Achilles Tendon: A fibrous cord that connects the muscles in the back of the calf to the HEEL BONE.Tendons: Fibrous bands or cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE at the ends of SKELETAL MUSCLE FIBERS that serve to attach the MUSCLES to bones and other structures.Tendon Injuries: Injuries to the fibrous cords of connective tissue which attach muscles to bones or other structures.Tendinopathy: Clinical syndrome describing overuse tendon injuries characterized by a combination of PAIN, diffuse or localized swelling, and impaired performance. Distinguishing tendinosis from tendinitis is clinically difficult and can be made only after histopathological examination.Rupture: Forcible or traumatic tear or break of an organ or other soft part of the body.Tendon Transfer: Surgical procedure by which a tendon is incised at its insertion and placed at an anatomical site distant from the original insertion. The tendon remains attached at the point of origin and takes over the function of a muscle inactivated by trauma or disease.Tenotomy: Surgical division of a tendon for relief of a deformity that is caused by congenital or acquired shortening of a muscle (Stedman, 27th ed). Tenotomy is performed in order to lengthen a muscle that has developed improperly, or become shortened and is resistant to stretching.Calcaneus: The largest of the TARSAL BONES which is situated at the lower and back part of the FOOT, forming the HEEL.Ankle Joint: The joint that is formed by the inferior articular and malleolar articular surfaces of the TIBIA; the malleolar articular surface of the FIBULA; and the medial malleolar, lateral malleolar, and superior surfaces of the TALUS.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Weight-Bearing: The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Casts, Surgical: Dressings made of fiberglass, plastic, or bandage impregnated with plaster of paris used for immobilization of various parts of the body in cases of fractures, dislocations, and infected wounds. In comparison with plaster casts, casts made of fiberglass or plastic are lightweight, radiolucent, able to withstand moisture, and less rigid.Reflex, Stretch: Reflex contraction of a muscle in response to stretching, which stimulates muscle proprioceptors.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Equinus Deformity: Plantar declination of the foot.Bursa, Synovial: A fluid-filled sac lined with SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE that provides a cushion between bones, tendons and/or muscles around a joint.Tensile Strength: The maximum stress a material subjected to a stretching load can withstand without tearing. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p2001)Elastic Modulus: Numerical expression indicating the measure of stiffness in a material. It is defined by the ratio of stress in a unit area of substance to the resulting deformation (strain). This allows the behavior of a material under load (such as bone) to be calculated.Bursitis: Inflammation or irritation of a bursa, the fibrous sac that acts as a cushion between moving structures of bones, muscles, tendons or skin.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Heel: The back (or posterior) of the FOOT in PRIMATES, found behind the ANKLE and distal to the TOES.Patellar Ligament: A band of fibrous tissue that attaches the apex of the PATELLA to the lower part of the tubercle of the TIBIA. The ligament is actually the caudal continuation of the common tendon of the QUADRICEPS FEMORIS. The patella is embedded in that tendon. As such, the patellar ligament can be thought of as connecting the quadriceps femoris tendon to the tibia, and therefore it is sometimes called the patellar tendon.Muscle Strength Dynamometer: A device that measures MUSCLE STRENGTH during muscle contraction, such as gripping, pushing, and pulling. It is used to evaluate the health status of muscle in sports medicine or physical therapy.Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Running: An activity in which the body is propelled by moving the legs rapidly. Running is performed at a moderate to rapid pace and should be differentiated from JOGGING, which is performed at a much slower pace.Clubfoot: A deformed foot in which the foot is plantarflexed, inverted and adducted.Cumulative Trauma Disorders: Harmful and painful condition caused by overuse or overexertion of some part of the musculoskeletal system, often resulting from work-related physical activities. It is characterized by inflammation, pain, or dysfunction of the involved joints, bones, ligaments, and nerves.Torque: The rotational force about an axis that is equal to the product of a force times the distance from the axis where the force is applied.Xanthomatosis: A condition marked by the development of widespread xanthomas, yellow tumor-like structures filled with lipid deposits. Xanthomas can be found in a variety of tissues including the SKIN; TENDONS; joints of KNEES and ELBOWS. Xanthomatosis is associated with disturbance of LIPID METABOLISM and formation of FOAM CELLS.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Xeroradiography: A photoelectric method of recording an X-ray image on a coated metal plate, using low-energy photon beams, long exposure time and dry chemical developers.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Suture Anchors: Implants used in arthroscopic surgery and other orthopedic procedures to attach soft tissue to bone. One end of a suture is tied to soft tissue and the other end to the implant. The anchors are made of a variety of materials including titanium, stainless steel, or absorbable polymers.Fibril-Associated Collagens: A family of non-fibrillar collagens that interact with FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS. They contain short triple helical domains interrupted by short non-helical domains and do not form into collagen fibrils.Foot: The distal extremity of the leg in vertebrates, consisting of the tarsus (ANKLE); METATARSUS; phalanges; and the soft tissues surrounding these bones.Rupture, Spontaneous: Tear or break of an organ, vessel or other soft part of the body, occurring in the absence of external force.Ankle: The region of the lower limb between the FOOT and the LEG.Exostoses: Benign hypertrophy that projects outward from the surface of bone, often containing a cartilaginous component.Isometric Contraction: Muscular contractions characterized by increase in tension without change in length.Fibrocartilage: A type of CARTILAGE whose matrix contains large bundles of COLLAGEN TYPE I. Fibrocartilage is typically found in the INTERVERTEBRAL DISK; PUBIC SYMPHYSIS; TIBIAL MENISCI; and articular disks in synovial JOINTS. (From Ross et. al., Histology, 3rd ed., p132,136)Elasticity: Resistance and recovery from distortion of shape.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Sutures: Materials used in closing a surgical or traumatic wound. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Muscle Stretching Exercises: Exercises that stretch the muscle fibers with the aim to increase muscle-tendon FLEXIBILITY, improve RANGE OF MOTION or musculoskeletal function, and prevent injuries. There are various types of stretching techniques including active, passive (relaxed), static, dynamic (gentle), ballistic (forced), isometric, and others.Collagen: A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).H-Reflex: A monosynaptic reflex elicited by stimulating a nerve, particularly the tibial nerve, with an electric shock.Manipulation, Orthopedic: The planned and carefully managed manual movement of the musculoskeletal system, extremities, and spine to produce increased motion. The term is sometimes used to denote a precise sequence of movements of a joint to determine the presence of disease or to reduce a dislocation. In the case of fractures, orthopedic manipulation can produce better position and alignment of the fracture. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p264)
(1/488) Metabolism and inflammatory mediators in the peritendinous space measured by microdialysis during intermittent isometric exercise in humans.

1. The metabolic processes that occur around the tendon during mechanical loading and exercise are undescribed in man. These processes are important for understanding the development of overuse inflammation and injury. 2. A microdialysis technique was used to determine interstitial concentrations of glycerol, glucose, lactate, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) as well as to calculate tissue substrate balance in the peritendinous region of the human Achilles tendon. Recovery of 48-62 % (range) at rest and 70-77 % during exercise were obtained for glycerol, glucose and PGE2. 3. Six young healthy humans were studied at rest, during 30 min of intermittent static plantar flexion of the ankle at a workload corresponding to individual body weight, and during 60 min of recovery. Microdialysis was performed in both legs with simultaneous determination of blood flow by 133Xe washout in the same area, and blood sampling from the radial artery. 4. With exercise, the net release of lactate as well as of glycerol from the peritendinous space of the Achilles tendon increased 2-fold (P < 0.05). Furthermore a 100 % increase in interstitial concentration of PGE2 and TXB2 was found, but it was only significant for TXB2(P < 0.05). As peritendinous blood flow increased 2- to 3-fold during intermittent static contractions, this indicates also that the output of these substances from the tissue increased during exercise. 5. This study indicates that both lipid and carbohydrate metabolism as well as inflammatory activity is accelerated in the peritendinous region of the human Achilles tendon with dynamic loading.  (+info)

(2/488) Sonographic incidence of tendon microtears in athletes with chronic Achilles tendinosis.

OBJECTIVE: To assess the number and distribution of tendon microtears in asymptomatic controls and athletes with chronic Achilles tendinitis or partial thickness tears using high resolution ultrasound. METHODS: The mean number of microtears in three random tendon cross sections were recorded per tendon third in 19 asymptomatic volunteers, 16 athletes with symptomatic chronic Achilles tendinitis, and eight athletes with partial Achilles tendon rupture. RESULTS: Microtears were most numerous in the middle third section of the Achilles tendon. Some 67% of tendons in the control group had no microtears, and 28% showed a single microtear. Only 18% of the athletes with chronic Achilles tendinitis and none of the athletes with partial tendon rupture were without microtears in the middle third of their Achilles tendon. Of the tendons with chronic tendinitis, 13% had more than three microtears per section which increased to 87% in tendons exhibiting partial rupture. CONCLUSIONS: There appears to be an association between microtear formation and Achilles tendon rupture.  (+info)

(3/488) Safe relief of rest pain that eases with activity in achillodynia by intrabursal or peritendinous steroid injection: the rupture rate was not increased by these steroid injections.

A history of morning and rest pain that eases with activity was found to improve after anti-inflammatory injections around the paratenon or within the Achilles bursae. The reduction in pain morbidity was significant, and the peritendinous steroid injections did not increase the rupture rate.  (+info)

(4/488) Negative interstitial pressure in the peritendinous region during exercise.

In the present study, tissue pressure in the peritendinous area ventral to the human Achilles tendon was determined. The pressure was measured during rest and intermittent isometric calf muscle exercise at three torques (56, 112, and 168 Nm) 20, 40 and 50 mm proximal to the insertion of the tendon in 11 healthy, young individuals. In all experiments a linear significant decrease in pressure was obtained with increasing torque [e.g., at 40 mm: -0.4 +/- 0.3 mmHg (rest) to -135 +/- 12 mmHg (168 Nm)]. No significant differences were obtained among the three areas measured. On the basis of these observations, microdialysis was performed in the peritendinous region with a colloid osmotic active substance (Dextran 70, 0.1 g/ml) added to the perfusate with the aim of counteracting the negative tissue pressure. Dialysate volume was found to be fully restored (100 +/- 4%) during exercise. It is concluded that a marked negative tissue pressure is generated in the peritendinous space around the Achilles tendon during exercise in humans. Negative tissue pressure could lead to fluid shift and could be involved in the increase in blood flow previously noted in the peritendinous tissue during exercise (H. Langberg, J. Bulow, and M. Kjaer. Acta Physiol. Scand. 163: 149-153, 1998; H. Langberg, J. Bulow, and M. Kjaer. Clin. Physiol. 19: 89-93, 1999).  (+info)

(5/488) Atraumatic bilateral Achilles tendon rupture: an association of systemic steroid treatment.

A case of bilateral Achilles tendon rupture associated with steroid use is reported. This case illustrates the importance of taking a thorough drug history in cases of tendon rupture. In lower limb tendon rupture all patients, especially those on steroids, should be warned of the increased risk of contralateral injury.  (+info)

(6/488) Achilles tendinitis associated with fluoroquinolones.

AIMS: To determine whether there is an association between use of fluoroquinolones and tendinitis in a large population under everyday circumstances. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was carried out in a dynamic population. Data came from the IPCI-database which consists of all data on consultations, morbidity, prescriptions and other interventions, as registered by GPs in a source population of approximately 250 000 persons. For this study data were collected from 41 general practices in the period from January 1st, 1995 through December 31st, 1996. All persons treated with either fluoroquinolones, amoxicillin, trimethoprim, cotrimoxazole or nitrofurantoin were followed from the first day of treatment until the outcome of interest, death, transfer to another practice, or end of the study period, whichever came first. The risk window was defined as the legend duration +1 month. Potential cases were defined as a registration of a tendinitis or tendon rupture. Patients with a history of tendinitis or tendon rupture, preceding trauma or inadequate diagnoses were excluded on the basis of a review of the patient profiles and additional clinical data, blinded as to the exposure status. Results were adjusted for age, gender, concurrent corticosteroid exposure and number of GP visits. RESULTS: There were 1841 users of fluoroquinolones and 9406 users of the other antibacterial drugs with an average duration of 9 and 7 days, respectively. Tendinitis or tendon rupture was registered in 97 profiles, but after review only 22 complied with the case definition. The adjusted relative risk of tendinitis to fluoroquinolones was 3. 7 (95%CI: 0.9-15.1) for Achilles tendinitis and 1.3 (95%CI: 0.4-4.7) for other types of tendinitis. Achilles tendinitis to ofloxacin had a relative risk of 10.1 (95%CI: 2.2-46.0) and an excess risk of 15 cases per 100 000 exposure days. CONCLUSIONS: Although the numbers in our study are small, our results suggest that some fluoroquinolones may increase the risk of Achilles tendinitis, and that this risk increase is highest for ofloxacin.  (+info)

(7/488) Percutaneous repair of the ruptured tendo Achillis.

Percutaneous repair of the ruptured tendo Achillis has a low rate of failure and negligible complications with the wound, but the sural nerve may be damaged. We describe a new technique which minimises the risk of injury to this nerve. The repair is carried out using three midline stab incisions over the posterior aspect of the tendon. A No. 1 nylon suture on a 90 mm cutting needle approximates the tendon with two box stitches. The procedure can be carried out under local anaesthesia. We reviewed 27 patients who had a percutaneous repair at a median interval of 35 months after the injury. They returned to work at four weeks and to sport at 16. One developed a minor wound infection and another complex regional pain syndrome type II. There were no injuries to the sural nerve or late reruptures. This technique is simple to undertake and has a low rate of complications.  (+info)

(8/488) Teasing out the truth about collagen.

Of all of the non-mineral constituents of the mammalian body there is more collagen than anything else except water and possibly fat. Nevertheless our understanding of the physiology of collagen is rudimentary. All cells and tissues are supported by a network of collagen fibres, the arrangement of which appears to be specifically site adaptive. We know a lot about the biochemistry of collagen, and its many subtypes: for example, all collagen molecules are made within fibroblasts (or modifications of them such as osteocytes), then the oversized collagen molecule is secreted in a soluble form, with hydrophilic ends which are enzymatically cleaved to leave the insoluble core collagen (tropocollagen) beached in the extracellular space. We know that collagen is made relatively immortal by being cross-linked and rather impervious to proteolysis. However, we do not know much about what governs collagen synthesis or its breakdown in the human body. It is important to know, not simply because like Everest, collagen presents a large unignorable mass. We need to understand collagen metabolism in order to understand how we grow, adapt to the environment, maintain our adult shapes and then wrinkle and crumble as we age. Collagen diseases are relatively common and almost certainly if we knew more about how, for example, the collagen framework of bone is laid down and turned over we would understand much more about osteopenia of old age. The problem in finding out has been that collagen is so difficult to study. It turns over relatively slowly, and that part of it that is cross-linked and forms mature collagen is, it seems, with us for life come hell, high-water or famine. The body reduces to mainly skin and bone-collagen in extremis. Because the system as a whole is so sluggish, it is difficult to see changes in indices of collagen metabolism. However, not all the body collagen seems to be as fixed, and indeed collagen in some tissues must turn over, enabling remodelling and adaptation, rather quickly. Think about the stiffness and discomfort that accompanies un-accustomed exercise, which not only abates with time but ceases to occur once the exercise has become customary. What is happening to collagen protein turnover in these circumstances? One obvious way to study protein turnover, even of collagen, is to follow the incorporation of stable isotope markers such as proline into the tissue (although the breakdown is harder to quantify), but this is technically difficult and requires biopsy of the tissue in question. Another way is to follow the appearance in biological fluids of markers of collagen turnover. Since the propeptides which make collagen soluble are cleaved as collagen is deposited extracellularly, their concentration is an index of the rate of collagen synthesis; similarly when tropocollagen is degraded by extracellular proteases, specific N- and C-terminal fragments are released, the amount of which scales with the rate of collagen breakdown. These bits of collagen find their way into the blood. However, assaying them there introduces non-specificity and dilution, rendering interpretation difficult. The ideal would be to measure them in the extracellular fluid at the site of production. This of course is not easy in vivo. One of the delights of the paper by Langberg and colleagues in this issue of The Journal of Physiology (Langberg et al. 1999) is the sheer cheek with which the authors decided to use the microdialysis technique to do this. Microdialysis is a technique whereby a slowly perfused, thin-walled membranous tube is introduced into the extracellular space and the collected fluid assayed for molecules which have diffused into it. Until now the idea of using microdialysis to measure concentrations of molecules much bigger than 300 Da would be regarded as ludicrous. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)  (+info)

*  Total contact casting
Mueller, M.J., et al., Effect of Achilles tendon lengthening on neuropathic plantar ulcers. A randomized clinical trial. J Bone ...
*  Prolotherapy
The injection is administered at joints or at tendons where they connect to bone. Prolotherapy treatment sessions are generally ... A 2015 review found limited evidence that prolotherapy is safe and effective for Achilles tendinopathy, plantar fasciosis, and ... Prolotherapy involves the injection of an irritant solution into a joint space, weakened ligament, or tendon insertion to ... Another 2015 review assigned a strength of recommendation level A for Achilles tendinopathy, knee osteoarthritis and level B ...
*  Fibro-adipose vascular anomaly
Achilles tendon lengthening (heel-cord release) and physical therapy can be helpful for treating equinus contracture. Unlike ...
*  Stretch reflex
A sudden stretch, such as tapping the Achilles' tendon, causes a reflex contraction in the muscle as the spindles sense the ... Other examples (followed by involved spinal nerves) are responses to stretch created by a blow upon a muscle tendon: Jaw jerk ... This reflex has the shortest latency of all spinal reflexes including the Golgi tendon reflex and reflexes mediated by pain and ... Reflex Proprioception Walker, H. K.; Walker, H. K.; Hall, W. D.; Hurst, J. W. (1990). "Deep Tendon Reflexes". PMID 21250237. [1 ...
*  Calcaneal fracture
Ligament and tendon involvement should also be explored. Achilles tendon injury can be seen with posterior (Type C) fractures. ... a fracture in which the Achilles tendon removes a portion of the bone as it rescinds) and diabetes mellitus. The diabetic ... Involvement of soft tissue (tendons, skin, etc.,) should be evaluated because soft tissue injury has been associated to serious ...
*  Compression lock
Similarly, some ankle locks also cause a compression lock on the Achilles tendon, and hence the term "Achilles lock" is often ... An Achilles lock (also called an Achilles hold or Achilles squeeze or Ashi-Hishigi in judo) is a compression lock that involves ... This causes severe pressure on the Achilles tendon, and often also results in an ankle lock, since the ankle is being used as a ... It is typically performed by wedging a forearm, especially a bony part of it, into the Achilles tendon, while leveraging the ...
*  Achilles tendon
... rupture is a partial or complete break in the tendon. Partial and full Achilles tendon ruptures are most likely ... The Achilles tendon or heel cord, also known as the calcaneal tendon (Latin: Tendo calcaneus), is a tendon of the back of the ... The Achilles tendon connects muscle to bone, like other tendons, and is located at the back of the lower leg. The Achilles ... Inflammation of the Achilles tendon is called Achilles tendinitis. Achilles tendinosis is the soreness or stiffness of the ...
*  Boot (medical)
"Achilles tendon rupture - aftercare". National Institutes of Health. 2012-06-28. Retrieved 2012-11-25. "Lisfranc (Midfoot) ...
*  James Andrews (physician)
... achilles tendon, 2005 • Donovin Darius: ACL, 2005; shoulder, 2006 • Drew Brees: shoulder, 2006 • Byron Leftwich: ankle, 2006 • ... a medical device company that manufactures and markets the Tenex Health TX System for the treatment of chronic tendon and ...
*  Trent Whitfield
Prior to his second year with the Bruins on August 22, 2010, it was announced that Whitfield had torn his Achilles tendon and ... "Bruins' Whitfield tears Achilles tendon; likely out for year". The Sports Network. 2010-08-22. Retrieved 2010-08-22. "Bruins ...
*  Saint Ladislaus legend
She cuts the pagan's Achilles tendon. Saint Ladislaus beheads the pagan with the help of the girl. In the last scene Saint ...
*  Vasilije Radović
because of an Achilles tendon injury. He played 307 official games for the club. After retirement, he continued to work in ...
*  Anthony McCoy
Rosenthal, Gregg (July 29, 2014). "Seahawks' Anthony McCoy tears Achilles tendon". NFL.com. Retrieved September 7, 2015. ... On July 29, 2014 McCoy suffered another torn Achilles' during training camp, his second in just over a year. The injury ... On May 21, 2013, McCoy suffered a torn Achilles' during organized team activities, and underwent surgery three days later. His ...
*  Menelik Watson
On 30 August 2015, Watson suffered a torn Achilles tendon during the third preseason game against the Arizona Cardinals. On 1 ... Menelik Watson ruptures Achilles tendon". National Football League. Retrieved 31 August 2015. Durkin, Jimmy (1 September 2015 ...
*  DeVier Posey
Further testing indicated that he had suffered a ruptured Achilles tendon. The Texans traded Posey and their 2015 third round ( ... "Report: Texans' Posey tears Achilles tendon". go.com. Retrieved 23 May 2017. Lange, Randy (May 1, 2015). "Jets Trade with ...
*  Ciro Immobile
"Torino trainer ruptures achilles tendon celebrating goal". eurosport.com. Retrieved 14 April 2014. "LAZIO VS. TORINO 3 - 3". ...
*  Simmonds' test
Thompson T, Doherty J (1962). "Spontaneous rupture of tendon of Achilles: a new clinical diagnostic test". J Trauma. 2 (2): 126 ... Check date values in: ,date= (help) Simmonds FA (1957). "The diagnosis of the ruptured Achilles tendon". Practitioner. 179 ( ... is used in lower limb examination to test for the rupture of the Achilles tendon. The patient lies face down with feet hanging ... signifying likely rupture of the Achilles tendon. The Simmonds' test has a positive predictive value of 13.7 and a negative ...
*  Night of Champions (2009)
In the coming week on Raw, it came to light that Edge had legitimately torn his Achilles tendon, which required surgery, as ... "Edge undergoes surgery on his Achilles tendon". World Wrestling Entertainment. 2009-07-10. Retrieved 2009-07-14. Plummer, Dale ...
*  Tomasz Adamczyk
In 2013 he tore his Achilles tendon. "Tomasz Adamczyk FIG Profile". fig-gymnastics.com. Retrieved 13 June 2016. "2014 ...
*  Justin Hodges
Hodges ruptured his Achilles tendon during pre-season training, and subsequently missed the entire 2010 NRL season. Hodges also ... "Broncos Centre Justin Hodges Tears Achilles Tendon". Couriermail.com.au. Retrieved 2015-10-12. "Broncos Wrap Up the Local Derby ... However, Hodges season ended prematurely after a snapped left Achilles which he suffered in the Round 22 home clash against the ...
*  Davis's law
T. Wren; S. Yerby; G. Beaupré; C. Carter (2001). "Mechanical properties of the human Achilles tendon". Clinical Biomechanics. ... Conversely, tendons that have lost their original strength due to extended periods of inactivity can regain most of their ... Tendons are soft tissue structures that respond to changes in mechanical loading. Bulk mechanical properties, such as modulus, ... In micro-gravity simulations, human test subjects can experience gastrocnemius tendon strength loss of up to 58% over a 90-day ...
*  Mika Halvari
Towards the end of his career, Halvari was injured numerous times; for example, his Achilles tendon snapped twice. His personal ...
*  2014-15 Tranmere Rovers F.C. season
"Hill Has Surgery On Injured Achilles Tendon". Tranmere Rovers F.C. 24 September 2014. Retrieved 23 November 2015. "Matt Gill ... though shortly after he suffered an Achilles tendon injury that ruled him out for six months. Tranmere was defeated 2-3 at ...
*  Indiana Fever
Then late in the first half Catchings went down with another injury; she had completely torn her Achilles tendon. The Shock ...
*  Patrick Ebert
He missed the vast majority of his debut season, due to an achilles tendon rupture. "Beginnen wollen wir mit Patrick Ebert!" [ ... "Confirmed: Ebert suffers rupture of Achilles tendon". Diario AS (in Spanish). 7 December 2015. Retrieved 6 April 2016. Patrick ...
*  William Dutton (speed skater)
Late in the 2011 season Dutton partially severed his Achilles tendon while practising starts, and the injury caused him to miss ...
*  Matt Hill (footballer)
Two weeks later Hill picked up the Achilles tendon injury against Newport County that forced him to miss the next six months. ... "Hill Has Surgery On Injured Achilles Tendon". Tranmere Rovers F.C. 24 September 2014. Retrieved 20 October 2015. "Report: ...
Achilles Tendon Injuries -  Health Encyclopedia - University of Rochester Medical Center  Achilles Tendon Injuries - Health Encyclopedia - University of Rochester Medical Center
Achilles Tendon Injuries. What are Achilles tendon injuries?. The Achilles tendon is a fibrous band of tissue that links the ... How is an Achilles tendon injury diagnosed? Injury to the Achilles tendon causes pain along the back of your leg near the heel ... What causes Achilles tendon injuries? Achilles tendon injuries can be caused by the following:. Tendonitis. Tendonitis might be ... Key points about Achilles tendon injuries. * Your Achilles tendon can develop tendonitis. This is when it becomes inflamed, ...
more infohttps://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?ContentTypeID=134&ContentID=215
PatEdu.com : Achilles Tendon Rupture  PatEdu.com : Achilles Tendon Rupture
Stretching can help make stress on the Achilles tendon less sudden. This can prevent an Achilles tendon rupture. ...
more infohttp://www.patient-education.com/english/interactive/achilles-tendon-rupture/section7_page2
Partial midportion Achilles tendon ruptures: new sonographic findings helpful for diagnosis.  Partial midportion Achilles tendon ruptures: new sonographic findings helpful for diagnosis.
... tendon. CONCLUSIONS: Ultrasound and Doppler examination can be helpful tools to diagnose partial midportion Achilles tendon ... In all patients the US examination showed a partial Achilles tendon rupture, presented as a disrupted dorsal (skin side) tendon ... BACKGROUND: Partial Achilles tendon ruptures are not always easy to diagnose. A history including a sudden onset of pain, and/ ... Partial midportion Achilles tendon ruptures: new sonographic findings helpful for diagnosis.. Alfredson, Håkan Umeå universitet ...
more infohttp://www.diva-portal.org/smash/record.jsf?pid=diva2%3A305703&c=29&searchType=SIMPLE&language=no&query=&af=%5B%5D&aq=%5B%5B%7B%22organisationId%22%3A%22776%22%7D%5D%5D&aq2=%5B%5B%5D%5D&aqe=%5B%5D&noOfRows=50&sortOrder=author_sort_asc&sortOrder2=title_sort_asc&onlyFullText=false&sf=all
Zamst AT-1 Achilles Tendon Support Injury Recovery at Road Runner
						Sports  Zamst AT-1 Achilles Tendon Support Injury Recovery at Road Runner Sports
Flexible compression support to prevent disorders of the Achilles tendon. *Padding guides the Achilles tendon while the outer ... ZAMST® AT-1 ACHILLES TENDON SUPPORT :: Feel secure and supported throughout every workout, keeping your ankle perfectly aligned ... A-Strap: Taping function outer strap restricts extension of Achilles tendon. *i-Fit: Open panel design with adjustable ... open-panel design of this awesome Achilles Tendon support.. Features & Benefits:. * ...
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Pro-tec Premium Achilles Tendon Strap Injury Recovery at Road Runner
						Sports  Pro-tec Premium Achilles Tendon Strap Injury Recovery at Road Runner Sports
Achilles Tendon Support strap during all your activities. Reduce stress to your Achilles tendon and ease persistent heel pain ... ACHILLES TENDON STRAP :: Get relief from Achilles Tendinitis pain by wearing the newly improved Pro-Tec Athletics® ... feel the difference of this new premium version that includes a heat-sealed EVA foam pad shaped to surround the Achilles tendon ... with this high-tech support strap that applies gentle pressure to your tendon and heel as you run. You're sure to ...
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Outcome of Two Different Suture Methods for Achilles Tendon Rupture - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov  Outcome of Two Different Suture Methods for Achilles Tendon Rupture - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov
Achilles tendon rupture is one of the most common tendon injuries in the adult population. The incidence of this injury is ... Outcome of Two Different Suture Methods for Achilles Tendon Rupture. The recruitment status of this study is unknown. The ... Studies have showed that the operation treatment of acute Achilles tendon ruptures had some advantages. But the rebuild of ... Closed Achilles Tendon Rupture Treats by Two Different Suture Methods and the Outcome. ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01622179
Achilles Tendon Injury: Physical Therapy and Rehab - Genesis HealthCare System - Zanesville, Ohio  Achilles Tendon Injury: Physical Therapy and Rehab - Genesis HealthCare System - Zanesville, Ohio
... and the extent of injury to the Achilles tendon. You will likely need rehab after an Achilles tendon injury whether or not you ... Rehabilitation for an Achilles tendon rupture helps you regain strength and flexibility in the tendon and leg. You can do it at ... Rehabilitation (rehab) and/or physical therapy are the usual treatment for an Achilles tendon injury. ForAchilles tendinopathy ... For an Achilles tendon rupture, you can try a rehab program after surgery to repair the rupture. Rehab can strengthen the ...
more infohttps://www.genesishcs.org/patients-visitors/health-library/healthwise-document-viewer/?id=tr2261
Achilles tendon - Sports Medicine  Achilles tendon - Sports Medicine
Achilles tendon. Achilles tendinitis is inflammation of the Achilles tendon, which is the tendon that connects the calf ... Achilles tendinitis may present with pain, tenderness, and stiffness along the tendon. This can occur directly over your heel ... Inflammation can occur in this tendon after a sudden injury or can occur over time based on the demands placed on the tendon. ... or a tight Achilles tendon, abrupt changes in activity level such as increasing running mileage too quickly or walking further ...
more infohttps://sportsmedicine.mayoclinic.org/condition/achilles-tendon/
The Influence of Early Weight-Bearing Compared with Non-Weight-Bearing After Surgical Repair of the Achilles Tendon  The Influence of Early Weight-Bearing Compared with Non-Weight-Bearing After Surgical Repair of the Achilles Tendon
This is the first report to describe the use of a hamstring tendon graft and gastrocnemius fascia flap for Achilles tendon ... Successful treatment of a fracture of a huge Achilles tendon ossification with autologous hamstring tendon graft and ... but not in pain-free normal Achilles tendons. In patients with Achilles tendinosis, injections with the sclerosing substance ... The article reports on the surgery undergone by 34-year-old midfielder David Beckham for torn left Achilles' tendon, after he ...
more infohttp://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/34230446/influence-early-weight-bearing-compared-non-weight-bearing-after-surgical-repair-achilles-tendon
Ruptured Achilles Tendon  Ruptured Achilles Tendon
MRI can confirm disruption or tear in the tendon. Inability to lift the toes.. Diagnosis. In diagnosing an Achilles tendon ... It is subject to 2-3 times body weight during normal walking so regaining normal Achilles tendon function is critical. Achilles ... Preceding tendon problems. Chronic Achilles tendonitis (can lead to small tears within the tendon, increasingly weakening it). ... tendonitis and other tendon disorders (most associated with the Achilles tendon) linked to Ciprofloxacin (Cipro) alone were ...
more infohttp://jeanettgebhart.weebly.com/blog/ruptured-achilles-tendon
Achilles Tendon Rupture  Achilles Tendon Rupture
Achilles Tendon Surgery Pain Management. Overview. Achilles tendon rupture is an injury that affects the back of your lower leg ... This is the narrowest portion of the Achilles tendon and is also the area with the poorest blood supply. achilles tendon ... The Achilles tendon is on average 15cm in length. Most ruptures occur 2-6cm above where the tendon inserts into the heel bone. ... The Achilles tendon ruptures because the load applied to it is greater than the tendon's ability to withstand that load. This ...
more infohttp://kristinetivis.blog.fc2.com/blog-category-1.html
Achilles Tendon - Achilles Tendinopathy Treatment  Achilles Tendon - Achilles Tendinopathy Treatment
Get advanced treatment for achilles tendinopathy in Sydney. CALL 1300 856 594 today! ... ModPod Sports Podiatry provides useful information on Achilles Tendon. ... 25 May Achilles Tendon. Posted at 05:00h in Uncategorized by admin 0 Likes ... The pain that this injury can cause can be felt in the Achilles tendon, heel and or in the lower calf.. A good way to test if ...
more infohttps://www.modpodpodiatry.com.au/achilles-tendon/
Achilles Tendon Repair, A Modified Technique  Achilles Tendon Repair, A Modified Technique
After the tendon was repaired, the deep fascia and paratenon was used to cover the Achilles tendon. Patients were followed for ... Conclusion: The present study showed that fascial envelope for full covering of the repaired Achilles tendon may help to ... Wound complications following open repair for acute Achilles tendon ruptures (AATR) remain the subject of significant debate. ... After the tendon was repaired, the deep fascia and paratenon was used to cover the Achilles tendon. Patients were followed for ...
more infohttp://abjs.mums.ac.ir/article_2079.html
Achilles Tendon Injury Overview  Achilles Tendon Injury Overview
... ContentsCauses of Achilles Tendon InjuryPreventing Achilles ... For more information on preventing Achilles tendon injuries see: Preventing Achilles Tendon Injury.. Types of Achilles Tendon ... see Causes of Achilles Tendon Injury.. Preventing Achilles Tendon Injury. The best way to prevent an Achilles tendon injury is ... The most common Achilles tendon injuries are Achilles tendinosis (also known as Achilles tendinopathy or misspelled Achilles ...
more infohttp://shoeliftsformen.soup.io/post/411440564/Achilles-Tendon-Injury-Overview
Achilles Tendon Surgery Pain Management  Achilles Tendon Surgery Pain Management
... Overview. Achilles tendon rupture is an injury that affects the back of your lower leg ... This is the narrowest portion of the Achilles tendon and is also the area with the poorest blood supply. achilles tendon ... The Achilles tendon is on average 15cm in length. Most ruptures occur 2-6cm above where the tendon inserts into the heel bone. ... The Achilles tendon ruptures because the load applied to it is greater than the tendon's ability to withstand that load. This ...
more infohttp://kristinetivis.blog.fc2.com/blog-entry-1.html
Achilles Tendon Rupture | newyork foot care services  Achilles Tendon Rupture | newyork foot care services
An Achilles tendon rupture is a complete or partial tear ... The Achilles tendon runs down the back of the lower leg and ... The Achilles tendon runs down the back of the lower leg and connects the calf muscle to the heel bone. An Achilles tendon ... Achilles Tendon Rupture. Home » Achilles Tendon Rupture. .botom-links { display: none; } .page-id-728 .botom-links { display: ... A person with a ruptured Achilles tendon may experience one or more of the following:. * Sudden pain (which feels like a kick ...
more infohttp://newyorkfootcareservices.com/achilles-tendon-rupture/
Achilles Tendon Rupture - Podiatrist in Kalispell, MT  Achilles Tendon Rupture - Podiatrist in Kalispell, MT
What is the Achilles Tendon? A tendon is a band of tissue that connects a muscle to a bone. The Achilles tendon runs down the ... What is an Achilles Tendon Rupture?. An Achilles tendon rupture is a complete or partial tear that occurs when the tendon is ... If the Achilles tendon is ruptured, the patient will have less strength in pushing down (as on a gas pedal) and will have ... In diagnosing an Achilles tendon rupture, the foot and ankle surgeon will ask questions about how and when the injury occurred ...
more infohttps://www.stepaheadmt.com/library/6699/AchillesTendonRupture.html
Symptoms of a Torn Achilles Tendon | Healthy Living  Symptoms of a Torn Achilles Tendon | Healthy Living
The Achilles is the thickest and strongest tendon in the body. When your calf muscles contract and pull on the Achilles tendon ... In severe cases the Achilles tendon can become torn. Learning to recognize the symptoms of a torn Achilles tendon will help you ... The Achilles tendon can become strained, inflamed or tear. If a small tear goes untreated the tendon can actually rupture as ... You may also experience stiffness in the Achilles tendon upon waking and you may notice some slight swelling around the tendon ...
more infohttps://healthyliving.azcentral.com/symptoms-of-a-torn-achilles-tendon-12180702.html
Achilles Tendon Rupture | Foot and Ankle | Conditions Treated  Achilles Tendon Rupture | Foot and Ankle | Conditions Treated
Achilles Tendon Rupture is a tear in the achilles tendon (heel) - To find out what the symptoms & causes are please CALL 9522 ... A tear in the achilles tendon (heel). What are the symptoms?. *Partial rupture: acute sharp pain, increasing with movement ...
more infohttp://synergyhealth.com.au/Conditions-Treated/Foot-and-Ankle/Achilles-Tendon-Rupture
Partial Achilles Tendon Rupture Recovery Problems  Partial Achilles Tendon Rupture Recovery Problems
... also known as an Achilles tendon tear, is the snapping or pulling apart of the Achilles tendon into two pieces. Achilles te… ... Partial Achilles Tendon Rupture Recovery Problems Overview. An Achilles tendon rupture, also known as an Achilles tendon tear, ... Achilles tendinosis. Achilles tendons can also be lacerated or crushed. Causes. Common causes of an Achilles tendon rupture ... is the snapping or pulling apart of the Achilles tendon into two pieces. Achilles tendon ruptures can be full ruptures or ...
more infohttp://juliettellera.hatenablog.com/entry/Partial_Achilles_Tendon_Rupture_Recovery_Problems
  • These are key to helping your tendon heal without shortening and causing long-term pain. (genesishcs.org)
  • This treatment uses high-energy shockwave impulses to help stimulate the healing process in damaged tendon tissue. (rochester.edu)
  • The purpose of this study is to estimate the effective of two suture methods in the treatment of Achilles rupture. (clinicaltrials.gov)
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