Process of cultural change in which one group or members of a group assimilate various cultural patterns from another.
Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.
Persons living in the United States of Mexican descent.
People who leave their place of residence in one country and settle in a different country.
Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent.
Central America is not a medical term, but a geographical region consisting of seven countries (Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama) that connect North America to South America, which may be relevant in medical contexts such as discussions of regional disease patterns, public health initiatives, or tropical medicine.
The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.
An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is San Juan. It is a self-governing commonwealth in union with the United States. It was discovered by Columbus in 1493 but no colonization was attempted until 1508. It belonged to Spain until ceded to the United States in 1898. It became a commonwealth with autonomy in internal affairs in 1952. Columbus named the island San Juan for St. John's Day, the Monday he arrived, and the bay Puerto Rico, rich harbor. The island became Puerto Rico officially in 1932. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p987 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p436)
An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies, south of Florida. With the adjacent islands it forms the Republic of Cuba. Its capital is Havana. It was discovered by Columbus on his first voyage in 1492 and conquered by Spain in 1511. It has a varied history under Spain, Great Britain, and the United States but has been independent since 1902. The name Cuba is said to be an Indian name of unknown origin but the language that gave the name is extinct, so the etymology is a conjecture. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p302 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p132)
An induced skin pigment (MELANIN) darkening after exposure to SUNLIGHT or ULTRAVIOLET RAYS. The degree of tanning depends on the intensity and duration of UV exposure, and genetic factors.
**I must clarify that there is no recognized or established medical term or definition for 'Texas.' However, if you're asking for a possible humorous play on words using the term 'Texas' in a medical context, here it is:**
Those aspects or characteristics which identify a culture.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "California" is a place, specifically a state on the western coast of the United States, and not a medical term or concept. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.
The process by which an aspect of self image is developed based on in-group preference or ethnocentrism and a perception of belonging to a social or cultural group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Arizona" is a proper noun and refers to a state in the southwestern United States, not a medical term or condition. It would not have a medical definition.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Mexico" is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. It is the name of a country located in North America, known officially as the United Mexican States. If you have any questions related to medical topics or terminology, I would be happy to help answer those!
I'm sorry for any confusion, but there seems to be a misunderstanding as "South America" is not a medical term and cannot have a medical definition. It is a geographical term referring to the southern portion of the American continent, consisting of twelve independent countries and three territories of other nations.
The term "United States" in a medical context often refers to the country where a patient or study participant resides, and is not a medical term per se, but relevant for epidemiological studies, healthcare policies, and understanding differences in disease prevalence, treatment patterns, and health outcomes across various geographic locations.
A republic in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is Santo Domingo. With Haiti, it forms the island of Hispaniola - the Dominican Republic occupying the eastern two thirds, and Haiti, the western third. It was created in 1844 after a revolt against the rule of President Boyer over the entire island of Hispaniola, itself visited by Columbus in 1492 and settled the next year. Except for a brief period of annexation to Spain (1861-65), it has been independent, though closely associated with the United States. Its name comes from the Spanish Santo Domingo, Holy Sunday, with reference to its discovery on a Sunday. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p338, 506 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p151)
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Florida" is a geographical location and not a medical term or condition with a specific definition. It is the 27th largest state by area in the United States, located in the southeastern region of the country and known for its diverse wildlife, beautiful beaches, and theme parks. If you have any medical questions or terms that need clarification, please feel free to ask!
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
An island republic of the West Indies. Its capital is Roseau. It was discovered in 1493 by Columbus and held at different times by the French and the British in the 18th century. A member of the West Indies Federation, it achieved internal self-government in 1967 but became independent in 1978. It was named by Columbus who discovered it on Sunday, Domingo in Spanish, from the Latin Dominica dies, the Lord's Day. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p338 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p151)
The geographic area of the southwestern region of the United States. The states usually included in this region are Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah.
Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.
whoa, hold up! 'New Mexico' is a state in the United States, it isn't a medical term or concept. It might be confused with a location name or geographical term. Let me know if you need information about a medical topic and I'd be happy to help!
(LA) is not a medical term; it is a region, specifically the second most populous city in the United States, located in Southern California, which contains several world-renowned hospitals and medical centers that offer advanced healthcare services and cutting-edge medical research.
A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.
Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.
The ability to speak, read, or write several languages or many languages with some facility. Bilingualism is the most common form. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
whoa! It seems like there might be a bit of confusion here. "Luxembourg" is actually the name of a country, specifically a small yet wealthy European nation known for its stable economy, beautiful landscapes, and cultural diversity. It doesn't have a medical definition. However, if you meant to ask about a different term, please let me know and I'd be happy to help!
(Disclaimer: This is a playful and fictitious response, as there isn't a medical definition for 'New York City'.)
A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.
People who frequently change their place of residence.
Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.
The interactions between parent and child.
Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.
A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.
A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.
Behavioral, psychological, and social relations among various members of the nuclear family and the extended family.
Comparison of various psychological, sociological, or cultural factors in order to assess the similarities or diversities occurring in two or more different cultures or societies.
Female parents, human or animal.
Philadelphia, in a medical context, does not have a specific definition as it is a city and not a term used for diagnosis or clinical condition; however, it is known for being the location of several major hospitals and medical institutions, including the University of Pennsylvania Health System and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
A republic consisting of an island group in Melanesia, in the southwest Pacific Ocean. Its capital is Suva. It was discovered by Abel Tasman in 1643 and was visited by Captain Cook in 1774. It was used by escaped convicts from Australia as early as 1804. It was annexed by Great Britain in 1874 but achieved independence in 1970. The name Fiji is of uncertain origin. In its present form it may represent that of Viti, the main island in the group. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p396 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p186)
Disorders related to substance abuse.
Human males as cultural, psychological, sociological, political, and economic entities.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.

Changes across 3 years in self-reported awareness of product warning messages in a Hispanic community. (1/654)

This study investigated the self-reported awareness of product warning messages among independent random samples of Hispanics in San Francisco surveyed from 1989 through 1992. Messages tested were primarily related to cigarette smoking and the consumption of alcoholic beverages. In general, respondents reported low levels of awareness of product warning messages with the exception of those messages dealing with the consumption of alcohol or cigarettes during pregnancy. Nevertheless, there were increases in awareness across years for the alcohol-related warning messages and for one of the cigarette messages, indicating that continued exposure increases awareness of the message. A notable proportion of the respondents reported being aware of a bogus message implying the presence of socially desirable responses in self-reports of message awareness. Gender, education, age and acculturation level of the respondents also showed effects on reported awareness of specific messages. Continued exposure to product warning messages seems useful in producing health-enhancing behaviors among Hispanics.  (+info)

Cardiovascular risk factors in Mexican American adults: a transcultural analysis of NHANES III, 1988-1994. (2/654)

OBJECTIVES: This study examined the extent to which cardiovascular disease risk factors differ among subgroups of Mexican Americans living in the United States. METHODS: Using data from a national sample (1988-1994) of 1387 Mexican American women and 1404 Mexican American men, aged 25 to 64 years, we examined an estimate of coronary heart disease mortality risk and 5 primary cardiovascular disease risk factors: systolic blood pressure, body mass index, cigarette smoking, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Differences in risk were evaluated by country of birth and primary language spoken. RESULTS: Estimated 10-year coronary heart disease mortality risk per 1000 persons, adjusted for age and education, was highest for US-born Spanish-speaking men and women (27.5 and 11.4, respectively), intermediate for US-born English-speaking men and women (22.5 and 7.0), and lowest for Mexican-born men and women (20.0 and 6.6). A similar pattern of higher risk among US-born Spanish-speaking men and women was demonstrated for each of the 5 cardiovascular disease risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: These findings illustrate the heterogeneity of the Mexican American population and identify a new group at substantial risk for cardiovascular disease and in need of effective heart disease prevention programs.  (+info)

Illness and treatment perceptions of Ethiopian immigrants and their doctors in Israel. (3/654)

OBJECTIVES: Patient-provider misunderstandings arising from disparate medical and cultural concepts can impede health care among immigrant populations. This study assessed the extent of disagreement and identified the salient problems of communication between Israeli doctors and Ethiopian immigrant patients. METHODS: Semistructured interviews were conducted with 59 Ethiopian immigrants. Self-reports of health status and effectiveness of treatment were compared with evaluations by the primary care physician and supplemented by qualitative data from descriptions of illness, observations of medical visits, informant interviews, and participant observations conducted by the anthropologist. RESULTS: Health status and effectiveness of treatment were rated significantly higher by the doctor than by the patients. Low doctor-patient agreement occurred mainly for illnesses with stress-related or culture-specific associations. Qualitative data suggested that more long-term immigrants may alter their expectations of treatment but continue to experience symptoms that are culturally, but not biomedically, meaningful. CONCLUSIONS: Misunderstandings between immigrant patients and their doctors emerge from the biomedical system's limitations in addressing stress-related illnesses and from culture-based discrepancies in concepts of illness and healing. Including trained translators in medical teams can reduce medical misunderstandings and increase patient satisfaction among immigrant populations.  (+info)

Is acculturation a risk factor for early smoking initiation among Chinese American minors? A comparative perspective. (4/654)

OBJECTIVE: To determine the extent to which Chinese American and white minors differ in age of smoking initiation, and to determine the effect of acculturation on smoking initiation. DESIGN: Cross-sectional telephone surveys. SETTING: Stratified random samples of the state of California, United States. SUBJECTS: 347 Chinese American and 10 129 white adolescents aged 12 through 17 years, from the California Tobacco Survey (1990-93) and the California Youth Tobacco Survey (1994-96). OUTCOME MEASURES: Hazards (risk) of smoking initiation by age, smoking initiation rate, cumulative smoking rate, mean age of smoking initiation, and acculturation status. STATISTICAL METHODS: Life table methods, proportional hazards models, and chi(2) tests. RESULTS: The risk of smoking initiation by age among Chinese American minors was about a third of that among white minors. The risk for Chinese Americans continued to rise even in later adolescence, in contrast to that for whites, which slowed after 15 years of age. Acculturation was associated significantly with smoking onset among Chinese Americans. Acculturation, smoking among social network members, attitudes toward smoking, and perceived benefits of smoking were associated with the difference in hazards of smoking onset between Chinese American minors and their white counterparts. CONCLUSIONS: Chinese American adolescents had a lower level and a different pattern of smoking onset than white adolescents. Levels of acculturation and other known risk factors were associated with the hazards of smoking initiation among Chinese American minors and with the difference in smoking initiation between the Chinese and white adolescents. Tobacco prevention policies, strategies, and programmes for ethnically diverse populations should take acculturation factors into account.  (+info)

Beyond artificial, sex-linked distinctions to conceptualize female sexuality: comment on Baumeister (2000) (5/654)

The authors comment on three aspects of R. F. Baumeister's (2000) theoretical article on female sexuality. Questioning the predominance of nature versus cultural factors in accounting for sexual outcomes for men and women, the authors draw attention to the similarities (as opposed to differences) in the sexual attitudes, behaviors, and responses of men and women, and directly question the suggestion of "controlling" women's sexual attitudes, behaviors, responses, etc. to meet social needs for change.  (+info)

Differences in energy, nutrient, and food intakes in a US sample of Mexican-American women and men: findings from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988-1994. (6/654)

As Mexican-American women and men migrate to the United States and/or become more acculturated, their diets may become less healthy, increasing their risk of cardiovascular disease. Data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994) were used to compare whether energy, nutrient, and food intakes differed among three groups of Mexican-American women (n = 1,449) and men (n = 1,404) aged 25-64 years: those born in Mexico, those born in the United States whose primary language was Spanish, and those born in the United States whose primary language was English. Percentages of persons who met the national dietary guidelines for fat, fiber, and potassium and the recommended intakes of vitamins and minerals associated with cardiovascular disease were also compared. In general, Mexican Americans born in Mexico consumed significantly less fat and significantly more fiber; vitamins A, C, E, and B6; and folate, calcium, potassium, and magnesium than did those born in the United States, regardless of language spoken. More women and men born in Mexico met the dietary guidelines or recommended nutrient intakes than those born in the United States. The heart-healthy diets of women and men born in Mexico should be encouraged among all Mexican Americans living in the United States, especially given the increasing levels of obesity and diabetes among this rapidly growing group of Americans.  (+info)

Recency of immigration, substance use, and sexual behavior among Massachusetts adolescents. (7/654)

OBJECTIVES: This study examined the relationships between recency of immigration, substance use, and sexual behavior. METHODS: Surveys were conducted with 2635 Massachusetts 8th and 10th graders that allowed comparisons of health behaviors and risk and protective factors among students living in the United States "always," more than 6 years, or 6 years or less. RESULTS: Compared with lifetime residents, immigrant youths (particularly those living in the United States 6 years or less) reported lower lifetime and recent alcohol and marijuana use (P < .001); sexual intercourse rates were similar across groups. However, recent immigrants were most likely to report peer pressures to engage in, and less parental support to avoid, risk behaviors (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: A window of opportunity exists to provide primary prevention programs in schools to immigrant youths that may reduce adolescent health risk behaviors.  (+info)

Acculturation and leisure-time physical inactivity in Mexican American adults: results from NHANES III, 1988-1994. (8/654)

OBJECTIVES: This study examined the relationship between acculturation and leisure-time physical inactivity among Mexican American adults. METHODS: Using data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, we estimated the prevalence of physical inactivity according to place of birth and language used at home. RESULTS: Spanish-speaking Mexican Americans had a higher prevalence of physical inactivity during leisure time than those who spoke mostly English, independent of place of birth. CONCLUSIONS: Acculturation seems to be positively associated with participation in leisure-time physical activity.  (+info)

Acculturation is a process that occurs when two cultures come into contact and influence each other. In the context of medical anthropology, acculturation often refers to the changes that take place when members of one cultural group adopt the beliefs, values, customs, and behaviors of another group, typically the dominant culture in a given society.

Acculturation can have significant impacts on health and healthcare. For example, individuals who are undergoing acculturation may experience stress related to adapting to a new culture, which can lead to negative health outcomes. Additionally, acculturation can affect health-seeking behaviors and attitudes toward medical treatment.

The process of acculturation is complex and multifaceted, and can involve changes in language, religion, diet, social norms, and other aspects of culture. It is important for healthcare providers to be aware of the potential impacts of acculturation on their patients' health and to provide culturally sensitive care that takes into account the unique experiences and perspectives of each patient.

Hispanic Americans, also known as Latino Americans, are individuals in the United States who are of Spanish-speaking origin or whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, Cuba, the Caribbean, Central and South America. This group includes various cultures, races, and nationalities. It is important to note that "Hispanic" refers to a cultural and linguistic affiliation rather than a racial category. Therefore, Hispanic Americans can be of any race, including White, Black, Asian, Native American, or mixed races.

I must clarify that "Mexican Americans" is not a medical term. It is a demographic term used to describe individuals who identify as having Mexican ancestry and who are residents or citizens of the United States. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Mexican American refers to a person of Mexican origin or descent who is living in the United States.

However, it's important to note that Mexican Americans, like any other ethnic group, can experience various health conditions and disparities. Therefore, medical professionals should be aware of and sensitive to the unique cultural, linguistic, and socioeconomic factors that may influence the health and healthcare experiences of Mexican American patients.

An emigrant is a person who leaves their native country to live permanently in another country. The process of leaving one's country to settle in another is called emigration.

On the other hand, an immigrant is a person who comes to live permanently in a foreign country. The process of coming to live permanently in a new country is called immigration.

So, the main difference between emigrants and immigrants lies in the perspective: emigrants are people leaving their own country, while immigrants are people entering a new country.

According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, Asian Americans are defined as "a person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam."

It's important to note that this definition is used primarily in a US context and may not be applicable or relevant in other parts of the world. Additionally, it's worth noting that the term "Asian American" encompasses a vast array of diverse cultures, languages, histories, and experiences, and should not be essentialized or oversimplified.

Central America is a geographical region that connects North America and South America. It is made up of seven countries: Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama. The eastern coast of Central America is bordered by the Caribbean Sea, while the western coast is bordered by the Pacific Ocean.

The region is characterized by its diverse geography, which includes lowland rainforests, volcanic mountain ranges, and coastal plains. It is also home to a wide range of plant and animal species, many of which are found nowhere else in the world.

Culturally, Central America is a melting pot of indigenous, African, and European influences. The region has a rich history of Mayan civilization, as well as Spanish colonialism. Today, the countries of Central America have diverse economies, with agriculture, manufacturing, and tourism being major industries.

Emigration is the process of leaving one's country of origin or habitual residence to settle in another country. It involves giving up the rights and privileges associated with citizenship in the country of origin and acquiring new rights and responsibilities as a citizen or resident of the destination country. Emigrants are people who choose to leave their native land to live elsewhere, often driven by factors such as economic opportunities, political instability, or conflict.

Immigration, on the other hand, is the process of entering and settling in a new country with the intention of becoming a permanent resident or citizen. Immigrants are individuals who come from another country to live in a new place, often seeking better job opportunities, education, or quality of life. They must comply with the immigration laws and regulations of the host country and may be required to undergo medical examinations, background checks, and other screening processes before being granted permission to enter and reside in the country.

In summary, emigration refers to leaving one's home country, while immigration refers to entering and settling in a new country.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Puerto Rico" is not a medical term. It is a territorial possession of the United States, located in the northeastern Caribbean Sea. It includes the main island of Puerto Rico and various smaller islands. If you have any questions about a medical topic, please provide more details so I can try to help answer your question.

I am not aware of a specific medical definition for "Cuba." Cuba is actually a country, specifically an island nation located in the Caribbean Sea. It is south of Florida and the Bahamas, west of Haiti, and north of Jamaica. The term "Cuba" would not typically be used in a medical context unless it was referring to something or someone that is related to or originates from this country. For example, a "Cuban immigrant" might be mentioned in a medical history, or a patient might have traveled to Cuba for medical treatment. In these cases, the relevant medical information would relate to the individual's personal history or the specific medical care they received, rather than to any inherent qualities of the country itself.

A suntan, also known as sun tan, is not a formal medical term, but it refers to the darkening of the skin due to exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun or artificial sources like tanning beds. This darkening occurs when the UV radiation triggers an increase in melanin production in the skin's outer layer (epidermis). Melanin is a pigment that helps protect the skin from further UV damage by absorbing and scattering the radiation.

It is important to note that while a suntan may give the appearance of a temporary "healthy glow," it actually represents skin damage. Prolonged or excessive exposure to UV radiation can lead to premature aging, wrinkles, sunburn, and an increased risk of skin cancer. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends protecting your skin from the sun by seeking shade, wearing protective clothing, hats, and sunglasses, and applying a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher to all exposed skin.

I'm not aware of any medical definition for the term "Texas." It is primarily used as the name of a state in the United States, located in the southern region. If you're referring to a specific medical term or concept that I might not be aware of, please provide more context or clarify your question.

If you meant to ask for an explanation of a medical condition named 'Texas', it is likely a typo or a misunderstanding, as there is no widely recognized medical condition associated with the name 'Texas'.

Cultural characteristics refer to the beliefs, customs, values, and behaviors that are shared by a group of people and are passed down from one generation to the next. These characteristics help define and distinguish one cultural group from another. In healthcare, understanding a patient's cultural characteristics is important for providing culturally competent care, which takes into account the patient's cultural background, beliefs, and values in the delivery of care. This can help improve communication, build trust, and ensure that the patient receives care that is respectful and responsive to their needs and preferences.

"California" is a geographical location and does not have a medical definition. It is a state located on the west coast of the United States, known for its diverse landscape including mountains, beaches, and forests. However, in some contexts, "California" may refer to certain medical conditions or situations that are associated with the state, such as:

* California encephalitis: a viral infection transmitted by mosquitoes that is common in California and other western states.
* California king snake: a non-venomous snake species found in California and other parts of the southwestern United States, which can bite and cause allergic reactions in some people.
* California roll: a type of sushi roll that originated in California and is made with avocado, cucumber, and crab meat, which may pose an allergy risk for some individuals.

It's important to note that these uses of "California" are not medical definitions per se, but rather descriptive terms that refer to specific conditions or situations associated with the state.

"Social identification" is a psychological concept rather than a medical term. It refers to the process by which individuals define themselves in terms of their group membership(s) and the social categories to which they believe they belong. This process involves recognizing and internalizing the values, attitudes, and behaviors associated with those groups, and seeing oneself as a member of that social collective.

In medical and healthcare settings, social identification can play an important role in shaping patients' experiences, perceptions of their health, and interactions with healthcare providers. For example, a patient who identifies strongly with a particular cultural or ethnic group may have unique health beliefs, practices, or needs that are influenced by that group membership. Recognizing and understanding these social identifications can help healthcare professionals provide more culturally sensitive and effective care.

However, it's important to note that 'social identification' itself is not a medical term with a specific diagnosis or clinical definition.

I believe you are looking for a medical condition or term related to the state of Arizona. However, there is no specific medical condition or term named "Arizona." If you're looking for medical conditions or healthcare-related information specific to Arizona, I could provide some general statistics or facts about healthcare in Arizona. Please clarify if this is not what you were looking for.

Arizona has a diverse population and unique healthcare needs. Here are some key points related to healthcare in Arizona:

1. Chronic diseases: Arizona experiences high rates of chronic diseases, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, which can lead to various health complications if not managed properly.
2. Mental health: Access to mental health services is a concern in Arizona, with a significant portion of the population living in areas with mental health professional shortages.
3. Rural healthcare: Rural communities in Arizona often face challenges accessing quality healthcare due to provider shortages and longer travel distances to medical facilities.
4. COVID-19 pandemic: Like other states, Arizona has been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, which has strained healthcare resources and highlighted existing health disparities among various populations.
5. Indigenous communities: Arizona is home to several indigenous communities, including the Navajo Nation, which faces significant health challenges, such as higher rates of diabetes, heart disease, and COVID-19 infections compared to the general population.

If you were looking for information on a specific medical condition or term related to Arizona, please provide more context so I can give a more accurate response.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Mexico" is not a medical term or concept. It is the name of a country located in North America. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "South America" is not a medical term. It is a geographical term that refers to the southern portion of the Americas, which is a continent in the Western Hemisphere. South America is generally defined as including the countries of Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela, as well as the overseas departments and territories of French Guiana (France), and the Falkland Islands (UK).

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to help answer them for you.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "United States" is a geopolitical entity, specifically the name of the country consisting of 50 states, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

The Dominican Republic is not a medical term or concept. It's the name of a country located in the Caribbean region, which shares the island of Hispaniola with Haiti. The Dominican Republic is known for its beautiful beaches, tropical climate, and diverse culture. If you have any questions about travel medicine or health-related issues related to the Dominican Republic, I would be happy to try to help answer them!

I'm not aware of any medical definition for the term "Florida." It is primarily used to refer to a state in the United States located in the southeastern region. If you have any specific medical context in which this term was used, please let me know and I will do my best to provide a relevant answer.

Socioeconomic factors are a range of interconnected conditions and influences that affect the opportunities and resources a person or group has to maintain and improve their health and well-being. These factors include:

1. Economic stability: This includes employment status, job security, income level, and poverty status. Lower income and lack of employment are associated with poorer health outcomes.
2. Education: Higher levels of education are generally associated with better health outcomes. Education can affect a person's ability to access and understand health information, as well as their ability to navigate the healthcare system.
3. Social and community context: This includes factors such as social support networks, discrimination, and community safety. Strong social supports and positive community connections are associated with better health outcomes, while discrimination and lack of safety can negatively impact health.
4. Healthcare access and quality: Access to affordable, high-quality healthcare is an important socioeconomic factor that can significantly impact a person's health. Factors such as insurance status, availability of providers, and cultural competency of healthcare systems can all affect healthcare access and quality.
5. Neighborhood and built environment: The physical conditions in which people live, work, and play can also impact their health. Factors such as housing quality, transportation options, availability of healthy foods, and exposure to environmental hazards can all influence health outcomes.

Socioeconomic factors are often interrelated and can have a cumulative effect on health outcomes. For example, someone who lives in a low-income neighborhood with limited access to healthy foods and safe parks may also face challenges related to employment, education, and healthcare access that further impact their health. Addressing socioeconomic factors is an important part of promoting health equity and reducing health disparities.

In the context of medicine, particularly in neurolinguistics and speech-language pathology, language is defined as a complex system of communication that involves the use of symbols (such as words, signs, or gestures) to express and exchange information. It includes various components such as phonology (sound systems), morphology (word structures), syntax (sentence structure), semantics (meaning), and pragmatics (social rules of use). Language allows individuals to convey their thoughts, feelings, and intentions, and to understand the communication of others. Disorders of language can result from damage to specific areas of the brain, leading to impairments in comprehension, production, or both.

A cross-sectional study is a type of observational research design that examines the relationship between variables at one point in time. It provides a snapshot or a "cross-section" of the population at a particular moment, allowing researchers to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition and identify potential risk factors or associations.

In a cross-sectional study, data is collected from a sample of participants at a single time point, and the variables of interest are measured simultaneously. This design can be used to investigate the association between exposure and outcome, but it cannot establish causality because it does not follow changes over time.

Cross-sectional studies can be conducted using various data collection methods, such as surveys, interviews, or medical examinations. They are often used in epidemiology to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition in a population and to identify potential risk factors that may contribute to its development. However, because cross-sectional studies only provide a snapshot of the population at one point in time, they cannot account for changes over time or determine whether exposure preceded the outcome.

Therefore, while cross-sectional studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying potential associations between variables, further research using other study designs, such as cohort or case-control studies, is necessary to establish causality and confirm any findings.

"Dominica" is a country and not a medical term. It is an island nation located in the Caribbean Sea, known for its lush rainforests, beautiful beaches, and natural hot springs. If you are looking for medical definitions, I would be happy to help with that. Could you please provide more information or clarify your question?

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Southwestern United States" is not a term that has a medical definition. It generally refers to a geographic region in the western part of the United States, consisting of Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas, as well as portions of California, Colorado, Nevada, and Utah. If you're looking for medical information, I'd be happy to help if you could provide more context or specify a medical topic.

Health behavior can be defined as a series of actions and decisions that individuals take to protect, maintain or promote their health and well-being. These behaviors can include activities such as engaging in regular exercise, eating a healthy diet, getting sufficient sleep, practicing safe sex, avoiding tobacco and excessive alcohol consumption, and managing stress.

Health behaviors are influenced by various factors, including knowledge and attitudes towards health, beliefs and values, cultural norms, social support networks, environmental factors, and individual genetic predispositions. Understanding health behaviors is essential for developing effective public health interventions and promoting healthy lifestyles to prevent chronic diseases and improve overall quality of life.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "New Mexico" is not a medical term or concept. It is a geographical location, specifically a state in the southwestern United States. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Los Angeles" is not a medical term or concept. It is a city in the state of California, USA. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to try and help answer them!

Health surveys are research studies that collect data from a sample population to describe the current health status, health behaviors, and healthcare utilization of a particular group or community. These surveys may include questions about various aspects of health such as physical health, mental health, chronic conditions, lifestyle habits, access to healthcare services, and demographic information. The data collected from health surveys can be used to monitor trends in health over time, identify disparities in health outcomes, develop and evaluate public health programs and policies, and inform resource allocation decisions. Examples of national health surveys include the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS).

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "social values" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, in a broader social context, "social values" refer to the beliefs, principles, and standards that a group or society holds in regard to what is considered important, desirable, or acceptable. These values can influence attitudes, behaviors, and decisions related to health and healthcare. They may also impact medical research, policy-making, and patient care.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "multilingualism" is not a medical term. It refers to the ability to communicate in and use two or more languages. Multilingualism can be observed at various levels, such as speaking, reading, and writing, and it can be an innate ability or acquired through education and experience.

Multilingualism is a common phenomenon worldwide, and it has been shown to have cognitive benefits, such as improved problem-solving skills and increased cultural sensitivity. However, it is not a medical concept and does not fall under the purview of medical definitions.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Luxembourg" is not a medical term or concept. It is actually the name of a country located in Western Europe, known officially as the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. If you have any questions about medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "New York City" is not a medical term or concept. It's a city located in the state of New York, United States. If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to help with those!

In the context of medical science, culture refers to the growth of microorganisms, such as bacteria or fungi, under controlled conditions in a laboratory setting. This process is used to identify and study the characteristics of these microorganisms, including their growth patterns, metabolic activities, and sensitivity to various antibiotics or other treatments.

The culture medium, which provides nutrients for the microorganisms to grow, can be modified to mimic the environment in which the organism is typically found. This helps researchers to better understand how the organism behaves in its natural habitat.

In addition to its use in diagnosis and research, culture is also an important tool in monitoring the effectiveness of treatments and tracking the spread of infectious diseases.

In the context of medical terminology, "transients" and "migrants" are often used to describe populations that are moving or have recently moved from one place to another. These terms can refer to individuals who are temporarily residing in a location for work, school, or other reasons (transients), as well as those who are planning to settle permanently in a new location (migrants).

A "transient" population may include people who are traveling for leisure, working on temporary contracts, attending school in a different city or country, or serving in the military. These individuals typically have a specific destination and time frame for their stay, and they may not have established long-term social or medical support systems in the area.

A "migrant" population, on the other hand, refers to people who are moving with the intention of settling permanently in a new location. This can include individuals and families who are seeking better economic opportunities, fleeing political unrest or natural disasters, or reuniting with family members in another country. Migrants often face unique challenges when it comes to accessing healthcare services, as they may not have established relationships with healthcare providers in their new location, may face language barriers, and may lack familiarity with the local healthcare system.

It's important to note that these terms are not mutually exclusive, and an individual or group could be considered both transient and migrant depending on the context. For example, a refugee family who is resettling permanently in a new country might initially be considered transients as they establish themselves in their new home, but over time they would become part of the migrant population.

'Alcohol drinking' refers to the consumption of alcoholic beverages, which contain ethanol (ethyl alcohol) as the active ingredient. Ethanol is a central nervous system depressant that can cause euphoria, disinhibition, and sedation when consumed in small to moderate amounts. However, excessive drinking can lead to alcohol intoxication, with symptoms ranging from slurred speech and impaired coordination to coma and death.

Alcohol is metabolized in the liver by enzymes such as alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). The breakdown of ethanol produces acetaldehyde, a toxic compound that can cause damage to various organs in the body. Chronic alcohol drinking can lead to a range of health problems, including liver disease, pancreatitis, cardiovascular disease, neurological disorders, and increased risk of cancer.

Moderate drinking is generally defined as up to one drink per day for women and up to two drinks per day for men, where a standard drink contains about 14 grams (0.6 ounces) of pure alcohol. However, it's important to note that there are no safe levels of alcohol consumption, and any level of drinking carries some risk to health.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Parent-Child Relations" is not a medical term per se. It falls more under the purview of psychology, social work, and sociology. However, I can provide you with a general definition:

Parent-Child Relations refers to the nature and quality of the emotional, behavioral, and social relationships between parents (or primary caregivers) and their children. This relationship significantly influences a child's development, including their cognitive, emotional, social, and behavioral growth. Positive parent-child relations typically involve warmth, support, communication, consistency, and appropriate expectations, which contribute to healthy child development outcomes. On the other hand, negative or dysfunctional parent-child relations can lead to various developmental and psychological issues for the child.

Psychological stress is the response of an individual's mind and body to challenging or demanding situations. It can be defined as a state of emotional and physical tension resulting from adversity, demand, or change. This response can involve a variety of symptoms, including emotional, cognitive, behavioral, and physiological components.

Emotional responses may include feelings of anxiety, fear, anger, sadness, or frustration. Cognitive responses might involve difficulty concentrating, racing thoughts, or negative thinking patterns. Behaviorally, psychological stress can lead to changes in appetite, sleep patterns, social interactions, and substance use. Physiologically, the body's "fight-or-flight" response is activated, leading to increased heart rate, blood pressure, muscle tension, and other symptoms.

Psychological stress can be caused by a wide range of factors, including work or school demands, financial problems, relationship issues, traumatic events, chronic illness, and major life changes. It's important to note that what causes stress in one person may not cause stress in another, as individual perceptions and coping mechanisms play a significant role.

Chronic psychological stress can have negative effects on both mental and physical health, increasing the risk of conditions such as anxiety disorders, depression, heart disease, diabetes, and autoimmune diseases. Therefore, it's essential to identify sources of stress and develop effective coping strategies to manage and reduce its impact.

An ethnic group is a category of people who identify with each other based on shared ancestry, language, culture, history, and/or physical characteristics. The concept of an ethnic group is often used in the social sciences to describe a population that shares a common identity and a sense of belonging to a larger community.

Ethnic groups can be distinguished from racial groups, which are categories of people who are defined by their physical characteristics, such as skin color, hair texture, and facial features. While race is a social construct based on physical differences, ethnicity is a cultural construct based on shared traditions, beliefs, and practices.

It's important to note that the concept of ethnic groups can be complex and fluid, as individuals may identify with multiple ethnic groups or switch their identification over time. Additionally, the boundaries between different ethnic groups can be blurred and contested, and the ways in which people define and categorize themselves and others can vary across cultures and historical periods.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "prejudice" is not a term that has a medical definition in the same way that a term like "myocardial infarction" (heart attack) does. Prejudice is a psychological or sociological concept that refers to preconceived opinions or attitudes about a person or group that are not based on reason or actual experience. It often involves stereotypes and can lead to discrimination or unfair treatment. While prejudice itself is not a medical condition, it can certainly have impacts on mental and physical health, both for those who experience it and for those who hold such biases.

"Family relations" is a broad term that refers to the various interactions, roles, and relationships between members of a family unit. This can include the dynamics between parents and children, siblings, extended family members, and any other individuals considered part of the family.

Family relations can be influenced by a variety of factors, including cultural background, individual personalities, life experiences, and family structure. These relationships can have a significant impact on an individual's emotional, social, and psychological development and well-being.

Positive family relations are characterized by open communication, mutual respect, support, and affection. On the other hand, negative family relations can be marked by conflict, hostility, neglect, and abuse. It is important to note that family relations can be complex and multifaceted, with both positive and negative aspects coexisting within the same family system.

In a medical context, understanding family relations can be crucial for healthcare providers in order to provide effective care and support to their patients. This may involve assessing family dynamics and communication patterns, as well as providing education and resources to help families navigate any challenges or conflicts that may arise.

Cross-cultural comparison is a research method used in various fields such as anthropology, sociology, psychology, and medical sciences to compare and contrast cultural practices, beliefs, values, and behaviors across different cultural groups. In the context of medicine, cross-cultural comparison involves examining health outcomes, illness experiences, healthcare systems, and medical practices across diverse populations to identify similarities and differences.

The goal of cross-cultural comparison in medicine is to enhance our understanding of how culture shapes health and illness, improve the cultural competence of healthcare providers, reduce health disparities, and develop culturally appropriate interventions and treatments. Cross-cultural comparison can help identify best practices and effective strategies that can be adapted and applied in different cultural contexts to promote health and wellbeing.

Examples of cross-cultural comparisons in medicine include comparing the prevalence and risk factors of chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer across different populations, examining cultural differences in pain management and communication styles between patients and healthcare providers, and exploring the impact of traditional healing practices on mental health outcomes.

I believe there may be a misunderstanding in your question. "Mothers" is a term that refers to individuals who have given birth to and raised children. It is not a medical term with a specific definition. If you are referring to a different word or term, please clarify so I can provide a more accurate response.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Philadelphia" is not a medical term. It is a place name, specifically referring to a large city in the state of Pennsylvania, USA. However, it could be used in a medical context if someone were discussing a treatment or procedure that was first developed or primarily practiced in Philadelphia.

If you're looking for a medical term, I'd be happy to help. Could you please provide more details?

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Fiji" is not a medical term. It is a country in the South Pacific Ocean, officially known as the Republic of Fiji, consisting of more than 300 islands. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help with those!

Substance-related disorders, as defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), refer to a group of conditions caused by the use of substances such as alcohol, drugs, or medicines. These disorders are characterized by a problematic pattern of using a substance that leads to clinically significant impairment or distress. They can be divided into two main categories: substance use disorders and substance-induced disorders. Substance use disorders involve a pattern of compulsive use despite negative consequences, while substance-induced disorders include conditions such as intoxication, withdrawal, and substance/medication-induced mental disorders. The specific diagnosis depends on the type of substance involved, the patterns of use, and the presence or absence of physiological dependence.

"Men" is not a medical term that can be defined in a medical context. It generally refers to adult male human beings. If you are looking for a medical definition related to males, there are several terms that could potentially fit based on the context. Here are some examples:

* Male: A person who is biologically determined to be male, typically having XY chromosomes, testes, and certain physical characteristics such as greater muscle mass and body hair compared to females.
* Men's health: Refers to the branch of medicine that deals with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of medical conditions that are more common or specific to males, such as prostate cancer, testicular cancer, and erectile dysfunction.
* Menopause: A natural biological process that occurs in women, typically in their 40s or 50s, when their ovaries stop producing hormones and menstrual periods cease. Although not directly related to males, it is worth noting that some men may experience symptoms similar to those of menopause due to a decline in testosterone levels as they age (a condition known as andropause).

I hope this helps clarify! Let me know if you have any further questions or need more information.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

Stress caused by acculturation has been heavily documented in phenomenological research on the acculturation of a large variety ... Attitudes towards acculturation, and thus the range of acculturation strategies available, have not been consistent over time. ... "Understanding Acculturation". ThoughtCo. Retrieved 2018-12-09. Rudmin, Floyd W. (2003). "Critical history of the acculturation ... Scholars making this distinction use the term "acculturation" only to address large-scale cultural transactions. Acculturation ...
The studies ask children and parents about how they feel about their own acculturation and the acculturation of other family ... and Vietnamese-American families where the acculturation gap exists. Researchers found that the acculturation gap between East ... The acculturation gap is the changing set of values and culture between a child and parent or guardian. The gap is usually ... Acculturation occurs when a person adapts into a new culture and learns its language, values, and traditions. When children ...
The process of acculturation was defined by Brown as "the process of being adapted to a new culture" which involves a new ... The acculturation model came into light with Schumann's study of six non-English learners where one learner named Alberto, ... Schumann based his Acculturation Model on two sets of factors: social and psychological. Schumann asserts that the degree to ... According to Brown, as culture is an integral part of a human being, the process of acculturation takes a deeper turn when the ...
Berry, J.W. (1980) Acculturation as varieties of adaptation. In A. M.Padilla (Ed.), Acculturation: Theory, models, and some new ... Berry, J.W. (2003). Conceptual approaches to acculturation. In K. Chun, P. Balls Organista, & G. Marín (Eds.), Acculturation: ... acculturation orientations adopted by immigrant groups in the host community; acculturation orientations adopted by the host ... In the past, acculturation has been described in both a macro level where there is emphasis on processes and effects on ...
... can also be compared to acculturation and enculturation. Acculturation is "the process of cultural and ... "Acculturation". Encyclopedia of Applied Psychology. Oxford: Elsevier Science & Technology. McLeish, Kenneth (1993). " ... Acculturation - Process of cultural and psychological change Anti-globalisation - Worldwide political movement against ...
This includes, but is not limited to: poverty; breakdown of homes and/or families; political unrest; acculturation; sexual, ...
Acculturation time. Various departments work together with the youth movements spending half a day per week at a time when ...
The work on acculturation shows the role of culture in producing and reproducing emotions, even beyond their initial ... It has also led to a cultural psychological theory of acculturation, in which 'deep' psychological processes, such as emotions ... They have yielded evidence for emotional acculturation: Emotions change as a result of contact with another culture. ... Jozefien, De Leersnyder; Mesquita, Batja; Kim, Heejung (2013). "Emotional acculturation". In Hermans, Dirk; Mesquita, Batja ( ...
"Acculturation and Assimilation". Slovenian Americans. Multicultural America. Retrieved December 26, 2007. Since the 1970s there ...
Ward's areas of contribution include cross-cultural psychology; acculturation and adaptation; intergroup perceptions and ... acculturation and intercultural relations". In 2017, Ward was selected as one of the Royal Society Te Apārangi's "150 women in ... acculturation, intercultural relations and cultural diversity. In October 2015, Ward was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society ...
39). Mohr, Tübingen 1981, ISBN 3-16-743752-9. Enlightenment and Acculturation. Persecution under the Nazi Regime (= Leo Baeck ...
Acculturation & Cultural Resistance. Archived from the original on 2022-06-01. Retrieved 2022-06-01. McLaughlin, Eliott C. ( ...
"Diffusionism and Acculturation". University of Alabama. Archived from the original on 2022-04-02. Retrieved 2022-04-02. Straube ...
"Adaptation and Acculturation , Caring for Kids New to Canada". www.kidsnewtocanada.ca. Retrieved 2021-04-09. "Few Hindus enter ...
ISBN 978-952-10-5018-3. Nurmi, Jari-Erik; Karmela Liebkind (1990). "Acculturation and Adaptation". Adolescents, Cultures, and ...
This is in agreement with Berry's model of acculturation, which maintains that the best strategy for immigrant success is ... Berry, J.W. (1990). "Psychology of acculturation." In J. Berman (Ed.). Nebraska symposium on Motivation 1989: Cross-cultural ...
See acculturation and assimilation. Young Yun Kim's assimilation Theory of Cross-Cultural Adaptation maintains that human ... This is the process known as acculturation as described by Shibutani and Kwan in 1965. According to Kim, as new learning occurs ... Acculturation Enculturation Intercultural communication principles Kim, Young Yun (1988). Communication and Cross-Cultural ... Kim, Young Yun (1979). Toward an interactive theory of communication-acculturation. In B. Ruben (Ed.), Communication Yearbook 3 ...
Kaeppler, Adrienne L. (1972). "Acculturation in Hawaiian Dance". Yearbook of the International Folk Music Council. Cambridge ...
Acculturation has different meanings. Still, in this context, it refers to the replacement of traits of one culture with ... Additionally, cultural ideas may transfer from one society to another, through diffusion or acculturation. In diffusion, the ...
... the acculturation of children; how an elite perpetuate its values. Nevertheless, simply to call these anthropological films ...
Acculturation has different meanings. Still, in this context, it refers to the replacement of traits of one culture with ... Additionally, cultural ideas may transfer from one society to another, through diffusion or acculturation. In diffusion, the ...
Otsuka, Noriko (2006). "Acculturation and Tradition: Falconry". Ce Health and Sport of Journal I. 4: 202. Gallery of the Indian ...
A Study in Acculturation. Abhandlungen der Deutschen Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Berlin. Klasse für Philosophie, Geschichte ... problems of acculturation and Social Indicators Research besides which he contributed over subjects like family, caste and ...
Mythe, conquête et acculturation". In: Cité et territoire. Colloque Européen Béziers, 14-16 octobre 1994. Besançon: Institut ... Mythe, conquête et acculturation". In: Cité et territoire. Colloque Européen Béziers, 14-16 octobre 1994. Besançon: Institut ...
Acculturation in the Americas. Proceedings and selected papers of the International Congress of Americanists. Chicago: ...
However, the ease of acculturation is dependent on age; the older an individual is when they immigrated to the United States, ... The extent of which this cultural diffusion remains variable is further due to acculturation, the process that occurs when ... Gindelsky's findings also further prove that acculturation is more often sought after due to the associated increase in earning ... Gindelsky, Marina (March 1, 2019). "Testing the acculturation of the 1.5 generation in the United States: Is there a "critical ...
Troike, Rudolph C. (1956). "Comanche linguistic acculturation: A critique". International Journal of American Linguistics. 22 ( ... Casagrande, Joseph B. (1954). "Comanche linguistic acculturation: I". International Journal of American Linguistics. 20 (2): ... Casagrande, Joseph B. (1954). "Comanche linguistic acculturation: II". International Journal of American Linguistics. 20 (3): ... Casagrande, Joseph B. (1955). "Comanche linguistic acculturation: III". International Journal of American Linguistics. 21 (1): ...
Olmedo, E. L., & Padilla, A. M. (1978). Empirical and construct validation of a measure of acculturation for Mexican Americans ... Olmedo, E. L., Martinez Jr, J. L., & Martinez, S. R. (1978). Measure of acculturation for Chicano adolescents. Psychological ... Esteban L. Olmedo is an organizational psychologist who conducted research on acculturation, ethnic minority issues, and mental ... Olmedo, E. L. (1979). Acculturation: A psychometric perspective. American Psychologist, 34(11), 1061-1070. Olmedo, E. L. (1981 ...
He has examined the psychology of acculturation and intercultural relations, and has developed the concepts of acculturation ... The concept of acculturation strategies refers to some different ways for how groups and individuals seek to live together, ... "Acculturation and Migration: Interview with Dr. J. W. Berry". Psychology Today. Retrieved 7 October 2022. "CURRICULUM VITAE" ( ... "Acculturation and Migration: Interview with Dr. J. W. Berry , Psychology Today". www.psychologytoday.com. Psychology Today. " ...
Kennard, Edward A. (1963). "Linguistic acculturation in Hopi". International Journal of American Linguistics. 29 (1): 36-41. ... contributed to a Hopi attitude where acculturation was resisted or rejected. A number of studies have focused on loanwords ...
Stress caused by acculturation has been heavily documented in phenomenological research on the acculturation of a large variety ... Attitudes towards acculturation, and thus the range of acculturation strategies available, have not been consistent over time. ... "Understanding Acculturation". ThoughtCo. Retrieved 2018-12-09. Rudmin, Floyd W. (2003). "Critical history of the acculturation ... Scholars making this distinction use the term "acculturation" only to address large-scale cultural transactions. Acculturation ...
Title: Acculturation (Y_ACQ ). Contact Number: 1-866-441-NCHS. Years of Content: 2012. First Published: August, 2014. Revised: ... Acculturation (Y_ACQ) Data File: Y_ACQ.xpt First Published: August, 2014. Last Revised: NA ... The Acculturation section (variable name prefix ACQ) provides personal interview data on language use in the home. Questions ... Subject: Acculturation section containing information on languages (English, Spanish, other) spoken in the home.. Record Source ...
... discussing it within the larger phenomenon of Nisei acculturation. While racism was prevalent in "paradise," the Nisei and ...
Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards containing terms like Enculturation, Acculturation, Child training practice and more.
Acculturation and Assimilation Slovak immigrants exemplified the pattern evident among most ethnic groups in the United States ...
Tracing Acculturations: Beliz Iristay reveals the artists critical examination of her Turkish and Mexican cultures as viewed ...
Acculturation may influence Filipino-American parent-adolescent communication about sex and, consequently, Filipino-American ... Acculturation and Parent-Adolescent Communication About Sex in Filipino-American Families. A Community-Based Participatory ... Whether acculturation affects parent-adolescent communication is unknown. METHODS: The authors surveyed 120 pairs of Filipino- ... Health care and public health providers may need to tailor adolescent sexual health programs based on acculturation or other ...
... and to show the processes of acculturation developing out of these relations of the island with the outside world. ...
Harvard Pop Center Social Demography Seminar: Intermarriage, assimilation theory, and the acculturation of global marriage ... Harvard Pop Center Social Demography Seminar: Intermarriage, assimilation theory, and the acculturation of global marriage ... and the acculturation of global marriage migrants in South Korea. ...
A qualitative study examining the acculturation process of Asian Indians in the United States ... "A qualitative study examining the acculturation process of Asian Indians in the United States" (2008) Available at: http:// ...
Acculturation was measured using the Abbreviated Multidimensional Acculturation Scale (AMAS-ZABB; Zea, Asner-Self, Birman & ... acculturation and native acculturation with the bond and goal subscales along with the overall therapeutic alliance. ... Multilingual clinician around the U.S. were included in this study to assess their reported U.S. acculturation, native ... acculturation, if applicable, and self-reported therapeutic alliance with one of their clients. ...
While the acculturation outcomes in the model in Figure 1 are based on Berry s (1980) acculturation model, the full model ... CONSUMER ACCULTURATION MODEL. Consumer acculturation has been defined as the general process of movement and adaptation to the ... Berry, John W. (1980), "Acculturation as Varieties of Adaptation," in Acculturation: Theory, Models and Some New Findings, ... Although acculturation in general has received some attention, consumer acculturation is still in the early stages of theory ...
Wikimedia in Japan: Acculturation and Outreach. Type of submission (workshop, tutorial, panel, presentation). Presentation. ... Submissions/Wikimedia in Japan: Acculturation and Outreach. From Wikimania 2010 • Gdańsk, Poland • July 9-11, 2010 ... Retrieved from "https://wikimania2010.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=Submissions/Wikimedia_in_Japan:_Acculturation_and_ ...
When East Meets West: Exploring the Acculturation Experiences of East Asian Online Learners.. EdD thesis The Open University. ... This study explores how East Asian postgraduate students experience acculturation when engaging in online learning in one UK ... East Asian students; acculturation; cultural diversity; cultural identities; postgraduate education; online learning; barriers ... When East Meets West: Exploring the Acculturation Experiences of East Asian Online Learners ...
... acculturation. In cultural anthropology, acculturation describes the process by which several cultural groups enter in contact ... Articles submitted to this Special Issue, besides elaborating on an analysis of the challenges of acculturation in the domain ... However, from the point of view of the history of cultural exchanges, the mechanisms of successful acculturation (assimilation ... Arts, Special Issue: Acculturations. open access journal ARTS. Deadline: Mar 31, 2015 ...
Orientation & Acculturation. Each semester begins with an orientation week during which you will be introduced to TBCs ...
Pursuing the integration method of acculturation, this thesis explores and isolates ways in which architectural design and ... An analysis of academic reports, statistical data, and sociological theories such as acculturation and cultural bereavement ... Architecture and Resettlement: Migration, Acculturation and the Public Realm. Darroch, Ashleigh Identifier: https://hdl.handle. ...
Finally, higher acculturated teachers were associated with university route and ESL program while low acculturation individuals ... This study examined psychological constructs of acculturation, ethnic identity, and teaching efficacy among 89 Latino in- ... Descriptors: Acculturation, Ethnicity, Teacher Effectiveness, Self Efficacy, Hispanic Americans, Minority Group Teachers, ... This study examined psychological constructs of acculturation, ethnic identity, and teaching efficacy among 89 Latino in- ...
... first impression is key to talent management and the driving force behind the continued success of the enterprise acculturation ... AFWN USAF AF Air Force New Hire civilian AFMC acculturation initiative inclusion talent management One Air Force ... standardized Air Force Materiel Command Civilian Acculturation Program. The acculturation program aims to decrease on-boarding ... The AFMC acculturation team has also chartered an external working group with representatives from across the mission set to ...
Keywords : Immigration; Identity; Acculturation; Idealisation. · abstract in Portuguese , French · text in French · French ( ... This progressive differentiation between the idealized past and the actual reality facilitates the acculturation in the host ... the double function of maintaining identity and acculturation. Arq. bras. psicol. [online]. 2006, vol.58, n.1, pp. 02-11. ISSN ...
Specifically, the low acculturation group improved in body composition measures over time and the high acculturation group did ... However, acculturation predicted changes in both BMI (b = 0.30, p = 0.03) and BFP (b = 1.33, p = 0 .01) from baseline to follow ... The influence of acculturation on the efficacy of nutrition and exercise interventions suggests that Hispanics should not be ... Acculturation may contribute to unhealthy weight gain among immigrant populations by shifting dietary patterns from high fruit ...
Prior reviews on acculturation have not approached the literature from this angle, which we termed a nonwork-work spillover ... Abstract: Acculturation has played an important role in understanding the behaviours, intergroup relations and adjustment of ... To fill this gap, we conducted a content analysis of quantitative empirical research to examine how acculturation from a ... A Review of Organizational Research on Acculturation from a Nonwork-Work Spillover Perspective: Content Analysis and Future ...
Acculturation begins when two cultures meet. There is no need for the meet of two cultures for enculturation. Acculturation for ... An example of acculturation direct change is: Native Americans.. Whats the difference between acculturation and assimilation ... What do you understand by acculturation?. Acculturation can be defined as the process of learning and incorporating the values ... What is a example of acculturation?. Examples of Acculturation Native Americans replacing or modifying certain societal or ...
... acculturation conditions, acculturation orientations, acculturation outcomes, acculturation attitudes, acculturation behaviors ... Additionally, they mainly assess behavioral acculturation outcomes than acculturation conditions and orientations. Regarding ... Guidelines for choosing or developing acculturation instruments are provided in the chapter. ... conceptual model and life domains). Majority of the reviewed acculturation measures are short, single-scale instruments that ...
The intercultural exposure through social media may lead to acculturation of some features of the other cultures, also referred ... This research aims to investigate the impact of virtual acculturation on travel destination choice and includes the variables ... The research concluded that online cultural identity towards other cultures has a positive influence on virtual acculturation ... Furthermore, this research explores the influence of perceived cultural distance on the relationship of virtual acculturation ...
... as well as the influence of acculturation and ethnic identity orientation. The study argues that acculturation, the process of ... This method is useful for describing the lived experiences of conflict and acculturation. The data consisted of twenty one in- ... The findings of this study reveal that due to their acculturation experiences, interviewees have developed an integrated ... Interpersonal conflict between employees and managers: The Chinese immigrants experiences of acculturation in New Zealand ...
Research into the impact of acculturation gaps on family adjustment (Birman 2006a, p. 568) highlights that acculturation gaps ... the contextual approach of acculturation research suggests that the relationship between acculturation and adjustment is shaped ... Abstracts: Acculturation and School Adjustment of Minority Youth: A Literature Review and Meta-Analysis of Family-Related Risk ... Acculturation and School Adjustment of Minority Youth: A Literature Review and Meta-Analysis of Family-Related Risk and ...
This study examined acculturation, socioeconomic resources, and family factors related to well-being among 357 Latina ... This study examined acculturation, socioeconomic resources, and family factors related to well-being among 357 Latina ... This study examined acculturation, socioeconomic resources, and family factors related to well-being among 357 Latina ... This study examined acculturation, socioeconomic resources, and family factors related to well-being among 357 Latina ...
fr acculturation (n, cognition) A French term in ConceptNet 5.8 Source: Open Multilingual WordNet ...
  • ABSTRACT - Consumer acculturation consists of three phases: Pre-immigration, transition, and outcomes. (acrwebsite.org)
  • Despite definitions and evidence that acculturation entails a two-way process of change, research and theory have primarily focused on the adjustments and adaptations made by minorities such as immigrants, refugees, and indigenous people in response to their contact with the dominant majority. (wikipedia.org)
  • From studying Polish immigrants in Chicago, they illustrated three forms of acculturation corresponding to three personality types: Bohemian (adopting the host culture and abandoning their culture of origin), Philistine (failing to adopt the host culture but preserving their culture of origin), and creative-type (able to adapt to the host culture while preserving their culture of origin). (wikipedia.org)
  • Acculturation can be defined as the 'process of learning and incorporating the values, beliefs, language, customs and mannerisms of the new country immigrants and their families are living in, including behaviors that affect health such as dietary habits, activity levels and substance use. (digglicious.com)
  • Yet there is a paucity of scientific information about the effects of acculturation on sexuality and sexual health among Indian immigrants and most of what we know is based on research that has a number of serious conceptual and methodological shortcomings. (edu.au)
  • Acculturation refers to how immigrants adapt to new cultures and their customs (4), and it may influence use of or access to health services among Hispanics in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • One important aspect to consider is the fact that Arab immigrants are living in a new culture, and cultural adjustment (or acculturation) exhibits some influence on their behaviours. (scirp.org)
  • This thesis examined the acculturation of Chinese immigrants and the effects of daily hassles on psychophysical distress amongst first-generation Chinese immigrants and Canadian-born Europeans. (uoguelph.ca)
  • Results also indicated that Chinese immigrants considered integration to be their actual acculturation strategy and ideal acculturation attitude. (uoguelph.ca)
  • The European Canadians considered Chinese immigrants to have adopted separation as their actual acculturation strategy and would like the immigrants to adopt integration in ways of thinking. (uoguelph.ca)
  • Research has consistently shown that immigrants differ in how they go about their acculturation. (sjsu.edu)
  • However, little is known about what acculturation strategies the majority group members believe immigrants should adopt in the host country. (sjsu.edu)
  • Acculturation as an experience tends to refer to immigrants. (scirp.org)
  • We conclude that indicators of acculturation, such as host national identity, are worth considering in order to understand the impact of person- job misfit on work -related well-being among immigrants. (cdc.gov)
  • Acculturation of immigrants and gender have become increasingly critical issues in contemporary academic, socio-economic and politico-cultural debates with rising mobility and migration from the Global South to the Global North. (lu.se)
  • This study aims to evaluate outcomes of Healthy Fit participants and examine changes in body composition in relation to level of acculturation at baseline and follow-up. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Additionally, they mainly assess behavioral acculturation outcomes than acculturation conditions and orientations. (gvsu.edu)
  • Finally, current research follows a more holistic understanding of academic success, focusing not only on students' achievement outcomes but also on their psychological adjustment (Makarova & Birman, 2016) and highlighting that not only risk but also resource factors are important determinants of individual resilience in the acculturation process (Castro & Murray, 2010). (eera-ecer.de)
  • Specifically, the research hypotheses emerge from a temporal perspective concerning (1) strategies of acculturation, (2) ethnic identification and its effect on acculturative outcomes, and (3) extensive acculturation variables and their impact on acculturative stress. (unimib.it)
  • Further, the study applies a large-scale view on acculturation outcomes by assessing acculturative stress throughout multicultural sample. (unimib.it)
  • An acculturation model illustrates how the process of language migration can occur between members of one culture immersed within another culture. (languagehumanities.org)
  • The growing global trend of migration gives social psychological enquiry into acculturation processes particular contemporary relevance. (figshare.com)
  • As enculturation is used to describe the process of first-culture learning, acculturation can be thought of as second-culture learning. (wikipedia.org)
  • This thesis is primarily concerned with culture change in the Ryukyu Islands and particularly on Okinawa, It proposes to describe commercial and military contact between Okinawa and China, Japan, and the West, and to show the processes of acculturation developing out of these relations of the island with the outside world. (ku.edu)
  • Pursuing the integration method of acculturation, this thesis explores and isolates ways in which architectural design and implementation can actively provide spaces for connection and integration. (auckland.ac.nz)
  • You are about to defend your thesis Gender Transculturation: Navigating Market-Mediated Contesting Gender Ideologies in Consumer Acculturation . (lu.se)
  • At the individual level, the process of acculturation refers to the socialization process by which foreign-born individuals blend the values, customs, norms, cultural attitudes, and behaviors of the overarching host culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • It included a number of validated tools for measuring multidimensionality of acculturation, sexual attitudes and safe sex behaviour. (edu.au)
  • Acculturation is a process of social, psychological, and cultural change that stems from the balancing of two cultures while adapting to the prevailing culture of the society. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acculturation is a process in which an individual adopts, acquires and adjusts to a new cultural environment as a result of being placed into a new culture, or when another culture is brought to someone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Under normal circumstances that are seen commonly in today's society, the process of acculturation normally occurs over a large span of time throughout a few generations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Physical force can be seen in some instances of acculturation, which can cause it to occur more rapidly, but it is not a main component of the process. (wikipedia.org)
  • Contemporary research has primarily focused on different strategies of acculturation, how variations in acculturation affect individuals, and interventions to make this process easier. (wikipedia.org)
  • Consumer acculturation has been defined as the general process of movement and adaptation to the consumer cultural environment in one country by persons from another country (Pe±aloza 1994). (acrwebsite.org)
  • In cultural anthropology, acculturation describes the process by which several cultural groups enter in contact with each other. (arthist.net)
  • Acculturation is the process of displacing/eliminating another culture, such as pilgrims or Spanish conquistadors coming to the new world and driving out/ killing off the natives. (digglicious.com)
  • This research aims to investigate the impact of virtual acculturation on travel destination choice and includes the variables online friendship orientation and online cultural identity to get a better understanding of the process of virtual acculturation. (utwente.nl)
  • The study argues that acculturation, the process of cultural change, is one of the factors that relates to the use and perceptions of different conflict management styles. (vuw.ac.nz)
  • A qualitative phenomenological method is employed in this study to obtain a deeper picture of conflict phenomena among Chinese migrant employees who have been through the process of acculturation. (vuw.ac.nz)
  • Other studies have investigated whether there is a difference between developmentally caused intergenerational conflicts and "conflicts specifically tied to the acculturation process" (Stuart, Ward, Jose, & Narayanan, 2010, p. 116). (eera-ecer.de)
  • Their results suggest that developmentally caused family conflicts may be intensified by the acculturation process. (eera-ecer.de)
  • Acculturation is, in a large sense, the process of two cultures coming into contact with each other and impacting each other's language, behavior, and beliefs. (languagehumanities.org)
  • While the process of acculturation is studied within many fields, such as anthropology , history, and cultural ethnography, linguistics is a field that has taken special interest in how acculturation affects language. (languagehumanities.org)
  • The acculturation model demonstrates how the process of assimilation occurs from belonging to a distinct "home" culture, through the cultures merging and the person feeling a part of both cultures, and finally to the person tending to identify more with the secondary culture than his or her "home" culture. (languagehumanities.org)
  • Research has also confirmed the importance of examining the relationship between sexuality and the culture change process (acculturation). (edu.au)
  • Acculturation, a fundamental concept in human geography, refers to the process of cultural exchange and adaptation that occurs when different cultural groups come into contact with one another. (examsabi.com)
  • Acculturation, in simple terms, is the process of cultural exchange that occurs when different cultural groups come into contact. (examsabi.com)
  • In my research in acculturation, I have come to understand that it is not a one-size-fits-all process. (examsabi.com)
  • The turning point can be a part of collegiate culture shock that students experience during the acculturation process. (uwm.edu)
  • we present a case for considering acculturation as a dynamic intergroup process. (figshare.com)
  • The present study addresses this gap in the literature by exploring the potential role of temporal items in the general acculturation process. (unimib.it)
  • Hence, acculturation tends to be seen as the process where an individual in one social group may increasingly align their values with the cultural model used in the new society to which they immigrated (Broesch & Hadley, 2012) . (scirp.org)
  • Majority of the reviewed acculturation measures are short, single-scale instruments that are directed to specific target groups. (gvsu.edu)
  • The Deaf Acculturation Scale (DAS) was used to examine four acculturation styles, including Hearing Acculturated, Bicultural Acculturated, Deaf Acculturated, and Marginal Acculturated. (scirp.org)
  • Individual scores on an acculturation scale (first language learned, language at home, degree of literacy in English, preferred language) demonstrated a correlation between a low degree of acculturation and low personal attenuation rating (R2= 0.49, p=0.0001). (cdc.gov)
  • Researchers used the English proficiency scores from the Acculturation Scale for Southeast Asians to estimate acculturation. (medscape.com)
  • In Barclay's Jews in the Mediterranean Diaspora (1996), he provides more technically precise definitions and terms for the processes of assimilation, acculturation, and accomodation, against which he judges the level of adaptation by various Jews in the Diaspora contemporary with Paul such as Philo of Alexandria, Josephus, and others. (newtestamentredux.com)
  • The following sentence Keefe & Padilla (1987) explored multidimensionality of the acculturation processes an immigrant goes through adapting to living in United States. (scirp.org)
  • However, outgroup hassles interacted with discrepancy from the perspective of the European Canadians in ideal acculturation attitude. (uoguelph.ca)
  • Outgroup hassles did not interact with discrepancy in actual acculturation strategy. (uoguelph.ca)
  • One of the most notable forms of acculturation is imperialism, the most common progenitor of direct cultural change. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thomas & Znaniecki's (1919) study illustrated three forms of acculturation corresponding to three personality types: "Bohemian (adopting the host culture and abandoning their culture or origin), Philistine (failing to adopt the host culture but preserving their culture of origin), and creative-type (able to adapt to the host culture while preserving their culture of origin. (scirp.org)
  • Whether acculturation affects parent-adolescent communication is unknown. (rand.org)
  • Social Identity Theory explain the psychology of acculturation, highlighting how it affects our sense of self. (examsabi.com)
  • Findings support the general time perspective, suggesting that perception of time affects acculturation strategy within the multicultural context. (unimib.it)
  • Thus, the intergenerational discrepancy is larger under conditions of an acculturation gap among immigrant families. (eera-ecer.de)
  • Anthropologists, historians, and sociologists have studied acculturation with dominance almost exclusively, primarily in the context of colonialism, as a result of the expansion of western European peoples throughout the world during the past five centuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Following the eco-developmental framework of human development (Bronfenbrenner, 1977), the contextual approach of acculturation research suggests that the relationship between acculturation and adjustment is shaped by the surrounding context (Birman & Simon, 2014). (eera-ecer.de)
  • The measurement of acculturation, youth characteristics (age, gender, & country of origin), and environmental context (socioeconomic status, documentation status) were examined as possible moderators. (uark.edu)
  • In order to put "selective acculturation" in context, I will first briefly outline the paradigms of immigrant incorporation, such as multiculturalism, that have given rise to the theory of segmented assimilation. (ukessays.com)
  • With the context of selective acculturation set up, I will then outline it's strengths and weaknesses as evidenced by four case studies relating to the identities of Asian-Americans (Indian, Chinese, Korean, Pakistani) of the second generation in the United States. (ukessays.com)
  • Azghari, Y, Hooghiemstra, E & van de Vijver, F 2017, ' The historical and social-cultural context of acculturation of Moroccan-Dutch ', Online Readings in Psychology and Culture , vol. 8, no. 1. (tilburguniversity.edu)
  • Taking a consumer cultural theoretical perspective, my study lies in the nexus of and unpacks an alternative understanding in the current research frontier of consumer acculturation, gender and ideologies. (lu.se)
  • After a discussion of selective acculturation, I will briefly discuss the correlation between acculturation and identity and then zoom into the field of cross-cultural psychology, which has a parallel theory to selective acculturation, and is referenced frequently in articles that discuss identity and acculturation. (ukessays.com)
  • Results of the study showed a statistically significant difference in college students' acculturation scores based on their K-12 school experience. (scirp.org)
  • When stratified by acculturation , this association remained statistically significant in the groups who immigrated to America more than 15 years ago and who spoke English only. (bvsalud.org)
  • Acculturation has played an important role in understanding the behaviours, intergroup relations and adjustment of cultural minorities in their mainstream national culture. (uncg.edu)
  • Therefore, the present study examines the host majority group members' (Euro-Americans) acculturation orientations toward two immigrant groups (Mexican and Japanese) on different life domains and identifies individual difference factors (e.g., social dominance orientation, social distance, and self-efficacy) that are related to each of the acculturation strategies differently. (sjsu.edu)
  • Results indicated that integrationism and individualism were the most preferred acculturation orientations endorsed by Euro-Americans towards both immigrant groups for both life domains. (sjsu.edu)
  • In addition, the immigrant groups' country of origin (either Mexico or Japan) did not have a significant effect on the acculturation orientations endorsed by host majority group members. (sjsu.edu)
  • Acculturation may contribute to unhealthy weight gain among immigrant populations by shifting dietary patterns from high fruit and vegetable consumption to unhealthier high fat diets. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Linguists create acculturation scales that indicate how far a language has deviated in its use among some populations against samples of the original language form. (languagehumanities.org)
  • To our knowledge, acculturation, specifically how it impacts health behaviour, has been exhausttively studied in specific immigrant populations: Hispanics and South East Asians [10-13]. (scirp.org)
  • However, only limited efforts have been developed to attempt to capture acculturation in immigrant Arab populations in the USA [14]. (scirp.org)
  • Acculturation and identity development are often perceived as identical or at least interrelated when it comes to studying minority populations. (scirp.org)
  • Tracing Acculturations: Beliz Iristay reveals the artist's critical examination of her Turkish and Mexican cultures as viewed through a Western lens. (riversideartmuseum.org)
  • By exploring the dynamics of acculturation through the lens of human geography, my aim is to shed light on the complex interplay between cultures, identities, and spaces, and how these interactions shape the social and spatial landscapes of communities around the world. (examsabi.com)
  • These indicators are not directly related to the measurement in question because measuring the degree of acculturation in immigrant groups is very difficult. (scirp.org)
  • Research into the impact of acculturation gaps on family adjustment (Birman 2006a, p. 568) highlights that acculturation gaps between parents and children were associated with greater family discord. (eera-ecer.de)
  • Portuguese immigrant families: the impact of acculturation. (bvsalud.org)
  • There was no relation between acculturation and internalizing problems when studies used a proxy measure of acculturation. (uark.edu)
  • when studies used a direct measure of acculturation, a positive relation was found. (uark.edu)
  • Those who speak primarily English at home (a measure of acculturation) are more likely to use oral health services and establish a regular source of dental care than those who speak mainly Spanish (10,11). (cdc.gov)
  • The effects of acculturation can be seen at multiple levels in both the devotee of the prevailing culture and those who are assimilating into the culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • To examine the effects of acculturation on sexuality of Indian immigrant men living in a multicultural society (Australia). (edu.au)
  • Of these variables, dietary behavior significantly mediated the relationship between acculturation and HbA 1c ( P = .047), and physical activity mediated the relationship between acculturation and HDL-C ( P = .011). (medscape.com)
  • This study explores how East Asian postgraduate students experience acculturation when engaging in online learning in one UK university. (open.ac.uk)
  • Furthermore, this research explores the influence of perceived cultural distance on the relationship of virtual acculturation and travel destination choice. (utwente.nl)
  • Overall, we conclude that acculturation discrepancies between parents and their children can burden the adjustment of minority youth. (eera-ecer.de)
  • We conclude with an agenda for future acculturation research and some policy implications of our analysis. (figshare.com)
  • In 1936, Redfield, Linton, and Herskovits provided the first widely used definition of acculturation as: Those phenomena which result when groups of individuals having different cultures come into continuous first-hand contact, with subsequent changes in the original cultural patterns of either or both groups. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acculturation begins when two cultures meet. (digglicious.com)
  • The research concluded that online cultural identity towards other cultures has a positive influence on virtual acculturation and that virtual acculturation has a positive influence on travel destination choice. (utwente.nl)
  • Launched in late 2019, the AFMC acculturation effort focuses directly on the experiences of new employees from initial contact through the first two years of employment. (af.edu)
  • This method is useful for describing the lived experiences of conflict and acculturation. (vuw.ac.nz)
  • The findings of this study reveal that due to their acculturation experiences, interviewees have developed an integrated bicultural identity that is rooted in good feelings about being New Zealanders, accompanied by a positive sense of Chinese ethnic identity. (vuw.ac.nz)
  • In this paper I will discuss the acculturation strategy developed and suggested by Portes and Rumbaut called "selective acculturation" and will use case studies to show it's strengths as a logical, valuable and applicable acculturation strategy and it's weaknesses in it's lack of recognition of the complexities of acculturation experiences and identity, such as the intersections of ethnicity, gender, sexuality and religion. (ukessays.com)
  • While the number of foreign students residing in Italy increases steadily, surprisingly their acculturation experiences have not yet been studied accordingly. (unimib.it)
  • Results are discussed with regards to the impact of early life experiences on later identity and acculturation into the dominant hearing culture or the minority Deaf culture. (scirp.org)
  • In this vein, the present study aims to provide a more comprehensive understanding of the determinants of minority students' academic success, by analyzing family-related risk and resource factors that may affect their acculturation and school adjustment. (eera-ecer.de)
  • Our purpose was to determine if acculturation significantly predicted use of oral health services among Hispanics, after controlling for the effects of several common determinants of access to and use of health care. (cdc.gov)
  • Social dominance orientation and social distance were significant determinants of each acculturation orientation. (sjsu.edu)
  • This study investigates role adjustment and symbolic consumption during the transition phase of consumer acculturation. (acrwebsite.org)
  • Rachel Maldonado and Patriya Tansuhaj (1999) ,'Transition Challenges in Consumer Acculturation: Role Destabilization and Changes in Symbolic Consumption', in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 26, eds. (acrwebsite.org)
  • Much of the consumer acculturation literature to date has concentrated on the end results of acculturation and its influence on consumer behavior (e.g. (acrwebsite.org)
  • The consumer acculturation model shown in Figure 1 begins with pre-immigration. (acrwebsite.org)
  • Some studies have found acculturation to be a positive predictor of internalizing problems (i.e., anxiety and depression) in Latino youth (Gonzales et al. (uark.edu)
  • For example, some studies indicate that acculturation is a predictor of better oral health, increased use of oral health services, and more positive self-rated oral health among Hispanics. (cdc.gov)
  • Specifically, the low acculturation group improved in body composition measures over time and the high acculturation group did not improve in either measure. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Multilingual clinician around the U.S. were included in this study to assess their reported U.S. acculturation, native acculturation, if applicable, and self-reported therapeutic alliance with one of their clients. (purdue.edu)
  • This Special Issue aims at responding to these questions by applying a concept that has often played a major role in the development of research on cultural exchanges and that will serve as a leitmotiv: acculturation. (arthist.net)
  • Additionally, organizational research has shown that acculturation is associated with a range of work-related variables. (uncg.edu)
  • To fill this gap, we conducted a content analysis of quantitative empirical research to examine how acculturation from a nonwork-work spillover perspective has been studied in terms of its conceptualization and operationalization and what has been studied per its association with work-related variables. (uncg.edu)
  • This review is especially important given the complexity associated with the conceptualization and operationalization of acculturation, which may affect the validity of the interpretation of research results in this area. (uncg.edu)
  • We also offer recommendations for addressing the extant research limitations and provide guidance for future research on acculturation in organizational settings. (uncg.edu)
  • Unlike much of the previous research, which conceptualised and measured acculturation as a unilinear (assimilation) and unidimensional (behavioural) phenomenon, it adopted a bilinear, multidimensional model of acculturation. (edu.au)
  • We first review research stimulated by the dominant perspective in the field, Berry's acculturation framework. (figshare.com)
  • We review research of others and our own that document each of these points: longitudinal and experimental studies, rarities in the acculturation literature, figure prominently. (figshare.com)
  • Dive into the research topics of 'Acculturation and hypertension in Mexican Americans. (utmb.edu)
  • This study examined psychological constructs of acculturation, ethnic identity, and teaching efficacy among 89 Latino in-service teachers serving minority students. (ed.gov)
  • This progressive differentiation between the idealized past and the actual reality facilitates the acculturation in the host society and at the same time allows for the preservation of their specific identity. (bvsalud.org)
  • The purpose of this study is to explore Chinese migrant employees' preferences for styles of conflict management and the reasons they perceive these styles, as well as the influence of acculturation and ethnic identity orientation. (vuw.ac.nz)
  • A differential pattern of acculturation was found in the present study, with more men holding on to Indian values even though they tend to be bicultural in their behaviour and self-identity. (edu.au)
  • PURPOSE: To examine whether acculturation is associated with parent-adolescent communication about sex in Filipino-American families. (rand.org)
  • The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between MetS and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) among AsAm adults and whether acculturation modifies this relationship. (bvsalud.org)
  • 2002), whereas other studies have revealed no relation or a negative relation between acculturation and internalizing problems (Smokowski, Buchanan, & Bacallao, 2009). (uark.edu)
  • After a systematic literature search that identified 38 studies meeting inclusionary criteria, a meta-analysis was performed to estimate the size and direction of the relation between acculturation and internalizing problems. (uark.edu)
  • Results revealed no significant relation between acculturation and internalizing problems. (uark.edu)
  • Further analysis of acculturation in relation to the risk of not considering quitting was performed using logistic regression. (scirp.org)
  • The influence of acculturation on the efficacy of nutrition and exercise interventions suggests that Hispanics should not be treated as a homogenous subgroup. (biomedcentral.com)
  • An analysis of academic reports, statistical data, and sociological theories such as acculturation and cultural bereavement presents evidence that successful and dignified resettlement is dependant on integration between communities. (auckland.ac.nz)
  • Without going into too much detail, Barclay's use of sociological categories to describe acculturation as "the linguistic, educational, and ideological aspects of a given cultural matrix" (p. 92) is a much more preferable term to describe competitive traditions than "syncretism. (newtestamentredux.com)
  • With respect to family challenges in cultural transition, a number of studies have focused on the acculturation gap between parents and their children, which appears when children acculturate to the new cultural environment more rapidly and are more likely to endorse the host culture than their parents, who prefer to preserve the values of their original culture exclusively (Birman, 2006b). (eera-ecer.de)
  • Acculturation may strongly influence use of or access to health services among Hispanics in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • Acculturation assessed by language spoken was not significantly associated with having had a dental visit in the previous 12 months among adult Hispanics in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • Acculturation, dental insurance coverage, income, education, perceived oral health, and access to and use of oral health services influence dental care among Hispanics in the United States (9). (cdc.gov)
  • However, from the point of view of the history of cultural exchanges, the mechanisms of successful acculturation (assimilation and integration) are the most frequently studied. (arthist.net)
  • Examples of Acculturation Native Americans replacing or modifying certain societal or cultural elements such as dress, language, or religion upon contact with Europeans. (digglicious.com)
  • Lara and colleagues [17] identify acculturation as the acquisition of different cultural elements of a dominant society, which is often measured using proxy indicators. (scirp.org)
  • Acculturation was first coined by J. W. Powell in 1880, defining it as psychological changes adapting to cross-cultural imitation. (scirp.org)
  • Acculturation according to John Berry, (1997) referred to cultural changes as immigrant encountered three aspects of psychological well-being, sociocultural events, and economic status. (scirp.org)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Acculturation may influence Filipino-American parent-adolescent communication about sex and, consequently, Filipino-American adolescent sexual health. (rand.org)
  • Scholars in different disciplines have developed more than 100 different theories of acculturation, but the concept of acculturation has only been studied scientifically since 1918. (wikipedia.org)
  • In acculturation within human geography, a clear understanding of the foundational theories and models is essential. (examsabi.com)
  • The study also demonstrates that both extensive acculturation variables (e.g. (unimib.it)
  • In contrast, exclusionism was the least preferred acculturation orientation followed by segregationism. (sjsu.edu)
  • The first psychological theory of acculturation was proposed in W.I. Thomas and Florian Znaniecki's 1918 study, The Polish Peasant in Europe and America. (wikipedia.org)
  • This paper proposed to study the effect that acculturation of multilingual mental health clinicians had on the therapeutic alliance from their perspective. (purdue.edu)
  • This study examined acculturation, socioeconomic resources, and family factors related to well-being among 357 Latina caregiving grandmothers. (syr.edu)
  • The purpose of this study was to determine whether cardiorespiratory fitness (VO 2max ) and/or PA were associated with acculturation status in overweight Hispanic children. (elsevierpure.com)
  • The purpose of this study was to determine whether cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max) and/or PA were associated with acculturation status in overweight Hispanic children. (elsevierpure.com)
  • In this study, we evaluated the associations of acculturation and use of oral health services among Hispanic adults aged 18 years and older in the United States by using 2006 data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). (cdc.gov)
  • Memorandum on the study of acculturation. (figshare.com)
  • Acculturation and hypertension in Mexican Americans. (utmb.edu)
  • At this group level, acculturation often results in changes to culture, religious practices, health care, and other social institutions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acculturation is retaining your own culture within a minority community in a country but adapt to some aspects of the majority culture. (digglicious.com)
  • Preference to be interviewed in English or Spanish was used as a proxy for acculturation. (cdc.gov)
  • Health care and public health providers may need to tailor adolescent sexual health programs based on acculturation or other immigration-related factors. (rand.org)