Acepromazine: A phenothiazine that is used in the treatment of PSYCHOSES.Xylazine: An adrenergic alpha-2 agonist used as a sedative, analgesic and centrally acting muscle relaxant in VETERINARY MEDICINE.Promazine: A phenothiazine with actions similar to CHLORPROMAZINE but with less antipsychotic activity. It is primarily used in short-term treatment of disturbed behavior and as an antiemetic.Methotrimeprazine: A phenothiazine with pharmacological activity similar to that of both CHLORPROMAZINE and PROMETHAZINE. It has the histamine-antagonist properties of the antihistamines together with CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM effects resembling those of chlorpromazine. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p604)Veterinary Drugs: Drugs used by veterinarians in the treatment of animal diseases. The veterinarian's pharmacological armamentarium is the counterpart of drugs treating human diseases, with dosage and administration adjusted to the size, weight, disease, and idiosyncrasies of the species. In the United States most drugs are subject to federal regulations with special reference to the safety of drugs and residues in edible animal products.Butorphanol: A synthetic morphinan analgesic with narcotic antagonist action. It is used in the management of severe pain.Preanesthetic Medication: Drugs administered before an anesthetic to decrease a patient's anxiety and control the effects of that anesthetic.Forensic Medicine: The application of medical knowledge to questions of law.Anesthetics, Combined: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially to induce anesthesia. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Ketamine: A cyclohexanone derivative used for induction of anesthesia. Its mechanism of action is not well understood, but ketamine can block NMDA receptors (RECEPTORS, N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE) and may interact with sigma receptors.
(1/45) A previously unidentified acepromazine metabolite in humans: implications for the measurement of acepromazine in blood.

High-performance liquid chromatography-diode-array detection results obtained during the investigation of two cases involving acepromazine prompted us to study the stability of the drug in blood. It was found that acepromazine can undergo in vitro conversion by human red blood cells to 2-(1-hydroxyethyl)promazine, a product that has been reported as a minor urinary metabolite in horse urine but not previously identified in humans. Further, our analytical findings in the two cases examined suggest that 2-(1-hydroxyethyl)promazine may be the major unconjugated metabolite of acepromazine in humans. These findings have important implications for the analytical toxicology of acepromazine.  (+info)

(2/45) The effect of opioid and acepromazine premedication on the anesthetic induction dose of propofol in cats.

The median effective dosage (ED50) for induction of anesthesia with propofol was determined by using the up-and-down method in 31 unpremedicated cats, in 30 cats premedicated with butorphanol, 0.4 mg/kg body weight (BW), and acepromazine, 0.1 mg/kg BW, intramuscularly, and in 30 cats premedicated with morphine, 0.2 mg/kg BW, and acepromazine, 0.1 mg/kg BW, intramuscularly. The dose required for a satisfactory anesthetic induction in 50% of unpremedicated cats (ED50) was 7.22 mg/kg BW and of premedicated cats was 5.00 mg/kg BW. The reduction in dose was statistically significant in both premedicated groups compared with no premedication. There was no significant difference in ED50 between premedication regimes. Cyanosis was the most common adverse effect observed in all groups following anesthetic induction with propofol.  (+info)

(3/45) Effect of general anesthetics on IOP in rats with experimental aqueous outflow obstruction.

PURPOSE: To determine the effect of several common general anesthetics on intraocular pressure (IOP) after experimental aqueous outflow obstruction in the rat. METHODS: A single episcleral vein injection of hypertonic saline was used to sclerose aqueous humor outflow pathways and produce elevated IOP in Brown Norway rats. Animals were housed in either standard lighting or a constant low-level light environment. Awake IOPs were determined using a TonoPen (Mentor, Norwell, MA) immediately before induction of anesthesia by either isoflurane, ketamine, or a mixture of injectable anesthetics (xylazine, ketamine, and acepromazine). For each anesthetic, IOPs were measured immediately after adequate sedation (time 0) and at 5-minute intervals, up to 20 minutes. RESULTS; Awake IOPs ranged from 18 to 52 mm Hg. All anesthetics resulted in a statistically significant (P: < 0.01) reduction in measured IOP at every duration of anesthesia when compared with the corresponding awake IOP. With increasing duration of anesthesia, measured IOP decreased approximately linearly for both the anesthetic mixture and isoflurane. However, with ketamine, IOP declined to 48% +/- 11% (standard lighting) and 60% +/- 7% (constant light) of awake levels at 5 minutes of anesthesia, where it remained stable. In fellow eyes, the SD of the mean IOP in animals under anesthesia was always greater than the corresponding SD of the awake mean. Anesthesia's effects in normal eyes and eyes with elevated IOP were indistinguishable. CONCLUSIONS: All anesthetics resulted in rapid and substantial decreases in IOP in all eyes and increased the interanimal variability in IOPs. Measurement of IOP in awake animals provides the most accurate documentation of pressure histories for rat glaucoma model studies.  (+info)

(4/45) Self-mutilation in rabbits following intramuscular ketamine-xylazine-acepromazine injections.

Following hind leg intramuscular injections of ketamine, xylazine, and acepromazine, 4 of 6 rabbits exhibited self-mutilation of the digits. At necropsy, the affected sciatic nerve appeared enlarged. Lymphohistiocytic perineural inflammation and fibrosis were observed, together with nerve degeneration. Neuronal regeneration as the reason for self-mutilation is discussed.  (+info)

(5/45) Structure of TAR RNA complexed with a Tat-TAR interaction nanomolar inhibitor that was identified by computational screening.

HIV-1 TAR RNA functions critically in viral replication by binding the transactivating regulatory protein Tat. We recently identified several compounds that experimentally inhibit the Tat-TAR interaction completely at a 100 nM concentration. We used computational screening of the 181,000-compound Available Chemicals Directory against the three-dimensional structure of TAR [1]. Here we report the NMR-derived structure of TAR complexed with acetylpromazine. This structure represents a new class of compounds with good bioavailability and low toxicity that bind with high affinity to TAR. NMR data unambiguously show that acetylpromazine binds only to the unique 5' bulge site to which the Tat protein binds. Specificity and affinity of binding are conferred primarily by a network of base stacking and hydrophobic interactions. Acetylpromazine alters the structure of free TAR less than Tat peptides and neomycin do.  (+info)

(6/45) Physiology and behavior of dogs during air transport.

Twenty-four beagles were used to measure physiological and behavioral reactions to air transport. Each of 3 groups of 4 sedated (with 0.5 mg/kg body weight of acepromazine maleate) and 4 non-sedated (control) dogs was flown on a separate flight between Montreal, Quebec, and Toronto, Ontario, after being transported by road from Quebec City to Montreal. Saliva and blood samples were taken before ground and air transport and after air transport. The heart rate was monitored during the whole experiment except during ground transport, and behavior was monitored by video during air transport. Sedation did not affect any of the variables measured. The mean plasma cortisol concentration was significantly higher (P < 0.05) after ground transport than at baseline (225.3 vs 134.5 nmol/L); the mean salivary cortisol concentration was significantly higher (P < 0.05) after both ground and air transport than at baseline (16.2 and 14.8, respectively, vs 12.6 nmol/L). The mean neutrophil count was significantly higher (P < 0.05) after both ground and air transport than at baseline (80.6 and 81.4, respectively, vs 69.5 per 100 white blood cells), whereas the mean lymphocyte count was significantly lower (P < 0.05) (13.2 and 13.7, respectively, vs 22.4 per 100 white blood cells). Loading and unloading procedures caused the largest increase in heart rate. On average, the dogs spent more than 50% of the time lying down, and they remained inactive for approximately 75% of the time, except during take-off. These results suggest that transportation is stressful for dogs and that sedation with acepromazine, at the dosage and timing used, does not affect the physiological and behavioral stress responses of dogs to air transport.  (+info)

(7/45) Inhibition has little effect on response latencies in the inferior colliculus.

The inferior colliculi of all mammals are characterized by a wide range of first-spike response latencies that can greatly exceed the minimum time required for the transmission of input through the lower brainstem. The mechanisms that account for long response latencies of up to 50 ms are unclear, but one hypothesis is that an early inhibition plays a role in shaping latency. To test this hypothesis, response latencies were measured in the inferior colliculi of the pallid and mustached bats before and during the blockade of GABAa and glycine receptors. The effect of blocking inhibition on response latency was compared under stimulus conditions that produced the shortest latency in the predrug condition. Multibarrel "piggyback" electrodes were used to iontophoretically apply bicuculline and strychnine sequentially while recording from single neurons. Predrug latencies ranged from 9 to 26 ms in the pallid bat and from 4 to 17 ms in the mustached bat. Despite large increases in response magnitude and response duration following disinhibition, the blockade of inhibitory receptors had modest effects on response latency. In the pallid bat, blocking GABA receptors produced latency changes that ranged from -3.8 to +0.2 ms, while blocking glycine receptors produced changes from -0.1 to +1.7 ms. Similarly, in the mustached bat, blocking GABA receptors caused changes ranging from -10.3 to +1.4 ms; blocking glycine receptors in the mustached bat caused changes from -3.6 to +1.0 ms. The large change of -10.3 ms was an exception. In both species, the majority of neurons showed changes of <1 ms. We conclude that a fast, early inhibitory input does not appear to play a significant role in shaping the wide range of response latencies present in the inferior colliculi of mustached and pallid bats.  (+info)

(8/45) Application of pulsed Doppler ultrasound for the evaluation of small intestinal motility in dogs.

The purpose of this study was to verify whether small intestinal peristalsis could be observed and quantitatively assessed using pulsed-Doppler ultrasound. Pulsed-Doppler ultrasound was used to evaluate small intestinal peristalsis after a meal in ten normal dogs and ten sedated dogs. The small intestinal peristalses were measured 0, 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 hours after a 24-hour fast and after feeding. The number of small intestinal peristalsis were 0.133/min, 0.100/min, 0.033/min, 0.167/min, 0.070/min, 0.067/min, and 0.100/min in the fasted dogs, and 1.667/ min, 0.933/min, 1.133/min, 1.234/min, 1.933/min, 1.533/ min, and 0.533/min in fed dogs, respectively. In the dogs sedated with xylazine HCl, the number of small intestinal peristalsis was significantly reduced (p<0.01). However, in the dogs treated with ketamine HCl and acepromazine, the number of small intestinal peristalsis remained unchanged. Therefore, it can be concluded that pulsed-Doppler ultrasound allows graphic visualization of the intestinal movements, which can be subjected to qualitative and quantitative analysis, and may be suitable for a non-invasive study of small intestinal motility.  (+info)

*  Butorphanol
For sedation, it may be combined with tranquilizers such as alpha-2 agonists (medetomidine), benzodiazepines, or acepromazine ...
*  List of veterinary drugs
... acepromazine - sedative, tranquilizer, and antiemetic alprazolam - benzodiazepine used as an anxiolytic and tranquilizer ...
*  Acepromazine
"Acepromazine Maleate Injection for Animal Use". Drugs.com. Retrieved 2017-06-11. "Acepromazine: Pet Anxiety Medication for Dogs ... While acepromazine is also used in cats, its absorption is erratic and can differ wildly from one cat to the next. It also ... "Determination of Acepromazine and its Major Metabolite in Equine Serum by LC-MS/MS using the Finnigan LCQ Deca XP Plus Ion Trap ... In the UK, acepromazine is not authorized for use in horses intended for human consumption. Side effects are not common, but ...
*  Brazilian Controlled Drugs and Substances Act
ACEPROMAZINE 2. VALPHORIC ACID 3. AMANTADINE 4. AMINEPTINE 5. AMISSULPRIDA 6. AMITRIPTILINE 7. AMOXAPINE 8. AZACICLONOL 9. ...
*  Boxer (dog)
"Acepromazine and Boxers - References". Retrieved 2009-01-16. Wendy Wallner, DVM. "Warning on Acepromazine". Retrieved 2009-01- ... acepromazine. It is recommended that the drug be avoided in the Boxer breed. As an athletic breed, proper exercise and ...
*  Potomac Horse Fever
... low doses of intramuscular acepromazine; and pentoxifylline. While a vaccine is available for PHF, it does not cover all ...
*  List of dopaminergic drugs
Acepromazine • Azaperone • Benperidol • Bromperidol • Clopenthixol • Chlorpromazine • Chlorprothixene • Droperidol • ...
*  Veterinary surgery
Sedatives commonly used include acepromazine, hydromorphine, midazolam, diazepam, xylazine, and medetomidine. α2 agonists like ... acepromazine, and glycopyrrolate). The next step is induction, usually with an intravenous drug. Dogs and cats commonly receive ...
*  Etorphine
Large Animal Immobilon is a combination of etorphine plus acepromazine maleate. An etorphine antidote Large Animal Revivon ...
*  Rodent cocktail
The injectable, clear liquid is a mixture of ketamine, xylazine, and acepromazine. The ratio used depends on the species of ...
*  Equine exertional rhabdomyolysis
Vasodilators, such as acepromazine, can help improve blood flow to the muscles. However, the owner should only give ... acepromazine if it is prescribed by the horse's veterinarian, as it can lower the animal's blood pressure and can cause ...
*  Scotty Cramp
Diazepam or acepromazine is used to control the symptoms of Scotty Cramp. Vitamin E may also be of some benefit. Because Scotty ...
*  Chlorpromazine
The veterinary use of chlorpromazine has generally been superseded by use of acepromazine. Chlorpromazine may be used as an ...
*  Tranquillizer gun
Immobilon, a mixture of etorphine and a phenothiazine tranquillizer such as acepromazine or methotrimeprazine. Valium (diazepam ...
*  Surgical stress
"Evaluation of the perioperative stress response in dogs administered medetomidine or acepromazine as part of the preanesthetic ... different aspects of manifestation and characteristics with medetomidine and acepromazine preanaesthetic medication (PDF). ...
*  Laminitis
Systemic acepromazine as a vasodilator with the fringe benefit of mild sedation which reduces the horse/pony's movements and ... 1997). "Effects of acepromazine maleate, isoxsuprine hydrochloride and prazosin hydrochloride on laminar blood flow in healthy ... Pentafusion, or the administration of ketamine, lidocaine, morphine, detomidine, and acepromazine at a constant rate of ...
*  Michael Persinger
... obesity in female rats following prepuberal induction of lithium-pilocarpine seizures and a single injection of acepromazine". ...
*  Equine drug testing
The widely used tranquilizer acepromazine, and any number of related or equivalent agents, have been used in this way. Higher ...
*  NMDA receptor antagonist
... acepromazine-butorphanol-ketamine, and xylazine-butorphanol-ketamine in ferrets". Journal of the American Animal Hospital ...
*  Diethylthiambutene
Thiambutene and acepromazine as analgesic and preanaesthetic agents in horses and sheep. Australian Veterinary Journal. 1974 ...
*  Climazolam
... and maintained by intravenous administration of a climazolam-ketamine combination in ponies premedicated with acepromazine and ...
*  Shetland Sheepdog
... including Acepromazine, Butorphanol, Doxorubicin, Erythromycin, Ivermectin, Loperamide, Milbemycin, Moxidectin, Rifampin, ...
*  Benzhydryl compounds
... acepromazine, chlorpromazine, fluphenazine, mesoridazine, levomepromazine, perazine, periciazine, perphenazine, ...
*  List of MeSH codes (D03)
... acepromazine MeSH D03.494.741.080 --- azure stains MeSH D03.494.741.198 --- chlorpromazine MeSH D03.494.741.326 --- ...
*  ACP
Association of Chinese Professionals Atari Coldfire Project Australian College of Pharmacy A Connecticut Party Acepromazine, ...
Acepromazine  Acepromazine
... is also commonly given as a preanesthetic agent. Rx Medication Sold Only To Licensed Veterinarians & Pharmacies.. ... Acepromazine is also commonly given as a preanesthetic agent.. Rx Medication: This product Sold Only To Licensed Veterinarians ... Acepromazine is also commonly given as a preanesthetic agent. Rx Medication: This Product Sold Only To Licensed Veterinarians ... Acepromazine is also commonly given as a preanesthetic agent.. Rx Medication Sold Only To Licensed Veterinarians & Pharmacies. ...
more infohttps://www.medi-vet.com/category-s/2107.htm
Acepromazine Injectable for Horses  Acepromazine Injectable for Horses
Acepromazine Injectable contains the active ingredient, acepromazine maleate. Acepromazine is used as a tranquilizer for ... Acepromazine Injectable is a tranquilizer and may also be used to relax or sedate animals. Who is it for?. Acepromazine ... Acepromazine Injectable How is it given?. Acepromazine Injectable may be given subcutaneously (subQ, under the skin) or ... How does Acepromazine Injectable work?. Acepromazine Injectable is a tranquilizer that affects the central nervous system by ...
more infohttp://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/prod_display.cfm?c=9547+9587+16493&pcatid=16493
What will happen if a human takes acepromazine? | Reference.com  What will happen if a human takes acepromazine? | Reference.com
Acepromazine is a veterinary drug that is not intended for human consumption and is fatal in certain doses. The drug is ... Acepromazine is a veterinary drug that is not intended for human consumption and is fatal in certain doses. The drug is ... Acepromazine affects animals and humans by depressing the central nervous system. As a result, muscles relax and cause heavy ... One report claims a toddler accidentally ingested acepromazine pills that were not in a childproof container. A veterinarian ...
more infohttps://www.reference.com/health/happen-human-takes-acepromazine-bdf63a80fae2047f
Tablet Acepromazine 25 mg, Sedative for Dogs - VetDepot  Tablet Acepromazine 25 mg, Sedative for Dogs - VetDepot
VetDepot offers Single Tablet Acepromazine 25 mg to help sedate pets for minor veterinary procedures and pre-anesthesia. Help ... Acepromazine maleate relaxes pets for travel, grooming, and minor medical procedures. It is also helpful during fireworks ... Acepromazine 25 mg, Single Tablet depresses your pet's central nervous system and causes sedation and muscular relaxation. ... ", "prodUrl":"/acepromazine-25-mg-single-tablet.html" }, { "prodNum":"1041440", "prodUrl":"/acepromazine-10-mg-single-tablet. ...
more infohttps://www.vetdepot.com/acepromazine-25-mg-single-tablet.html
The pharmacokinetics, pharmacological responses and behavioral effects of acepromazine in the horse - BALLARD - 1982 - Journal...  The pharmacokinetics, pharmacological responses and behavioral effects of acepromazine in the horse - BALLARD - 1982 - Journal...
Acepromazine is difficult to detect in plasma at normal clinical doses. However, because of its large volume of distribution, ... At a dosage level of 0.3 mg/kg acepromazine was detectable in the plasma for 8 h post dosing. The whole blood partitioning of ... B. DRIESSEN, L. ZARUCCO, B. KALIR, L. BERTOLOTTI, Contemporary use of acepromazine in the anaesthetic management of male horses ... After intravenous (i.v.) injection, acepromazine was distributed widely in the horse (Vd= 6.6 litres/kg) and bound extensively ...
more infohttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2885.1982.tb00495.x/abstract
Does Acepromazine reduce the cardiovascular toxicity of Norepinephrine in the horse - Péters P  Does Acepromazine reduce the cardiovascular toxicity of Norepinephrine in the horse - Péters P
Reference : Does Acepromazine reduce the cardiovascular toxicity of Norepinephrine in the horse. ...
more infohttp://orbi.ulg.ac.be/handle/2268/127659
Acepromazine for Dogs & Cats - Petrx2go  Acepromazine for Dogs & Cats - Petrx2go
Acepromazine for Dogs & Cats is one of the most commonly used tranquilizers in veterinary medicine; most often used to sedate ... Acepromazine is a potent neuroleptic agent with a low order of toxicity. It is one of the most commonly used tranquilizers in ... Acepromazine should be given 45 minutes to 1 hour prior to the procedure for the medication to take effect. ...
more infohttps://www.petrx2go.com/cat/acepromazine.html
Acepromazine Maleate (Manufacture may vary)  Acepromazine Maleate (Manufacture may vary)
Acepromazine is a phenothiazine tranquilizer that is used prior to anesthesia and surgery because of its sedative effects and ...
more infohttp://entirelypetspharmacy.com/acepromazine-maleate.html
Acepromazine Dogs, Cats, Horses, Maleate, Side Effects, Humans | Chemistry Learner  Acepromazine Dogs, Cats, Horses, Maleate, Side Effects, Humans | Chemistry Learner
Picture 1 - Acepromazine. IUPAC Name for Acepromazine. The IUPAC name for this material is 1-{10-[3-(dimethylamino) propyl]-10H ... Acepromazine for Sale. It is generally used in the form of Acepromazine Maleate. This drug is usually administered by injection ... Where can I get acepromazine. Can I get it in India ? What is the prevailing price of acepromazine ? can you provide list of ... Acepromazine for Humans. It was first used on humans as an anti-psychotic drug during the 1950s. However, its uses on humans ...
more infohttp://www.chemistrylearner.com/acepromazine.html?replytocom=50094
07-808-8822 | 500/Bottle | Acepromazine Tablets (Phoenix) - 10 mg  07-808-8822 | 500/Bottle | Acepromazine Tablets (Phoenix) - 10 mg
Revision date indicates the date the MSDS or SDS was last revised. MSDS / SDS are dated when they are originally issued AND when any significant change has been made to the chemical compound or research has revealed a health or physical hazard different from what was originally stated. Additional information regarding MSDS / SDS is available at https://www.osha.gov ...
more infohttps://www.pattersonvet.com/ProductItem/078088822
07-808-8814 | 100/Bottle | Acepromazine Tablets (Phoenix) - 10 mg  07-808-8814 | 100/Bottle | Acepromazine Tablets (Phoenix) - 10 mg
Revision date indicates the date the MSDS or SDS was last revised. MSDS / SDS are dated when they are originally issued AND when any significant change has been made to the chemical compound or research has revealed a health or physical hazard different from what was originally stated. Additional information regarding MSDS / SDS is available at https://www.osha.gov ...
more infohttps://www.pattersonvet.com/ProductItem/078088814
Library - Norwood Animal Clinic  Library - Norwood Animal Clinic
Acepromazine. Acepromazine is a sedative/tranquilizer used primarily in cats and dogs as a pre-medication for anesthesia or for ... Acepromazine should not be used in conjunction with certain toxicities, or in pets with heart disease, low blood pressure. It ...
more infohttps://norwoodanimal.com/pet-health-resources/pet-health-articles/articles/?ps=2
American Manchester Terrier Club - Anesthesia  Manchester Terriers and Anesthesia   Updated by Regina R. Allen DVM  American Manchester Terrier Club - Anesthesia Manchester Terriers and Anesthesia Updated by Regina R. Allen DVM
Manchester Terriers tolerate premedication well prior to anesthesia with acepromazine/opioid combinations given IM or SQ, ... provided that acepromazine is used at the lowest effective dose. Barbiturates used for induction are metabolized slowly and ...
more infohttps://www.americanmanchester.org/page-18089/3628889
Acepromazine  Acepromazine
... is one of the most commonly used tranquilizers in veterinary medicine. It is a phenothiazine compound ... Acepromazine doesn't have any pain-killing effects. Many dogs seem to be able to will themselves to overcome its effects, at ... In addition, acepromazine seems to make it easier for dogs with seizure disorders to have a seizure. This medication should not ... The recommended dosage for acepromazine is 0.25mg to 1mg per pound of body weight. In most cases it is not necessary to use the ...
more infohttps://www.vetinfo.com/dencyclopedia/deace.html
Acepromazine - Drugs.com  Acepromazine - Drugs.com
A list of US medications equivalent to Acepromazine is available on the Drugs.com website. ... Acepromazine is a medicine available in a number of countries worldwide. ... Acepromazine Maleate (PH: BP vet. 2018, USP 41). Brand Names. *Large Animal Etorphilon [+ Etorphine] [veterinary use]. Abbeyvet ... Acepromazine Maleate [veterinary use]. Bayer HealthCare LLC, United States; Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, United States ...
more infohttps://www.drugs.com/international/acepromazine.html
Medication - Acepromazine  Medication - Acepromazine
Acepromazine Acepromazine is one of the most commonly used tranquilizers in veterinary medicine. It is a phenothiazine compound ... Acepromazine for Aggression Q: I have a 2 year old male boxer/pitbull, neutered, approx 70 lbs, not a social dog. Last year the ... Acepromazine Use For Aggression - Continued Q: I previously wrote to you about acepromzaine. With the approval of my vet, we ... Acepromazine doesn't have any pain-killing effects. Many dogs seem to be able to will themselves to overcome its effects, at ...
more infohttps://www.vetinfo.com/dogace.html
Acepromazine | Revival Animal Health  Acepromazine | Revival Animal Health
Acepromazine is used as a sedative for dogs and cats. Also treats itching from skin irritation. Revival Animal Health's pet ... Acepromazine has been shown to decrease tear production in cats.. May give urine a pinkish to red-brown color.. In male horses ... Acepromazine has also been used to treat itching as a result of skin irritation in dogs, cats and horses.. In horses, ... Acepromazine is used as a tranquilizer/sedative for dogs, cats and horses as well as to control vomiting associated with motion ...
more infohttps://www.revivalanimal.com/product/acepromazine/full-service-pharmacy
ACEPROMAZINE TABS  ACEPROMAZINE TABS
Acepromazine Maleate Tablets can be used as an aid in controlling intractable animals during examination, treatment, grooming, ... DESCRIPTION: Acepromazine maleate, a potent neuroleptic agent with a low order of toxicity, is of particular value in the ... Acepromazine, like other phenothiazine derivatives, is detoxified in the liver; therefore, it should be used with caution on ... HOW SUPPLIED: Acepromazine Maleate Tablets are available in 10 & 25 mg concentrations, and are quarter scored for convenience ...
more infohttps://www.atozvetsupply.com/ACEPROMAZINE-TABS-p/71-acetab.htm
The use of Acepromazine in Dogs and Cats | HubPages  The use of Acepromazine in Dogs and Cats | HubPages
... your vet may prescribe acepromazine (promace). Learn about its side effects, and how it works. ... Acepromazine Side Effects. Acepromazine may cause side effects in both dogs and cats. As with any medication pets may develop ... Why Acepromazine is Not Recommended for Air Travel. While many vets will prescribe Acepromazine for car travel, many may be ... Acepromazine is also prescribed for aggressive dogs.. Acepromazine will cause hypotension, decreased respiratory rate, and ...
more infohttps://hubpages.com/animals/The-use-of-Acepromazine-in-Dogs-and-Cats
Acepromazine Injection Rx | PBS Animal Health  Acepromazine Injection Rx | PBS Animal Health
Each ml of Acepromazine Injection contains 10 mg acepromazine maleate, sodium citrate 0.36%, citric acid 0.075%, benzyl alcohol ... Each ml of Acepromazine Injection contains 10 mg acepromazine maleate, sodium citrate 0.36%, citric acid 0.075%, benzyl alcohol ... Share your story about: Acepromazine Injection Rx Your Name & Location: Your Email Address: Send me a copy of this message ... Email to a friend: Acepromazine Injection Rx Email To:. Enter email addresses, separated by commas. Maximum 200 characters.. ...
more infohttps://www.pbsanimalhealth.com/details/Acepromazine-Injection-Rx/81-81.html
  • Acepromazine has a depressant effect on the central nervous system (CNS) resulting in sedation, muscle relaxation, and a reduction in spontaneous activity. (zooveterinary.com)