Acedapsone: Acetylated sulfone that is slowly metabolized to give long-term, low blood levels of DAPSONE. It has antimicrobial and antimalarial action, but is mainly used as a depot leprostatic agent.Acetanilides: Compounds based on N-phenylacetamide, that are similar in structure to 2-PHENYLACETAMIDES. They are precursors of many other compounds. They were formerly used as ANALGESICS and ANTIPYRETICS, but often caused lethal METHEMOGLOBINEMIA.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Computer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Privacy: The state of being free from intrusion or disturbance in one's private life or affairs. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)AmidohydrolasesCytochrome P-450 Enzyme System: A superfamily of hundreds of closely related HEMEPROTEINS found throughout the phylogenetic spectrum, from animals, plants, fungi, to bacteria. They include numerous complex monooxygenases (MIXED FUNCTION OXYGENASES). In animals, these P-450 enzymes serve two major functions: (1) biosynthesis of steroids, fatty acids, and bile acids; (2) metabolism of endogenous and a wide variety of exogenous substrates, such as toxins and drugs (BIOTRANSFORMATION). They are classified, according to their sequence similarities rather than functions, into CYP gene families (>40% homology) and subfamilies (>59% homology). For example, enzymes from the CYP1, CYP2, and CYP3 gene families are responsible for most drug metabolism.Tropical Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with diseases, mainly of parasitic origin, common in tropical and subtropical regions.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.alpha-Macroglobulins: Glycoproteins with a molecular weight of approximately 620,000 to 680,000. Precipitation by electrophoresis is in the alpha region. They include alpha 1-macroglobulins and alpha 2-macroglobulins. These proteins exhibit trypsin-, chymotrypsin-, thrombin-, and plasmin-binding activity and function as hormonal transporters.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Inventions: A novel composition, device, or process, independently conceived de novo or derived from a pre-existing model.Intellectual Property: Property, such as patents, trademarks, and copyright, that results from creative effort. The Patent and Copyright Clause (Art. 1, Sec. 8, cl. 8) of the United States Constitution provides for promoting the progress of science and useful arts by securing for limited times to authors and inventors, the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 5th ed, p1014)History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.Biotechnology: Body of knowledge related to the use of organisms, cells or cell-derived constituents for the purpose of developing products which are technically, scientifically and clinically useful. Alteration of biologic function at the molecular level (i.e., GENETIC ENGINEERING) is a central focus; laboratory methods used include TRANSFECTION and CLONING technologies, sequence and structure analysis algorithms, computer databases, and gene and protein structure function analysis and prediction.History, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Rare, chronic, papulo-vesicular disease characterized by an intensely pruritic eruption consisting of various combinations of symmetrical, erythematous, papular, vesicular, or bullous lesions. The disease is strongly associated with the presence of HLA-B8 and HLA-DR3 antigens. A variety of different autoantibodies has been detected in small numbers in patients with dermatitis herpetiformis.Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Glutens: Prolamins in the endosperm of SEEDS from the Triticeae tribe which includes species of WHEAT; BARLEY; and RYE.Celiac Disease: A malabsorption syndrome that is precipitated by the ingestion of foods containing GLUTEN, such as wheat, rye, and barley. It is characterized by INFLAMMATION of the SMALL INTESTINE, loss of MICROVILLI structure, failed INTESTINAL ABSORPTION, and MALNUTRITION.Dapsone: A sulfone active against a wide range of bacteria but mainly employed for its actions against MYCOBACTERIUM LEPRAE. Its mechanism of action is probably similar to that of the SULFONAMIDES which involves inhibition of folic acid synthesis in susceptible organisms. It is also used with PYRIMETHAMINE in the treatment of malaria. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p157-8)Jejunum: The middle portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between DUODENUM and ILEUM. It represents about 2/5 of the remaining portion of the small intestine below duodenum.Skin Diseases, Vesiculobullous: Skin diseases characterized by local or general distributions of blisters. They are classified according to the site and mode of blister formation. Lesions can appear spontaneously or be precipitated by infection, trauma, or sunlight. Etiologies include immunologic and genetic factors. (From Scientific American Medicine, 1990)Mycobacterium kansasii: A slow-growing, photochromogenic species that is the etiologic agent of a tuberculosis-like disease in humans and is frequently isolated from human pulmonary secretions or tubercles. The incidence of infection is sharply increased among immunocompromised individuals. (Dorland, 28th ed)Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Mycobacterium avium Complex: A complex that includes several strains of M. avium. M. intracellulare is not easily distinguished from M. avium and therefore is included in the complex. These organisms are most frequently found in pulmonary secretions from persons with a tuberculous-like mycobacteriosis. Strains of this complex have also been associated with childhood lymphadenitis and AIDS; M. avium alone causes tuberculosis in a variety of birds and other animals, including pigs.Pyrazinamide: A pyrazine that is used therapeutically as an antitubercular agent.Optic Neuritis: Inflammation of the optic nerve. Commonly associated conditions include autoimmune disorders such as MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, infections, and granulomatous diseases. Clinical features include retro-orbital pain that is aggravated by eye movement, loss of color vision, and contrast sensitivity that may progress to severe visual loss, an afferent pupillary defect (Marcus-Gunn pupil), and in some instances optic disc hyperemia and swelling. Inflammation may occur in the portion of the nerve within the globe (neuropapillitis or anterior optic neuritis) or the portion behind the globe (retrobulbar neuritis or posterior optic neuritis).Antitubercular Agents: Drugs used in the treatment of tuberculosis. They are divided into two main classes: "first-line" agents, those with the greatest efficacy and acceptable degrees of toxicity used successfully in the great majority of cases; and "second-line" drugs used in drug-resistant cases or those in which some other patient-related condition has compromised the effectiveness of primary therapy.Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A species of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria that produces TUBERCULOSIS in humans, other primates, CATTLE; DOGS; and some other animals which have contact with humans. Growth tends to be in serpentine, cordlike masses in which the bacilli show a parallel orientation.OklahomaEngineering: The practical application of physical, mechanical, and mathematical principles. (Stedman, 25th ed)IllinoisPublications: Copies of a work or document distributed to the public by sale, rental, lease, or lending. (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p181)Rehabilitation: Restoration of human functions to the maximum degree possible in a person or persons suffering from disease or injury.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)ButylaminesMefloquine: A phospholipid-interacting antimalarial drug (ANTIMALARIALS). It is very effective against PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM with very few side effects.Antimalarials: Agents used in the treatment of malaria. They are usually classified on the basis of their action against plasmodia at different stages in their life cycle in the human. (From AMA, Drug Evaluations Annual, 1992, p1585)Malaria: A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.QuinolinesProguanil: A biguanide compound which metabolizes in the body to form cycloguanil, an anti-malaria agent.Access to Information: Individual's rights to obtain and use information collected or generated by others.Peer Review, Research: The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.

Activities of respository preparations of cycloguanil pamoate and 4,4'-diacetyldiaminodiphenylsulfone, alone and in combination, against infections with Plasmodium cynomolgi in rhesus monkeys. (1/2)

The studies summarized in this report were concerned with the capacities of repository preparations of cycloguanil pamoate (CGT-P) to protect rhesus monkeys against infections with drug-susceptible and pyrimethamine-resistant strains of Plasmodium cynomolgi. Administered intramuscularly as a suspension in an oleaginous vehicle, CGT-P (i) provided long-term protection against single and repetitive challenges of rhesus monkeys with sporozoites of the drug-susceptible B and Ro strains, (ii) effected prompt clearance of parasitemia in established infections, and (iii) delayed relapse. Protection was equated to absence of parasites on thick blood films, negative results when blood was transferred to susceptible recipients, and inability to activate infection by splenectomy. Eventual loss of protection was not related to emergence of parasites resistant to cycloguanil (CGT). Although protection varied from monkey to monkey, its mean duration was related directly to size of CGT-P dose and size of particles in the suspension. Urinary excretion studies indicated that protection persisted as long as the daily output of CGT did not fall below that attained with the parenterally administered hydrochloride salt at a dose equivalent to 0.015 mg of CGT per kg. Studies on infections with the resistant Ro/PM strain showed that the activity of CGT-P was compromised severely by resistance to pyrimethamine. Attempts to minimize this liability by concomitant administration of 4,4'-diacetyldiaminodiphenylsulfone met with limited success. These results suggest that even the best of the repository preparations of CGT-P, with or without 4,4'-diacetyldiaminodiphenylsulfone, would be useful only in areas where Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax are fully susceptible to chlorguanide and pyrimethamine.  (+info)

Susceptibility of Mycobacterium leprae to dapsone as a determinant of patient response to acedapsone. (2/2)

In the course of a clinical trial of acedapsone therapy in 17 patients with lepromatous leprosy, the rate of response to therapy was measured by inoculation of mice with Mycobacterium leprae recovered from biopsy specimens of skin lesions obtained before treatment and at intervals of 4, 12, and 24 weeks after institution of treatment. The susceptibility of each isolate of M. leprae to dapsone (4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulfone [DDS]) was measured by passaging organisms that had multiplied in mice to new groups of untreated mice and to mice treated with DDS incorporated in the mouse chow in concentrations of 10(-5), 3 x 10(-5), and 10(-4) g/100 ml. The rate of response to acedapsone therapy and the susceptibility of patient strains of M. leprae to DDS varied widely among patients. All isolates were inhibited from multiplication by treatment of mice with 10(-4) g of DDS per 100 ml; all but two isolates were susceptible to 3 x 10(-5) g of DDS per 100 ml; and 17 of 36 isolates, representing nine patient strains, were susceptible to 10(-5) g of DDS per 100 ml. Plasma levels of DDS measured in the mice administered these diets show that the minimal inhibitory concentration of DDS for M. leprae isolated from untreated patients is about 3 ng/ml. No relationship could be demonstrated between DDS susceptibility of pretreatment isolates of M. leprae and the rate at which patients responded to acedapsone therapy. Neither acedapsone treatment of patients nor DDS treatment of mice appeared to select genotypically more resistant M. leprae.  (+info)

Demonstration of a persisting exo-erythrocytic cycle in plasmodium cynomolgi and its bearing on the reproduction of relapses / H. E. Shortt and P. C. C. ...
Demonstration of a persisting exo-erythrocytic cycle in Plasmodium cynomolgi and its bearing on the production of relapses Public Health Classics ...
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Abstract An analogue of primaquine, N1-(3-acetyl-4-5-dihydro-2-furanyl)-N4-(6-methoxy-8-quinolinyl) 1, 4-pentanediamine, CDRI Code 80/53), has been evaluated for anti-relapse activity against sporozoite induced Plasmodium cynomolgi B infection in rhesus monkeys. The compound has shown 100% curative anti-relapse activity at 1.25 mg/kg × 7 day dose schedule, thereby giving a primaquine index of 0.8. The compound is currently under Phase-I clinical trials.
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Acedapsone is a derivative of dapsone that has little activity against M. leprae but is converted to an active dapsone ... The following agents are leprostatic agents: acedapsone clofazimine dapsone desoxyfructo-serotonin diucifon ethionamide ...
... acedapsone MeSH D02.886.590.625 --- phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride MeSH D02.886.590.700 --- sulfonamides MeSH D02.886.590.700. ...
... acedapsone (INN) acediasulfone (INN) acedoben (INN) acefluranol (INN) acefurtiamine (INN) acefylline clofibrol (INN) acefylline ...
... (INN) is an antimicrobial drug, which also has antimalarial activity. Acedapsone, or 1399 F, is a diacetyl compound ... Acedapsone is conveniently prepared by acetylation of dapsone. (in French) E. Fourneau, J. et Th. Tréfouël, F. Nitti, D. Bovet ... 4',4 ' ' ' -Sulfonylbisacetanilide (acedapsone, DADDS) and related sulfanilylanilides with prolonged antimalarial and ...
... Antimycobacterials is a therapeutic subgroup of the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System, a system of alphanumeric codes developed by the WHO for the classification of drugs and other medical products. Subgroup J04 is part of the anatomical group J Antiinfectives for systemic use.[1] Codes for veterinary use (ATCvet codes) can be created by placing the letter Q in front of the human ATC code: for example, QJ04.[2] National issues of the ATC classification may include additional codes not present in this list, which follows the WHO version. ...
... (EMB, E) is a medication primarily used to treat tuberculosis.[1] It is usually given in combination with other tuberculosis medications, such as isoniazid, rifampicin and pyrazinamide.[4] It may also be used to treat Mycobacterium avium complex, and Mycobacterium kansasii.[1] It is taken by mouth.[1] Common side effects include problems with vision, joint pain, nausea, headaches, and feeling tired.[1] Other side effects include liver problems and allergic reactions.[1] It is not recommended in people with optic neuritis, significant kidney problems, or under the age of five.[4] Use during pregnancy or breastfeeding has not been found to cause harm.[4][5] In the United States the FDA has raised concerns about eye issues in the baby if used during pregnancy.[1] Ethambutol is believed to work by interfering with the bacteria's metabolism.[1] Ethambutol was discovered in 1961.[6] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines ...
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ಈ ಖಾಯಿಲೆ ಹೊಂದಿರುವವರ ಜೊತೆ ಆರೋಗ್ಯವಂತರು ಸಂಪರ್ಕವನ್ನು ಹೊಂದಿದರೆ ಖಾಯಿಲೆ ಅಂಟುತ್ತದೆ ಎಂದು ತುಂಬಾ ವ್ಯಾಪಕವಾಗಿ ನಂಬಲಾಗಿದೆ.[೩೭] ಸಾಮಾನ್ಯವಾಗಿ, ಎಷ್ಟು ಹತ್ತಿರದಲ್ಲಿ ಸಂಪರ್ಕ ಹೊಂದಿದ್ದಾರೆ ಎನ್ನುವುದರ ಮೇಲೆ ಖಾಯಿಲೆ ಪ್ರಕಟವಾಗುವುದು ಅವಲಂಬಿಸಿದೆ. ಹಲವು ವಿಧದ ಸಂಪರ್ಕಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ಮನೆಯೊಳಗಿನ ಸಂಪರ್ಕವನಷ್ಟೇ ಸುಲಭವಾಗಿ ಗುರುರು ಹಿಡಿಯುವುದಕ್ಕೆ ಸಾಧ್ಯವಾಗುವುದು,ಆದಾಗ್ಯೂ ಸಂಪರ್ಕದ ನೈಜ ಘಟನೆ ಮತ್ತು ಅವುಗಳ ತೊಂದರೆ ಹಲವು ಅಧ್ಯಯನಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ...
Acedapsone (INN) is an antimicrobial drug, which also has antimalarial activity. Acedapsone, or 1399 F, is a diacetyl compound ... Acedapsone is conveniently prepared by acetylation of dapsone. (in French) E. Fourneau, J. et Th. Tréfouël, F. Nitti, D. Bovet ... 4,4 -Sulfonylbisacetanilide (acedapsone, DADDS) and related sulfanilylanilides with prolonged antimalarial and ...
Acedapsone side effects and Toxicity No information avaliable Acedapsone Patient Information 1. Patients should use ACZONE® Gel ... Acedapsone Pharmacology Dapsone is a sulfone with anti-inflammatory immunosuppressive properties as well as antibacterial and ... Acedapsone Indication For the treatment and management of leprosy and dermatitis herpetiformis ... Acedapsone Chemical_Formula C12H12N2O2S ... Acedapsone Melting Point 175.5 oC Acedapsone H2O Solubility 380 ...
Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. ...
Study VII - Topnotch Pharma Flash Cards - Chemotherapeutic Drugs flashcards from
Acedapsone (DADDS) Treatment of Leprosy Patients in the Karimui of Papua New Guinea: Status at Six Years * D. A. Russell, C. C ... Acedapsone (DADDS), a repository sulfone given by injection five times a year, has been used since 1967 for the treatment of ... They were then treated as outpatients with intramuscular acedapsone (225 mg every 12 weeks) or oral dapsone (50 mg daily). They ...
acedapsone. 17. B05. choline chloride. 65. F05. atomoxetine hydrochloride. 18. B06. atorvastatin calcium. 66. F06. ...
Acedapsone [USAN:INN:BAN] View Synonyms. View Structure. Description:. Acetylated sulfone that is slowly metabolized to give ...
N-[(2R,3S)-5-[(2R)-1-hydroxypropan-2-yl]-3-methyl-2-(methylaminomethyl)-6-oxo-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,5-benzoxazocin-10-yl]-2-pyrazinecarboxamide - Ontology Browser - Rat Genome Database
2-[(3S,6aR,8S,10aR)-3-hydroxy-1-[oxo(2-pyrazinyl)methyl]-3,4,6,6a,8,9,10,10a-octahydro-2H-pyrano[2,3-c][1,5]oxazocin-8-yl]-N-[(4-fluorophenyl)methyl]acetamide - Ontology Browser - Rat Genome Database
Acedapsone; Acetosulfone Sodium; Alamecin; Alexidine; Amdinocillin; Amdinocillin Pivoxil; Amicycline; Amifloxacin; Amifloxacin ...
Acedapsone * in the Prevention of Leprosy: Field Trial in Three High Prevalence Villages in Micronesia † Authors: D. A. Russell ... people in a Micronesian population experiencing an annual leprosy incidence rate of about 7/1,000 were offered 15 acedapsone ( ...
Further examples of anti-parasitic compounds include but are not limited to Acedapsone; Amodiaquine Hydrochloride; Amquinate; ... Additional examples of antibacterial agents include but are not limited to Acedapsone; Acetosulfone Sodium; Alamecin; Alexidine ...
Acedapsone is a derivative of dapsone that has little activity against M. leprae but is converted to an active dapsone ... The following agents are leprostatic agents: acedapsone clofazimine dapsone desoxyfructo-serotonin diucifon ethionamide ...
Namespaces Article Talk. The Journal of Antibiotics. Rifampicin has some effectiveness against vaccinia virus. Tarascon pocket pharmacopoeia: deluxe lab-pocket edition 15 ed. The activity of rifampicin against some species of mycobacteria can be potentiated by isoniazid through inhibiting mycolate synthesis [39] and ambroxol through host directed effects in autophagy and pharmacokinetics. Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy. International Programme on Chemical Safety. After two years of attempts to obtain more stable semisynthetic products, a new molecule with high efficacy and good tolerability was produced in and was named "rifampicin". Applied Microbiology.. ...
InChI=1/C19H19N7O6/c20-19-25-15-14(17(30)26-19)23-11(8-22-15)7-21-10-3-1-9(2-4-10)16(29)24-12(18(31)32)5-6-13(27)28/h1-4,8,12,21H,5-7H2,(H,24,29)(H,27,28)(H,31,32)(H3,20,22,25,26,30)/t12-/m0/ ...
... and two with acedapsone (one dose every 10 weeks for seven months in both). The meta-analysis showed a reduction in the ... incidence of leprosy among the contacts with patients, varying from 30% to 72%, with the use of dapsone, acedapsone, or ...
... such as Acedapsone, Acetosulfone Sodium, Clofazimine, Dapsone, Diathymosulfone, Glucosulfone Sodium, Hydnocarpic Acid, ... Acedapsone, Acediasulfone, Acetosulfone Sodium, Dapsone, Diathymosulfone, Glucosulfone Sodium, Solasulfone, Succisulfone, ...
... acedapsone, acediasulfone, acedoben, acefluranol, acefurtiamine, acefylline clofibrol, acefylline piperazine, aceglatone, ...
ATC code J04 Antimycobacterials is a therapeutic subgroup of the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System, a system of alphanumeric codes developed by the WHO for the classification of drugs and other medical products. Subgroup J04 is part of the anatomical group J Antiinfectives for systemic use.[1] Codes for veterinary use (ATCvet codes) can be created by placing the letter Q in front of the human ATC code: for example, QJ04.[2] National issues of the ATC classification may include additional codes not present in this list, which follows the WHO version. ...
Ethambutol (EMB, E) is a medication primarily used to treat tuberculosis.[1] It is usually given in combination with other tuberculosis medications, such as isoniazid, rifampicin and pyrazinamide.[4] It may also be used to treat Mycobacterium avium complex, and Mycobacterium kansasii.[1] It is taken by mouth.[1] Common side effects include problems with vision, joint pain, nausea, headaches, and feeling tired.[1] Other side effects include liver problems and allergic reactions.[1] It is not recommended in people with optic neuritis, significant kidney problems, or under the age of five.[4] Use during pregnancy or breastfeeding has not been found to cause harm.[4][5] In the United States the FDA has raised concerns about eye issues in the baby if used during pregnancy.[1] Ethambutol is believed to work by interfering with the bacterias metabolism.[1] Ethambutol was discovered in 1961.[6] It is on the World Health Organizations List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines ...
Acedapsone Acedoxin use Acetyldigitoxins ACEL IMUNE use Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis Vaccines ...
Clark, M. P., Bahr, J. A., Bierkens, M. F. P., Cai, X., Hogue, T. S., Luce, C. H., Lundquist, J. D., Mackay, D. S., van Meerveld, H. J. I., Rajaram, H., Sanchez-Vila, X. & Troch, P. A. 2017 In : Water Resources Research.. Research output: Contribution to journal › Article ...
Acedapsone Acedoxin use Acetyldigitoxins ACEL IMUNE use Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis Vaccines ...
Acedapsone Acedoxin use Acetyldigitoxins ACEL IMUNE use Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis Vaccines ...

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