AccidentsAccidents, Traffic: Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.Accidents, Occupational: Unforeseen occurrences, especially injuries in the course of work-related activities.Accident Prevention: Efforts and designs to reduce the incidence of unexpected undesirable events in various environments and situations.Chernobyl Nuclear Accident: April 25th -26th, 1986 nuclear power accident that occurred at Chernobyl in the former USSR (Ukraine) located 80 miles north of Kiev.Accidents, HomeAccident Proneness: Tendency toward involvement in accidents. Implies certain personality characteristics which predispose to accidents.Fukushima Nuclear Accident: Nuclear power accident that occurred following the Tohoku-Kanto earthquake of March 11, 2011 in the northern region of Japan.Radioactive Hazard Release: Uncontrolled release of radioactive material from its containment. This either threatens to, or does, cause exposure to a radioactive hazard. Such an incident may occur accidentally or deliberately.Accidents, AviationEmergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Insurance, Accident: Insurance providing coverage for physical injury suffered as a result of unavoidable circumstances.UkraineWounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Automobile Driving: The effect of environmental or physiological factors on the driver and driving ability. Included are driving fatigue, and the effect of drugs, disease, and physical disabilities on driving.Cesium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of cesium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Cs atoms with atomic weights of 123, 125-132, and 134-145 are radioactive cesium isotopes.Motorcycles: Two-wheeled, engine-driven vehicles.Radioactive Pollutants: Radioactive substances which act as pollutants. They include chemicals whose radiation is released via radioactive waste, nuclear accidents, fallout from nuclear explosions, and the like.Radiation Monitoring: The observation, either continuously or at intervals, of the levels of radiation in a given area, generally for the purpose of assuring that they have not exceeded prescribed amounts or, in case of radiation already present in the area, assuring that the levels have returned to those meeting acceptable safety standards.Craniocerebral Trauma: Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.Nuclear Power Plants: Facilities that convert NUCLEAR ENERGY into electrical energy.Radioactive Fallout: The material that descends to the earth or water well beyond the site of a surface or subsurface nuclear explosion. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Chemical and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Nuclear Reactors: Devices containing fissionable material in sufficient quantity and so arranged as to be capable of maintaining a controlled, self-sustaining NUCLEAR FISSION chain reaction. They are also known as atomic piles, atomic reactors, fission reactors, and nuclear piles, although such names are deprecated. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Power Plants: Units that convert some other form of energy into electrical energy.Emergency Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with the evaluation and initial treatment of urgent and emergent medical problems, such as those caused by accidents, trauma, sudden illness, poisoning, or disasters. Emergency medical care can be provided at the hospital or at sites outside the medical facility.EnglandEmergencies: Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.Wounds, Nonpenetrating: Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.Naval Medicine: The practice of medicine concerned with conditions affecting the health of individuals associated with the marine environment.Nuclear Fission: Nuclear reaction in which the nucleus of a heavy atom such as uranium or plutonium is split into two approximately equal parts by a neutron, charged particle, or photon.Motor Vehicles: AUTOMOBILES, trucks, buses, or similar engine-driven conveyances. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Ships: Large vessels propelled by power or sail used for transportation on rivers, seas, oceans, or other navigable waters. Boats are smaller vessels propelled by oars, paddles, sail, or power; they may or may not have a deck.Nuclear Physics: The study of the characteristics, behavior, and internal structures of the atomic nucleus and its interactions with other nuclei. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Drowning: Death that occurs as a result of anoxia or heart arrest, associated with immersion in liquid.Food Contamination, RadioactiveMultiple Trauma: Multiple physical insults or injuries occurring simultaneously.Whiplash Injuries: Hyperextension injury to the neck, often the result of being struck from behind by a fast-moving vehicle, in an automobile accident. (From Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Accidental Falls: Falls due to slipping or tripping which may result in injury.Thoracic Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the chest area.Fast Neutrons: Neutrons, the energy of which exceeds some arbitrary level, usually around one million electron volts.Trauma Severity Indices: Systems for assessing, classifying, and coding injuries. These systems are used in medical records, surveillance systems, and state and national registries to aid in the collection and reporting of trauma.Great BritainInjury Severity Score: An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.Skull Fractures: Fractures of the skull which may result from penetrating or nonpenetrating head injuries or rarely BONE DISEASES (see also FRACTURES, SPONTANEOUS). Skull fractures may be classified by location (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, BASILAR), radiographic appearance (e.g., linear), or based upon cranial integrity (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, DEPRESSED).Medical Staff, Hospital: Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.Facial Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the soft tissue or bony portions of the face.Protective Devices: Devices designed to provide personal protection against injury to individuals exposed to hazards in industry, sports, aviation, or daily activities.LondonPoisoning: A condition or physical state produced by the ingestion, injection, inhalation of or exposure to a deleterious agent.Emergency Medical Services: Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.Triage: The sorting out and classification of patients or casualties to determine priority of need and proper place of treatment.Eye Injuries: Damage or trauma inflicted to the eye by external means. The concept includes both surface injuries and intraocular injuries.Head Protective Devices: Personal devices for protection of heads from impact, penetration from falling and flying objects, and from limited electric shock and burn.Automobiles: A usually four-wheeled automotive vehicle designed for passenger transportation and commonly propelled by an internal-combustion engine using a volatile fuel. (Webster, 1973)Maxillofacial Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the face and jaw (either upper, lower, or both).Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Abdominal Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving organs in the abdominal cavity.Seat Belts: Restraining belts fastened to the frame of automobiles, aircraft, or other vehicles, and strapped around the person occupying the seat in the car or plane, intended to prevent the person from being thrown forward or out of the vehicle in case of sudden deceleration.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Spinal Injuries: Injuries involving the vertebral column.Insurance: Coverage by contract whereby one part indemnifies or guarantees another against loss by a specified contingency.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.ExplosionsBicycling: The use of a bicycle for transportation or recreation. It does not include the use of a bicycle in studying the body's response to physical exertion (BICYCLE ERGOMETRY TEST see EXERCISE TEST).Railroads: Permanent roads having a line of rails fixed to ties and laid to gage, usually on a leveled or graded ballasted roadbed and providing a track for freight cars, passenger cars, and other rolling stock. Cars are designed to be drawn by locomotives or sometimes propelled by self-contained motors. (From Webster's 3d) The concept includes the organizational and administrative aspects of railroads as well.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Hand Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the hand.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Occupational Injuries: Injuries sustained from incidents in the course of work-related activities.Fractures, Bone: Breaks in bones.Air Pollutants, Radioactive: Pollutants, present in air, which exhibit radioactivity.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Ambulances: A vehicle equipped for transporting patients in need of emergency care.Emergency Treatment: First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.ScotlandReferral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Electric Injuries: Injuries caused by electric currents. The concept excludes electric burns (BURNS, ELECTRIC), but includes accidental electrocution and electric shock.Safety: Freedom from exposure to danger and protection from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. It suggests optimal precautions in the workplace, on the street, in the home, etc., and includes personal safety as well as the safety of property.Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced: Tumors, cancer or other neoplasms produced by exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Soft Tissue Injuries: Injuries of tissue other than bone. The concept is usually general and does not customarily refer to internal organs or viscera. It is meaningful with reference to regions or organs where soft tissue (muscle, fat, skin) should be differentiated from bones or bone tissue, as "soft tissue injuries of the hand".Back Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the posterior part of the trunk. It includes injuries to the muscles of the back.Violence: Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.Northern IrelandTime Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Medical Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of medical care.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Aviation: Design, development, manufacture, and operation of heavier-than-air AIRCRAFT.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Neck Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the neck. It includes injuries to the skin, muscles, and other soft tissues of the neck.Leg Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the leg.Legislation as Topic: The enactment of laws and ordinances and their regulation by official organs of a nation, state, or other legislative organization. It refers also to health-related laws and regulations in general or for which there is no specific heading.Needlestick Injuries: Penetrating stab wounds caused by needles. They are of special concern to health care workers since such injuries put them at risk for developing infectious disease.Oil and Gas Fields: Areas of the earth where hydrocarbon deposits of PETROLEUM and/or NATURAL GAS are located.Emergency Nursing: The specialty or practice of nursing in the care of patients admitted to the emergency department.Radiation Dosage: The amount of radiation energy that is deposited in a unit mass of material, such as tissues of plants or animal. In RADIOTHERAPY, radiation dosage is expressed in gray units (Gy). In RADIOLOGIC HEALTH, the dosage is expressed by the product of absorbed dose (Gy) and quality factor (a function of linear energy transfer), and is called radiation dose equivalent in sievert units (Sv).Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Diagnostic Errors: Incorrect diagnoses after clinical examination or technical diagnostic procedures.Radiation Injuries: Harmful effects of non-experimental exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation in VERTEBRATES.Patient Admission: The process of accepting patients. The concept includes patients accepted for medical and nursing care in a hospital or other health care institution.BrazilAbbreviated Injury Scale: Classification system for assessing impact injury severity developed and published by the American Association for Automotive Medicine. It is the system of choice for coding single injuries and is the foundation for methods assessing multiple injuries or for assessing cumulative effects of more than one injury. These include Maximum AIS (MAIS), Injury Severity Score (ISS), and Probability of Death Score (PODS).Suicide: The act of killing oneself.WalesSuperstitions: A belief or practice which lacks adequate basis for proof; an embodiment of fear of the unknown, magic, and ignorance.Homicide: The killing of one person by another.Alcoholic Intoxication: An acute brain syndrome which results from the excessive ingestion of ETHANOL or ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.Heart Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the heart.Snake Bites: Bites by snakes. Bite by a venomous snake is characterized by stinging pain at the wound puncture. The venom injected at the site of the bite is capable of producing a deleterious effect on the blood or on the nervous system. (Webster's 3d ed; from Dorland, 27th ed, at snake, venomous)Arm Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the arm.Radiography: Examination of any part of the body for diagnostic purposes by means of X-RAYS or GAMMA RAYS, recording the image on a sensitized surface (such as photographic film).JapanWorkload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Burns: Injuries to tissues caused by contact with heat, steam, chemicals (BURNS, CHEMICAL), electricity (BURNS, ELECTRIC), or the like.Foreign Bodies: Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the body.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Near Drowning: Non-fatal immersion or submersion in water. The subject is resuscitable.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Traumatology: The medical specialty which deals with WOUNDS and INJURIES as well as resulting disability and disorders from physical traumas.Construction Industry: The aggregate business enterprise of building.First Aid: Emergency care or treatment given to a person who suddenly becomes ill or injured before full medical services become available.Wounds, Gunshot: Disruption of structural continuity of the body as a result of the discharge of firearms.Gas PoisoningSkiing: A snow sport which uses skis to glide over the snow. It does not include water-skiing.Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced: Congenital changes in the morphology of organs produced by exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation.Ipecac: A syrup made from the dried rhizomes of two different species, CEPHAELIS ipecacuanha and C. acuminata. They contain EMETINE, cephaeline, psychotrine and other ISOQUINOLINES. Ipecac syrup is used widely as an emetic acting both locally on the gastric mucosa and centrally on the chemoreceptor trigger zone.Tsunamis: Series of ocean waves produced by geologic events or underwater LANDSLIDES. These waves can travel at speeds averaging 450 (and up to 600) miles per hour in the open ocean.Causality: The relating of causes to the effects they produce. Causes are termed necessary when they must always precede an effect and sufficient when they initiate or produce an effect. Any of several factors may be associated with the potential disease causation or outcome, including predisposing factors, enabling factors, precipitating factors, reinforcing factors, and risk factors.Wounds, Penetrating: Wounds caused by objects penetrating the skin.Air Bags: Automotive safety devices consisting of a bag designed to inflate upon collision and prevent passengers from pitching forward. (American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)Laboratory Infection: Accidentally acquired infection in laboratory workers.Baths: The immersion or washing of the body or any of its parts in water or other medium for cleansing or medical treatment. It includes bathing for personal hygiene as well as for medical purposes with the addition of therapeutic agents, such as alkalines, antiseptics, oil, etc.Trauma Centers: Specialized hospital facilities which provide diagnostic and therapeutic services for trauma patients.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Work Schedule Tolerance: Physiological or psychological effects of periods of work which may be fixed or flexible such as flexitime, work shifts, and rotating shifts.Licensure: The legal authority or formal permission from authorities to carry on certain activities which by law or regulation require such permission. It may be applied to licensure of institutions as well as individuals.Bothrops: A genus of poisonous snakes of the VIPERIDAE family. About 50 species are known and all are found in tropical America and southern South America. Bothrops atrox is the fer-de-lance and B. jararaca is the jararaca. (Goin, Goin, and Zug, Introduction to Herpetology, 3d ed, p336)Mandibular Fractures: Fractures of the lower jaw.TurkeyTransportation of Patients: Conveying ill or injured individuals from one place to another.Safety Management: The development of systems to prevent accidents, injuries, and other adverse occurrences in an institutional setting. The concept includes prevention or reduction of adverse events or incidents involving employees, patients, or facilities. Examples include plans to reduce injuries from falls or plans for fire safety to promote a safe institutional environment.Emergency Medical Service Communication Systems: The use of communication systems, such as telecommunication, to transmit emergency information to appropriate providers of health services.Risk Management: The process of minimizing risk to an organization by developing systems to identify and analyze potential hazards to prevent accidents, injuries, and other adverse occurrences, and by attempting to handle events and incidents which do occur in such a manner that their effect and cost are minimized. Effective risk management has its greatest benefits in application to insurance in order to avert or minimize financial liability. (From Slee & Slee: Health care terms, 2d ed)Swimming PoolsDislocationsHazardous Substances: Elements, compounds, mixtures, or solutions that are considered severely harmful to human health and the environment. They include substances that are toxic, corrosive, flammable, or explosive.Extraction and Processing Industry: The industry concerned with the removal of raw materials from the Earth's crust and with their conversion into refined products.Hospitals, General: Large hospitals with a resident medical staff which provides continuous care to maternity, surgical and medical patients.Zygomatic Fractures: Fractures of the zygoma.Health Services Misuse: Excessive, under or unnecessary utilization of health services by patients or physicians.Uranium: Uranium. A radioactive element of the actinide series of metals. It has an atomic symbol U, atomic number 92, and atomic weight 238.03. U-235 is used as the fissionable fuel in nuclear weapons and as fuel in nuclear power reactors.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Mandibular Injuries: Injuries to the lower jaw bone.Contusions: Injuries resulting in hemorrhage, usually manifested in the skin.Automobile Driver Examination: Government required written and driving test given to individuals prior to obtaining an operator's license.Sprains and Strains: A collective term for muscle and ligament injuries without dislocation or fracture. A sprain is a joint injury in which some of the fibers of a supporting ligament are ruptured but the continuity of the ligament remains intact. A strain is an overstretching or overexertion of some part of the musculature.Radiology Department, Hospital: Hospital department which is responsible for the administration and provision of x-ray diagnostic and therapeutic services.Spectrometry, Gamma: Determination of the energy distribution of gamma rays emitted by nuclei. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Seveso Accidental Release: 1976 accidental release of DIOXINS from a manufacturing facility in Seveso, ITALY following an equipment failure.Night Care: Institutional night care of patients.Jurisprudence: The science or philosophy of law. Also, the application of the principles of law and justice to health and medicine.Asphyxia: A pathological condition caused by lack of oxygen, manifested in impending or actual cessation of life.Unconsciousness: Loss of the ability to maintain awareness of self and environment combined with markedly reduced responsiveness to environmental stimuli. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp344-5)Air Pollution, RadioactiveFinlandAntivenins: Antisera used to counteract poisoning by animal VENOMS, especially SNAKE VENOMS.Chemical Industry: The aggregate enterprise of manufacturing and technically producing chemicals. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)FiresIndustry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Diving: An activity in which the organism plunges into water. It includes scuba and bell diving. Diving as natural behavior of animals goes here, as well as diving in decompression experiments with humans or animals.Bites and StingsEmergency Medical Technicians: Paramedical personnel trained to provide basic emergency care and life support under the supervision of physicians and/or nurses. These services may be carried out at the site of the emergency, in the ambulance, or in a health care institution.Cerebrovascular Disorders: A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.Hospitals, Urban: Hospitals located in metropolitan areas.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: Toxic asphyxiation due to the displacement of oxygen from oxyhemoglobin by carbon monoxide.Hospitals, District: Government-controlled hospitals which represent the major health facility for a designated geographic area.Skating: Using ice skates, roller skates, or skateboards in racing or other competition or for recreation.Thorium: Thorium. A radioactive element of the actinide series of metals. It has an atomic symbol Th, atomic number 90, and atomic weight 232.04. It is used as fuel in nuclear reactors to produce fissionable uranium isotopes. Because of its radioopacity, various thorium compounds are used to facilitate visualization in roentgenography.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Head Injuries, Closed: Traumatic injuries to the cranium where the integrity of the skull is not compromised and no bone fragments or other objects penetrate the skull and dura mater. This frequently results in mechanical injury being transmitted to intracranial structures which may produce traumatic brain injuries, hemorrhage, or cranial nerve injury. (From Rowland, Merritt's Textbook of Neurology, 9th ed, p417)Engineering: The practical application of physical, mechanical, and mathematical principles. (Stedman, 25th ed)Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Transportation: The means of moving persons, animals, goods, or materials from one place to another.Decompression Sickness: A condition occurring as a result of exposure to a rapid fall in ambient pressure. Gases, nitrogen in particular, come out of solution and form bubbles in body fluid and blood. These gas bubbles accumulate in joint spaces and the peripheral circulation impairing tissue oxygenation causing disorientation, severe pain, and potentially death.Sleep Deprivation: The state of being deprived of sleep under experimental conditions, due to life events, or from a wide variety of pathophysiologic causes such as medication effect, chronic illness, psychiatric illness, or sleep disorder.Nursing: The field of nursing care concerned with the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of health.Sports Equipment: Equipment required for engaging in a sport (such as balls, bats, rackets, skis, skates, ropes, weights) and devices for the protection of athletes during their performance (such as masks, gloves, mouth pieces).Holidays: Days commemorating events. Holidays also include vacation periods.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Consultants: Individuals referred to for expert or professional advice or services.Liability, Legal: Accountability and responsibility to another, enforceable by civil or criminal sanctions.Traction: The pull on a limb or a part thereof. Skin traction (indirect traction) is applied by using a bandage to pull on the skin and fascia where light traction is required. Skeletal traction (direct traction), however, uses pins or wires inserted through bone and is attached to weights, pulleys, and ropes. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed)Hemiplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function on one side of the body. This condition is usually caused by BRAIN DISEASES that are localized to the cerebral hemisphere opposite to the side of weakness. Less frequently, BRAIN STEM lesions; cervical SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; and other conditions may manifest as hemiplegia. The term hemiparesis (see PARESIS) refers to mild to moderate weakness involving one side of the body.Hong Kong: The former British crown colony located off the southeast coast of China, comprised of Hong Kong Island, Kowloon Peninsula, and New Territories. The three sites were ceded to the British by the Chinese respectively in 1841, 1860, and 1898. Hong Kong reverted to China in July 1997. The name represents the Cantonese pronunciation of the Chinese xianggang, fragrant port, from xiang, perfume and gang, port or harbor, with reference to its currents sweetened by fresh water from a river west of it.Brain Injuries: Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.

Water traffic accidents, drowning and alcohol in Finland, 1969-1995. (1/709)

OBJECTIVE: To examine age- and sex-specific mortality rates and trends in water traffic accidents (WTA), and their association with alcohol, in Finland. MATERIALS AND METHODS: National mortality and population data from Finland, 1969-1995, are used to analyse rates and trends. The mortality rates are calculated on the basis of population, per 100000 inhabitants in each age group (<1, 1-4, 5-14, 15-24, 25-44, 45-64, > or = 65), and analysed by sex and age. The Poisson regression model and chi2 test for trend (EGRET and StatXact softwares) are used to analyse time trends. RESULTS: From 1969 through 1995 there were 3473 (2.7/100000/year; M:F= 20.4:1) WTA-related deaths among Finns of all ages. In 94.7% of the cases the cause of death was drowning. Alcohol intoxication was a contributing cause of death in 63.0% of the fatalities. During the study period the overall WTA mortality rates declined significantly (-4% per year; P < 0.001). This decline was observed in all age groups except > or = 65 year olds. The overall mortality rates in WTA associated with alcohol intoxication (1987-1995) also declined significantly (-6%; P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: In Finland, mortality rates in WTA are exceptionally high. Despite a marked decline in most age groups, the high mortality in WTA nevertheless remains a preventable cause of death. Preventive countermeasures targeted specifically to adult males, to the reduction of alcohol consumption in aquatic settings and to the use of personal safety devices should receive priority.  (+info)

The prevalence and distribution of bruising in babies. (2/709)

AIM: To obtain a prevalence rate and determine the distribution of accidental bruising in babies. METHODS: 177 babies aged 6-12 months were examined naked to look for bruises. They were seen in health visitor hearing test clinics and child health surveillance clinics. The site, size, shape, and colour of bruises were recorded on a skin map, and the parent's explanation noted. Any other injury was recorded. Data collection included the baby's age, mobility and weight, demographic details, and health visitor concerns. RESULTS: Twenty two babies had bruises, giving a prevalence rate of 12%. There was a total of 32 bruises, 15 babies had one bruise. All bruises were found on the front of the body and were located over bony prominences. Twenty five of the bruises were on the face and head, and seven were on the shin. The babies with bruises on the shin were mobile. There was a highly significant increase in bruises with increase in mobility. CONCLUSIONS: The study has produced a prevalence and distribution of bruising in babies and sets a baseline from which to work when assessing bruises. It also tested out the methodology, which could be used in further research, particularly of younger babies. Clinicians need to assess a baby's level of development when considering whether a bruise is accidental.  (+info)

Patients' experience of surgical accidents. (3/709)

OBJECTIVE: To examine the psychological impact of surgical accidents and assess the adequacy of explanations given to the patients involved. DESIGN: Postal questionnaire survey. SETTING: Subjects were selected from files held Action for Victims of Medical Accidents. PATIENTS: 154 surgical patients who had been injured by their treatment, who considered that their treatment had fallen below acceptable standards. MAIN MEASURES: Adequacy of explanations given to patients and responses to standard questionnaires assessing pain, distress, psychiatric morbidity, and psychosocial adjustment (general health questionnaire, impact of events scale, McGill pain questionnaire, and psychosocial adjustment to illness scale). RESULTS: 101 patients completed the questionnaires (69 women, 32 men; mean age 44 (median 41.5) years. Mean scores on the questionnaires indicated that these injured patients were more distressed than people who had suffered serious accidents or bereavements; their levels of pain were comparable, over a year after surgery, to untreated postoperative pain; and their psychosocial adjustment was considerably worse than in patients with serious illnesses. They were extremely unsatisfied with the explanations given about their accident, which they perceived as lacking in information, unclear, inaccurate, and given unsympathetically. Poor explanations were associated with higher levels of disturbing memories and poorer adjustment. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical accidents have a major adverse psychological impact on patients, and poor communication after the accident may increase patients' distress. IMPLICATIONS: Communication skills in dealing with such patients should be improved to ensure the clear and comprehensive explanations that they need. Many patients will also require psychological treatment to help their recovery.  (+info)

Injuries caused by falling soccer goalposts in Denmark. (4/709)

OBJECTIVE: A falling soccer goalpost is associated with the potential risk of serious injury that can sometimes even be fatal. The aim of the study was to analyse the extent of the problem in Denmark and focus on the mechanism of injury and prevention. METHODS: Data were analysed for the period 1989-1997 from the European Home and Leisure Accident Surveillance System, which is an electronic register of the injuries seen in the casualty departments of the hospitals of five selected cities in Denmark representing 14% of the Danish population; in addition, fatal accidents in the whole of Denmark since 1981 were examined. Forty two injured persons were interviewed about the circumstances of the accident. Attempts were made to estimate the proportion of goalposts secured by counterweight in the five different regions, compared with the proportion secured with ground stakes and those that were unsecured, by analysing data from the largest producers of goalposts in Denmark. RESULTS: In the period 1981-1988, two fatal accidents were recorded. In the period 1989-1997, 117 people were injured by a falling goalpost; six of the injuries required hospitalisation. Some 88% of the injured were under the age of 15. In a telephone interview with 42 of the injured, 50% stated that the goalpost fell because someone was hanging on the crossbar. Comparing the five different regions with respect to the proportion of goalposts secured by counterweight and the number of accidents, the following relation was found. Areas in which a high percentage of the goalposts were secured by a counterweight correlated inversely with a high number of accidents (r = -0.9; p = 0.04). CONCLUSION: Soccer is a widely played sport and it is important to be aware that accidents caused by falling goalposts can occur and that they presumably can be prevented by proper use of goalposts, by using secure goalposts, and by securing old goalposts with a counterweight.  (+info)

Child health statistics review, 1998. (5/709)

There is a broad spectrum of data that can be used to describe the health of young people in the UK. These data are of varying quality, reflecting in part the methods used to collect them. However, it is often frustrating trying to locate information relevant to young people: so many of the apparently obvious sources of data, such as routine surveillance data, are either not collated centrally, or are not related to a defined population. Perhaps, with the recently introduced changes in commissioning health services within England and Wales, local pressure will bring about an improvement in this.  (+info)

What problems do patients present with outside normal general practice surgery hours? A prospective study of the use of general practice and accident and emergency services. (6/709)

BACKGROUND: This study was designed to address some current issues concerning the use of general practice and accident and emergency (A & E) services outside normal surgery hours. METHOD: Six general practices in Nottingham (with a combined population of 46,698 patients) were recruited to take part in the study. Over a six month period, data were collected on patient contacts with general practice services and the local A & E department outside normal surgery hours. RESULTS: General practice services dealt with 63 per cent of first contacts over the course of the study. There were 3181 (136 per 1000 patients per year) contacts with general practitioners and deputizing service doctors (of which 1009 (31.7 per cent) were dealt with by telephone alone) and 1876 (80 per 1000 patients per year) attendances at the A & E department. There were marked differences in the distribution of problems that patients presented to the two types of service. The proportion of presentations dealt with by telephone alone by general practice services varied with the type of presentation. However, the use of the telephone was not particularly high, even for problems such as a sore throat. CONCLUSIONS: Given the differences in presentations to both general practice and A & E services there may be limited scope for altering patients' consulting patterns without making significant changes to service provision. However, there may be scope for increasing the proportion of general practice contacts dealt with by telephone alone.  (+info)

How members of the public interpret the word accident. (7/709)

OBJECTIVE: To explore what the word accident means to the lay public. This interpretation is of interest because it has been raised by injury control professionals as one justification for discouraging use of that word. METHODS: A national telephone survey of 943 adults in the United States was conducted. Respondents were selected at random from households whose phone numbers were generated using random digit dialing techniques. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine if respondent characteristics predicted their interpretations of the word accident. RESULTS: Eighty three per cent of respondents associated preventability with the word accident, and only 26% felt that accidents were controlled by fate. However, 71% thought that accidents could not be predicted, and 4% felt that accidents were done on purpose. Age, education, income, and race emerged as independent predictors of various accident interpretations. CONCLUSIONS: Only in the case of "unpredictability" does the public's interpretation of the word accident match many experts' expectations. The concept of "unintentionality" is what seems to be communicated most strongly by use of the word accident. Persistent attempts on the part of injury control professionals to eliminate this word from social discourse may result in unintended consequences, which are discussed.  (+info)

Open water scuba diving accidents at Leicester: five years' experience. (8/709)

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence, type, outcome, and possible risk factors of diving accidents in each year of a five year period presenting from one dive centre to a large teaching hospital accident and emergency (A&E) department. METHODS: All patients included in this study presented to the A&E department at a local teaching hospital in close proximity to the largest inland diving centre in the UK. Our main outcome measures were: presenting symptoms, administration of recompression treatment, mortality, and postmortem examination report where applicable. RESULTS: Overall, 25 patients experienced a serious open water diving accident at the centre between 1992 and 1996 inclusive. The percentage of survivors (n = 18) with symptoms of decompression sickness receiving recompression treatment was 52%. All surviving patients received medical treatment for at least 24 hours before discharge. The median depth of diving accidents was 24 metres (m) (range 7-36 m). During the study period, 1992-96, the number of accidents increased from one to 10 and the incidence of diving accidents increased from four per 100,000 to 15.4 per 100,000. Over the same time period the number of deaths increased threefold. CONCLUSIONS: The aetiology of the increase in the incidence of accidents is multifactorial. Important risk factors were thought to be: rapid ascent (in 48% of patients), cold water, poor visibility, the number of dives per diver, and the experience of the diver. It is concluded that there needs to be an increased awareness of the management of diving injuries in an A&E department in close proximity to an inland diving centre.  (+info)

Your brain is to blame for the uptick in accidental deaths : Your brain is to blame for the uptick in accidental deaths One in 20 people died of an ...
Accidental Deaths Texas News. Find breaking news, commentary, and archival information about Accidental Deaths Texas From The latimes
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An accident can change a persons life - leaving them with pain and mental health concerns, as well as taking a toll on their relationships, family and work life, a new study has shown.
When asked to name their greatest health risks, people rarely mention accidents. Yet accidental injuries are the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, claiming more than 136,000 lives annually. And if youre under 45, youre more likely to die from an accidental injury than from any other cause. Three types of accidents -poisonings, motor vehicle crashes, and falls - account for about two-thirds of these deaths, according to the Harvard Special Health Report Womens Health: Fifty and Forward. Poisoning is the leading cause of death due to injury in the United States, bridging all age groups. Car crashes are more likely to claim the lives younger people, while falls are a more common cause of death for seniors. More » ...
Learn how to reduce and prevent childhood accidents / unintentional injuries and keep your children safe around your home, farm, the playground or while driving, swimming, out in the sun and around pets
I take authority over ________________s physical body for a few minutes, in Jesus name, and I command his/her body to release all the long and short term effects of trauma, everything that it has held onto all the way down to the cellular level; from all the accidents, injuries, medical procedures, surgeries, invasive medical procedures, broken bones, cuts, hearing and deafness issues, vision and eye impairments. I also command their bodies to release all the effects of trauma with respect to rejection, abandonment, death, deep depression, divorce, loss of dreams, hopes, and aspirations….every time that they were robbed and stolen from, yelled or screamed at, pushed, shoved, beaten, held captive, shot, stabbed, subjected to explosive blasts, tortured and tormented, the emotional, spiritual and physical effects of childhood accidents and injuries, operations, invasive medical procedures, childhood fears, loss of a key loved one by death, witnessing the death, destruction, wounding or ...
Le Bonheur Childrens Hospital is ranked as one of the nations Best Childrens Hospital by U.S. News & World Report, featuring expert physicians and staff, state-of-the-art technology and family-friendly resources.
Le Bonheur Childrens Hospital is ranked as one of the nations Best Childrens Hospital by U.S. News & World Report, featuring expert physicians and staff, state-of-the-art technology and family-friendly resources.
ContextIn 1997, unintentional injury was the leading cause of death for persons aged 1 to 34 years. Approximately one third of deaths due to unintentional inj
Burns are a potential hazard in every home. In fact, burns - especially scalds from hot water and liquids - are some of the most common childhood accidents. Heres how to protect kids from burns.
Burns are a potential hazard in every home. In fact, burns - especially scalds from hot water and liquids - are some of the most common childhood accidents. Heres how to protect kids from burns.
The occupier or the person in charge of a non-work related accident area is required by law to report to WorkSafe any accidents that are caused by electricity or gas that result in fatalities, serious injuries or significant damage to property
Worldwide, there are approximately 450,000 deaths each year from drowning. Most occur in low- and middle-income countries, but in 2006 there were 312 accidental deaths from drowning in the UK and 3582 in the USA, an annual incidence of 0.56 and 1.2 per 100,000 population respectively. Drowning is the leading cause of accidental death in Europe in young males. It occurs most commonly during the warmer summer months (Figure 1). Contrary to popular perception, nearly half of drowning cases occur in inland waterways. Drowning in a swimming pool is relatively rare (Figure 2).. ...
PROTECTION solutions Are you protected from life s accidents? There are things that you or your family do daily that may lead to an accidental injury and out-of-pocket expenses. SPORTS TRAVEL WORK More
Dear Colleagues,. We are pleased to advise you that the Universitys new on line accident/near miss reporting tool is now available. This tool enables staff to report all accidents and near misses quickly and easily.. As a leading learning and research institution we recognise and value the importance of a robust environment for health and safety. Having accurate data on accidents and near misses allows us to take actions to prevent reoccurrence, to identify health and safety risks and to support our commitment to continually improve the working environment.. We wish to encourage and facilitate a culture of openness and honesty around health and safety. Accurately reporting accidents and near misses needs to be seen as a strength and an opportunity rather than a sign of weakness.. Please do make use of this new on line reporting tool: www.bristol.ac.uk/safety/accident. If you wish to know more please contact Safety and Health Services (www.bristol.ac.uk/safety/ or 88780).. Robin Geller, Guy ...
Free Online Library: Accidents are written in the stars.(News) by Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland); News, opinion and commentary General interest
Historically, older people have a greater risk than any other age group of accidental injury, for example, from falling, that results in hospitalisation.. The Royal Society for the Prevention of accidents estimates that one in three people aged 65 and over experience a fall at least once a year - rising to one in two among 80 year olds.. We work with the Milton Keynes Council Falls Prevention Service which provides specialised assessment and treatment for people who have fallen or who are considered to be at risk of falls.. Falls are not natural or a part of aging and should not be ignored. Unfortunately, not all falls can be prevented, but advice and information can be provided to minimise the risk.. The Milton Keynes Falls Prevention Service has information for those at risk from falls, as well as their friends and family. In addition, information for professionals, including pathways, referral forms and leaflets is available. For more information, click here. ...
Using accidents per million train miles, where accidents are defined in accordance with U.S. criteria, CN and CP compare favourably to U.S. railways, based on their overall North American operations.5 It is interesting to note that if the U.S. definition of accidents were adopted in Canada instead of the TSB criteria, the number of TSB reportable accidents would drop by 90 per cent or more.6 We believe that analysis of accidents is enhanced by having more data, not less, and would not be in favour of revising accident reporting criteria or severity indicators that would result in fewer reported accidents and incidents than is the case under current TSB requirements.. The data normalization measures employed are inadequate to reflect workload changes in the railway industry over time. Tonnage carried by the railways has steadily risen7 and outside third party influences, such as urban growth, have resulted in greater opportunities for human/vehicular interfaces with railway rolling stock. At ...
The 22-year-old driver and his 18-year-old passenger were unhurt except for minor cuts and bruises. The accident occurred on State Route 59 near the city of Hurricane, Utah. Now take a moment to realize just how very, very, very, very lucky…"Mr. Lucky" truly was in where and how he landed!. If that was the end of the story, many would claim this is truly a miracle.. But if you want to consider that a higher power was surely involved…. …then take a look at the final picture below. ...
Burns are a leading cause of accidental injury and death in the United States and worldwide. Each year approximately one million people in the United States seek medical care for burns, approximately one-third of these in the emergency department. Al
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Health Insurance policy of Universal Sompo is offered to individual and/or his family. The policy designed to pay the Insured person(s) the hospitalization expenses as well as domiciliary hospitalization benefits if he/she suffers an illness or accidental injury during the policy period.
Health Insurance policy of Universal Sompo is offered to individual and/or his family. The policy designed to pay the Insured person(s) the hospitalization expenses as well as domiciliary hospitalization benefits if he/she suffers an illness or accidental injury during the policy period.
All European countries, including those that have recently joined the European Union or are candidates for membership, currently show a clear trend towards an increasing number of accidental injuries.
Free Articles Straight to Your Mailbox - It truly is a dog eat dog community out there and quite a few folks obviously realize it. Because of a a few different arguments, many individuals fall sufferers to all types of accidental injuries. Some prefer to take care of all of it on their own;
Those people of us whove performed aggressive sports have got likely struggled sports accidental injuries at one stage or an additional. I consider time invested in the exercising room twelve months round when I took part in football within the...
Then you have the non-genetic factors, like the amount and type of exercise as a foal, feeding, training, what specific things the trainer seems to focus on, sheer accidental injury, God knows what else. They all come into play. There is no way to say you bred x to z and are guaranteed to come up with y. There are too many things to factor in ...
A construction accident at a hospital in Osceola County sent a worker to the emergency room Monday. The worker was injured while working in a parking garage under construction at the Celebration...
Many times we adults try to protect children by denying them information or their participation in death rituals. Depending on the age of the child, their prior experience with loss, their relationship to the deceased, and the type of death, the type and amount of helpful information will vary. Generally, children need simple explanations of the truth. They can sense when they are not getting the truth which results in a loss of trust in the adults around them and increases their sense of insecurity. Its better to tell them simply that the person died in the accident because she was so badly hurt that her body does not work any more. If you show that you are open about your feelings and interested in those of the children they will feel more free to ask questions and tell you how they feel. This is what they need in order to learn about death and feel secure.. Many younger children (ages 3-5) see death as reversible. The simple explanation of an accidental death described in the preceding ...
Accidents at home can be dangerous, particularly for older people, and the consequences of falls can be serious. You can take action now to prevent an accident or fall.
Railroad Accidents Ventura County News. Find breaking news, commentary, and archival information about Railroad Accidents Ventura County From The latimes
ICD-10 code T42.8X1S for Poisoning by antiparkinsonism drugs and other central muscle-tone depressants, accidental (unintentional), sequela is a medic
As expected, lawnmower accidents always increase dramatically in the spring and summer months. An estimated 9,400 children are injured each year. Many of the accidents result in amputations of legs, hands, fingers, feet and toes.
Learn how to prevent the third most common cause of accidental death, drowning. Discover the symptoms of both wet drowning and dry drowning, and learn how to protect young children from drowning in pools, as well as lakes, rivers, and oceans. All victims of drowning should be evaluated by a health care professional.
{loadposition article-preamble} Hi Everyone, In emotional healing, things arent always as they seem. Deborah Mitnick guides us through a session she had a year ago with Meredith who had intense reactions over witnessing a babys accidental death. ...
Parents of very young babies may wonder if swimming lessons for babies are a good idea. Statistics reveal that death by drowning is the second largest cause of accidental death
Dr. Villaplana responded: You will likely not. But you are going to be a hot mess, physically, mentally and emotionally. Indirectly, it can cause an accidental death also.
Directed by Michael Winner. With Burt Lancaster, Robert Ryan, Lee J. Cobb, Robert Duvall. A lawman from Bannock arrives in Sabbath to arrest all the cattlemen whose wild celebration the year before resulted in the accidental death of an old man.
If an accident has resulted in serious injury, or a hazard is so serious that it could result in an accident in the immediate future, it is important that these facts are reported immediately by contacting a member of the Safety Team directly ...
... - It is no secret that even the most careful and law abiding residents of southern California can be involved in an accident when they
Every day, you probably use a few items that were originally invented by complete accident. Its much more common than you realize for modern inventions to be discovered by accident. Experiments can go awry, leading researchers to discover that whatever they were attempting to make didnt quite work… but had some other awesome applications. In fact, youre probably using one of these right now.. ...
Feeling CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT while using Lexapro? CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT Causes, Patient Concerns and Latest Treatments and Lexapro Reports and Side Effects.
Is Cerebrovascular Accident a common side effect of Cardensiel? View Cerebrovascular Accident Cardensiel side effect risks. Female, 77 years of age, was diagnosed with myeloma recurrence and took Cardensiel Oral.
Its that time of the week again, where we ask What would you do? Several days ago, I posted a video showing the aftermath of an ATV accident; I asked you to watch the video, and consider what sorts of injuries youd look for, as well as how youd manage the patient. Today, Im going…
A spate of high profile crude-by-rail accidents is making oil analysts consider how tighter rail safety standards could impact U.S. oil markets, by potentially crimping a mode of transport that has grown exponentially amid the shale drilling boom
Updated 4:42 p.m., July 11 STANDISH - An accident occurred between a semi and a van at the M-61 and US-23 intersection in Standish July 11 at approximately 1:50 p.m.
A two-vehicle accident closed all the westbound lanes of I-96 at the Ingham County and Livingston County lines today just after noon.
mattghg:. Of course thats not an argument-its an example. Heres the expansion on that example: can "redness" exist itself? No. Can a ball-no matter its color exist by itself? Yes. Can you put a ball in my pocket of any color or (within reason) size or age or temperature or etc.? Yes. Can you put a "red" or "10 years old" in my pocket? No.. That is the example between a substance: sub-stance: that which "stands under" and "supports" the accidents; sub-stance is also that which we under-stand of what an object is AS object. An accident can be predicated of a substance (a BALL is RED); a substance cannot be predicated of an accident (a red is ball).. Substance (definition): that which is basic and independent in existence, standing under (substans) and sustaining accidents in their being, and a source of activity. Per Aquinas, "substance is essence to which per se existence is proper". (Essence is a principle of an actually existing thing-not a thing itself-providing a full explanation of the ...
24hr Call Center: (314) 361-4242 :: If you are in an auto accident, there are three reasons why you should get eyewitness accounts on record at the scene.
"ACCIDENTS". 15 January 1935. p. 7 - via Trove. "ACCIDENTS AND FATALITIES". 1 August 1910. p. 4 - via Trove. "MAN'S HOLIDAY ENDS ... "ACCIDENTS". 19 January 1928. p. 14 - via Trove. "A TERRIBLE ACCIDENT". 29 June 1894. p. 5 - via Trove. "Tree Lopper Dies on ... "FATAL ACCIDENT AT LONGWARRY". 13 December 1886. p. 6 - via Trove. "KILLED BY A FALLING TREE". 11 August 1899. p. 6 - via Trove ... "Five Accident Deaths In New South Wales". 6 January 1947. p. 4 - via Trove. "CHILD KILLED INSTANTLY". 26 October 1929. p. 6 - ...
"Accidents". SDJR.net. Retrieved 2012-01-15. "Industrial Railway". Twyford Waterworks museaum. Retrieved 2012-01-15. Brunning, ...
He died at age 50 from an automobile accident in St. Paul, Minnesota. He is interred at Willow River Cemetery in Hudson, ... "Accidents". thedeadballera.com. Retrieved 2006-10-12. Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference, or ...
p. 7. "Accidents". The Cornishman (71). 20 November 1879. p. 7. "Wreck Of An Egyptian Steamer And Loss Of 25 Lives". The ... p. 5. "Accidents". Cornishman (55). 31 July 1879. p. 6. "Samacood". The Cornishman (55). 31 July 1879. p. 8. "Sudden Foundering ... p. 5. "Accidents". The Cornishman (58). 21 August 1879. p. 3. "Manilla". The Cornishman (59). 28 August 1879. p. 7. " ... p. 5. "Accidents". The Cornishman (61). 11 September 1879. p. 3. "Distant Fishery News". The Cornishman (61). 11 September 1879 ...
"Accidents". Royal Cornwall Gazette, Falmouth Packet & Plymouth Journal (1222). 25 November 1826. "Ship News". Glasgow Herald ( ...
In 1911, new regulations went into effect to control the use of city streets ... yet ... accidents ... rose at an alarming rate ...
The Air Accident Investigation Branch published an enquiry into damage suffered by G-CVIX on landing at Bournemouth on 5 April ... Subsequent investigation of the accident traced the failure to faulty design of the end sections of the main spar, which ... "DH110 Sea Vixen Faw Mk2, G-CVIX." Air Accident Investigation Branch. Retrieved 14 July 2014. Eagles, Sue. "Classic Fleet Air ... 55 were lost in accidents. Two DH.110 development prototypes were also lost. The 55 Sea Vixens lost represented a loss rate of ...
He died there on July 18, 1908 at the age of 31 of extensive burns on his body and limbs due to a work-related accident at UGI ... "Accidents". thedeadballera.com. TheDeadBallEra. Retrieved June 4, 2013. Career statistics and player information from Baseball- ...
She also is referring to her sexual encounters as "accidents." The difference between her physical injury, or these "accidents ... She has been in an accident that may have caused head trauma, a story in which she uses to lure men in and have sexual ... Everyone is still alive after the accident, but Franice continues to believe that she is crazy when she envisions people in ... "Accidents." Black tickets. New York: Delacorte Press/S. Lawrence, 1979. 255-256. Print.. ...
"Accidents". thedeadballera.com. Retrieved May 30, 2013. Conner, p. 346 Conner, Floyd (2002). Baseball's Most Wanted™: The Top ...
"ACCIDENTS. SEVERE HEAD INJURIES - Fall from Motor-Cycle Sandy Bay Accident - The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954) - 5 Jun ... A very sad drowning accident, in which one of the best-known residents, of Forester's Peninsula lost his life, took place on ... On 7 August 1932, Arthur Vince was involved in a serious traffic accident on the Huon Highway, when his milk lorry collided ... On 3 June 1935, Arthur Charles Vince was involved in another accident on the Huon Highway, again while driving his milk lorry. ...
Plock was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and died at the age of 30 in Richmond, Virginia of a bridge accident. He is ... "Accidents". thedeadballera.com. TheDeadBallEra. Retrieved 27 September 2010. Career statistics and player information from MLB ...
He died in 1930 at age 42 in a train accident in Birmingham, Alabama. He was buried at Elmwood Cemetery in Birmingham. "Guy ...
This "cyclognomic art" is an arrangement of seven concentric circles, starting from the outermost: substances; accidents; ...
p. 5. "Accidents". The Cornishman (93). 22 April 1880. p. 3. "Narrow Escape Of 47 Passengers And Crew". The Cornishman (92). 15 ... p. 5. "1881 opens with another of the constantly recurring accidents". The Cornishman (130). 6 January 1881. p. 4. "Loss Of The ... p. 7. "Terrible Lifeboat Accident. Eleven Men Drowned". The Cornishman (121). 4 November 1880. p. 3. "Falmouth". The Cornishman ...
Accidents. Police Intelligence.", The New York Times, October 19, 1858, Wednesday. This has several orders and messages from ...
"Holiday Accidents". The Argus. Melbourne, Vic.: National Library of Australia. 29 December 1913. p. 5. Retrieved 9 February ...
"Avoiding accidents". PSA Peugeot Citroën. "ivsource.net - ivsource Resources and Information". ivsource.net. "Toyota Global ... These systems are designed to minimize accidents by addressing the main causes of collisions: driver error, distractions and ...
"Fog accidents". First Post. 2 January 2017. "Delhi cold". Hindustan Times. 12 January 2017. "Chandigarh received heaviest ... Three people died due to fog related accidents in North India. India's capital New Delhi witnessed minimum temperatures of 3.4 ...
George Lucas (30 January 1951). "Road Accidents". Hansard. Retrieved 23 January 2013. The London-Southampton road, trunk roads ...
"Atomic Accidents". Atomic Heritage Foundation. Retrieved December 9, 2016. Ahern 2003, pp. 176-177. "Charles Phelps Smyth ...
"Accidents, Offences &c". The Morning Post (12032). 26 May 1806. "Ship News". The Times (6747). London. 27 May 1806. col B, p. 3 ... "Accidents &c". The Morning Chronicle (11653). 22 September 1806. "LLOYD's MARINE LIST - Sept. 23". Caledonian Mercury (13219). ...
"LLNL explosives accident training web page". Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Retrieved 2006-05-03. [dead link] " ... "Warhead Accidents". Banthebomb.org. Retrieved 2006-05-03. Carey Sublette (1999-02-20). "4.1.6.2.2.5 Explosives". 4. Engineering ...
"Pair died in potholing accident". BBC News. BBC. Retrieved 23 February 2016. "Caver dies following mine rescue". BBC News. 21 ... "Man, 50 killed by falling boulder in Bull Pot caving accident". BBC News. BBC. Retrieved 13 February 2015. "Lancaster caver ... "Diver dies in Welsh quarry accident". The Hinckley Times. Retrieved 29 August 2014. "Caver Will Smith's Llangollen slate mine ... Churcher, R.A.; Lloyd, O.C.. (1980). "British Cave Diving Accidents" (PDF). Proceedings of the University of Bristol ...
The higher pressure can increase the consequences of a loss-of-coolant accident. The reactor pressure vessel is manufactured ... Mosey, David (1990). Reactor Accidents. Nuclear Engineering International Special Publications. pp. 92-94. ISBN 0408061987. ...
128 aviation accidents and incidents have been reported for the month of August in the United States, according to statistics ... Over 100 Aviation Accidents in August Leave Nearly Fifty Dead. As of this writing, 128 aviation accidents and incidents have ... The data collected thus far reveals 49 deaths having resulted from 24 of these accidents. In one accident, four people were ... Repots of the various accidents can be found online at the NTSB aviation accident database. Preliminary reports may contain ...
The overwhelming numbers of aviation fatalities occur in General Aviation (GA) accidents. While the fatal accident rate has ... An analysis of federal aviation administration knowledge test scores and fatal general aviation accidents. K-REx Repository. ... Fatal GA accidents that had pilot error as a causal factor were compared with those in which maintenance factors caused the ... The NTSB has cited a lack of aeronautical knowledge as the cause of many of these accidents. If pilots are required to pass ...
Aviation Accident Attorney. If you have received injuries in an aviation accident that might have been caused by Air Traffic ... Aviation Accidents Caused by Air Traffic Controllers *In Aviation Law, Helicopter Crash, Mass transit, Personal Injury ... If you have been injured, or a loved one was injured or killed, in an aviation accident caused by Air Traffic Controller error ... The typical categories of recoverable damages in a personal injury claim arising from an aviation accident caused by Air ...
Unfortunately, scores of children and adults perish each year in drowning accidents. The DAN Oxygen First Aid for Aquatic ... thousands of instructors to teach recreational divers how to provide vital oxygen first aid in the event of a diving accident. ...
Let us help you recover compensation after being hurt in a semi-truck accident in El Paso, TX. Contact our attorneys for a free ... Why Are Truck Accidents More Complicated?. There are many reasons that truck accidents are not like other car accidents on the ... Truck accident claims are much more complex than typical car accident claims. So you should not try to handle your case on your ... If youve been hurt in a truck accident or have lost a loved one, talk to an El Paso truck accident lawyer from the Law Offices ...
Latest Transportation accidents News. The Latest: UN to decide in month whether to delay meeting. Apr. 4, 2020 1:29 AM EDT ... The accident happened around 2:30 a.m. The officer suffered minor facial injuries and was being treated at a hospital, while ...
A Los Angeles judge says he is not convinced that Juan Manuel Alvarez was trying to harm himself on 2005 when he triggered a train crash and killed 11 people. ...
INES 7: major accident. The worlds worst nuclear disaster after Chernobyl, and the only other accident to be given the top ... INES 6: serious accident. Another failure-of-coolant accident, this time in the Mayak complex that formed the dark heart of the ... INES 5: accident with wider consequences. Britains most severe nuclear accident was at a nuclear reactor then known as ... Levels one to three are incidents; four to seven are accidents.. These are some of the most serious nuclear accidents to date: ...
An investigation is also necessary when insurance claims for damages by the injured parties arise from the accident. Source for ... Automobile Accidents Automobile accidents are still a major source of injury to pedestrians, drivers, and passengers, although ... information on Automobile Accidents: World of Forensic Science dictionary. ... Automobile Accidents. Automobile accidents are still a major source of injury to pedestrians, drivers, and passengers, although ...
Yesterdays papers, as usual on Monday, contained a long list of automobile "accidents," and, again as usual, practically every ... Therefore, strictly speaking, they were not accidents at all. View Full Article in Timesmachine » ... AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS. Order Reprints, Todays Paper,Subscribe ... AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS.. JULY 21, 1914. Continue reading the main ...
A version of this archives appears in print on June 1, 1869, on Page 5 of the New York edition with the headline: Car Accidents ...
... occupational accidents involving the 3 voltage categories, and home accidents usually involving low voltage current only. ... Accidents dus l lectricit . [in French]. Bibliographic information. Encyclop die m dico-chirurgicale. Maladies caus es par les ... electrical accidents; electricity. Descriptors (secondary). France; aetiology; sequelae; diagnosis; electrical safety; electric ... This medical encyclopaedia article gives a roundup of knowledge concerning these accidents, considered in 2 separate groups: ...
Accidents That Can Happen at Home. Common causes of home-injury deaths are fire and burns, suffocation, drowning, choking, ... However, accidents will still happen, so its important to be prepared. If youre expecting a baby or have kids, its wise to: ...
home/health & living center/ exercise & fitness a-z list/ how to prevent exercise accidents article ...
See an archive of all freak accidents stories published on the New York Media network, which includes NYMag, The Cut, Vulture, ... Ryan Phillippe Injured in Freak Accident, Which May Affect Shooter ProductionThe actor is still wrapping up production on ... Freak Garbage Truck Accident Kills Woman Trying to Save Her DogJust the worst. ... Brooklyn Car Wash Turns Deadly in Freak-Accident Chain ReactionOvertones of Final Destination. ...
... the radiotherapy accident in Costa Rica,[15] the radiotherapy accident in Zaragoza,[16] the radiation accident in Morocco,[17] ... the Goiania accident,[18] the radiation accident in Mexico City, the radiotherapy unit accident in Thailand,[19] and the ... the Three Mile Island accident (1979), and the SL-1 accident (1961).[11] Nuclear power accidents can involve loss of life and ... Accident categories[edit]. Nuclear meltdown[edit]. Main articles: Nuclear meltdown and Design basis accident ...
Find breaking news, commentary, and archival information about Railroad Accidents Kentucky From The latimes ...
The number of cases involving electric bicycle accidents with primary and secondary school students has increased by 700 ... Li sustained a fracture to her left leg and lost two teeth in the accident. The court ruled the rider, a man surnamed Liu, 31, ... Electric bike accidents with kids rise. By Zhang Yan (China Daily). Updated: 2010-03-31 07:52. ... The number of cases involving electric bicycle accidents with primary and secondary school students has increased by 700 ...
Different issues arise when a car accident involves a pedestrian, or when a passenger is injured, or when the accident might ... p,A lot of car accident claims arise from simple fact scenarios where one vehicle rear-ends another or two vehicles trade ... Car Accidents Caused by Cell Phone Use. You may be liable for a car accident if you were using a cell phone or other device ... Bus Accident Injury Claims. If youre hurt in an accident involving a city/county-owned bus, your injury claim could face some ...
These accidents can seem very overwhelming to the individuals involved and are extremely complicated. ... Escalator accidents often cause many traumatizing injuries and can result in expensive medical bills and therapy. ... Escalator Accidents in Arizona. Escalator accidents often cause many traumatizing injuries and can result in expensive medical ... These accidents can seem very overwhelming to the individuals involved and are extremely complicated.. ...
Wikimedia Commons has media related to Rail transport accidents in the United States.. ... Category:Railway accidents in the United States. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ... Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Railway_accidents_in_the_United_States&oldid=802120482" ...
... in the home as in motor-vehicle accidents, and about twice as many at home as in industrial accidents. On a worldwide basis, ... motor-vehicle accidents tend to be the primary cause of accidental deaths, followed by those in industry and in the home. ... Other articles where Traffic accident is discussed: safety: … ... at the scene of an accident and investigate accidents. Traffic ... in the home as in motor-vehicle accidents, and about twice as many at home as in industrial accidents. On a worldwide basis, ...
Source for information on Accidents and Injuries from Drugs: Encyclopedia of Drugs, Alcohol, and Addictive Behavior dictionary. ... ACCIDENTS AND INJURIES FROM DRUGS Throughout history, humans have taken substances other than food into their bodies in ways ... See also: Accidents and Injuries from Alcohol ; Alcohol: History of Drinking ; Dovers Powder ; Driving, Alcohol, and Drugs ; ... Accidents and Injuries from Drugs. Updated About encyclopedia.com content Print Article Share Article ...
Car Accidents Involving Pedestrians Car Accidents Caused by Negligence When You Are Liable for Another Persons Driving Proving ... When your car accident injuries are caused -- or made worse -- by the deployment of an air bag, heres what you need to know.. ... Generally, if an insurer declares a car to be a total loss after an accident, the insurer will want to take possession of the ... Do not let the airbag or any parts related to it -- like the crash sensor -- be thrown away after the accident. Make sure that ...
Les accidents chez les enfants : l étude des faits, base de l action préventive, rapport d un groupe consultatif [‎réuni ... Accidents in childhood : facts as a basis for prevention, report of an advisory group [‎meeting held in Geneva from 4 to 8 June ... Accidents in childhood and adolescence : the role of research / edited by M. Manciaux & C. J. Romer  ... Advisory Group on Prevention of Accidents in Childhood; World Health Organization (‎Ginebra : Organizacion Mundial de la Salud ...
  • INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY, Nuclear Accident Knowledge Taxonomy, Nuclear Energy Series No. NG-T-6.8, IAEA, Vienna (2016). (iaea.org)
  • The severe consequences of accidental transboundary water pollution have been illustrated by a number of major industrial accidents in Europe and Central Asia, including the Sandoz accident (Switzerland, 1986), Baia Mare disaster (Romania, 2000) and the Ridder accident (Kazakhstan, 2016). (unece.org)
  • This publication is intended to support Member State activity in managing knowledge from serious nuclear accidents, providing a description of knowledge organization system features, information about the developed system taxonomy, and details on the methodology to organize knowledge in this area. (iaea.org)
  • The classification may change as more details emerge, but at level three the Sosnovy Bor incident is less serious than either the Windscale fire of 1957 or the Three Mile Island accident in 1979, which were classified as level five accidents. (newscientist.com)
  • That is one of the big causes of boating accidents. (boat-ed.com)
  • The IAEA maintains a website reporting recent nuclear accidents. (wikipedia.org)
  • In order to support those activities, the IAEA has taken a leading role to assist in the development of a knowledge organization system and associated taxonomy for nuclear accident knowledge domain, which could be implemented and applied by Member States' nuclear organizations. (iaea.org)
  • Yesterday's papers, as usual on Monday, contained a long list of automobile "accidents," and, again as usual, practically every one of them came in the "avoidable" class. (nytimes.com)
  • Common symptoms and causes of whiplash, in car accidents and other kinds of injury cases. (nolo.com)
  • If you're hurt in an accident involving a city/county-owned bus, your injury claim could face some unique procedural challenges. (nolo.com)
  • A taxi cab's involvement in a car accident doesn't affect your ability to make an injury claim, but it could affect the outcome. (nolo.com)
  • Benetech, Inc. is further refining its focus on dust mitigation that reduces accident and injury hazards caused by fugitive dust. (prweb.com)
  • In addition to the combustion and respiration dangers of dust, bulk material handlers with an airborne dust problem often contend with reduced visibility, compromised walkways and hindered access to conveyors and other process equipment, all of which can lead to an accident or injury. (prweb.com)
  • Researchers say young people were more likely to sustain head injuries and to be diagnosed with a traumatic brain injury and hospitalized if accidents occurred on a street or highway. (webmd.com)
  • Here at Accident Law Group, our entire firm handles only accident/injury cases. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Breyer is in a Washington hospital after shoulder replacement surgery following a bicycle accident injury to his right shoulder Friday, April 26, 2013. (yahoo.com)
  • BIRT helps people regain the skills lost as a result of brain injury, whether caused by road accident, assault, stroke or illness. (prweb.com)
  • Support from National Accident Helpline will help the Brain Injury Rehabilitation Trust to continue providing vital services to those who suffer an acquired brain injury and their families. (prweb.com)
  • NAH is the UK's leading free advisory service for people who have suffered an injury as a result of an accident and who are looking to claim compensation. (prweb.com)
  • BIRT is a leading European provider in specialist brain injury rehabilitation, supporting people to regain lost skills and independence and rebuild their lives following acquired brain injury, caused typically by road accident, assault, stroke or disease. (prweb.com)
  • Burns were the leading Nature of Injury in electrical accidents, but were rarely fatal. (cdc.gov)
  • The injury severity for victims of nonfatal mine electrical injuries does not increase with age in victims 50 years and older, unlike many other types of occupational accidents. (cdc.gov)
  • For more information about auto accident claims and personal injury settlements , please visit Hector's website. (selfgrowth.com)
  • The department director, chair or supervisor is required to complete a Drury University Employee's Report of Injury setting forth the time, place and nature of the accident/injury, and the name and address of the person injured. (drury.edu)
  • Any accident arising out of or in connection with a commercial workplace in which an employee, or a self-employed person working on your premises is killed or suffers a major injury (including as a result of physical violence). (croydon.gov.uk)
  • If there is an accident connected with your workplace (including an act of physical violence) and your employee, or a self-employed person working on your premises, suffers an injury which requires them to take over 7 days off work as a result. (croydon.gov.uk)
  • Instead, the goal is to apply scientific knowledge of human behavior and psychology in order to develop systems and products that allow for optimal performance and reduced probability of an accident or injury. (expertlaw.com)
  • The presence and placement of instructions, warning signs and labels may affect the chance of an accident or injury. (expertlaw.com)
  • The study of human factors is not meant to shift responsibility for accidents from those who develop or manufacture systems and products to the end user, or to blame avoidable accidents on people. (expertlaw.com)
  • The statement, published today in Pediatrics, emphasizes that children may be exposed to radiation as a direct result of accidents or disasters or by consuming contaminated milk and foods. (reuters.com)
  • Potassium iodide may be given to infants and children to protect the thyroid gland in the aftermath of radiation accidents, the statement also advises. (reuters.com)
  • Three workers were seriously injured and at least 35 others were exposed to radiation on Wednesday at the Tokaimura plant, which is about 80 miles from Tokyo, when workers apparently poured too much uranium by accident into a purification tank containing nitric acid, a mistake that reportedly caused a flash of blue light and unleashed a chain reaction tantamount to a small nuclear bomb. (democracynow.org)
  • Eleven more workers were exposed to radiation today as they attempted to clean up the accident at the plant. (democracynow.org)
  • Don't fear because we've rounded up some of the top computer accidents that can have disastrous consequences. (makeuseof.com)
  • However, accidents will become more common and disastrous if we become complacent. (cdc.gov)
  • Although these complications can make a truck wreck case more challenging, an El Paso semi-truck accident lawyer will know how to overcome these difficulties to help you fight for the full compensation you deserve. (michaelgopin.com)
  • Timely reporting is critical, because claims can be denied if accidents and injuries are not reported to the Missouri Division of Workers' Compensation within the required time frame of 30 days. (drury.edu)
  • Bunker has started offering both occupational accident and workers' compensation products to freelancers who secure work through two platforms-Wonolo and Field Nation-with rollouts on eight more platforms in progress, according to Chad Nitschke, co-founder and CEO of Bunker. (forbes.com)
  • The court of appeals affirmed a denial of compensation by the Commission that claimant failed to prove his accident while he was going hunting was compensable under the dual purpose doctrine. (lexisnexis.com)
  • Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida said Friday that legislation may be submitted to the Diet early next year for ratifying an international pact on compensation for nuclear accidents. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • The following is an accident report that was printed in the newsletter of the British equivalent of the Workers Compensation Board. (emofree.com)
  • Using multiple regression analysis, this book addresses driver and vehicle effects separately in order to define both the magnitude of the handling/accident causation problem as well as the relative importance of the various performance measures. (elsevier.com)
  • That information may be applied to try to avoid similar accidents in the future. (expertlaw.com)
  • Papchiak, who leaves near the lake, said she couldn't recall any similar accidents at that location. (unionleader.com)
  • As self-driving cars move out of science fiction and onto the nation's streets and highways, what happens when you're involved in an accident with a driverless vehicle? (nolo.com)
  • With so many accidents happening in our state, we want to alert you to the real dangers of our highways and the fact that, if you are a pedestrian who walks along a highway, you have increased risks of a catastrophic accident at any given time. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Unlike accidents on our highways, waterways, and theme parks, there is no system for independently tracking accidents at ski resorts, despite the fact that in California, most resorts are on federal land. (nbcbayarea.com)
  • It is important to note that who driver that who the red light may not be 100% liable for the accident. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Statements like "I had the green light" are not sufficient to dispel the question of who is entirely liable for the accident. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Pathologists note characteristic patterns of injuries in these different victim groups that can be very revealing about the circumstances of the accident. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The claimant had retrograde amnesia and was unable to testify regarding the circumstances of the accident. (lexisnexis.com)
  • During the 1990s, 1 of every 272 mining accidents resulted in a fatality. (cdc.gov)
  • The number of cases involving electric bicycle accidents with primary and secondary school students has increased by 700 percent, Fengtai district court said on Tuesday. (chinadaily.com.cn)
  • Assesses the ways in which epidemiological research can be used to determine when factors in the workplace operate as causes of disease or accidents. (who.int)
  • The ideal is to identify how all of the elements of a workplace or other situation interact, and to use that information to both properly identify the causes of accidents and to reduce the likelihood of future accidents. (expertlaw.com)
  • When human factors are studied with the goal of reducing workplace accidents, the study involves not only examining the people within the workplace, but the workplace itself. (expertlaw.com)
  • A lot of car accident claims arise from simple fact scenarios where one vehicle rear-ends another or two vehicles "trade paint. (nolo.com)
  • Different issues arise when a car accident involves a pedestrian, or when a passenger is injured, or when the accident might have been caused by a vehicle defect or distracted driving. (nolo.com)
  • If you're involved in a car accident that damages your rental vehicle, you could be on the financial hook, even if you weren't at fault for the crash. (nolo.com)
  • liable to death in a motor-vehicle accident. (britannica.com)
  • When a pedestrian causes their own accident, it is usually due to 'darting out,' which means running out in front of a vehicle very suddenly. (selfgrowth.com)
  • If you were legally walking along the highway and did not do anything to contribute to your accident, you can hold a vehicle driver liable in your case. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Springfield, MO A man was recently killed in a Springfield accident after his vehicle struck a deer near the southwest Missouri city. (lawyersandsettlements.com)
  • If an arbitrator decides that one party had the red light, it may also conclude that the vehicle with the green light had a duty to look out and avoid the accident but failed to do so. (selfgrowth.com)
  • The Effect of Vehicle Characteristics on Road Accidents investigates whether vehicle characteristics related to handling and stability contribute to road accidents. (elsevier.com)
  • Measures of vehicle handling and stability related to accident rates are also discussed. (elsevier.com)
  • Take note of the: time and date of the accident, location, driver names, contact details (phone and address), insurance information, make/model and licence plate numbers of all the vehicles involved, and the contact details for all vehicle occupants and witnesses. (kanetix.ca)