A species of gram-negative bacteria of the family ACETOBACTERACEAE found in FLOWERS and FRUIT. Cells are ellipsoidal to rod-shaped and straight or slightly curved.
A species of acetate-oxidizing bacteria, formerly known as Acetobacter xylinum.
Product of the oxidation of ethanol and of the destructive distillation of wood. It is used locally, occasionally internally, as a counterirritant and also as a reagent. (Stedman, 26th ed)
A polysaccharide with glucose units linked as in CELLOBIOSE. It is the chief constituent of plant fibers, cotton being the purest natural form of the substance. As a raw material, it forms the basis for many derivatives used in chromatography, ion exchange materials, explosives manufacturing, and pharmaceutical preparations.
A family of gram-negative aerobic bacteria consisting of ellipsoidal to rod-shaped cells that occur singly, in pairs, or in chains.
A tree of the family Sterculiaceae (or Byttneriaceae), usually Theobroma cacao, or its seeds, which after fermentation and roasting, yield cocoa and chocolate.
A family of gram-negative bacteria usually found in soil or water and including many plant pathogens and a few animal pathogens.
A subclass of heme a containing cytochromes have a reduced alpha-band absorption of 587-592 nm. They are primarily found in microorganisms.
Cytochromes (electron-transporting proteins) in which the heme prosthetic group is heme a, i.e., the iron chelate of cytoporphyrin IX. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992, p539)
A genus in the family ACETOBACTERACEAE comprised of acetate-oxidizing bacteria.
An enzyme that catalyzes the formation of UDPglucose from UTP plus glucose 1-phosphate. EC 2.7.7.9.
A ketotriose compound. Its addition to blood preservation solutions results in better maintenance of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels during storage. It is readily phosphorylated to dihydroxyacetone phosphate by triokinase in erythrocytes. In combination with naphthoquinones it acts as a sunscreening agent.
A potent eye, throat, and skin irritant. One of its uses is as a riot control agent.
Derivatives of OXALOACETIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that include a 2-keto-1,4-carboxy aliphatic structure.
A plant genus of the family ANACARDIACEAE best known for the edible fruit.
Hydroxylated benzoic acid derivatives that contain mercury. Some of these are used as sulfhydryl reagents in biochemical studies.
A plant genus of the family POACEAE widely cultivated in the tropics for the sweet cane that is processed into sugar.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Anaerobic degradation of GLUCOSE or other organic nutrients to gain energy in the form of ATP. End products vary depending on organisms, substrates, and enzymatic pathways. Common fermentation products include ETHANOL and LACTIC ACID.

Digestion of crystalline cellulose substrates by the clostridium thermocellum cellulosome: structural and morphological aspects. (1/162)

The action of cellulosomes from Clostridium thermocellum on model cellulose microfibrils from Acetobacter xylinum and cellulose microcrystals from Valonia ventricosa was investigated. The biodegradation of these substrates was followed by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier-transform IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis, as a function of the extent of degradation. The cellulosomes were very effective in catalysing the complete digestion of bacterial cellulose, but the total degradation of Valonia microcrystals was achieved more slowly. Ultrastructural observations during the digestion process suggested that the rapid degradation of bacterial cellulose was the result of a very efficient synergistic action of the various enzymic components that are attached to the scaffolding protein of the cellulosomes. The degraded Valonia sample assumed various shapes, ranging from thinned-down microcrystals to crystals where one end was pointed and the other intact. This complexity may be correlated with the multi-enzyme content of the cellulosomes and possibly to a diversity of the cellulosome composition within a given batch. Another aspect of the digestion of model celluloses by cellulosomes is the relative invariability of their crystallinity, together with their Ialpha/Ibeta composition throughout the degradation process. Comparison of the action of cellulosomes with that of fungal enzymes indicated that the degradation of cellulose crystals by cellulosomes occurred with only limited levels of processivity, in contrast with the observations reported for fungal enzymes. The findings were consistent with a mechanism whereby initial attack by a cellulosome of an individual cellulose crystal results in its 'commitment' towards complete degradation.  (+info)

The respiratory system and diazotrophic activity of Acetobacter diazotrophicus PAL5. (2/162)

The characteristics of the respiratory system of Acetobacter diazotrophicus PAL5 were investigated. Increasing aeration (from 0.5 to 4.0 liters of air min(-1) liter of medium(-1)) had a strong positive effect on growth and on the diazotrophic activity of cultures. Cells obtained from well-aerated and diazotrophically active cultures possessed a highly active, membrane-bound electron transport system with dehydrogenases for NADH, glucose, and acetaldehyde as the main electron donors. Ethanol, succinate, and gluconate were also oxidized but to only a minor extent. Terminal cytochrome c oxidase-type activity was poor as measured by reduced N, N,N,N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine, but quinol oxidase-type activity, as measured by 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-1,4-benzenediol, was high. Spectral and high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis of membranes revealed the presence of cytochrome ba as a putative oxidase in cells obtained from diazotrophically active cultures. Cells were also rich in c-type cytochromes; four bands of high molecular mass (i.e., 67, 56, 52, and 45 kDa) were revealed by a peroxidase activity stain in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. KCN inhibition curves of respiratory oxidase activities were biphasic, with a highly resistant component. Treatment of membranes with 0.2% Triton X-100 solubilized c-type cytochromes and resulted in a preparation that was significantly more sensitive to cyanide. Repression of diazotrophic activity in well-aerated cultures by 40 mM (NH(4))(2)SO(4) caused a significant decrease of the respiratory activities. It is noteworthy that the levels of glucose dehydrogenase and putative oxidase ba decreased 6. 8- and 10-fold, respectively. In these cells, a bd-type cytochrome seems to be the major terminal oxidase. Thus, it would seem that glucose dehydrogenase and cytochrome ba are key components of the respiratory system of A. diazotrophicus during aerobic diazotrophy.  (+info)

Acid hydrolysis of bacterial cellulose reveals different modes of synergistic action between cellobiohydrolase I and endoglucanase I. (3/162)

Intact and partially acid hydrolyzed cellulose from Acetobacter xylinum were used as model substrates for cellulose hydrolysis by 1,4-beta-D-glucan-cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I) and 1,4-beta-D-endoglucanase I (EG I) from Trichoderma reesei. A high synergy between CBH I and EG I in simultaneous action was observed with intact bacterial cellulose (BC), but this synergistic effect was rapidly reduced by acid pretreatment of the cellulose. Moreover, a distinct synergistic effect was observed upon sequential endo-exo action on BC, but not on bacterial microcrystalline cellulose (BMCC). A mechanism for endo-exo synergism on crystalline cellulose is proposed where the simultaneous action of the enzymes counteract the decrease of activity caused by undesirable changes in the cellulose surface microstructure.  (+info)

Identification of essential amino acids in the bacterial alpha -mannosyltransferase aceA. (4/162)

The alpha-mannosyltransferase AceA from Acetobacter xylinum belongs to the CaZY family 4 of retaining glycosyltransferases. We have identified a series of either highly conserved or invariant residues that are found in all family 4 enzymes as well as other retaining glycosyltransferases. These residues included Glu-287 and Glu-295, which comprise an EX(7)E motif and have been proposed to be involved in catalysis. Alanine replacements of each conserved residue were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The mannosyltransferase activity of each mutant was examined by both an in vitro transferase assay using recombinant mutant AceA expressed in Escherichia coli and by an in vivo rescue assay by expressing the mutant AceA in a Xanthomonas campestris gumH(-) strain. We found that only mutants K211A and E287A lost all detectable activity both in vitro and in vivo, whereas E295A retained residual activity in the more sensitive in vivo assay. H127A and S162A each retained reduced but significant activities both in vitro and in vivo. Secondary structure predictions of AceA and subsequent comparison with the crystal structures of the T4 beta-glucosyltransferase and MurG suggest that AceA Lys-211 and Glu-295 are involved in nucleotide sugar donor binding, leaving Glu-287 of the EX(7)E as a potential catalytic residue.  (+info)

Characterization of a major cluster of nif, fix, and associated genes in a sugarcane endophyte, Acetobacter diazotrophicus. (5/162)

A major 30.5-kb cluster of nif and associated genes of Acetobacter diazotrophicus (syn. Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus), a nitrogen-fixing endophyte of sugarcane, was sequenced and analyzed. This cluster represents the largest assembly of contiguous nif-fix and associated genes so far characterized in any diazotrophic bacterial species. Northern blots and promoter sequence analysis indicated that the genes are organized into eight transcriptional units. The overall arrangement of genes is most like that of the nif-fix cluster in Azospirillum brasilense, while the individual gene products are more similar to those in species of Rhizobiaceae or in Rhodobacter capsulatus.  (+info)

Gluconacetobacter entanii sp. nov., isolated from submerged high-acid industrial vinegar fermentations. (6/162)

Acetic acid bacteria have been isolated from submerged high-acid spirit vinegar fermentations in the Southern part of Germany. Four strains (LTH 4560T, LTH 4341, LTH 4551 and LTH 4637) were characterized in more detail and it was revealed that they have in common certain properties such as requirement of acetic acid, ethanol and glucose for growth, and no over-oxidation of acetate. Growth occurs only at total concentrations (sum of acetic acid and ethanol) exceeding 6.0%. A method for their preservation was developed. Comparative analysis of the 16S rRNA revealed sequence similarities of >99% between strain LTH 4560T and the type strains of the related species Gluconacetobacter hansenii. However, low levels of DNA relatedness (<41 %) were determined in DNA-DNA similarity studies. In addition, specific physiological characteristics permitted a clear identification of the strains within established species of acetic acid bacteria. The strains could also be differentiated on the basis of the distribution of IS element 1031 C within the chromosome. Based on these results, the new species Gluconacetobacter entanii sp. nov. is proposed for strain LTH 4560T ( = DSM 13536T). A 16S-rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probe was constructed that was specific for G. entanii, and the phylogenetic position of the new species was derived from a 16S-rRNA-based tree.  (+info)

Transfer of Acetobacter oboediens Sokollek et al 1998 and Acetobacter intermedius Boesch et al. 1998 to the genus Gluconacetobacter as Gluconacetobacter oboediens comb. nov. and Gluconacetobacter intermedius comb. nov. (7/162)

Acetobacter oboediens Sokollek et al. 1998 and Acetobacter intermedius Boesch et al. 1998 are transferred to the genus Gluconacetobacter as Gluconacetobacter oboediens comb. nov. and Gluconacetobacter intermedius comb. nov. because, on the basis of their 16S rRNA gene sequences, the type strains of both species are located in the cluster of the genus Gluconacetobacter along with those of Gluconacetobacter xylinus, Gluconacetobacter europaeus, Gluconacetobacter hansenii, Gluconacetobacter liquefaciens (the type species) and Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus. The significance of growth on mannitol agar and the presence of a ubiquinone isoprenologue composed of Q-10 is discussed for characterization of the genus Gluconacetobacter.  (+info)

Characterization of acetic acid bacteria in traditional acetic acid fermentation of rice vinegar (komesu) and unpolished rice vinegar (kurosu) produced in Japan. (8/162)

Bacterial strains were isolated from samples of Japanese rice vinegar (komesu) and unpolished rice vinegar (kurosu) fermented by the traditional static method. Fermentations have never been inoculated with a pure culture since they were started in 1907. A total of 178 isolates were divided into groups A and B on the basis of enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR and random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting analyses. The 16S ribosomal DNA sequences of strains belonging to each group showed similarities of more than 99% with Acetobacter pasteurianus. Group A strains overwhelmingly dominated all stages of fermentation of both types of vinegar. Our results indicate that appropriate strains of acetic acid bacteria have spontaneously established almost pure cultures during nearly a century of komesu and kurosu fermentation.  (+info)

'Acetobacter' is a genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that are commonly found in various environments such as soil, water, and plant surfaces. They are known for their ability to oxidize alcohols to aldehydes and then to carboxylic acids, particularly the oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid. This property makes them important in the production of vinegar and other fermented foods. Some species of Acetobacter can also cause food spoilage and may be associated with certain human infections, although they are not considered primary human pathogens.

*Gluconacetobacter xylinus*, also known as *Acetobacter xylinum*, is a gram-negative, acetic acid-producing bacterium that is commonly found in fermenting fruits, vegetables, and other plant materials. It is an obligate aerobe, which means it requires oxygen to grow. This bacterium is well-known for its ability to produce cellulose, a complex carbohydrate, as a major component of its extracellular matrix. The cellulose produced by *G. xylinus* is pure and highly crystalline, making it an attractive material for various industrial applications, including the production of biodegradable plastics, nanocomposites, and medical materials. In the medical field, the cellulose produced by this bacterium has been studied for its potential use in wound healing, tissue engineering, and drug delivery systems.

Acetic acid is an organic compound with the chemical formula CH3COOH. It is a colorless liquid with a pungent, vinegar-like smell and is the main component of vinegar. In medical terms, acetic acid is used as a topical antiseptic and antibacterial agent, particularly for the treatment of ear infections, external genital warts, and nail fungus. It can also be used as a preservative and solvent in some pharmaceutical preparations.

Cellulose is a complex carbohydrate that is the main structural component of the cell walls of green plants, many algae, and some fungi. It is a polysaccharide consisting of long chains of beta-glucose molecules linked together by beta-1,4 glycosidic bonds. Cellulose is insoluble in water and most organic solvents, and it is resistant to digestion by humans and non-ruminant animals due to the lack of cellulase enzymes in their digestive systems. However, ruminants such as cows and sheep can digest cellulose with the help of microbes in their rumen that produce cellulase.

Cellulose has many industrial applications, including the production of paper, textiles, and building materials. It is also used as a source of dietary fiber in human food and animal feed. Cellulose-based materials are being explored for use in biomedical applications such as tissue engineering and drug delivery due to their biocompatibility and mechanical properties.

Acetobacteraceae is a family of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that are capable of converting ethanol into acetic acid, a process known as oxidative fermentation. These bacteria are commonly found in environments such as fruits, flowers, and the gut of insects. They are also used in the industrial production of vinegar and other products. Some members of this family can cause food spoilage or infections in humans with weakened immune systems.

The term "cacao" refers to the plant Theobroma cacao, which is native to tropical regions of Central and South America. It is a small evergreen tree that produces large, football-shaped fruits called pods. Each pod contains 20-60 seeds, also known as beans, which are used to make cocoa powder and chocolate.

Cacao beans contain several bioactive compounds, including flavonoids, theobromine, and caffeine, that have been shown to have potential health benefits. However, it is important to note that these benefits are typically associated with moderate consumption of cocoa products, rather than large amounts of chocolate or cacao beans themselves.

In summary, while "cacao" may be used interchangeably with "cocoa" in some contexts, the term technically refers to the plant and its seeds, rather than the processed powder or chocolate that is derived from them.

Pseudomonadaceae is a family of Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria within the class Gammaproteobacteria. The name "Pseudomonadaceae" comes from the type genus Pseudomonas, which means "false unitform." This refers to the fact that these bacteria can appear similar to other rod-shaped bacteria but have distinct characteristics.

Members of this family are typically motile, aerobic organisms with a single polar flagellum or multiple lateral flagella. They are widely distributed in various environments, including soil, water, and as part of the normal microbiota of plants and animals. Some species can cause diseases in humans, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is an opportunistic pathogen known to cause severe infections in individuals with weakened immune systems, cystic fibrosis, or burn wounds.

Pseudomonadaceae bacteria are metabolically versatile and can utilize various organic compounds as carbon sources. They often produce pigments, such as pyocyanin and fluorescein, which contribute to their identification in laboratory settings. The family Pseudomonadaceae includes several genera, with Pseudomonas being the most well-known and clinically relevant.

Cytochrome a1 is a type of cytochrome found in the inner mitochondrial membrane and is a component of the electron transport chain, which plays a crucial role in cellular respiration and energy production. Specifically, cytochrome a1 is involved in the transfer of electrons from cytochrome c to oxygen, the final electron acceptor in the electron transport chain.

Cytochromes are heme-containing proteins that contain a prosthetic group called heme, which consists of an iron atom coordinated to a porphyrin ring. The different types of cytochromes are classified based on the type of heme they contain and their absorption spectra. Cytochrome a1 contains a heme with a formyl group at the 2 position (heme a) and has an alpha band in its absorption spectrum at around 605 nm.

It is worth noting that cytochrome a1 is not always present in all organisms, and its function may vary depending on the species. In some cases, it may be replaced by other types of cytochromes or have additional functions beyond its role in the electron transport chain.

Cytochrome a is a type of cytochrome found in the inner mitochondrial membrane of eukaryotic cells. It is a component of cytochrome c oxidase, the final enzyme in the electron transport chain responsible for reducing molecular oxygen to water during cellular respiration. Cytochrome a contains a heme group with a low redox potential, making it capable of accepting electrons from cytochrome c and transferring them to oxygen.

The "Cytochrome a Group" typically refers to a family of related cytochromes that share similar structural and functional properties, including the presence of a heme group with a low redox potential. This group includes cytochrome a, as well as other closely related cytochromes such as cytochrome aa3 and cytochrome o. These cytochromes play important roles in electron transfer and energy conservation during cellular respiration in various organisms.

"Gluconacetobacter" is a genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that are commonly found in various environments such as soil, water, and plant surfaces. They are known for their ability to oxidize sugars and alcohols into organic acids, which makes them important in industrial processes like the production of vinegar and biofuels. In a medical context, they are not typically associated with human diseases, but there have been rare reports of infections in immunocompromised individuals.

UTP-Glucose-1-Phosphate Uridylyltransferase is an enzyme that catalyzes the reaction to form UDP-glucose from UTP and glucose-1-phosphate. This reaction plays a crucial role in the biosynthesis of various carbohydrates, glycoproteins, and glycolipids in the body. The enzyme is also known as UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase or simply as UGPase.

The systematic name for this enzyme is glucose-1-phosphate:UTP uridylyltransferase, and its reaction can be represented as follows:
UTP + glucose-1-phosphate ⇌ UDP-glucose + pyrophosphate

The enzyme is widely distributed in nature and is found in various organisms, including bacteria, plants, and animals. In humans, UGPase is present in multiple tissues, such as the liver, kidney, and brain. Defects in this enzyme can lead to several metabolic disorders, highlighting its importance in maintaining normal bodily functions.

Dihydroxyacetone (DHA) is a simple sugar that is used as an ingredient in many self-tanning products. When applied to the skin, DHA reacts with amino acids in the dead layer of the skin to temporarily darken the skin color. This process is known as the Maillard reaction, which is a chemical reaction between an amino acid and a sugar. The effect of DHA is limited to the uppermost layer of the skin and it does not provide any protection against sunburn or UV radiation. The tanning effect produced by DHA usually lasts for about 5-7 days.

It's important to note that while DHA is considered safe for external use, it should not be inhaled or ingested, as it can cause irritation and other adverse effects. Additionally, some people may experience skin irritation or allergic reactions to products containing DHA, so it's always a good idea to do a patch test before using a new self-tanning product.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "omega-Chloroacetophenone" doesn't seem to be a recognized medical term or abbreviation. Chloroacetophenone (also known as CN) is a type of tear gas used for riot control. It's not typically used in a medical context, but it can cause symptoms such as tearing, coughing, and difficulty breathing if inhaled. If you have any more specific information or context regarding this term, I'd be happy to help further!

Oxaloacetates are organic compounds that are integral to the Krebs cycle, also known as the citric acid cycle, in biological energy production. Specifically, oxaloacetate is an important intermediate compound within this metabolic pathway, found in the mitochondria of cells.

In the context of a medical definition, oxaloacetates are not typically referred to directly. Instead, the term "oxaloacetic acid" might be used, which is the conjugate acid of the oxaloacetate ion. Oxaloacetic acid has the chemical formula C4H4O5 and appears in various biochemical reactions as a crucial component of cellular respiration.

The Krebs cycle involves several stages where oxaloacetic acid plays a significant role:

1. In the first step, oxaloacetic acid combines with an acetyl group (derived from acetyl-CoA) to form citric acid, releasing coenzyme A in the process. This reaction is catalyzed by citrate synthase.
2. Throughout subsequent steps of the cycle, citric acid undergoes a series of reactions that generate energy in the form of NADH and FADH2 (reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide, respectively), as well as GTP (guanosine triphosphate).
3. At the end of the cycle, oxaloacetic acid is regenerated to continue the process anew. This allows for continuous energy production within cells.

In summary, while "oxaloacetates" isn't a standard term in medical definitions, it does refer to an essential component (oxaloacetic acid) of the Krebs cycle that plays a critical role in cellular respiration and energy production.

"Mangifera" is not a medical term, but a botanical name. It refers to the genus of trees that produce mangoes and other related fruits. The scientific name for the mango fruit is "Mangifera indica." This tropical tree is native to South Asia, particularly India and Southeast Asia.

The mango fruit is rich in vitamins A, C, and B6, as well as dietary fiber, antioxidants, and various other nutrients. It has been used in traditional medicine for its anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and hypoglycemic properties. However, it is important to note that while the fruit itself may have health benefits, "Mangifera" does not have a specific medical definition or application.

Hydroxymercuribenzoates are a group of organic compounds that contain a mercury atom bonded to a hydroxyl group and a benzene ring. They were historically used in medicine as antiseptics and preservatives, but their use has been largely discontinued due to the toxicity of mercury.

The general structure of a hydroxymercuribenzoate is R-C6H4-COOH, where R represents a mercury atom bonded to a hydroxyl group (-OH). The most common example of this class of compounds is merbromin (also known as Mercurochrome), which has the chemical formula C9H9HgNaO2S.

It's important to note that due to the toxicity of mercury, these compounds are no longer used in modern medicine and have been replaced by safer alternatives.

"Saccharum" is not a medical term, but a genus name in botany. It refers to the sugarcane plant (*Saccharum officinarum*), which is a tall perennial grass native to tropical regions of Southeast Asia. The sap of this plant contains high amounts of sucrose and has been used as a sweetener for thousands of years.

In a medical context, "saccharum" might be encountered in the form of sugar-based ingredients, such as dextrose (glucose) or sucrose, which are derived from sugarcane or other sugar-rich plants. These substances can be used in various medical applications, including intravenous fluids and nutritional supplements.

Bacterial DNA refers to the genetic material found in bacteria. It is composed of a double-stranded helix containing four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) - that are linked together by phosphodiester bonds. The sequence of these bases in the DNA molecule carries the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of bacteria.

Bacterial DNA is circular in most bacterial species, although some have linear chromosomes. In addition to the main chromosome, many bacteria also contain small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids that can carry additional genes and provide resistance to antibiotics or other environmental stressors.

Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA enclosed within a nucleus, bacterial DNA is present in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it is in direct contact with the cell's metabolic machinery. This allows for rapid gene expression and regulation in response to changing environmental conditions.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

Fermentation is a metabolic process in which an organism converts carbohydrates into alcohol or organic acids using enzymes. In the absence of oxygen, certain bacteria, yeasts, and fungi convert sugars into carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and various end products, such as alcohol, lactic acid, or acetic acid. This process is commonly used in food production, such as in making bread, wine, and beer, as well as in industrial applications for the production of biofuels and chemicals.

In 2002, Acetobacter cerevisiae and Acetobacter malorum were identified by 16S rRNA sequence analysis of Acetobacter strains. ... In 1998, two strains of Acetobacter isolated from red wine and cider vinegar were named Acetobacter oboediens and Acetobacter ... In 2006, a strain of Acetobacter isolated from spoiled red wine was named Acetobacter oeni. Regarding the genus Acetobacter's ... In 2000, Acetobacter oboediens and Acetobacter intermedius were transferred to Gluconacetobacter on the basis of 16S rRNA ...
"Acetobacter cerevisiae" at the Encyclopedia of Life LPSN Type strain of Acetobacter cerevisiae at BacDive - the Bacterial ... Valera, Maria José; Torija, Maria Jesús; Mas, Albert; Mateo, Estibaliz (2013). "Acetobacter malorum and Acetobacter cerevisiae ... with descriptions of Acetobacter cerevisiae sp. nov. and Acetobacter malorum sp. nov". International Journal of Systematic and ... Acetobacter cerevisiae is a species of Gram negative acetic acid bacteria. Its type strain is LMG 1625T (= DSM 14362T = NCIB ...
"Acetobacter pomorum" at the Encyclopedia of Life LPSN Type strain of Acetobacter pomorum at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity ... Sokollek, S. J.; Hertel, C.; Hammes, W. P. (1998). "Description of Acetobacter oboediens sp. nov. and Acetobacter pomorum sp. ... Acetobacter pomorum is a bacterium first isolated from industrial vinegar fermentations. Its type strain is LTH 2458T. ...
"Acetobacter malorum" at the Encyclopedia of Life LPSN Type strain of Acetobacter malorum at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity ... Valera, Maria José; Torija, Maria Jesús; Mas, Albert; Mateo, Estibaliz (2013). "Acetobacter malorum and Acetobacter cerevisiae ... with descriptions of Acetobacter cerevisiae sp. nov. and Acetobacter malorum sp. nov". International Journal of Systematic and ... Acetobacter malorum is a bacterium. Its type strain is LMG 1746T (= DSM 14337T). Cleenwerck, I. (2002). "Re-examination of the ...
... is an obligate aerobe, which means that it requires oxygen to grow. Acetobacter aceti is economically ... Acetobacter aceti is a Gram-negative bacterium that moves using its peritrichous flagella. Louis Pasteur proved it to be the ... "Acetobacter aceti Final Risk Assessment - Biotechnology Program Under Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) - US EPA". epa.gov. ... Type strain of Acetobacter aceti at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase (Articles with short description, Short ...
... is a bacterium that was first identified from fermenting cocoa beans in Ghana. A. fabarum are gram-negative ... Cleenwerck, I; Gonzalez, A; Camu, N; Engelbeen, K; De Vos, P; De Vuyst, L (2008). "Acetobacter fabarum sp. nov., an acetic acid ... Schaffner, D.W. (2014). "Oxidation of Metabolites Highlights the Microbial Interactions and Role of Acetobacter pasteurianus ... http://aem.asm.org/content/80/6/1848.full https://www.uniprot.org/taxonomy/483199 [1] Type strain of Acetobacter fabarum at ...
Acetobacter (subgen. Gluconoacetobacter) liquefaciens. In some contexts, it is typical to cite the author's name alongside the ...
For the acetic acid production are considered three kind of bacteria: Clostridium aceticum; Acetobacter woodii; and Clostridium ...
Acetobacter, Pseudomonas and Gluconobacter. In its pure form, it is a white to off-white powder. It can also be made by ...
... with descriptions of Acetobacter cerevisiae sp. nov. and Acetobacter malorum sp. nov". International Journal of Systematic and ... Cleenwerck I; Vandemeulebroecke D; Janssens D; Swings J (2002). "Re-examination of the genus Acetobacter, ...
Kasai T, Suzuki I, Asai T (1962). "[Glyoxylic oxidase system in Acetobacter.]". Koso Kagaku Shimpojiumu. 17: 77-81. Portal: ...
KING TE, CHELDELIN VH (1956). "Oxidation of acetaldehyde by Acetobacter suboxydans". J. Biol. Chem. 220 (1): 177-91. PMID ... Tanenbaum SW (1956). "The metabolism of Acetobacter peroxidans. I. Oxidative enzymes". Biochim. Biophys. Acta. 21 (2): 335-342 ...
... was originally proposed as a family for Acetobacter and Gluconobacter based on rRNA and DNA-DNA hybridization ... The type genus is Acetobacter. Ten genera from Acetobacteraceae make up the acetic acid bacteria. ... The following genera have been effectively and validly published: Acetobacter Beijerinck 1898 (Approved Lists 1980) ... and Intergenic Similarities of the Ribosomal Ribonucleic Acid Cistrons of Acetobacter and Gluconobacter". International Journal ...
Seurinck J, Van, de Voorde A, Van Montagu M (July 1983). "A new restriction endonuclease from Acetobacter pasteurianus". ... Sugisaki H, Maekawa Y, Kanazawa S, Takanami M (October 1982). "New restriction endonucleases from Acetobacter aceti and ... Grones J, Turna J (March 1993). "Some properties of restriction endonuclease ApaBI from Acetobacter pasteurianus". Biochim ... "Acetobacter xylinus"". Agric Biol Chem. 47 (12): 2871-9. doi:10.1271/bbb1961.47.2871. (CS1 Russian-language sources (ru), ...
Iannino, N.I. De; Couso, R.O.; Dankert, M.A. (1998). "Lipid-linked intermediates and the synthesis of acetan in Acetobacter ... The discovery of cellulose produced by bacteria, specifically from the Acetobacter xylinum, was accredited to A.J. Brown in ... Fontana, J.D. et al (1990) "Acetobacter cellulose pellicle as a temporary skin substituite". .Applie d Biochemistry and ... Masaoka, S.; Ohe, T.; Sakota, N. (1993). "Production of cellulose from glucose by Acetobacter xylinum". J. Ferment. Bioeng. 75 ...
It also contains Zygosaccharomyces sp., Acetobacter pasteurianus, Acetobacter aceti, and Gluconobacter oxydans. The ...
In 1955, Posternak and Reymond studied the oxydation of the 1,4/2,3 isomer (dihydro-conduritol) by Acetobacter suboxydans, ... Sur l'oxydation de divers cyclitols par Acetobacter suboxydans". Helvetica Chimica Acta, volume 36, issue 1, pages 260-268. doi ...
The growth of Acetobacter in wine can be suppressed through effective sanitation, by complete exclusion of air from wine in ... Acetobacter xylinum is able to synthesize cellulose, something normally done only by plants. Raspor P; Goranovic D (2008). " ... Some genera, such as Acetobacter, can oxidize ethanol to carbon dioxide and water using Krebs cycle enzymes. Other genera, such ... "Formation of cellulose by certain species of Acetobacter". Biochem. J. 48 (5): 618-621. doi:10.1042/bj0480618. PMC 1275385. ...
... typically see Acetobacter present. However, on an industrial scale, Acetobacter was seen in acetic acid concentrations of 11.5- ... The main bacterial genus involved in the mother of kombucha is Acetobacter, which is also a main genus in mother of vinegar. ... Acetobacter Fulvic acid SCOBY Turbatrix aceti - vinegar eels Kombucha Bacterial cellulose William Theodore Brannt (1889). A ... The amount of Gluconacetobacter and Acetobacter in the mother of vinegar is associated with the concentration of acetic acid in ...
Nov., Incorporating Acetobacter methanolicus as Acidomonas methanolica comb. Nov". International Journal of Systematic ... formerly known as Acetobacter methanolicus The name Acidomonas derives from: Latin adjective acidus, sour, acid; Latin feminine ...
Nov., Incorporating Acetobacter methanolicus as Acidomonas methanolica comb. Nov". International Journal of Systematic ...
Sur l'oxydation de divers cyclitols par Acetobacter suboxydans". Helvetica Chimica Acta, volume 36, issue 1, pages 260-268. doi ...
Sugisaki H, Maekawa Y, Kanazawa S, Takanami M (October 1982). "New restriction endonucleases from Acetobacter aceti and ...
In addition to being a part of the Acetobacter family, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus belongs to the Pseudomonadota phylum, ... Fuentes-Ramirez, L.E.; Abarca-Ocampo, I.; Jimenez-Salgado, T.; Caballero-Mellado, J. (1993). "Acetobacter diazotrophicus, an ... the bacterium is renamed as Acetobacter diazotrophicus because the bacterium is found to belong with bacteria that are able to ... a new host plant for Acetobacter diazotrophicus, and isolation of other nitrogen-fixing acetobacteria". Applied and ...
"Purification and characterization of aldehyde dehydrogenase of Acetobacter aceti". Agric. Biol. Chem. 45 (8): 1889-1890. doi: ...
Claus GW, Roth LE (February 1964). "Fine Structure of the Gram-Negative Bacterium Acetobacter Suboxydans". The Journal of Cell ...
Acetic acid bacteria like Acetobacter aceti produce acetic acid. Bacteria such as Propionibacterium freudenreichii that produce ...
2. The polyol dehydrogenases of Acetobacter suboxydans and Candida utilis". Biochem. J. 64 (3): 385-94. PMC 1199748. PMID ...
2. The polyol dehydrogenases of Acetobacter suboxydans and Candida utilis. Biochem. J. 64, 385-394.[www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov PMID ...
Adachi and colleagues discovered that PQQ was also found in Acetobacter. A novel aspect of PQQ is its biosynthesis in bacteria ...
In 2002, Acetobacter cerevisiae and Acetobacter malorum were identified by 16S rRNA sequence analysis of Acetobacter strains. ... In 1998, two strains of Acetobacter isolated from red wine and cider vinegar were named Acetobacter oboediens and Acetobacter ... In 2006, a strain of Acetobacter isolated from spoiled red wine was named Acetobacter oeni. Regarding the genus Acetobacters ... In 2000, Acetobacter oboediens and Acetobacter intermedius were transferred to Gluconacetobacter on the basis of 16S rRNA ...
Other sequences of Acetobacter pasteurianus IFO 3283-26 ...
Parent taxon: Acetobacter xylinum (Brown 1886) Yamada 1984 Assigned by: Kojima Y, Tonouchi N, Tsuchida T, Yoshinaga F, Yamada Y ... The Proposal of Acetobacter xylinum subsp. nonacetoxidans subsp. Nov. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 1998; 62:185-187. ... The Proposal of Acetobacter xylinum subsp. nonacetoxidans subsp. Nov. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 1998; 62:185-187. ... Linking: To permanently link to this page, use https://lpsn.dsmz.de/subspecies/acetobacter-xylinum-nonacetoxidans. Copy to ...
Acetobacter Beijerinck 1898 (Approved Lists 1980). NHPID Name: Acetobacter aceti. 1ACETF ), Acetobacter aceti ( 17 (publication ... Acetobacter aceti ssp. Linking: because the search term doesnt match exactly. Acetobacter pomorum Sokollek et al. Kondo 46. ... However Acetobacter (subgen. Organism - Acetobacter aceti. Taxonomy. validly published, Number of child taxa with a validly ... NCBI TAXONOMY Acetobacter orleanensis (Henneberg 1906) Lisdiyanti et al. The subgenus Acetobacter appears in Validation List no ...
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Acetobacter is probably the most potent souring bacteria which can form a thin white film of a pellicle (few if any bubbles), ... Acetobacter thrives in warmer temperatures (75 - 85° F) and in oxygen-rich environments. Early detection is the best defense ... Three common safe-to-consume pellicle-forming bacteria are Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, and Acetobacter, and the yeast ... but not as easily and quickly as Acetobacter. ... Tag: How to Control Acetobacter How to Save a Bad Batch of ...
Acetobacter (subgen. Gluconoacetobacter) liquefaciens.[19] ...
Synthesis of Cellulose by Acetobacter Xylinum: A Comparison Vegan Leather to Animal and Imitation Leather ... Acetobacter xylinum is a Gram-negative soil bacterium that synthesize and secrete cellulose during its metabolism of glucose ( ... The purpose of this research is to synthesize vegan leather from Acetobacter xylinum in the lab and compare it to animal and ... Synthesis of Cellulose by Acetobacter Xylinum: A Comparison Vegan Leather to Animal and Imitation Leather. ...
Acetobacter sp., Azospirillum sp.) are known as well. Many of these organisms have been formulated into biofertilizers and are ...
Acetobacter Xylinum, Bacterial cellulose, crystallinity, X-ray diffraction, SEM Abstract. Bacterial cellulose (BC) is a ... "Cellulose synthesized by Acetobacter xylinum in the presence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes," Carbohydrate Research, 343(1): ... EVALUATION OF THE CRYSTALLINITY OF BACTERIAL CELLULOSE PRODUCED FROM PINEAPPLE WASTE SOLUTION BY USING ACETOBACTER XYLINUM ... "Acetobacter cellulose pellicle as a temporary skin substitute," Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology, 24-25(1): 253-264 ...
Wikipedia article:w:Acetobacter. *Wikipedia article:w:Yeast in winemaking. Assignments[edit , edit source]. Preliminary Study ...
Ama, Acetobacter malorum; Ara, Acinetobacter radioresistens; Eag, Enterobacter aglomerans; Erh, Erwinia rhapontici; Ent, ... Z. mobilis was detected in low amounts only in two samples, and 16S rDNA clones identified as the AAB Acetobacter pomorium and ... The γ-Proteobacteria Enterobacter agglomerans, and the α-Proteobacteria Z. mobilis and Acetobacter malorum were also detected ... An acetic acid fermentation performed probably by AAB such Acetobacter and Gluconobacter species (Escalante et al., 2004, 2008 ...
Acetobacter Ave. Logged The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. - ...
"Acetobacter xylinum needs oxygen," says Gatenholm. "If you place a rubber glove into a fermentation broth and add oxygen into ... One of them, Arterion (Göteborg, Sweden; www.arterion.se), models artificial blood vessels from the Acetobacter xylinum microbe ... Field emission scanning electron microscope image of cylindrical Acetobacter xylinum cells entrapped in the cellulose ... have developed a process for controlling the motion of cellulose-producing Acetobacter xylinum bacteria, guiding them to ...
FAM: Lactobacillus/Pediococcus species; ROX: Acetobacter/Gluconobacter/Bacillus species; Cy5: Internal Amplification Control ...
Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Acetobacter pasteurianus, Acetobacter aceti, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, ... Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Acetobacter xylinum, Zygosaccharomyces spp., Acetobacter, Gluconacetobacter Sauerkraut. Fermented ... Acetobacter lovaniensis, Acetobacter orientalis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. unisporus, Candida Kefyr, Kluyveromyces marxianus ... The bacterial and fungal species constituting the SCOBY typically include acetic acid bacteria (Acetobacter, Gluconobacter), ...
Fermentation with oxygen and acetobacter bacteria. *Acetone (petrochemical), sulfuric acid (will eat you face off) ...
http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/b94-054... ). Pineapple plants were found to host Acetobacter diazotrophicus, isolated from inner ... Natural endophytic occurrence of Acetobacter diazotrophicus in pineapple plants. Microb. Ecol. 39:49-55. http://dx.doi.org/ ... Natural endophytic occurrence of Acetobacter diazotrophicus in pineapple plants. Microb. Ecol. 39:49-55. http://dx.doi.org/ ... Natural endophytic occurrence of Acetobacter diazotrophicus in pineapple plants. Microb. Ecol. 39:49-55. http://dx.doi.org/ ...
Properties of the quinoprotein aldehyde dehydrogenase from Acetobacter rancens R. Hommel and H.-P. Kleber ... The membrane-bound aldehyde dehydrogenase from Acetobacter rancens CCM 1774, solubilized from the membrane fraction by ...
Non LABs were identified as Acetobacter fabarum and Ac. orientalis. The Acetobacter species were more prevalent in consortium ... Cluster analyses of RAPD-PCR patterns revealed an interspecies diversity among the Lactobacillus and Acetobacter strains. ...
In 2013, another case observed was the contamination by Acetobacter indonesiensis. It is a Gram-negative bacteria associated to ... with drastic reduction of fermentation yield and ethanol production due to Gram-negative bacteria identified as Acetobacter ...
Because of its heavy pigmentation and the resulting binding of SO2, Norton is particularly prone to Acetobacter spoilage, and ... Anti-oxidative strength is essential to controlling Acetobacter, which requires dissolved oxygen to thrive. By healthy, I mean ... advice to prevent VA always focused on preventing negligence in the cellar leading to oxidative VA caused by Acetobacter. In ... 5 Anthocyanin-bound SO2 is ineffective in controlling Acetobacter.6 ...
This allows Acetobacter bacteria to convert the alcohol into acetic acid, producing vinegar. The entire process takes around 30 ... The second automation system (acetobacter) that was already on the fruit will then take care of the alcohol to acetic acid ... however when the PH drops below 4 your ethanol production will decline so youd need to probably introduce the Acetobacter ...
They also inhibit aerobic bacteria from growing, notably the acetobacter which produces vinegar. ...
Production of Vinegar Mango Using Acetobacter tropicalis CRSBAN-BVA1 and CRSBAN-BVK2 Isolated from Burkina Faso (Articles) ...
Katherine thinks this is because a species of bacteria in the SCOBY, Acetobacter, produces acetic acid. This acidic environment ...
Due to its ease of handling, Acetobacter xylinum (A. xylinum) has been studied as a model organism of cellulose production. BC ... Acetobacter (=Gluconacetobacter), which is a Gram-negative bacterium, produces cellulose called bacterial cellulose (BC) from ...
  • Acetobacter is a genus of acetic acid bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bacteria of the genus Acetobacter have been isolated from industrial vinegar fermentation processes and are frequently used as fermentation starter cultures. (wikipedia.org)
  • Kojima Y, Tonouchi N, Tsuchida T, Yoshinaga F, Yamada Y. The Characterization of Acetic Acid Bacteria Efficiently Producing Bacterial Cellulose from Sucrose: The Proposal of Acetobacter xylinum subsp. (dsmz.de)
  • www.sbes.vt.edu ), have developed a process for controlling the motion of cellulose-producing Acetobacter xylinum bacteria, guiding them to produce structures that the researchers hope will one day be able to support cartilage, bone tissue, and other biomaterials. (mddionline.com)
  • However, the bacteria's mechanical properties could not be controlled beyond thin, flexible layers because cellulose scaffolds produced using Acetobacter xylinum bacteria lacked the stiffness required to support healing bone or cartilage. (mddionline.com)
  • This allows Acetobacter bacteria to convert the alcohol into acetic acid, producing vinegar. (hackaday.com)
  • They also inhibit aerobic bacteria from growing, notably the acetobacter which produces vinegar. (connexionfrance.com)
  • Katherine thinks this is because a species of bacteria in the SCOBY, Acetobacter, produces acetic acid. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • Then, the team added plates of food: control fly populations received standard food, while others got food laced with one of two bacteria commonly found in the insects' guts, Acetobacter and Lactobacillus . (the-scientist.com)
  • The principal bacteria include Gluconicum, Acetobacter ketogenum, Acetobacteria xylinium, brown Xylinioides and Acetobacteria pasteurianum . (growyouthful.com)
  • According to them, anyone can grow the bacteria with a few simple ingredients in the kitchen, using water, tea, sugar, and a small bacterial sample of xylinum acetobacter. (who.int)
  • The acetic fermentation was demonstrated by Louis Pasteur, who discovered the first acetobacter - Acetobacter aceti - in 1864. (wikipedia.org)
  • Organism - Acetobacter aceti. (heisenberghorticulture.com)
  • 1ACETF ), Acetobacter aceti ( 17 (publication date: 15 April 1985). (heisenberghorticulture.com)
  • Acetobacter) aceti is not listed in Validation List no. (heisenberghorticulture.com)
  • Acetobacter aceti IFO 3283. (heisenberghorticulture.com)
  • Acetobacter aceti ssp. (heisenberghorticulture.com)
  • Acetobacter aceti (Pasteur 1864) Beijerinck 1898 (Approved Lists 1980): validly published: correct name: Acetobacter ascendens (Henneberg 1898) Kim et al. (heisenberghorticulture.com)
  • General information about Acetobacter aceti (ACETAC) EPPO Global Database. (heisenberghorticulture.com)
  • Number of child taxa with a validly published and correct name: 0, Number of child taxa with a validly published name, including synonyms: 4, https://lpsn.dsmz.de/species/acetobacter-aceti, synonym of its species (division into subspecies abandoned). (heisenberghorticulture.com)
  • Studies on the oxidation of ribitol and D-arabitol by Acetobacter aceti IFO 3281. (scialert.net)
  • This disease is bacterial in nature and is caused by several strains of Acetobacter aceti and Gluconobacter oxydans , which are disseminated by insect vectors and mites. (apsnet.org)
  • Acetobacter xylinum is a Gram-negative soil bacterium that synthesize and secrete cellulose during its metabolism of glucose (Cannon R.E, 2000). (uwyo.edu)
  • The purpose of this research is to synthesize vegan leather from Acetobacter xylinum in the lab and compare it to animal and imitation leather. (uwyo.edu)
  • Field emission scanning electron microscope image of cylindrical Acetobacter xylinum cells entrapped in the cellulose nanofibril network that they created. (mddionline.com)
  • Due to its ease of handling, Acetobacter xylinum ( A. xylinum ) has been studied as a model organism of cellulose production. (or.jp)
  • Bio-designers Garrett Benisch and Elizabeth Bridges created a face mask out of bacterial cellulose called xylinum acetobacter. (who.int)
  • In 2000, Acetobacter oboediens and Acetobacter intermedius were transferred to Gluconacetobacter on the basis of 16S rRNA sequencing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acetobacter (= Gluconacetobacter ), which is a Gram-negative bacterium, produces cellulose called bacterial cellulose (BC) from glucose on the surface of a culture medium. (or.jp)
  • By doing that, we were sort of able to move their microbiomes towards an Acetobacter -dominated [composition] or a Lactobacillus -dominated [one]. (the-scientist.com)
  • In 2019, the team published its findings showing clearly that, as Rudman had hypothesized, the populations of Drosophila had diverged from one another, with the several Lactobacillus- fed populations showing different allele frequencies from the populations that had been fed Acetobacter . (the-scientist.com)
  • The morphological and biochemical characterization identifies the cultures as Saccharomyces, Lactobacillus and Acetobacter sp. (scholarsresearchlibrary.com)
  • A chemically-defined growth medium to support Lactobacillus-Acetobacter sp. (bvsalud.org)
  • In 1998, two strains of Acetobacter isolated from red wine and cider vinegar were named Acetobacter oboediens and Acetobacter pomorum. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1998 and Acetobacter intermedius Boesch et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • Transfer of Acetobacter oboediens Sokollek et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2002, Acetobacter cerevisiae and Acetobacter malorum were identified by 16S rRNA sequence analysis of Acetobacter strains. (wikipedia.org)
  • We report a case of Acetobacter indonesiensis pneumonia organism is not in any Food and Drug Administration-ap- in a 51-year-old woman after bilateral lung transplanta- proved databases and therefore would not have been identi- tion. (cdc.gov)
  • Of these, the genus Acetobacter is distinguished by the ability to oxidize lactate and acetate into carbon dioxide and water. (wikipedia.org)
  • Re-examination of the genus Acetobacter, with descriptions of Acetobacter cerevisiae sp. (wikipedia.org)
  • Via 16S rDNA sequencing, all of the isolates were identified as Acetobacter pasteurianus. (koreamed.org)
  • We report a case of Acetobacter indonesiensis pneumonia organism is not in any Food and Drug Administration-ap- in a 51-year-old woman after bilateral lung transplanta- proved databases and therefore would not have been identi- tion. (cdc.gov)
  • Acetobacter indonesiensis Bacteremia in Child with Metachromatic Leukodystrophy. (nih.gov)
  • Acetobacter sicerae JCM 21163 is a mesophilic bacterium that produces polysaccharides and was isolated from Cider. (dsmz.de)
  • [3] Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a part of the Acetobacteraceae family and started out with the name, Saccharibacter nitrocaptans , however, the bacterium is renamed as Acetobacter diazotrophicus because the bacterium is found to belong with bacteria that are able to tolerate acetic acid. (wikipedia.org)
  • nov., isolated from cider and kefir, and identification of species of the genus Acetobacter by dnaK, groEL and rpoB sequence analysis. (dsmz.de)
  • Several alcohol-fermented foods are preceded by an acid fermentation and in the presence of oxygen and acetobacter , alcohol can be fermented to produce acetic acid. (fao.org)
  • If the temperature in the fermentation vessel is too high, the Acetobacter will outgrow the yeasts and the produced alcohol will be converted to vinegar. (thanosvinegar.com)
  • In conditions of excess oxygen (and in the presence of acetobacter) the alcohol can be oxidised to form acetic acid. (fao.org)
  • If left at room temperature alcohol containing solution with Acetobacter will be converted to vinegar in months. (thanosvinegar.com)
  • Acetobacter diazotrophicus, apparently responsible for this Nitrogen fixation associated with the plants, has unique physiological properties for a diazotroph, such as tolerance to low pH, and high sugar and salt concentrations, lack of nitrate reductase, and nitrogenase activity which tolerates short term exposure to ammonia. (farmersstop.com)
  • Sugar cane set treatment - Mix 1 litre Acetobacter diazotrophicus per 100 lit. (farmersstop.com)
  • Soil application - Mix 500 - 1000 ml Acetobacter diazotrophicus per acre in 50 kg well rotten FYM/compost / vermi compost / field soil. (farmersstop.com)
  • Drip Irrigation - Where drip irrigation is being used mix 500 - 1000 ml Acetobacter diazotrophicus in 200 lit. (farmersstop.com)
  • Foliar spray - Mix 10 ml Acetobacter diazotrophicus per lit. (farmersstop.com)
  • Acetobacter oxidize ethanol more efficiently than glucose. (scirp.org)
  • According to a 1976 chapter in the book series Advances in Applied Microbiology , "Nearly any unfortified wine or beer when exposed to the atmosphere will develop an acidity which, in many cases, results from the action of Acetobacter in converting the ethanol to acetic acid. (acne.org)
  • Acetobacter has symbiotic relationship with many different plants like sugarcane and coffee by colonizing their internal tissues to promote the plant growth. (farmersstop.com)
  • In 2006, a strain of Acetobacter isolated from spoiled red wine was named Acetobacter oeni. (wikipedia.org)
  • 0 Alpha/beta hydrolase fold proteins are known to date in Acetobacter senegalensis. (inra.fr)
  • Transfer of Acetobacter oboediens Sokollek et al. (wikipedia.org)