Acetazolamide: One of the CARBONIC ANHYDRASE INHIBITORS that is sometimes effective against absence seizures. It is sometimes useful also as an adjunct in the treatment of tonic-clonic, myoclonic, and atonic seizures, particularly in women whose seizures occur or are exacerbated at specific times in the menstrual cycle. However, its usefulness is transient often because of rapid development of tolerance. Its antiepileptic effect may be due to its inhibitory effect on brain carbonic anhydrase, which leads to an increased transneuronal chloride gradient, increased chloride current, and increased inhibition. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1991, p337)Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors: A class of compounds that reduces the secretion of H+ ions by the proximal kidney tubule through inhibition of CARBONIC ANHYDRASES.Carbonic Anhydrases: A family of zinc-containing enzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide. They play an important role in the transport of CARBON DIOXIDE from the tissues to the LUNG. EC 4.2.1.1.Altitude Sickness: Multiple symptoms associated with reduced oxygen at high ALTITUDE.Benzolamide: Selective renal carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. It may also be of use in certain cases of respiratory failure.Mountaineering: A sport involving mountain climbing techniques.Ethoxzolamide: A carbonic anhydrase inhibitor used as diuretic and in glaucoma. It may cause hypokalemia.Bicarbonates: Inorganic salts that contain the -HCO3 radical. They are an important factor in determining the pH of the blood and the concentration of bicarbonate ions is regulated by the kidney. Levels in the blood are an index of the alkali reserve or buffering capacity.Cerebrovascular Circulation: The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.Methazolamide: A carbonic anhydrase inhibitor that is used as a diuretic and in the treatment of glaucoma.Alkalosis: A pathological condition that removes acid or adds base to the body fluids.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Iofetamine: An amphetamine analog that is rapidly taken up by the lungs and from there redistributed primarily to the brain and liver. It is used in brain radionuclide scanning with I-123.Xenon Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of xenon that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Xe atoms with atomic weights 121-123, 125, 127, 133, 135, 137-145 are radioactive xenon isotopes.Dichlorphenamide: A carbonic anhydrase inhibitor that is used in the treatment of glaucoma.Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon: A method of computed tomography that uses radionuclides which emit a single photon of a given energy. The camera is rotated 180 or 360 degrees around the patient to capture images at multiple positions along the arc. The computer is then used to reconstruct the transaxial, sagittal, and coronal images from the 3-dimensional distribution of radionuclides in the organ. The advantages of SPECT are that it can be used to observe biochemical and physiological processes as well as size and volume of the organ. The disadvantage is that, unlike positron-emission tomography where the positron-electron annihilation results in the emission of 2 photons at 180 degrees from each other, SPECT requires physical collimation to line up the photons, which results in the loss of many available photons and hence degrades the image.Diuretics: Agents that promote the excretion of urine through their effects on kidney function.Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis: An autosomal dominant familial disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of skeletal muscle weakness associated with falls in serum potassium levels. The condition usually presents in the first or second decade of life with attacks of trunk and leg paresis during sleep or shortly after awakening. Symptoms may persist for hours to days and generally are precipitated by exercise or a meal high in carbohydrates. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1483)Technetium Tc 99m Exametazime: A gamma-emitting RADIONUCLIDE IMAGING agent used in the evaluation of regional cerebral blood flow and in non-invasive dynamic biodistribution studies and MYOCARDIAL PERFUSION IMAGING. It has also been used to label leukocytes in the investigation of INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES.Chlorothiazide: A thiazide diuretic with actions and uses similar to those of HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p812)Carbonic Anhydrase II: A cytosolic carbonic anhydrase isoenzyme found widely distributed in cells of almost all tissues. Deficiencies of carbonic anhydrase II produce a syndrome characterized by OSTEOPETROSIS, renal tubular acidosis (ACIDOSIS, RENAL TUBULAR) and cerebral calcification. EC 4.2.1.-Acid-Base Equilibrium: The balance between acids and bases in the BODY FLUIDS. The pH (HYDROGEN-ION CONCENTRATION) of the arterial BLOOD provides an index for the total body acid-base balance.Altitude: A vertical distance measured from a known level on the surface of a planet or other celestial body.Organotechnetium Compounds: Organic compounds that contain technetium as an integral part of the molecule. These compounds are often used as radionuclide imaging agents.Norandrostanes: Androstanes in which ring contractions have occurred or which are lacking carbon-18. Compounds with any degree of unsaturation are included. Androstanes which are lacking carbon-19 are ESTRANES.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Amphetamines: Analogs or derivatives of AMPHETAMINE. Many are sympathomimetics and central nervous system stimulators causing excitation, vasopressin, bronchodilation, and to varying degrees, anorexia, analepsis, nasal decongestion, and some smooth muscle relaxation.Furosemide: A benzoic-sulfonamide-furan. It is a diuretic with fast onset and short duration that is used for EDEMA and chronic RENAL INSUFFICIENCY.Ion-Selective Electrodes: Electrodes which can be used to measure the concentration of particular ions in cells, tissues, or solutions.
(1/653) Does gill boundary layer carbonic anhydrase contribute to carbon dioxide excretion: a comparison between dogfish (Squalus acanthias) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

In vivo experiments were conducted on spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in sea water to determine the potential role of externally oriented or gill boundary layer carbonic anhydrase in carbon dioxide excretion. This was accomplished by assessing pH changes in expired water using a stopped-flow apparatus. In dogfish, expired water was in acid-base disequilibrium as indicated by a pronounced acidification (delta pH=-0.11+/-0.01; N=22; mean +/- s.e.m.) during the period of stopped flow; inspired water, however, was in acid-base equilibrium (delta pH=-0.002+/-0.01; N=22). The acid-base disequilibrium in expired water was abolished (delta pH=-0.005+/-0.01; N=6) by the addition of bovine carbonic anhydrase (5 mg l-1) to the external medium. Addition of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide (1 mmol l-1) to the water significantly reduced the magnitude of the pH disequilibrium (from -0.133+/-0.03 to -0.063+/-0.02; N=4). However, after correcting for the increased buffering capacity of the water caused by acetazolamide, the acid-base disequilibrium during stopped flow was unaffected by this treatment (control delta [H+]=99.8+/-22.8 micromol l-1; acetazolamide delta [H+]=81.3+/-21.5 micromol l-1). In rainbow trout, expired water displayed an acid-base disequilibrium (delta pH=0.09+/-0.01; N=6) that also was abolished by the application of external carbonic anhydrase (delta pH=0.02+/-0.01). The origin of the expired water acid-base disequilibrium was investigated further in dogfish. Intravascular injection of acetazolamide (40 mg kg-1) to inhibit internal carbonic anhydrase activity non-specifically and thus CO2 excretion significantly diminished the extent of the expired water disequilibrium pH after 30 min (from -0.123+/-0.01 to -0.065+/-0.01; N=6). Selective inhibition of extracellular carbonic anhydrase activity using a low intravascular dose (1.3 mg kg-1) of the inhibitor benzolamide caused a significant reduction in the acid-base disequilibrium after 5 min (from -0.11+/-0.01 to -0.07+/-0. 01; N=14). These results demonstrate that the expired water acid-base disequilibrium originates, at least in part, from excretory CO2 and that extracellular carbonic anhydrase in dogfish may have a significant role in carbon dioxide excretion. However, externally oriented carbonic anhydrase (if present in dogfish) plays no role in catalysing the hydration of the excretory CO2 in water flowing over the gills and thus is unlikely to facilitate CO2 excretion.  (+info)

(2/653) Modulation of chloride, potassium and bicarbonate transport by muscarinic receptors in a human adenocarcinoma cell line.

1. Short-circuit current (I(SC)) responses to carbachol (CCh) were investigated in Colony 1 epithelia, a subpopulation of the HCA-7 adenocarcinoma cell line. In Krebs-Henseleit (KH) buffer, CCh responses consisted of three I(SC) components: an unusual rapid decrease (the 10 s spike) followed by an upward spike at 30 s and a slower transient increase (the 2 min peak). This response was not potentiated by forskolin; rather, CCh inhibited cyclic AMP-stimulated I(SC). 2. In HCO3- free buffer, the decrease in forskolin-elevated I(SC) after CCh was reduced, although the interactions between CCh and forskolin remained at best additive rather than synergistic. When Cl- anions were replaced by gluconate, both Ca2+- and cyclic AMP-mediated electrogenic responses were significantly inhibited. 3. Basolateral Ba2+ (1-10 mM) and 293B (10 microM) selectively inhibited forskolin stimulation of I(SC), without altering the effects of CCh. Under Ba2+- or 293B-treated conditions, CCh responses were potentiated by pretreatment with forskolin. 4. Basolateral charybdotoxin (50 nM) significantly increased the size of the 10 s spike of CCh responses in both KH and HCO3- free medium, without affecting the 2 min peak. The enhanced 10 s spike was inhibited by prior addition of 5 mM apical Ba2+. Charybdotoxin did not affect forskolin responses. 5. In epithelial layers prestimulated with forskolin, the muscarinic antagonists atropine and 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide (4-DAMP, both at 100 nM) abolished subsequent 10 microM CCh responses. Following addition of p-fluoro hexahydro-sila-difenidol (pF-HHSiD, 10 microM) or pirenzepine (1 microM), qualitative changes in the CCh response time-profile also indicated a rightward shift of the agonist concentration-response curve; however, 1 microM gallamine had no effect. These results suggest that a single M3-like receptor subtype mediates the secretory response to CCh. 6. It is concluded that CCh and forskolin activate discrete populations of basolateral K+ channels gated by either Ca2+ or cyclic AMP, but that the Cl- permeability of the apical membrane may limit their combined effects on electrogenic Cl- secretion. In addition, CCh activates a Ba2+-sensitive apical K+ conductance leading to electrogenic K+ transport. Both agents may also modulate HCO3- secretion through a mechanism at least partially dependent on carbonic anhydrase.  (+info)

(3/653) Formal analysis of electrogenic sodium, potassium, chloride and bicarbonate transport in mouse colon epithelium.

1. The mammalian colonic epithelium carries out a number of different transporting activities simultaneously, of which more than one is increased following activation with a single agonist. These separate activities can be quantified by solving a set of equations describing these activities, provided some of the dependent variables can be eliminated. Using variations in the experimental conditions, blocking drugs and comparing wild type tissues with those from transgenic animals this has been achieved for electrogenic ion transporting activity of the mouse colon. 2. Basal activity and that following activation with forskolin was measured by short circuit current in isolated mouse colonic epithelia from normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) mice. 3. Using amiloride it is shown that CF colons show increased electrogenic sodium absorption compared to wild type tissues. CF mice had elevated plasma aldosterone, which may be responsible for part or all of the increased sodium absorbtion in CF colons. 4. The derived values for electrogenic chloride secretion and for electrogenic potassium secretion were increased by 13 and 3 fold respectively by forskolin, compared to basal state values for these processes. 5. The loop diuretic, frusemide, completely inhibited electrogenic potassium secretion, but apparently only partially inhibited electrogenic chloride secretion. However, use of bicarbonate-free solutions and acetazolamide reduced the frusemide-resistant current, suggesting that electrogenic bicarbonate secretion accounts for the frusemide-resistant current. 6. It is argued that the use of tissues from transgenic animals is an important adjunct to pharmacological analysis, especially where effects in tissues result in the activation of more than one sort of response.  (+info)

(4/653) Effects of maternal acetazolamide treatment on body weights and incisor development of the fetal rat.

The incisor development of fetal rats on gestation day 19 was well correlated with their fetal weights. The number of odontoblasts in the mandibular incisors, an index of incisor development, increased more than that of the maxillary incisors with increase in fetal body weights. Maternal acetazolamide treatments were observed to suppress the mean fetal weight and to retard incisor development. A smaller incisor size, a thinner predentin layer, and fewer odontoblasts were characteristic of the acetazolamide group. There was also a good correlation between the fetal weights and the number of odontoblasts in the acetazolamide group. From these results, we postulated that the retarded incisor development of the fetal rats caused by the maternal acetazolamide treatment was related to their suppressed fetal weights. However, the regression coefficient of the fetal weights and the number of odontoblasts in the acetazolamide group was smaller than that of the vehicle control group. It may indicate that retarded incisor development in response to maternal acetazolamide treatment is to some extent independent of suppressed fetal weight.  (+info)

(5/653) Cerebral vasculopathy in HIV infection revealed by transcranial Doppler: A pilot study.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: There is growing evidence for affection of cerebral vessels during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We prospectively evaluated cerebrovascular reserve capacity (CRC) in HIV-seropositive patients by transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) after systemic administration of acetazolamide. We hypothesized that a disturbed vasoreactivity would reflect the cerebral arteries' involvement in HIV infection. METHODS: We assessed the mean blood flow velocity (BFV) of the middle cerebral artery and its increase after intravenous administration of 1 g acetazolamide (CRC) in 31 HIV-infected individuals without symptoms of cerebrovascular disease (mean+/-SD age, 39+/-11 years). Stenotic or occlusive lesions of the large brain-supplying arteries were excluded by color-coded duplex and transcranial imaging. BFV and CRC were also measured in an age-matched group of 10 healthy control subjects. Patients were classified according to clinical, laboratory, and neurophysiological parameters. We also performed cerebral MRI (n=25) and rheumatological blood tests (n=26). RESULTS: Baseline BFV and CRC both were significantly reduced in HIV-infected patients as compared with control subjects (P<0.05, Student's t test). These findings did not correlate with duration of seropositivity, helper cell count, or other clinical, rheumatological, and neuroradiological findings. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support the hypothesis of a cerebral vasculopathy etiologically associated with HIV infection.  (+info)

(6/653) Acetazolamide and amiloride inhibit pentobarbital-induced facilitation of nocifensive reflexes.

BACKGROUND: Neuronal excitation may result from stimulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A)) receptors that prolong the channel opening, depolarizing the postsynaptic membrane. Drugs such as acetazolamide or amiloride can block GABA depolarization. Barbiturates facilitate nociceptive reflexes and also prolong the GABA(A) channel open-time. To evaluate the possible mechanism, the authors studied the impact of acetazolamide and amiloride on pentobarbital-induced nocifensive reflex facilitation. Because nitric oxide (NO) is a mediator of reflex facilitation, the authors evaluated the effects of NO synthase inhibition. METHODS: Nocifensive reflex thresholds were quantified with the hind paw withdrawal latency from radiant heat (HPW latency) in the rat. Nocifensive reflexes were facilitated with intraperitoneal injection of pentobarbital (30 mg/kg). The authors tested the roles of GABA-mediated depolarization and NO in reflex facilitation by pretreatment with acetazolamide and amiloride and inhibition of NO synthase with L-NAME and 7-NI, respectively. Sedative effects of pentobarbital were evaluated with the righting reflex, the response to vibrissal stimulation, and plasma drug concentrations. RESULTS: Pentobarbital decreased the hind paw withdrawal latency from 11.2+/-1 to 8.3+/-1 s (P < 0.001). Pretreatment with each of the four test drugs limited the reduction in reflex facilitation after pentobarbital to 1.3 s or less, similar to the reduction seen after saline injection, without altering sedation. L-NAME increased plasma pentobarbital concentrations by 10% without changing the concentration associated with return of responsiveness. CONCLUSIONS: Pentobarbital-induced nocifensive reflex facilitation was inhibited by all four tested drugs without evidence of increased sedation. The results are consistent with a role for GABA(A) receptor-mediated depolarization in barbiturate-induced hyper-reflexia.  (+info)

(7/653) Natriuretic peptide receptors, NPR-A and NPR-B, in cultured rabbit retinal pigment epithelium cells.

We tried to detect natriuretic peptide (NP) receptor (NPR-A and NPR-B) mRNAs in cultured rabbit retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells and examined the regulation of their expression in relation to subretinal fluid absorption or RPE cell proliferation. RPE cells from 2-4 passages were grown to confluence on microporous membranes and analyzed for levels of expression of receptor mRNAs by quantitative RT-PCR and Northern blotting. The expression of NPR-B mRNA was approximately tenfold higher than that of NPR-A mRNA. The expression of NPR-A mRNA was not affected by treatments that may change subretinal fluid transport, while that of NPR-B mRNA was inhibited by transmitters involved in light- and dark-adaptation such as dopamine and melatonin. Expression of NPR-B mRNA was also suppressed by platelet-derived growth factor and transforming growth factor-beta. Furthermore, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), ligands for NPR-A and B, respectively, inhibited the proliferation of RPE cells, as analyzed by incorporation of [3H]thymidine. These findings suggest that ANP may be involved in constitutive absorption of subretinal fluid and that NPs form an important regulatory system of proliferation in RPE cells.  (+info)

(8/653) VCO2 and VE kinetics during moderate- and heavy-intensity exercise after acetazolamide administration.

The effect of carbonic anhydrase inhibition with acetazolamide (Acz) on CO2 output (VCO2) and ventilation (VE) kinetics was examined during moderate- and heavy-intensity exercise. Seven men [24 +/- 1 (SE) yr] performed cycling exercise during control (Con) and Acz (10 mg/kg body wt iv) sessions. Each subject performed step transitions (6 min) in work rate from 0 to 100 W [below ventilatory threshold (VET)]. VE and gas exchange were measured breath by breath. The time constant (tau) was determined for exercise VET by using a three-component model (fit from the start of exercise). VCO2 kinetics were slower in Acz (VET, MRT = 75 +/- 10 s) than Con (VET, MRT = 54 +/- 7 s). During VET kinetics were faster in Acz (MRT = 85 +/- 17 s) than Con (MRT = 106 +/- 16 s). Carbonic anhydrase inhibition slowed VCO2 kinetics during both moderate- and heavy-intensity exercise, demonstrating impaired CO2 elimination in the nonsteady state of exercise. The slowed VE kinetics in Acz during exercise +info)

*  Periodic paralysis
Treatment of the periodic paralyses may include carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (such as acetazolamide, methazolamide or ...
*  Hypokalemic periodic paralysis
For example, most patients do well on acetazolamide, but some don't. Some patients will do well with extra magnesium (the ... Avoiding carbohydrate-rich meals, strenuous exercise and other identified triggers, and taking acetazolamide (Diamox®) or ...
*  Acetazolamide
... is pregnancy category B3 in Australia, which means that studies in rats, mice and rabbits in which acetazolamide ... Anticoagulants, cardiac glycosides, may have their effects potentiated by acetazolamide. Acetazolamide is a carbonic anhydrase ... Acetazolamide is available as a generic medication. The wholesale cost in the developing world is about 1.40 to 16.93 USD per ... Acetazolamide is still effective if started early in the course of mountain sickness. As prevention it is started one day ...
*  DMOZ - Health: Pharmacy: Drugs and Medications: A: Acetazolamide
Drugs.com: Acetazolamide (injection, USP) Professional information regarding drug use, side effects, interactions and ...
*  Carbonic anhydrase inhibitor
Acetazolamide is an inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase. It is used for glaucoma, epilepsy (rarely), idiopathic intracranial ... It has a longer elimination half-life than acetazolamide and is less associated with adverse effects to the kidney. Dorzolamide ... Acetazolamide is a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. Other examples are; Dorzolamide Methazolamide Brinzolamide dichlorphenamide ... For the reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP), acetazolamide inactivates carbonic anhydrase and interferes with the sodium ...
*  Anticonvulsant
Acetazolamide (1953). Sultiame Methazolamide Zonisamide (2000). Lamotrigine (1990). Pheneturide Phenacemide Valpromide ...
*  Migraine-associated vertigo
The syndrome responds to acetazolamide. Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) has been linked to mutations in the calcium channel ...
*  High-altitude cerebral edema
Acetazolamide also helps prevent the condition. Untreated patients usually die within 48 hours. Those who receive treatment may ... Generally, the use of acetazolamide is preferred, but dexamethasone can be used for prevention if there are side effects or ... Dexamethesone should be discontinued, but continual acetazolamide is recommended. In one study, it took patients between one ... The risk of developing HACE is diminished if acetazolamide or dexamethasone are administered. ...
*  List of OMIM disorder codes
... acetazolamide-responsive; 608390; SCN4A Myotonia congenita, dominant; 160800; CLCN1 Myotonia congenita, recessive; 255700; ...
*  Episodic ataxia
Acetazolamide administration has proved successful in some patients. As EA3 is extremely rare, there is currently no known ... Yue Q, Jen J, Thwe M, Nelson S, Baloh R (1998). "De novo mutation in CACNA1A caused acetazolamide-responsive episodic ataxia". ... These patients are responsive to acetazolamide. Both juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and EA5 are a result of mutations in CACNB4, a ... Some patients respond to acetazolamide though others do not. Typically, episodic ataxia presents as bouts of ataxia induced by ...
*  Jane Wilson-Howarth
White, A.J. (1984). "Cognitive impairment of AMS and acetazolamide". Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine. 5: 598-603. ...
*  Chronic mountain sickness
Medication with acetazolamide, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, has been shown to improve chronic mountain sickness by reducing ... 1 December 2005). "Acetazolamide: a treatment for chronic mountain sickness". American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care ...
*  Hyperuricemia
Medications that have a similar effect include acetazolamide. Low temperature is a commonly reported trigger of acute gout: an ...
*  Diuretic
Some diuretics, such as acetazolamide, help to make the urine more alkaline and are helpful in increasing excretion of ... Drugs in this class include acetazolamide and methazolamide. These are diuretics which do not promote the secretion of ...
*  Papilledema
Such medicines include diuretics like acetazolamide and furosemide. These diuretics, along with surgical interventions, can ...
*  Vestibulocerebellar syndrome
Trials with acetazolamide achieved some success, while amitriptyline hydrochloride was unsuccessful. Acetazolamide therapy ... In trials with patients afflicted with vestibulocerebellar syndrome, acetazolamide either eliminated or significantly decreased ... Baloh RW, Winder A (March 1991). "Acetazolamide-responsive vestibulocerebellar syndrome: clinical and oculographic features". ...
*  Altitude sickness
Acetazolamide can be taken before symptoms appear as a preventive measure at a dose of 125 mg twice daily. The Everest Base ... The drug acetazolamide (trade name Diamox) may help some people making a rapid ascent to sleeping altitude above 2,700 metres ( ... Although a sulfonamide; acetazolamide is a non-antibiotic and has not been shown to cause life-threatening allergic cross- ... Acetazolamide 250 mg twice daily dosing assists in AMS treatment by quickening altitude acclimatization. A study by the Denali ...
*  Ilya Konovalov
In 2007 Konovalov was found guilty of acetazolamide doping. The sample was delivered on 17 December 2006 in an in-competition ...
*  High-altitude pulmonary edema
Acetazolamide, a drug that speeds acclimatization to high altitudes. Pulmonary edema Altitude sickness High-altitude cerebral ...
*  Visual snow
Medications that may be used include lamotrigine, acetazolamide, or verapamil. But these do not always result in benefits. ... acetazolamide, or verapamil. But these do not always result in benefits. Some neuro-ophthalmologists believe that visual snow ...
*  Cav2.1
Yue Q, Jen JC, Thwe MM, Nelson SF, Baloh RW (1998). "De novo mutation in CACNA1A caused acetazolamide-responsive episodic ...
*  Neurofibromatosis type I
Acetazolamide has shown promise as a treatment for this condition. Children with NF-1 can experience social problems, attention ...
*  Eosinophilic myocarditis
Other drugs: digoxin, ranitidine, lenalidomide, methyldopa, interleukin 2, dobutamine, acetazolamide. Contaminants: ... Anti-inflammatory agents: ibuprofen, indomethacin, phenylbutazone, oxyphenbutazone, acetazolamide, piroxicam, diclofenac. ...
*  Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis
Diuretics such as furosemide may be needed to stop sudden attacks; acetazolamide and thiazide diuretics such as chlorothiazide ...
*  Primary polydipsia
... such as conivaptan Acetazolamide, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor Lithium was previously used for treatment of PPD as a direct ... "Treatment of psychogenic polydipsia with acetazolamide: a report of 5 cases". Clinical Neuropharmacology. 34 (1): 5-7. doi: ...
Altitude Pulmonary Edema: Symptoms  Altitude Pulmonary Edema: Symptoms
Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled comparison of ginkgo biloba and acetazolamide for prevention of acute mountain ...
more infohttp://www.freemd.com/altitude-pulmonary-edema/symptoms.htm
Small-Molecule Suppression of Misfolding of Mutated Human Carbonic Anhydrase II Linked to Marble Brain Disease  Small-Molecule Suppression of Misfolding of Mutated Human Carbonic Anhydrase II Linked to Marble Brain Disease
... showed that the folding equilibrium can be shifted towards the native state by binding of the small-molecule drug acetazolamide ...
more infohttp://liu.diva-portal.org/smash/record.jsf?pid=diva2:225924
Treatment Options in Severe Metabolic Alkalosis  -     AJKD Blog  Treatment Options in Severe Metabolic Alkalosis - AJKD Blog
Diuretics that enhance renal bicarbonate losses, such as acetazolamide, are effective and in some severe cases, hydrochloric ... Diuretics that enhance renal bicarbonate losses, such as acetazolamide, are effective and in some severe cases, hydrochloric ...
more infohttps://ajkdblog.org/2013/05/21/treatment-options-in-severe-metabolic-alkalosis/
Acetazolamide | Encyclopedia.com  Acetazolamide | Encyclopedia.com
Acetazolamide Definition Acetazolamide (a-set-a-ZOLE-a-mide) is a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. Carbonic anhydrase [1] is an ... Acetazolamide. Definition. Acetazolamide (a-set-a-ZOLE-a-mide) is a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. Carbonic anhydrase is an ... Acetazolamide is also used to treat non-neurological disorders such as glaucoma (acetazolamide decreases pressure in the eye), ... Acetazolamide is available in oral form in extended release capsules and tablets. Acetazolamide can also be administered by ...
more infohttps://www.encyclopedia.com/medicine/drugs/pharmacology/acetazolamide
Acetazolamide, Urine  Acetazolamide, Urine
... ,ARUP Laboratories is a national reference laboratory and a worldwide leader in innovative laboratory ... Acetazolamide, Serum or Plasma. 2. Clinitek 500 Urine Chemistry Analyzer. 3. Clinitek Atlas Automated Urine Chemistry Analyzer ...
more infohttp://www.bio-medicine.org/medicine-products/Acetazolamide--Urine-20902-1/
acetazolamide  acetazolamide
... is used in people with certain types of glaucoma to reduce the amount of fluid in the eye, which decreases ... Acetazolamide reduces the activity of a protein in your body called carbonic anhydrase. Blocking this protein can help reduce ... While using acetazolamide, you may need frequent blood tests.. Acetazolamide may be only part of a complete treatment program ... What is acetazolamide?. Acetazolamide reduces the activity of a protein in your body called carbonic anhydrase. Blocking this ...
more infohttps://www.rexhealth.com/rh/health-library/document-viewer/?id=d00161a1
Prescriber Checkup | ACETAZOLAMIDE  Prescriber Checkup | ACETAZOLAMIDE
Prescriber Checkup » ACETAZOLAMIDE ACETAZOLAMIDE. Diamox (Acetazolamide) is a diuretic that treats edema, glaucoma, seizures, ...
more infohttp://projects.propublica.org/checkup/drugs/4433
Acetazolamide sustained-release capsules  Acetazolamide sustained-release capsules
ACETAZOLAMIDE (a set a ZOLE a mide) is used to treat glaucoma. It is also used to treat and to prevent altitude or mountain ... Acetazolamide sustained-release capsules. What is this medicine?. ACETAZOLAMIDE (a set a ZOLE a mide) is used to treat glaucoma ... an unusual or allergic reaction to acetazolamide, sulfa drugs, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives ...
more infohttps://www.nationwidechildrens.org/family-resources-education/family-resources-library/acetazolamide-sustained-release-capsules
Acetazolamide | Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center  Acetazolamide | Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
No se debe utilizar esta información para decidir si se debe tomar este medicamento o cualquier otro. Solamente el proveedor de atención médica tiene el conocimiento y la capacitación para decidir qué medicamentos son adecuados para un paciente específico. Esta información no recomienda ningún medicamento como seguro, eficaz o aprobado para tratar a ningún paciente o enfermedad. Es solamente un breve resumen de información general sobre este medicamento. NO incluye toda la información sobre los usos, las instrucciones, las advertencias, las precauciones, las interacciones, los efectos secundarios o los riegos posibles que podrían aplicarse a este medicamento. Esta información no constituye asesoramiento médico específico y no reemplaza la información que usted recibe de su proveedor de atención médica. Debe hablar con el proveedor de atención médica para obtener información completa sobre los riesgos y los beneficios de tomar este medicamento.. ...
more infohttps://www.mskcc.org/es/cancer-care/patient-education/acetazolamide-01
Acetazolamide: uses & side-effects | PatientsLikeMe  Acetazolamide: uses & side-effects | PatientsLikeMe
Find the most comprehensive real-world treatment information on Acetazolamide at PatientsLikeMe. 43 patients with fibromyalgia ... bipolar I disorder or psoriasis currently take Acetazolamide. ... 9 patient evaluations for Acetazolamide Sort by: Most recent * ... Showing 3 of 9 patient evaluations for Acetazolamide Previous page 1 2 3 Next page ...
more infohttps://www.patientslikeme.com/treatment/acetazolamide?page=3&size=3
Acetazolamide Side Effects in Detail - Drugs.com  Acetazolamide Side Effects in Detail - Drugs.com
Learn about the potential side effects of acetazolamide. Includes common and rare side effects information for consumers and ... acetazolamide))." Sterimax Inc, Kingston, OR. 4. "Product Information. AcetaZOLAMIDE (acetaZOLAMIDE (acetazolamide))." Taro ... Diamox Sequels (acetaZOLAMIDE (acetazolamide))." Barr Pharmaceuticals Inc, Pomona, NY. 2. Cerner Multum, Inc. "UK Summary of ... Applies to acetazolamide: compounding powder, injectable powder for injection, intravenous powder for injection, oral capsule ...
more infohttps://www.drugs.com/sfx/acetazolamide-side-effects.html
Acetazolamide report for  patients like you  Acetazolamide report for patients like you
Find the most comprehensive real-world treatment information on Acetazolamide at PatientsLikeMe. 37 patients with fibromyalgia ... gastroesophageal reflux disease or mild depression currently take Acetazolamide. ... What are people saying about Acetazolamide?. There is 1 topic in our forum about Acetazolamide. ... Stopped taking Acetazolamide Duration. Patients. This item is relevant to you: Less than 1 month 4 * 4 ...
more infohttps://www.patientslikeme.com/treatments/show/6004-acetazolamide-side-effects-and-efficacy?brand=f
Acetazolamide-based fungal chitinase inhibitors.  - PubMed - NCBI  Acetazolamide-based fungal chitinase inhibitors. - PubMed - NCBI
A co-crystal structure of AfChiA1 with acetazolamide was used to guide synthesis and screening of acetazolamide analogues that ... Unbiased (i.e., calculated before the addition of the ligand to the model) σA-weighted Fo − Fc density for acetazolamide ... Acetazolamide-based fungal chitinase inhibitors.. Schüttelkopf AW1, Gros L, Blair DE, Frearson JA, van Aalten DM, Gilbert IH. ... B) Acetazolamide (slate) binding to the active site of AfChiA1. The protein is shown as a grey cartoon with the side chains of ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21044846?dopt=Abstract
Acetazolamide | VCA Animal Hospital  Acetazolamide | VCA Animal Hospital
Acetazolamide is a diuretic used off label and given by mouth to treat glaucoma or alkalosis. The most common side effect is ... How is acetazolamide given?. Acetazolamide is given by mouth in the form of a tablet, capsule, or compounded liquid. Give this ... What is acetazolamide?. Acetazolamide (brand names: Diamox®) is a diuretic and antiglaucoma agent, used primarily to treat ... How do I store acetazolamide?. Acetazolamide tablets should be stored at room temperature. Compounded liquid medications are ...
more infohttps://vcahospitals.com/know-your-pet/acetazolamide
Acetazolamide - definition of acetazolamide by The Free Dictionary  Acetazolamide - definition of acetazolamide by The Free Dictionary
acetazolamide synonyms, acetazolamide pronunciation, acetazolamide translation, English dictionary definition of acetazolamide ... acetazolamide. Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia. acetazolamide. (əˌsɛtəˈzɒləˌmaɪd; əˌsiːtə-; - ... Acetazolamide - definition of acetazolamide by The Free Dictionary https://www.thefreedictionary.com/acetazolamide ... The authors do not seem to be clear about the fact that there is strong evidence for the role of acetazolamide in the ...
more infohttp://www.thefreedictionary.com/acetazolamides
Acetazolamide and Pepto-Bismol Drug Interactions - Drugs.com  Acetazolamide and Pepto-Bismol Drug Interactions - Drugs.com
A Major Drug Interaction exists between acetazolamide and Pepto-Bismol. View detailed information regarding this drug ... Ask your doctor before using acetaZOLAMIDE together with bismuth subsalicylate. This can cause ringing in your ears, headache, ...
more infohttps://www.drugs.com/drug-interactions/acetazolamide-with-pepto-bismol-86-0-391-177.html
Acetazolamide legal definition of acetazolamide  Acetazolamide legal definition of acetazolamide
What is acetazolamide? Meaning of acetazolamide as a legal term. What does acetazolamide mean in law? ... Definition of acetazolamide in the Legal Dictionary - by Free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. ... Acetazolamide legal definition of acetazolamide https://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/acetazolamide. Printer Friendly ... redirected from acetazolamide). Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia. See: deterrent. ...
more infohttp://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/acetazolamide
Acetazolamide: Considerations for Systemic Administration - American Academy of Ophthalmology  Acetazolamide: Considerations for Systemic Administration - American Academy of Ophthalmology
... and dosing adjustments for systemic acetazolamide to help streamline decision making in the office setting. ... Acetazolamide is reportedly 90 to 98 percent protein bound; this means that 2 to 10 percent of the drug is active and excreted ... Acetazolamide: Considerations for Systemic Administration Written By: Garrick Chak, MD, Roma Patel, MD, MBA, and R. Rand ... ACETAZOLAMIDE. This drug can be useful for acute reduction of intraocular pressure, if the physician is mindful of systemic ...
more infohttps://www.aao.org/eyenet/article/acetazolamide-considerations-systemic-administrati?march-2015
Acetazolamide Tabs  Acetazolamide Tabs
Acetazolamide's onset of action may be as early as 30 minutes after an oral dose. Its maximum effects occur in about 5 hours ... Acetazolamide is a prescription drug and can only be obtained from a veterinarian or by prescription from a veterinarian. This ... Acetazolamide is use most commonly for the following:. To reduce IOP in chronic simple (open-angle) glaucoma and secondary ... Acetazolamide should not be used in animals with known hypersensitivity or allergy to the drug or other sulfonamides. Also, it ...
more infohttps://www.atozvetsupply.com/Acetazolamide-Tabs-p/71-029902.htm
Dazamide (Acetazolamide) The Harvard Drug Group  Dazamide (Acetazolamide) The Harvard Drug Group
Dazamide information about active ingredients, pharmaceutical forms and doses by The Harvard Drug Group, Dazamide indications, usages and related health products lists
more infohttp://drugs-about.com/drugs-d/dazamide.html
  • The patient reported that she was taking acetazolamide for IIH treatment orally during the last 15 days with an onset dosage of 750 mg/day, increased to 1500 mg/day after the 7th day of usage. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In order to prevent restenosis the patient's administration with acetazolamide was maintained as presumably elevation of CSF pressure would have led to restenosis. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • It has a longer elimination half-life than acetazolamide and is less associated with adverse effects to the kidney. (wikipedia.org)