.

Ribose monophosphates are essential for the proper functioning of cells and have implications in various physiological processes, as well as in certain disease states.

"Mycoplasma mycoides" is a species of bacteria that lack a cell wall and are characterized by their small size. They are part of the class Mollicutes and are known to cause various diseases in animals, particularly ruminants such as cattle, goats, and sheep. The most well-known disease caused by M. mycoides is contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP), a severe and highly contagious respiratory disease in cattle that can lead to pneumonia, pleurisy, and death.

M. mycoides has been the subject of scientific research due to its small genome size and minimal genetic requirements for growth and survival. In fact, it was the first species of Mycoplasma to have its genome fully sequenced, and it has been used as a model organism in synthetic biology studies.

It's important to note that M. mycoides is not known to cause disease in humans. However, other species of Mycoplasma can cause respiratory and urogenital infections in humans.

Phosphatidylglycerols are a type of glycerophospholipids, which are major components of biological membranes. They are composed of a glycerol backbone to which two fatty acid chains and a phosphate group are attached. In the case of phosphatidylglycerols, the phosphate group is linked to a glycerol molecule through an ester bond, forming a phosphoglyceride.

Phosphatidylglycerols are unique because they have an additional glycerol molecule attached to the phosphate group, making them more complex than other glycerophospholipids such as phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine. This additional glycerol moiety can be further modified by the addition of various headgroups, leading to the formation of different subclasses of phosphatidylglycerols.

In biological membranes, phosphatidylglycerols are often found in the inner leaflet of the mitochondrial membrane and play important roles in maintaining the structure and function of this organelle. They have also been implicated in various cellular processes such as membrane fusion, protein trafficking, and bacterial cell wall biosynthesis.

... are small bacteria which lack a cell wall. Like other Acholeplasma and Mycoplasma, A. laidlawii has been ... Type strain of Acholeplasma laidlawii at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase A. laidlawii genome sequence from NCBI ... Additionally its genome has a low GC-content of just 31%. The A. laidlawii genome has been sequenced. Acholeplasma laidlawii ... Windsor HM; Windsor GD; Noordergraaf JH (March 2010). "The growth and long term survival of Acholeplasma laidlawii in media ...
Tryon VV, Pollack D (1984). "Purine metabolism in Acholeplasma laidlawii B: novel PPi-dependent nucleoside kinase activity". J ...
"Genomic and proteomic profiles of Acholeplasma laidlawii strains differing in sensitivity to ciprofloxacin." Doklady ...
"Correlation between bilayer lipid dynamics and activity of the diglucosyldiacylglycerol synthase from Acholeplasma laidlawii ...
... laidlawii is a common contaminant of cell culture media products, and has also been used in extensive studies of ... Windsor, Helena M.; Windsor, G. David; Noordergraaf, J.H. (2010). "The growth and long term survival of Acholeplasma laidlawii ... The G+C content is low, ranging from 26 - 36% (mol%). The genomes of Acholeplasma species range in size from 1.5 to 1.65 Mbp. ... Acholeplasma are wall-less bacteria in the Mollicutes class. They include saprotrophic or pathogenic species. There are 15 ...
1983). "Intraspecies Genetic Relatedness among Strains of Acholeplasma laidlawii and of Acholeplasma axanthum by Nucleic Acid ... The family comprises the genera Acholeplasma and Phytoplasma. Phytoplasma has the candidatus status, because members still ... Freundt Amended nomenclature for strains related to Mycoplasma laidlawii.; J Gen Microbiol. 1970 Jul; 62; PDF Stephens; et al ... "Proposal for Classifying Organisms Related to Mycoplasma laidlawii in a Family Sapromycetaceae, Genus Sapromyces, within the ...
Mycoplasmatales virus-laidlawii 3 (L3) Mycoplasmatales virus-laidlawii 51 (L51) Mycoplasmatales virus-laidlawii O1 (O1) The ... Acholeplasma species serve as natural hosts. There is one genus in the family, Plasmavirus, which contains one species: ... There are five tentative members of Plasmavirus: Mycoplasmatales virus-laidlawii 1 (L1) Mycoplasmatales virus-laidlawii 2 (L2) ... Acholeplasma species serve as the natural host. A productive infectious cycle begins before a lysogenic cycle establishes the ...
Acholeplasma MeSH B03.440.560.074.150.500 - Acholeplasma laidlawii MeSH B03.440.560.074.575 - Phytoplasma MeSH B03.440.560.112 ...
Acholeplasma laidlawii are small bacteria which lack a cell wall. Like other Acholeplasma and Mycoplasma, A. laidlawii has been ... Type strain of Acholeplasma laidlawii at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase A. laidlawii genome sequence from NCBI ... Additionally its genome has a low GC-content of just 31%. The A. laidlawii genome has been sequenced. Acholeplasma laidlawii ... Windsor HM; Windsor GD; Noordergraaf JH (March 2010). "The growth and long term survival of Acholeplasma laidlawii in media ...
Acholeplasma laidlawiiAcholeplasmaMycoplasmaMycoplasmatalesTenericutesSpiroplasmaUreaplasmaBacteriophagesVincaMycoplasma ...
Acholeplasma laidlawii + Pseudomonas aeruginosa - Mycoplasma fermentans + Staphylococcus aureus - Mycoplasma arginini + ... Acholeplasma & Mycoplasma strains detected by MycoStrip™. MycoStrip™ has been specifically designed to detect Mycoplasma and ... MycoStrip™ has been specifically designed to detect the Mycoplasma and Acholeplasma species that most commonly contaminate cell ... laidlawii. Importantly, because the MycoStrip™ reaction mix detects unique regions of DNA there is no cross‑reactivity with ...
However, five species (Mycoplasma [M.] arginini, M. fermentans, M. orale, M. hyorhinis and Acholeplasma laidlawii) are isolated ... Mycoplasma and Acholeplasma. Mycoplasma and Acholeplasma are genera that comprise more than 100 recognized species in the class ... laidlawii) or porcine trypsin (M. hyorhinis). Once an area has become contaminated, the mycoplasmas can spread by aerosol ...
... and there seems to be only a single tRNA-CCA for tryptophan in Acholeplasma laidlawii (Tanaka et al. 1989). In contrast, in a ...
... production of intracellular membrane vesicles in Escherichia coli can be triggered by expression of Acholeplasma laidlawii ...
Acholeplasma laidlawii. *Bordetella pertussis. *Borrelia burgdorferi. *Brucella abortus. *Campylobacter jejuni. *Chlamydia ...
Acholeplasma laidlawii. Aeropyrum pernix K1. Aquifex aeolicus VF5. Archaeoglobus fulgidus DSM 4304. Avian myeloblastosis virus ...
Acholeplasma laidlawii (1) * Mycoplasma synoviae (1) Filter by product attributes Additional Required Components ...
0.1 μm Acholeplasma laidlawii. 0.2μm Brevundimonas diminuta. 0.45μm Serratia marcescens. 0.8μm Lactobacillus species. 1μm ...
Presence of protein constituents of the gram-positive bacterial phosphotransferase regulatory system in Acholeplasma laidlawii ...
Acholeplasma laidlawii PG-8A chromosome, complete genome. tRNA uridine 5-carboxymethylaminomethyl modification enzyme GidA. 3e- ...
Acholeplasma laidlawii/química , Acholeplasma laidlawii/metabolismo , Proteínas de Escherichia coli/metabolismo , Proteínas ... The phytopathogenic Acholeplasma laidlawii possesses only a single sHSP, AlIbpA. Here, we demonstrate non-trivial features of ... The Functionality of IbpA from Acholeplasma laidlawii Is Governed by Dynamic Rearrangement of Its Globular-Fibrillar Quaternary ... Our results show that the efficiency of the A. laidlawii multi-chaperone system is driven with the ability of AlIbpA to form ...
Acholeplasma laidlawii] 79 5e-13 gi,15679295,ref,NP_276412.1, DnaJ protein [Methanothermobacter t... 79 7e-13 gi,50751414,ref, ...
The Acholeplasma Laidlawii Na2+Mg2-ATPase (R.N. McElhaney). Vacuolar H+-ATPase (N. Nelson). The F0F1 ATP Synthase: Structures ... ATPase of Acholeplasma. Finally, eukaryotic systems contain a variety of ectonucleotidases important, for example, in ...
1993). Evidence for Two Pools of Cholesterol in the Acholeplasma laidlawii Strain B Membrane: A Deuterium NMR and DSC Study. ... 1992). Influence of Lipid Composition on the Orientational Order in Acholeplasma laidlawii Strain B Membranes: A Deuterium NMR ... 1976). Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Acholeplasma Laidlawii Cell Membranes and Derived Liposomes. Biochim. Biophys. ...
Extracellular membrane vesicles secreted by mycoplasma Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8 are enriched in virulence proteins. J Proteom ...
... orale and Acholeplasma laidlawii. Binding specificities of MAbs and rabbit antibodies to the immunized antigens were confirmed ... Among the established MAbs and rabbit anti-mycoplasmas, MAb MH03 against M. hyorhinis, and rabbit anti-A. laidlawii showed high ... We constructed a sandwich ELISA using MH03 as capture, horse radish peroxidase labeled rabbit anti-A. laidlawii as detector, ... and could detect M.arginini with the detection limit of 0.5 ㎍/ml and M. hyorhinis, M. orale and A. laidlawii with the detection ...
... hyorhinis and Acholeplasma laidlawii. It is commonly used in tissue culture, where it requires incubation for a week after ...
Analysis of the Complete Genomes of Acholeplasma brassicae, A. palmae and A. laidlawii and Their Comparison to the Obligate ... Complete genome determination and analysis of Acholeplasma oculi strain 19L, highlighting the loss of basic genetic features in ...
Nakagawa T., Uemori T., Asada K., Kato I., Harasawa R. Acholeplasma laidlawii has tRNA genes in the 16S-23S spacer of the rRNA ...
... coding for DNA gyrase from the mycoplasma Acholeplasma laidlawii PG-8B. Molekuliarnaia Biologiia 34(2): 292-299 ...
Acholeplasma Acholeplasma hippikon (UP000290909) Acholeplasma laidlawii (strain PG-8A) (UP000008558) Acholeplasma oculi ( ... UP000032434) environmental samples Acholeplasma sp. CAG:878 (UP000017930) Alteracholeplasma Alteracholeplasma palmae (strain ...
Spiroplasma citri and Acholeplasma laidlawii, are listed in the European Pharmacopoeia 2.6.7. In silico analysis shows that ...
Acholeplasma Acholeplasma hippikon (UP000290909) Acholeplasma laidlawii (strain PG-8A) (UP000008558) Acholeplasma oculi ( ... UP000032434) environmental samples Acholeplasma sp. CAG:878 (UP000017930) Alteracholeplasma Alteracholeplasma palmae (strain ...
One species of Acholeplasma (these organisms are widely disseminated in animals), Acholeplasma laidlawii, has been isolated ...
  • Like other Acholeplasma and Mycoplasma, A. laidlawii has been identified as a common contaminant of growth media for cell culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • MycoStrip™ has been specifically designed to detect the Mycoplasma and Acholeplasma species that most commonly contaminate cell culture. (invivogen.com)
  • Mycoplasma and Acholeplasma are genera that comprise more than 100 recognized species in the class Mollicutes, which are bacteria that lack a cell wall. (invivogen.com)
  • Extracellular membrane vesicles secreted by mycoplasma Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8 are enriched in virulence proteins. (appmicro.org)
  • We produced the mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and rabbit antibodies against Mycoplasma arginini, M. hyorhinis, M. orale and Acholeplasma laidlawii. (jejunu.ac.kr)
  • Among the established MAbs and rabbit anti-mycoplasmas, MAb MH03 against M. hyorhinis, and rabbit anti-A. laidlawii showed high cross reactivities to the four Mycoplasma species. (jejunu.ac.kr)
  • Acholeplasma laidlawii may contaminate bovine serum and also occurs in serum-free cell culture media products. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acholeplasma laidlawii are small bacteria which lack a cell wall. (wikipedia.org)
  • The other important classes of ATPase in eukaryotic systems are the vacuolar H+ -ATPases and the F0F1 ATP synthase, and, in bacteria, the anion-translocating ATPases, responsible for resistance to arsenicals and antimonials, and the (Na+ -Mg2+) -ATPase of Acholeplasma. (elsevier.com)
  • and cell culture reagents such as bovine sera (M. arginine and A. laidlawii) or porcine trypsin (M. hyorhinis). (invivogen.com)
  • We constructed a sandwich ELISA using MH03 as capture, horse radish peroxidase labeled rabbit anti-A. laidlawii as detector, and could detect M.arginini with the detection limit of 0.5 ㎍/ml and M. hyorhinis, M. orale and A. laidlawii with the detection limit of 0.1 ㎍/ml. (jejunu.ac.kr)
  • Presence of protein constituents of the gram-positive bacterial phosphotransferase regulatory system in Acholeplasma laidlawii. (ucsd.edu)
  • Our results show that the efficiency of the A. laidlawii multi-chaperone system is driven with the ability of AlIbpA to form both globular and fibrillar structures, thus combining functions of both IbpA and IbpB when transferring the substrate proteins to the HSP70-HSP100 system. (bvsalud.org)
  • A. laidlawii may flourish and survive for prolonged periods at refrigeration and ambient temperatures in serum-free cell culture media. (wikipedia.org)
  • Comparative analysis of these sequences and previously published genomes of A. laidlawii strain PG-8, 'Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris' strains, 'Ca. P. australiense' and 'Ca. P. mali' show a limited shared basic genetic repertoire. (inrae.fr)
  • We constructed a sandwich ELISA using MH03 as capture, horse radish peroxidase labeled rabbit anti-A. laidlawii as detector, and could detect M.arginini with the detection limit of 0.5 ㎍/ml and M. hyorhinis, M. orale and A. laidlawii with the detection limit of 0.1 ㎍/ml. (jejunu.ac.kr)
  • Interspecies and intraspecies DNA homology among established species of Acholeplasma: a review. (nih.gov)
  • Type strain of Acholeplasma laidlawii at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase A. laidlawii genome sequence from NCBI. (wikipedia.org)
  • Analysis of the completely determined genomes of the plant-derived Acholeplasma brassicae strain O502 and A. palmae strain J233 revealed that the circular chromosomes are 1,877,792 and 1,554,229 bp in size, have a G + C content of 36 and 29%, and encode 1,690 and 1,439 proteins, respectively. (inrae.fr)