Alpha- or beta-acetyl derivatives of DIGOXIN or lanatoside C from Digitalis lanata. They are better absorbed and longer acting than digoxin and are used in congestive heart failure.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Cyclopentanophenanthrenes with a 5- or 6-membered lactone ring attached at the 17-position and SUGARS attached at the 3-position. Plants they come from have long been used in congestive heart failure. They increase the force of cardiac contraction without significantly affecting other parameters, but are very toxic at larger doses. Their mechanism of action usually involves inhibition of the NA(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE and they are often used in cell biological studies for that purpose.
A cardiotonic glycoside obtained mainly from Digitalis lanata; it consists of three sugars and the aglycone DIGOXIGENIN. Digoxin has positive inotropic and negative chronotropic activity. It is used to control ventricular rate in ATRIAL FIBRILLATION and in the management of congestive heart failure with atrial fibrillation. Its use in congestive heart failure and sinus rhythm is less certain. The margin between toxic and therapeutic doses is small. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p666)
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Any compound that contains a constituent sugar, in which the hydroxyl group attached to the first carbon is substituted by an alcoholic, phenolic, or other group. They are named specifically for the sugar contained, such as glucoside (glucose), pentoside (pentose), fructoside (fructose), etc. Upon hydrolysis, a sugar and nonsugar component (aglycone) are formed. (From Dorland, 28th ed; From Miall's Dictionary of Chemistry, 5th ed)
A cardiac glycoside sometimes used in place of DIGOXIN. It has a longer half-life than digoxin; toxic effects, which are similar to those of digoxin, are longer lasting. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p665)
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Complementary combining site contact residue mutations of the anti-digoxin Fab 26-10 permit high affinity wild-type binding. (1/3)

Antibody 26-10, obtained in a secondary immune response, binds digoxin with high affinity (K(a) = 1.3 x 10(10) M(-1)) because of extensive shape complementarity. We demonstrated previously that mutations of the hapten contact residue HTrp-100 to Arg (where H refers to the heavy chain) resulted in increased specificity for digoxin analogs substituted at the cardenolide 16 position. However, mutagenesis of H:CDR1 did not result in such a specificity change despite the proximity of the H:CDR1 hapten contact residue Asn-35 to the cardenolide 16 position. Here we constructed a bacteriophage-displayed library containing randomized mutations at H chain residues 30-35 in a 26-10 mutant containing Arg-100 (26-10-RRALD). Phage were selected by panning against digoxin, gitoxin (16-OH), and 16-acetylgitoxin coupled to bovine serum albumin. Clones that retained wild-type Asn at position 35 showed preferred binding to gitoxin, like the 26-10-RRALD parent. In contrast, clones containing Val-35 selected mainly on digoxin-bovine serum albumin demonstrated a shift back to wild-type specificity. Several clones containing Val-35 bound digoxin with increased affinity, approaching that of the wild type in a few instances, in contrast to the mutation Val-35 in the wild-type 26-10 background, which reduces affinity for digoxin 90-fold. It has therefore proven possible to reorder the 26-10 binding site by mutations including two major contact residues on opposite sides of the site and yet to retain high affinity for binding for digoxin. Thus, even among antibodies that have undergone affinity maturation in vivo, different structural solutions to high affinity binding may be revealed.  (+info)

The effect of dietary fiber on postprandial serum digoxin concentration in man. (2/3)

The postprandial digoxin concentrations in serum were measured for 4 hr by radioimmunological assay in six healthy volunteers who had received 0.8 mg beta-acetyldigoxin by the oral route. Digoxin was given together with a formula diet containing as admixture, respectively, wheat bran, microcrystalline cellulose, pectin, carrageenan, and carob seed flour. The various additions did not reduce the mean digoxin concentrations in serum. After carob seed flour, the concentrations were significantly (P less than 5%) higher, as compared to the control. After microcrystalline cellulose, pectin, and wheat bran the mean peak concentrations were reached later than in the control state.  (+info)

The effect of meloxicam on the pharmacokinetics of beta-acetyl-digoxin. (3/3)

The influence of multiple-dose administration of meloxicam on the pharmacokinetics of oral beta-acetyl-digoxin was studied in 12 healthy male volunteers in a randomized double-blind two-way crossover study. The primary endpoint, Cminss, was within the accepted range for bioequivalence, as were Cmaxss and AUCss. The 90% confidence interval and the point estimator of 98.7 for Cminss were within the equivalence range of 0.8-1.25. MRT and tmax were also unchanged, while the elimination rate constant was decreased slightly by 12%, which is of no therapeutic relevance. It is concluded that co-treatment with meloxicam has no effect on the pharmacokinetics of oral digoxin.  (+info)

Acetyldigoxin is not a recognized or commonly used term in medicine or pharmacology. It's possible that you may have misspelled or misremembered the name of a specific medication. One possibility is that you are referring to "digoxin," which is a medication derived from the digitalis plant and is used to treat heart conditions such as congestive heart failure and atrial fibrillation.

If you have any further questions or concerns about medications or medical terms, I would recommend consulting with a healthcare professional or using a reliable medical reference source.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

Cardiac glycosides are a group of naturally occurring compounds that have a toxic effect on the heart. They are found in certain plants, including foxglove and lily of the valley, as well as in some toads and beetles. The most well-known cardiac glycoside is digoxin, which is derived from the foxglove plant and is used as a medication to treat heart failure and atrial arrhythmias.

Cardiac glycosides work by inhibiting the sodium-potassium pump in heart muscle cells, leading to an increase in intracellular calcium levels. This increases the force of heart contractions, which can be beneficial in treating heart failure. However, if the dose is too high, cardiac glycosides can also cause dangerous arrhythmias and even death.

It's important for healthcare professionals to carefully monitor patients taking cardiac glycosides, as the therapeutic and toxic doses are very close together. Additionally, certain medications and medical conditions can interact with cardiac glycosides and increase the risk of toxicity.

Digoxin is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called cardiac glycosides. It is used to treat various heart conditions, such as heart failure and atrial fibrillation, by helping the heart beat stronger and more regularly. Digoxin works by inhibiting the sodium-potassium pump in heart muscle cells, which leads to an increase in intracellular calcium and a strengthening of heart contractions. It is important to monitor digoxin levels closely, as too much can lead to toxicity and serious side effects.

MedlinePlus is not a medical term, but rather a consumer health website that provides high-quality, accurate, and reliable health information, written in easy-to-understand language. It is produced by the U.S. National Library of Medicine, the world's largest medical library, and is widely recognized as a trusted source of health information.

MedlinePlus offers information on various health topics, including conditions, diseases, tests, treatments, and wellness. It also provides access to drug information, medical dictionary, and encyclopedia, as well as links to clinical trials, medical news, and patient organizations. The website is available in both English and Spanish and can be accessed for free.

Glycosides are organic compounds that consist of a glycone (a sugar component) linked to a non-sugar component, known as an aglycone, via a glycosidic bond. They can be found in various plants, microorganisms, and some animals. Depending on the nature of the aglycone, glycosides can be classified into different types, such as anthraquinone glycosides, cardiac glycosides, and saponin glycosides.

These compounds have diverse biological activities and pharmacological effects. For instance:

* Cardiac glycosides, like digoxin and digitoxin, are used in the treatment of heart failure and certain cardiac arrhythmias due to their positive inotropic (contractility-enhancing) and negative chronotropic (heart rate-slowing) effects on the heart.
* Saponin glycosides have potent detergent properties and can cause hemolysis (rupture of red blood cells). They are used in various industries, including cosmetics and food processing, and have potential applications in drug delivery systems.
* Some glycosides, like amygdalin found in apricot kernels and bitter almonds, can release cyanide upon hydrolysis, making them potentially toxic.

It is important to note that while some glycosides have therapeutic uses, others can be harmful or even lethal if ingested or otherwise introduced into the body in large quantities.

Digitoxin is a cardiac glycoside drug that is derived from the foxglove plant (Digitalis lanata). It is used in the treatment of various heart conditions, particularly congestive heart failure and certain types of arrhythmias. Digitoxin works by increasing the force of heart muscle contractions and slowing the heart rate, which helps to improve the efficiency of the heart's pumping action.

Like other cardiac glycosides, digitoxin inhibits the sodium-potassium pump in heart muscle cells, leading to an increase in intracellular calcium levels and a strengthening of heart muscle contractions. However, digitoxin has a longer half-life than other cardiac glycosides such as digoxin, which means that it stays in the body for a longer period of time and may require less frequent dosing.

Digitoxin is available in tablet form and is typically prescribed at a low dose, with regular monitoring of blood levels to ensure safe and effective use. Common side effects of digitoxin include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and dizziness. In rare cases, it can cause more serious side effects such as arrhythmias or toxicity, which may require hospitalization and treatment with medications or other interventions.

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* Diseases and conditions
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* Medical tests and procedures
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* Patient rights and responsibilities

CHI can be found in various formats, such as pamphlets, brochures, websites, videos, podcasts, and social media. It is essential to ensure that CHI is accurate, unbiased, and up-to-date to help consumers make informed decisions about their health and healthcare. The goal of CHI is to empower individuals to take an active role in managing their health and making healthcare choices that are right for them.

... is a cardiac glycoside. It is an acetyl derivative of digoxin and an isomer of β-acetyldigoxin. It increases ... α-acetyldigoxin in the ChemIDplus database v t e (Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata, Articles ... The effects of α-acetyldigoxin begin 3-4 hours after administration, and maximize after 6-8 hours. It is prescribed for ...
Members include: acetyldigitoxins acetyldigoxins cymarine digitoxin digitoxigenin digoxigenin digoxin medigoxin neoconvalloside ...
... acetyldigoxins MeSH D09.408.180.261.436.500 - medigoxin MeSH D09.408.180.261.657 - lanatosides MeSH D09.408.180.261.657.200 - ...
... acetyldigoxins MeSH D04.808.155.160.349.350 - digoxigenin MeSH D04.808.155.160.349.500 - medigoxin MeSH D04.808.155.160.861 - ... acetyldigoxins MeSH D04.808.155.580.261.436.500 - medigoxin MeSH D04.808.155.580.261.657 - lanatosides MeSH D04.808.155.580. ...
C01AA01 Acetyldigitoxin C01AA02 Acetyldigoxin C01AA03 Digitalis leaves C01AA04 Digitoxin C01AA05 Digoxin C01AA06 Lanatoside C ... C01AA07 Deslanoside C01AA08 Metildigoxin C01AA09 Gitoformate C01AA52 Acetyldigoxin, combinations C01AB01 Proscillaridin C01AB51 ...
α-Acetyldigoxin is a cardiac glycoside. It is an acetyl derivative of digoxin and an isomer of β-acetyldigoxin. It increases ... α-acetyldigoxin in the ChemIDplus database v t e (Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata, Articles ... The effects of α-acetyldigoxin begin 3-4 hours after administration, and maximize after 6-8 hours. It is prescribed for ...
Atenolol may cause heart failure in some patients. Check with your doctor right away if you are having chest pain or discomfort, dilated neck veins, extreme fatigue, irregular breathing or heartbeat, swelling of the face, fingers, feet, or lower legs, trouble breathing, or weight gain. Do not suddenly stop taking this medicine without first checking with your doctor. Your doctor may want you to gradually reduce the amount you are taking before stopping it completely. Some conditions may become worse when the medicine is stopped suddenly, which can be dangerous. Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are using this medicine. Do not stop taking this medicine before surgery without your doctors approval. This medicine may cause changes in blood sugar levels. Also, this medicine may cover up the symptoms of low blood sugar (including fast heartbeat) and increase the risk for serious or prolonged hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Check with your doctor if you notice a change in ...
Acetyldigoxin Cardiotonic Digitalis lanata (Grecian foxglove, woolly foxglove). Adoniside Cardiotonic Adonis vernalis ( ...
(3ß, 5ß)-3-((6-Deoxy-a-L-mannopyranosyl)oxy)-5,14-dihydroxy-19-oxo-card-20(22)-enolideLily-Of-The-Valley (Convallaria majalis)
as in the case of 12-acetyldigoxin). Since the 12 beta-OH group is not required for CG-like activity, to account for these ... digoxin, SC4453, digoxigenin, lanatoside C, alpha- and beta-methyldigoxin, dihydrodigoxin, alpha- and beta-acetyldigoxin, alpha ...
D4.808.155.580.130.625.259 Acetyldigoxins D4.808.155.160.349.50 D4.808.155.580.130.688.50 Acidaminococcus B3.440.425.410.96.20 ...
Acetyldigoxins D4.808.155.580.130.500.436.50 D4.210.500.155.580.130.500.436.50 D4.808.155.580.130.688.50 D4.210.500.155.580.130 ...
Acetyldigoxins [D04.210.500.155.580.130.688.050] * Digoxigenin [D04.210.500.155.580.130.688.350] * Medigoxin [D04.210.500.155. ...
C01AA52: acetildigoxina, combinaciones - acetyldigoxin, combinations *C01AB: Glucósidos de la escila - Scilla glycosides * ...
Acetyldigoxin. Cardiotonic. Digitalis lanata (foxglove). Allyl isothiocyanate. Rubefaciant. Brassica nigra (black mustard). ...
Digoxin: Meloxicam 15 mg once daily for 7 days did not alter the plasma concentration profile of digoxin after β-acetyldigoxin ...
Acetyldigoxins D4.808.155.580.130.500.436.50 D4.210.500.155.580.130.500.436.50 D4.808.155.580.130.688.50 D4.210.500.155.580.130 ...
alpha-Acetyldigoxin Narrower Concept UI. M0000183. Registry Number. 0. Terms. alpha-Acetyldigoxin Preferred Term Term UI ... beta-Acetyldigoxin Narrower Concept UI. M0000184. Registry Number. P7K44M64CW. Terms. beta-Acetyldigoxin Preferred Term Term UI ... alpha-Acetyldigoxin beta-Acetyldigoxin digox von ct glycotop Pharm Action. Anti-Arrhythmia Agents. Cardiotonic Agents. Enzyme ... Acetyldigoxins Preferred Term Term UI T000332. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1979). ...
alpha-Acetyldigoxin Narrower Concept UI. M0000183. Registry Number. 0. Terms. alpha-Acetyldigoxin Preferred Term Term UI ... beta-Acetyldigoxin Narrower Concept UI. M0000184. Registry Number. P7K44M64CW. Terms. beta-Acetyldigoxin Preferred Term Term UI ... alpha-Acetyldigoxin beta-Acetyldigoxin digox von ct glycotop Pharm Action. Anti-Arrhythmia Agents. Cardiotonic Agents. Enzyme ... Acetyldigoxins Preferred Term Term UI T000332. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1979). ...
... beta-acetyldigoxin, E0557768,Hevizos,epervudine, E0557784,Hyalase,hyaluronidase, E0557814,Indermil,tissue adhesive, E0558089, ...
Chloride N0000167628 Acetylcholinesterase N0000006327 Acetylcysteine N0000168448 Acetyldigitoxins N0000168451 Acetyldigoxins ...
Digoxin: Meloxicam 15 mg once daily for 7 days did not alter the plasma concentration profile of digoxin after β-acetyldigoxin ...
D4.808.155.580.130.500.336.259 Acetyldigoxins D4.808.155.580.261.436.50 D4.808.155.580.130.500.436.50 Acidosis, Renal Tubular ...

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