Acetobacteraceae: A family of gram-negative aerobic bacteria consisting of ellipsoidal to rod-shaped cells that occur singly, in pairs, or in chains.Gluconobacter oxydans: A rod-shaped to ellipsoidal, gram-negative bacterium which oxidizes ethanol to acetic acid and prefers sugar-enriched environments. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)Gluconobacter: A genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped to ellipsoidal bacteria occurring singly or in pairs and found in flowers, soil, honey bees, fruits, cider, beer, wine, and vinegar. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)Rhodospirillales: An order of photosynthetic bacteria representing a physiological community of predominantly aquatic bacteria.Acetobacter: A species of gram-negative bacteria of the family ACETOBACTERACEAE found in FLOWERS and FRUIT. Cells are ellipsoidal to rod-shaped and straight or slightly curved.Peptide Synthases: Ligases that catalyze the joining of adjacent AMINO ACIDS by the formation of carbon-nitrogen bonds between their carboxylic acid groups and amine groups.Pseudomonadaceae: A family of gram-negative bacteria usually found in soil or water and including many plant pathogens and a few animal pathogens.Databases, Protein: Databases containing information about PROTEINS such as AMINO ACID SEQUENCE; PROTEIN CONFORMATION; and other properties.Californium: Californium. A man-made radioactive actinide with atomic symbol Cf, atomic number 98, and atomic weight 251. Its valence can be +2 or +3. Californium has medical use as a radiation source for radiotherapy.Sorbose: A ketose sugar that is commonly used in the commercial synthesis of ASCORBIC ACID.Panicum: A plant genus of the family POACEAE. The seed is one of the EDIBLE GRAINS used in millet cereals and in feed for birds and livestock (ANIMAL FEED). It contains diosgenin (SAPONINS).Wetlands: Environments or habitats at the interface between truly terrestrial ecosystems and truly aquatic systems making them different from each yet highly dependent on both. Adaptations to low soil oxygen characterize many wetland species.Biohazard Release: Uncontrolled release of biological material from its containment. This either threatens to, or does, cause exposure to a biological hazard. Such an incident may occur accidentally or deliberately.Containment of Biohazards: Provision of physical and biological barriers to the dissemination of potentially hazardous biologically active agents (bacteria, viruses, recombinant DNA, etc.). Physical containment involves the use of special equipment, facilities, and procedures to prevent the escape of the agent. Biological containment includes use of immune personnel and the selection of agents and hosts that will minimize the risk should the agent escape the containment facility.Laboratory Infection: Accidentally acquired infection in laboratory workers.Gentian Violet: A dye that is a mixture of violet rosanilinis with antibacterial, antifungal, and anthelmintic properties.PhenazinesIndustrial Microbiology: The study, utilization, and manipulation of those microorganisms capable of economically producing desirable substances or changes in substances, and the control of undesirable microorganisms.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Acetic Acid: Product of the oxidation of ethanol and of the destructive distillation of wood. It is used locally, occasionally internally, as a counterirritant and also as a reagent. (Stedman, 26th ed)Gluconacetobacter xylinus: A species of acetate-oxidizing bacteria, formerly known as Acetobacter xylinum.Gluconacetobacter: A genus in the family ACETOBACTERACEAE comprised of acetate-oxidizing bacteria.Cacao: A tree of the family Sterculiaceae (or Byttneriaceae), usually Theobroma cacao, or its seeds, which after fermentation and roasting, yield cocoa and chocolate.Alphaproteobacteria: A class in the phylum PROTEOBACTERIA comprised mostly of two major phenotypes: purple non-sulfur bacteria and aerobic bacteriochlorophyll-containing bacteria.Alcohol Dehydrogenase: A zinc-containing enzyme which oxidizes primary and secondary alcohols or hemiacetals in the presence of NAD. In alcoholic fermentation, it catalyzes the final step of reducing an aldehyde to an alcohol in the presence of NADH and hydrogen.Cellulose: A polysaccharide with glucose units linked as in CELLOBIOSE. It is the chief constituent of plant fibers, cotton being the purest natural form of the substance. As a raw material, it forms the basis for many derivatives used in chromatography, ion exchange materials, explosives manufacturing, and pharmaceutical preparations.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Ethnobotany: The study of plant lore and agricultural customs of a people. In the fields of ETHNOMEDICINE and ETHNOPHARMACOLOGY, the emphasis is on traditional medicine and the existence and medicinal uses of PLANTS and PLANT EXTRACTS and their constituents, both historically and in modern times.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Medicine, Traditional: Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.Interior Design and Furnishings: The planning of the furnishings and decorations of an architectural interior.Classification: The systematic arrangement of entities in any field into categories classes based on common characteristics such as properties, morphology, subject matter, etc.Political Systems: The units based on political theory and chosen by countries under which their governmental power is organized and administered to their citizens.Roman World: A historical and cultural entity dispersed across a wide geographical area under the political domination and influence of ancient Rome, bringing to the conquered people the Roman civilization and culture from 753 B.C. to the beginning of the imperial rule under Augustus in 27 B.C. The early city built on seven hills grew to conquer Sicily, Sardinia, Carthage, Gaul, Spain, Britain, Greece, Asia Minor, etc., and extended ultimately from Mesopotamia to the Atlantic. Roman medicine was almost entirely in Greek hands, but Rome, with its superior water system, remains a model of sanitation and hygiene. (From A. Castiglioni, A History of Medicine, 2d ed pp196-99; from F. H. Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine, 4th ed, pp107-120)Dental Plaque: A film that attaches to teeth, often causing DENTAL CARIES and GINGIVITIS. It is composed of MUCINS, secreted from salivary glands, and microorganisms.Plants, Medicinal: Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.Biotechnology: Body of knowledge related to the use of organisms, cells or cell-derived constituents for the purpose of developing products which are technically, scientifically and clinically useful. Alteration of biologic function at the molecular level (i.e., GENETIC ENGINEERING) is a central focus; laboratory methods used include TRANSFECTION and CLONING technologies, sequence and structure analysis algorithms, computer databases, and gene and protein structure function analysis and prediction.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Epidemiology: Field of medicine concerned with the determination of causes, incidence, and characteristic behavior of disease outbreaks affecting human populations. It includes the interrelationships of host, agent, and environment as related to the distribution and control of disease.Reference Books, Medical: Books in the field of medicine intended primarily for consultation.BooksTextbooks as Topic: Books used in the study of a subject that contain a systematic presentation of the principles and vocabulary of a subject.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.): An agency of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that conducts and supports programs for the prevention and control of disease and provides consultation and assistance to health departments and other countries.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Inventions: A novel composition, device, or process, independently conceived de novo or derived from a pre-existing model.
(1/68) Microbial reduction of Fe(III) in acidic sediments: isolation of Acidiphilium cryptum JF-5 capable of coupling the reduction of Fe(III) to the oxidation of glucose.

To evaluate the microbial populations involved in the reduction of Fe(III) in an acidic, iron-rich sediment, the anaerobic flow of supplemental carbon and reductant was evaluated in sediment microcosms at the in situ temperature of 12 degrees C. Supplemental glucose and cellobiose stimulated the formation of Fe(II); 42 and 21% of the reducing equivalents that were theoretically obtained from glucose and cellobiose, respectively, were recovered in Fe(II). Likewise, supplemental H(2) was consumed by acidic sediments and yielded additional amounts of Fe(II) in a ratio of approximately 1:2. In contrast, supplemental lactate did not stimulate the formation of Fe(II). Supplemental acetate was not consumed and inhibited the formation of Fe(II). Most-probable-number estimates demonstrated that glucose-utilizing acidophilic Fe(III)-reducing bacteria approximated to 1% of the total direct counts of 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole-stained bacteria. From the highest growth-positive dilution of the most-probable-number series at pH 2. 3 supplemented with glucose, an isolate, JF-5, that could dissimilate Fe(III) was obtained. JF-5 was an acidophilic, gram-negative, facultative anaerobe that completely oxidized the following substrates via the dissimilation of Fe(III): glucose, fructose, xylose, ethanol, glycerol, malate, glutamate, fumarate, citrate, succinate, and H(2). Growth and the reduction of Fe(III) did not occur in the presence of acetate. Cells of JF-5 grown under Fe(III)-reducing conditions formed blebs, i.e., protrusions that were still in contact with the cytoplasmic membrane. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of JF-5 demonstrated that it was closely related to an Australian isolate of Acidiphilium cryptum (99.6% sequence similarity), an organism not previously shown to couple the complete oxidation of sugars to the reduction of Fe(III). These collective results indicate that the in situ reduction of Fe(III) in acidic sediments can be mediated by heterotrophic Acidiphilium species that are capable of coupling the reduction of Fe(III) to the complete oxidation of a large variety of substrates including glucose and H(2).  (+info)

(2/68) Acetogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria inhabiting the rhizoplane and deep cortex cells of the sea grass Halodule wrightii.

Recent declines in sea grass distribution underscore the importance of understanding microbial community structure-function relationships in sea grass rhizospheres that might affect the viability of these plants. Phospholipid fatty acid analyses showed that sulfate-reducing bacteria and clostridia were enriched in sediments colonized by the sea grasses Halodule wrightii and Thalassia testudinum compared to an adjacent unvegetated sediment. Most-probable-number analyses found that in contrast to butyrate-producing clostridia, acetogens and acetate-utilizing sulfate reducers were enriched by an order of magnitude in rhizosphere sediments. Although sea grass roots are oxygenated in the daytime, colorimetric root incubation studies demonstrated that acetogenic O-demethylation and sulfidogenic iron precipitation activities were tightly associated with washed, sediment-free H. wrightii roots. This suggests that the associated anaerobes are able to tolerate exposure to oxygen. To localize and quantify the anaerobic microbial colonization, root thin sections were hybridized with newly developed (33)P-labeled probes that targeted (i) low-G+C-content gram-positive bacteria, (ii) cluster I species of clostridia, (iii) species of Acetobacterium, and (iv) species of Desulfovibrio. Microautoradiography revealed intercellular colonization of the roots by Acetobacterium and Desulfovibrio species. Acetogenic bacteria occurred mostly in the rhizoplane and outermost cortex cell layers, and high numbers of sulfate reducers were detected on all epidermal cells and inward, colonizing some 60% of the deepest cortex cells. Approximately 30% of epidermal cells were colonized by bacteria that hybridized with an archaeal probe, strongly suggesting the presence of methanogens. Obligate anaerobes within the roots might contribute to the vitality of sea grasses and other aquatic plants and to the biogeochemistry of the surrounding sediment.  (+info)

(3/68) Description of Gluconacetobacter sacchari sp. nov., a new species of acetic acid bacterium isolated from the leaf sheath of sugar cane and from the pink sugar-cane mealy bug.

A new species of the genus Gluconacetobacter, for which the name Gluconacetobacter sacchari sp. nov. is proposed, was isolated from the leaf sheath of sugar cane and from the pink sugar-cane mealy bug, Saccharicoccus sacchari, found on sugar cane growing in Queensland and northern New South Wales, Australia. The nearest phylogenetic relatives in the alpha-subclass of the Proteobacteria are Gluconacetobacter liquefaciens and Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus, which have 98.8-99.3% and 97.9-98.5% 16S rDNA sequence similarity, respectively, to members of Gluconacetobacter sacchari. On the basis of the phylogenetic positioning of the strains, DNA reassociation studies, phenotypic tests and the presence of the Q10 ubiquinone, this new species was assigned to the genus Gluconacetobacter. No single phenotypic characteristic is unique to the species, but the species can be differentiated phenotypically from closely related members of the acetic acid bacteria by growth in the presence of 0.01% malachite green, growth on 30% glucose, an inability to fix nitrogen and an inability to grow with the L-amino acids asparagine, glycine, glutamine, threonine and tryptophan when D-mannitol was supplied as the sole carbon and energy source. The type strain of this species is strain SRI 1794T (= DSM 12717T).  (+info)

(4/68) Magnesium insertion by magnesium chelatase in the biosynthesis of zinc bacteriochlorophyll a in an aerobic acidophilic bacterium Acidiphilium rubrum.

To elucidate the mechanism for formation of zinc-containing bacteriochlorophyll a in the photosynthetic bacterium Acidiphilium rubrum, we isolated homologs of magnesium chelatase subunits (bchI, -D, and -H). A. rubrum bchI and -H were encoded by single genes located on the clusters bchP-orf168-bchI-bchD-orf320-crtI and bchF-N-B-H-L as in Rhodobacter capsulatus, respectively. The deduced sequences of A. rubrum bchI, -D, and -H had overall identities of 59. 8, 40.5, and 50.7% to those from Rba. capsulatus, respectively. When these genes were introduced into bchI, bchD, and bchH mutants of Rba. capsulatus for functional complementation, all mutants were complemented with concomitant synthesis of bacteriochlorophyll a. Analyses of bacteriochlorophyll intermediates showed that A. rubrum cells accumulate magnesium protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester without detectable accumulation of zinc protoporphyrin IX or its monomethyl ester. These results indicate that a single set of magnesium chelatase homologs in A. rubrum catalyzes the insertion of only Mg(2+) into protoporphyrin IX to yield magnesium protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester. Consequently, it is most likely that zinc-containing bacteriochlorophyll a is formed by a substitution of Zn(2+) for Mg(2+) at a step in the bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis after formation of magnesium protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester.  (+info)

(5/68) Evaluation of a fluorescent lectin-based staining technique for some acidophilic mining bacteria.

A fluorescence-labeled wheat germ agglutinin staining technique (R. K. Sizemore et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 56:2245-2247, 1990) was modified and found to be effective for staining gram-positive, acidophilic mining bacteria. Bacteria identified by others as being gram positive through 16S rRNA sequence analyses, yet clustering near the divergence of that group, stained weakly. Gram-negative bacteria did not stain. Background staining of environmental samples was negligible, and pyrite and soil particles in the samples did not interfere with the staining procedure.  (+info)

(6/68) Development and application of small-subunit rRNA probes for assessment of selected Thiobacillus species and members of the genus Acidiphilium.

Culture-dependent studies have implicated sulfur-oxidizing bacteria as the causative agents of acid mine drainage and concrete corrosion in sewers. Thiobacillus species are considered the major representatives of the acid-producing bacteria in these environments. Small-subunit rRNA genes from all of the Thiobacillus and Acidiphilium species catalogued by the Ribosomal Database Project were identified and used to design oligonucleotide DNA probes. Two oligonucleotide probes were synthesized to complement variable regions of 16S rRNA in the following acidophilic bacteria: Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and T. thiooxidans (probe Thio820) and members of the genus Acidiphilium (probe Acdp821). Using (32)P radiolabels, probe specificity was characterized by hybridization dissociation temperature (T(d)) with membrane-immobilized RNA extracted from a suite of 21 strains representing three groups of bacteria. Fluorochrome-conjugated probes were evaluated for use with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) at the experimentally determined T(d)s. FISH was used to identify and enumerate bacteria in laboratory reactors and environmental samples. Probing of laboratory reactors inoculated with a mixed culture of acidophilic bacteria validated the ability of the oligonucleotide probes to track specific cell numbers with time. Additionally, probing of sediments from an active acid mine drainage site in Colorado demonstrated the ability to identify numbers of active bacteria in natural environments that contain high concentrations of metals, associated precipitates, and other mineral debris.  (+info)

(7/68) Identification of acetic acid bacteria by RFLP of PCR-amplified 16S rDNA and 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer.

DNA corresponding to 16S rDNA and the 165-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (ITS) from 22 reference strains of acetic acid bacteria, representing the diversity of the family Acetobacteraceae, and 24 indigenous acetic acid bacteria isolated from wine fermentations were analysed by PCR-RFLP. Frateuria aurantia LMG 1558T and Escherichia coli ATCC 11775T were included as outgroups. PCR-amplified products of about 1450 bp were obtained from the 16S rDNA of all the strains and products of between 675 and 800 bp were obtained from the 16S-23S rDNA ITS. PCR products were digested with 4-base-cutting restriction enzymes in order to evaluate the degree of polymorphism existing among these strains. Of the enzymes tested, Taql and Rsal were the most discriminatory and showed no intraspecific variations in the restriction patterns. Restriction analysis of the 16S rDNA with these enzymes is proposed as a rapid and reliable method to identify acetic acid bacteria at the level of genus and species (or related species group) and its applicability to identification of indigenous acetic acid bacteria was demonstrated. The same degree of distinction as that for the 16S rDNA analysis was obtained within reference strains of acetic acid bacteria by PCR-RFLP of the 16S-23S rDNA ITS. However, 16S-23S rDNA ITS restriction patterns of strains isolated from wine did not match those of any of the reference strains. Thus, PCR-RFLP of the 16S-23S rDNA ITS is not a useful method to identify isolates of acetic acid bacteria at the species level, although it may be an adequate method to detect intraspecific differentiation.  (+info)

(8/68) Asaia siamensis sp. nov., an acetic acid bacterium in the alpha-proteobacteria.

Five bacterial strains were isolated from tropical flowers collected in Thailand and Indonesia by the enrichment culture approach for acetic acid bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the isolates were located within the cluster of the genus Asaia. The isolates constituted a group separate from Asaia bogorensis on the basis of DNA relatedness values. Their DNA G+C contents were 58.6-59.7 mol%, with a range of 1.1 mol%, which were slightly lower than that of A. bogorensis (59.3-61.0 mol%), the type species of the genus Asaia. The isolates had morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics similar to A. bogorensis strains, but the isolates did not produce acid from dulcitol. On the basis of the results obtained, the name Asaia siamensis sp. nov. is proposed for these isolates. Strain S60-1T, isolated from a flower of crown flower (dok rak, Calotropis gigantea) collected in Bangkok, Thailand, was designated the type strain ( = NRIC 0323T = JCM 10715T = IFO 16457T).  (+info)

*  Saccharibacter
... is a bacterial genus from the family of Acetobacteraceae. Up to now there is only one species of this genus ...
*  Acetobacteraceae
... is a family of gram-negative bacteria. The type genus is Acetobacter. Ten genera from Acetobacteraceae make up ... Acetobacteraceae page on the List of Prokaryotic Names with Standing "Family Acetobacteraceae". List of Prokaryotic Names with ... Acetobacteraceae was proposed as a family for Acetobacter and Gluconobacter based on rRNA and DNA-DNA hybridization comparisons ...
*  Alphaproteobacteria
Rickettsiaceae, Anaplasmataceae, Rhodospirillaceae, Acetobacteraceae, Bradyrhiozobiaceae, Brucellaceae and Bartonellaceae). ...
*  Microbiome in the Drosophila gut
30%, members of the Firmicutes) and Acetobacteraceae (approx. 55%, members of the Proteobacteria). Other less common bacterial ... such as Acetobacteraceae and Lactobacillaceae) if compared to fruit-eating species such as Drosophila hydei, Drosophila ...
*  Belnapia
... is a genus of bacteria from the family of Acetobacteraceae. Parte, A.C. "Belnapia". www.bacterio.net. "Belnapia". www. ...
*  Kozakia
... is a genus of bacteria from the family of Acetobacteraceae. Up to now there is only one species of this genus known ( ... the First Sequenced Kozakia Strain from the Family Acetobacteraceae". Genome Announcements. 2 (3): e00594-14-e00594-14. doi: ...
*  Granulibacter bethesdensis
nov., a distinctive pathogenic acetic acid bacterium in the family Acetobacteraceae". Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. Pt 11. 56: ...
*  Rhodospirillales
The Acetobacteraceae comprise the acetic acid bacteria, which are heterotrophic and produce acetic acid during their ... The Rhodospirillales are an order of Proteobacteria, with two families: the Acetobacteraceae and the Rhodospirillaceae. ...
*  Granulibacter
... is a Gram-negative and non-motile bacterial genus from the family of Acetobacteraceae. Up to now there is only ...
*  Asaia
... is a genus of Gram-negative, aerobic and rod-shaped bacteria from the family of Acetobacteraceae which occur in tropical ...
*  Craurococcus
... is a Gram-negative and non-motile genus of bacteria from the family of Acetobacteraceae with one known species ( ...
*  List of MeSH codes (B03)
... acetobacteraceae MeSH B03.440.400.425.100.100 --- Acetobacter MeSH B03.440.400.425.100.110 --- Acidiphilium MeSH B03.440. ... acetobacteraceae MeSH B03.660.050.663.050.010 --- Acetobacter MeSH B03.660.050.663.050.020 --- Acidiphilium MeSH B03.660. ...
*  Bacterial taxonomy
... such as Pectobacterium Acetic acid bacteria are members of the family Acetobacteraceae The abbreviation for species is sp. ( ...
Acetobacter xylinum | definition of Acetobacter xylinum by Medical dictionary  Acetobacter xylinum | definition of Acetobacter xylinum by Medical dictionary
Ace·to·bac·ter/ (ah-se″to-bak´ter) a genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (family Acetobacteraceae), made up of ...
more infohttp://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Acetobacter+xylinum
Figure 1 - Recurrent Granulibacter bethesdensis Infections and Chronic Granulomatous Disease - Volume 16, Number 9-September...  Figure 1 - Recurrent Granulibacter bethesdensis Infections and Chronic Granulomatous Disease - Volume 16, Number 9-September...
Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is characterized by frequent infections, most of which are curable. Granulibacter bethesdensis is an emerging pathogen in patients with CGD that causes fever and necrotizing lymphadenitis. However, unlike typical CGD organisms, this organism can cause relapse after clinical quiescence. To better define whether infections were newly acquired or recrudesced, we use comparative bacterial genomic hybridization to characterize 11 isolates obtained from 5 patients with CGD from North and Central America. Genomic typing showed that 3 patients had recurrent infection months to years after apparent clinical cure. Two patients were infected with the same strain as previously isolated, and 1 was infected with a genetically distinct strain. This organism is multidrug resistant, and therapy required surgery and combination antimicrobial drugs, including long-term ceftriaxone. G. bethesdensis causes necrotizing lymphadenitis in CGD, which may recur or relapse.
more infohttps://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/16/9/09-1800-f1
Acetobacteraceae bacterium AT-5844  Acetobacteraceae bacterium AT-5844
Proteome IDi ,p>The proteome identifier (UPID) is the unique identifier assigned to the set of proteins that constitute the ,a href="http://www.uniprot.org/manual/proteomes_manual">proteome,/a>. It consists of the characters 'UP' followed by 9 digits, is stable across releases and can therefore be used to cite a UniProt proteome.,p>,a href='/help/proteome_id' target='_top'>More...,/a>,/p> ...
more infohttps://www.uniprot.org/proteomes/UP000003292
Acetobacteraceae | definition of Acetobacteraceae by Medical dictionary  Acetobacteraceae | definition of Acetobacteraceae by Medical dictionary
What is Acetobacteraceae? Meaning of Acetobacteraceae medical term. What does Acetobacteraceae mean? ... Looking for online definition of Acetobacteraceae in the Medical Dictionary? Acetobacteraceae explanation free. ... redirected from Acetobacteraceae). Also found in: Encyclopedia. acetic acid bacteria. Any of a family of bacteria that oxidize ... Other members of this microbial family, Acetobacteraceae, are used in the vinegar-making industry and aren't known to cause ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Acetobacteraceae
Acetobacteraceae - Wikipedia  Acetobacteraceae - Wikipedia
Acetobacteraceae is a family of gram-negative bacteria. The type genus is Acetobacter. Ten genera from Acetobacteraceae make up ... Acetobacteraceae page on the List of Prokaryotic Names with Standing "Family Acetobacteraceae". List of Prokaryotic Names with ... Acetobacteraceae was proposed as a family for Acetobacter and Gluconobacter based on rRNA and DNA-DNA hybridization comparisons ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acetobacteraceae
Sourdough : 70 Steps (with Pictures)  Sourdough : 70 Steps (with Pictures)
Step 22: Lactobacillales, Acetobacteraceae, Yeast. In many recipes and explanations about sourdough you will be told that it ... True acetobacteraceae need oxygen and ethanol to produce acetic acid. The full list of microorganisms in a sourdough can be ... It decreases the chance acetobacteraceae proliferate in the sourdough and produce formic acid or other bad tasting chemicals. ...
more infohttps://www.instructables.com/id/Sourdough/
Environmental Health Perspectives   -  Exposures Related to House Dust Microbiota in a U.S. Farming Population  Environmental Health Perspectives - Exposures Related to House Dust Microbiota in a U.S. Farming Population
Acetobacteraceae. 0.024. 0.047. -. 20. 4. 0. Actinobacteria. Actinomycetales (O)c. 0.024. 0.047. -. 18. 4. 0. ...
more infohttps://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/ehp3145/
SWISSPROT: A5FTY1 ACICJ  SWISSPROT: A5FTY1 ACICJ
Acetobacteraceae; Acidiphilium. OX NCBI_TaxID=349163 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:ABQ29063.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000000245}; RN [1] { ...
more infohttp://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr/cgi-bin/acnuc-search-ac?query=A5FTY1&db=SWISSPROT
Gluconacetobacter - Wikispecies  Gluconacetobacter - Wikispecies
Familia: Acetobacteraceae. Genus: Gluconacetobacter. Species: Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Name[edit]. Gluconacetobacter ...
more infohttps://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Gluconacetobacter
Granulibacter - Wikispecies  Granulibacter - Wikispecies
Familia: Acetobacteraceae. Genus: Granulibacter Species: Granulibacter bethesdensis - References[edit]. *NCBI link: ...
more infohttps://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Granulibacter
Aerobic Gram Negative Rod  Aerobic Gram Negative Rod
Acetobacteraceae, Family acetobacteraceae, Acetobacteraceae (ex Henrici 1939) Gillis and De Ley 1980, Family Acetobacteraceae ( ... Ontology: Acetobacteraceae. (C0085461) Definition (NCI) A taxonomic family of bacterium in the phylum Proteobacteria that ... A species of gram-negative bacteria of the family ACETOBACTERACEAE found in FLOWERS and FRUIT. Cells are ellipsoidal to rod- ... Aka: Aerobic Gram Negative Rod, Pseudomonadaceae, Legionellaceae, Brucella, Flavobacterium, Alcaligenes, Acetobacteraceae, ...
more infohttps://fpnotebook.com/id/Bacteria/ArbcGrmNgtvRd.htm
UniProt/SWISS-PROT: DDL GLUOX  UniProt/SWISS-PROT: DDL GLUOX
Acetobacteraceae; Gluconobacter. OX NCBI_TaxID=290633; RN [1] RP NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCE [LARGE SCALE GENOMIC DNA]. RC STRAIN=621H ...
more infohttp://www.genome.jp/dbget-bin/www_bget?sp:DDL_GLUOX
UniProt/SWISS-PROT: EFTU GRABC  UniProt/SWISS-PROT: EFTU GRABC
Acetobacteraceae; Granulibacter. OX NCBI_TaxID=391165; RN [1] RP NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCE [LARGE SCALE GENOMIC DNA]. RC STRAIN=ATCC ...
more infohttps://www.genome.jp/dbget-bin/www_bget?sp:EFTU_GRABC
Acetobacter xylinum - microbewiki  Acetobacter xylinum - microbewiki
Bactiera; Protobcteria; Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodospirllales; Acetobacteraceae; Gluconacetobacter; Acetobacter xylinum Other ...
more infohttps://microbewiki.kenyon.edu/index.php/Acetobacter_xylinum
Frontiers | Aedes spp. and Their Microbiota: A Review | Microbiology  Frontiers | Aedes spp. and Their Microbiota: A Review | Microbiology
and unclassified Acetobacteraceae, which were previously found in associations with insects relying on sugar-based diets ( ... Acetobacteraceae (e.g., Asaia), Enterococcaceae (e.g., Enterococcus), and of Bacillaceae (e.g., Bacillus) are the most- ...
more infohttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2019.02036/full
CAZy - Bacteria  CAZy - Bacteria
Lineage: cellular organisms; Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodospirillales; Acetobacteraceae; Acetobacter; ...
more infohttp://www.cazy.org/b1030.html
Acidocella aminolytica  Acidocella aminolytica
Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodospirillales; Acetobacteraceae; Acidocella. Industrial uses or economic ...
more infohttp://thelabrat.com/protocols/Bacterialspecies/Acidocellaaminolytica.shtml
CAZy - Bacteria  CAZy - Bacteria
Lineage: cellular organisms; Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Alphaproteobacteria; Rhodospirillales; Acetobacteraceae; Acetobacter; ...
more infohttp://www.cazy.org/b1032.html
  • Bacteria commonly associated with fruit ( Acetobacteraceae , Enterobacteriaceae , and Leuconostocaceae ) were detected in wild larvae, but were largely absent from domesticated larvae. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Ace·to·bac·ter/ ( ah-se″to-bak´ter ) a genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (family Acetobacteraceae), made up of nonsporogenous organisms that produce acetic acid from ethanol and found in fruits, vegetables, souring juices, and alcoholic beverages. (thefreedictionary.com)