AccidentsPoisoning: A condition or physical state produced by the ingestion, injection, inhalation of or exposure to a deleterious agent.Accidents, HomeAccidental Falls: Falls due to slipping or tripping which may result in injury.Drug Overdose: Accidental or deliberate use of a medication or street drug in excess of normal dosage.Hypothermia: Lower than normal body temperature, especially in warm-blooded animals.Accidents, Occupational: Unforeseen occurrences, especially injuries in the course of work-related activities.Rewarming: Application of heat to correct hypothermia, accidental or induced.Laboratory Infection: Accidentally acquired infection in laboratory workers.Foreign Bodies: Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the body.Accident Prevention: Efforts and designs to reduce the incidence of unexpected undesirable events in various environments and situations.Asphyxia: A pathological condition caused by lack of oxygen, manifested in impending or actual cessation of life.Biohazard Release: Uncontrolled release of biological material from its containment. This either threatens to, or does, cause exposure to a biological hazard. Such an incident may occur accidentally or deliberately.Sverdlovsk Accidental Release: ANTHRAX outbreak that occurred in 1979 and was associated with a research facility in Sverdlovsk, in the Ural mountain region of central RUSSIA. Most victims worked or lived in a narrow zone extending from the facility. The zone of anthrax-caused livestock mortality paralleled the northerly wind that prevailed shortly before the outbreak. It was concluded that an escape of ANTHRAX caused outbreak.Needlestick Injuries: Penetrating stab wounds caused by needles. They are of special concern to health care workers since such injuries put them at risk for developing infectious disease.Kerosene: A refined petroleum fraction used as a fuel as well as a solvent.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Radioactive Hazard Release: Uncontrolled release of radioactive material from its containment. This either threatens to, or does, cause exposure to a radioactive hazard. Such an incident may occur accidentally or deliberately.Numismatics: Study of coins, tokens, medals, etc. However, it usually refers to medals pertaining to the history of medicine.Seveso Accidental Release: 1976 accidental release of DIOXINS from a manufacturing facility in Seveso, ITALY following an equipment failure.Chemical Hazard Release: Uncontrolled release of a chemical from its containment that either threatens to, or does, cause exposure to a chemical hazard. Such an incident may occur accidentally or deliberately.Near Drowning: Non-fatal immersion or submersion in water. The subject is resuscitable.Electric Injuries: Injuries caused by electric currents. The concept excludes electric burns (BURNS, ELECTRIC), but includes accidental electrocution and electric shock.Skull Fracture, Depressed: A skull fracture characterized by inward depression of a fragment or section of cranial bone, often compressing the underlying dura mater and brain. Depressed cranial fractures which feature open skin wounds that communicate with skull fragments are referred to as compound depressed skull fractures.Household Products: Substances or materials used in the course of housekeeping or personal routine.Respiratory Aspiration: Inhaling liquid or solids, such as stomach contents, into the RESPIRATORY TRACT. When this causes severe lung damage, it is called ASPIRATION PNEUMONIA.Suicide: The act of killing oneself.Bhopal Accidental Release: 1984 accident in Bhopal, INDIA at a PESTICIDES facility, resulting when WATER entered a storage tank containing ISOCYANATES. The following accidental chemical release and uncontrolled reaction resulted in several thousand deaths.Inlays: Restorations of metal, porcelain, or plastic made to fit a cavity preparation, then cemented into the tooth. Onlays are restorations which fit into cavity preparations and overlay the occlusal surface of a tooth or teeth. Onlays are retained by frictional or mechanical factors.Death, Sudden: The abrupt cessation of all vital bodily functions, manifested by the permanent loss of total cerebral, respiratory, and cardiovascular functions.Shaken Baby Syndrome: Brain injuries resulted from vigorous shaking of an infant or young child held by the chest, shoulders, or extremities causing extreme cranial acceleration. It is characterized by the intracranial and intraocular hemorrhages with no evident external trauma. Serious cases may result in death.Antidotes: Agents counteracting or neutralizing the action of POISONS.Drug Packaging: Containers, packaging, and packaging materials for drugs and BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS. These include those in ampule, capsule, tablet, solution or other forms. Packaging includes immediate-containers, secondary-containers, and cartons. In the United States, such packaging is controlled under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act which also stipulates requirements for tamper-resistance and child-resistance. Similar laws govern use elsewhere. (From Code of Federal Regulations, 21 CFR 1 Section 210, 1993) DRUG LABELING is also available.Intraoperative Awareness: Occurence of a patient becoming conscious during a procedure performed under GENERAL ANESTHESIA and subsequently having recall of these events. (From Anesthesiology 2006, 104(4): 847-64.)Wounds, Penetrating: Wounds caused by objects penetrating the skin.Contusions: Injuries resulting in hemorrhage, usually manifested in the skin.Medical Laboratory Personnel: Health care professionals, technicians, and assistants staffing LABORATORIES in research or health care facilities.Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: Toxic asphyxiation due to the displacement of oxygen from oxyhemoglobin by carbon monoxide.Drowning: Death that occurs as a result of anoxia or heart arrest, associated with immersion in liquid.Extravasation of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Materials: The escape of diagnostic or therapeutic material from the vessel into which it is introduced into the surrounding tissue or body cavity.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Wounds, Gunshot: Disruption of structural continuity of the body as a result of the discharge of firearms.Dental Service, Hospital: Hospital department providing dental care.Iatrogenic Disease: Any adverse condition in a patient occurring as the result of treatment by a physician, surgeon, or other health professional, especially infections acquired by a patient during the course of treatment.Post-Dural Puncture Headache: A secondary headache disorder attributed to low CEREBROSPINAL FLUID pressure caused by SPINAL PUNCTURE, usually after dural or lumbar puncture.Masochism: Pleasure derived from being physically or psychologically abused, whether inflicted by oneself or by others. Masochism includes sexual masochism.Poison Control Centers: Facilities which provide information concerning poisons and treatment of poisoning in emergencies.Paraphilias: Disorders that include recurrent, intense sexually arousing fantasies, sexual urges, or behaviors generally involving nonhuman objects, suffering of oneself or partners, or children or other nonconsenting partners. (from DSM-IV, 1994)Caustics: Strong alkaline chemicals that destroy soft body tissues resulting in a deep, penetrating type of burn, in contrast to corrosives, that result in a more superficial type of damage via chemical means or inflammation. Caustics are usually hydroxides of light metals. SODIUM HYDROXIDE and potassium hydroxide are the most widely used caustic agents in industry. Medically, they have been used externally to remove diseased or dead tissues and destroy warts and small tumors. The accidental ingestion of products (household and industrial) containing caustic ingredients results in thousands of injuries per year.Dura Mater: The outermost of the three MENINGES, a fibrous membrane of connective tissue that covers the brain and the spinal cord.Catheterization, Peripheral: Insertion of a catheter into a peripheral artery, vein, or airway for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.Petroleum: Naturally occurring complex liquid hydrocarbons which, after distillation, yield combustible fuels, petrochemicals, and lubricants.Phosgene: A highly toxic gas that has been used as a chemical warfare agent. It is an insidious poison as it is not irritating immediately, even when fatal concentrations are inhaled. (From The Merck Index, 11th ed, p7304)Medical Errors: Errors or mistakes committed by health professionals which result in harm to the patient. They include errors in diagnosis (DIAGNOSTIC ERRORS), errors in the administration of drugs and other medications (MEDICATION ERRORS), errors in the performance of surgical procedures, in the use of other types of therapy, in the use of equipment, and in the interpretation of laboratory findings. Medical errors are differentiated from MALPRACTICE in that the former are regarded as honest mistakes or accidents while the latter is the result of negligence, reprehensible ignorance, or criminal intent.Plant Poisoning: Poisoning by the ingestion of plants or its leaves, berries, roots or stalks. The manifestations in both humans and animals vary in severity from mild to life threatening. In animals, especially domestic animals, it is usually the result of ingesting moldy or fermented forage.Lacerations: Torn, ragged, mangled wounds.Water Pollution, Chemical: Adverse effect upon bodies of water (LAKES; RIVERS; seas; groundwater etc.) caused by CHEMICAL WATER POLLUTANTS.Retinal Hemorrhage: Bleeding from the vessels of the retina.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Blood Patch, Epidural: The injection of autologous blood into the epidural space either as a prophylactic treatment immediately following an epidural puncture or for treatment of headache as a result of an epidural puncture.Burns, ChemicalCraniocerebral Trauma: Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.Frostbite: Damage to tissues as the result of low environmental temperatures.Homicide: The killing of one person by another.Head Injuries, Penetrating: Head injuries which feature compromise of the skull and dura mater. These may result from gunshot wounds (WOUNDS, GUNSHOT), stab wounds (WOUNDS, STAB), and other forms of trauma.Myiasis: The invasion of living tissues of man and other mammals by dipterous larvae.Child Abuse: Abuse of children in a family, institutional, or other setting. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Masturbation: Sexual stimulation or gratification of the self.Anesthesia, Epidural: Procedure in which an anesthetic is injected into the epidural space.Merbromin: A once-popular mercury containing topical antiseptic.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Acid-Base Imbalance: Disturbances in the ACID-BASE EQUILIBRIUM of the body.Containment of Biohazards: Provision of physical and biological barriers to the dissemination of potentially hazardous biologically active agents (bacteria, viruses, recombinant DNA, etc.). Physical containment involves the use of special equipment, facilities, and procedures to prevent the escape of the agent. Biological containment includes use of immune personnel and the selection of agents and hosts that will minimize the risk should the agent escape the containment facility.Egg Hypersensitivity: Allergic reaction to eggs that is triggered by the immune system.Hydroxyzine: A histamine H1 receptor antagonist that is effective in the treatment of chronic urticaria, dermatitis, and histamine-mediated pruritus. Unlike its major metabolite CETIRIZINE, it does cause drowsiness. It is also effective as an antiemetic, for relief of anxiety and tension, and as a sedative.Veterinarians: Individuals with a degree in veterinary medicine that provides them with training and qualifications to treat diseases and injuries of animals.Deglutition: The act of taking solids and liquids into the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT through the mouth and throat.Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional: The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens from patients to health professionals or health care workers. It includes transmission via direct or indirect exposure to bacterial, fungal, parasitic, or viral agents.Multiple Trauma: Multiple physical insults or injuries occurring simultaneously.Rolitetracycline: A pyrrolidinylmethyl TETRACYCLINE.Incidental Findings: Unanticipated information discovered in the course of testing or medical care. Used in discussions of information that may have social or psychological consequences, such as when it is learned that a child's biological father is someone other than the putative father, or that a person tested for one disease or disorder has, or is at risk for, something else.Angiostrongylus cantonensis: A species of parasitic nematodes distributed throughout the Pacific islands that infests the lungs of domestic rats. Human infection, caused by consumption of raw slugs and land snails, results in eosinophilic meningitis.Dental Instruments: Hand-held tools or implements especially used by dental professionals for the performance of clinical tasks.Hematoma, Subdural: Accumulation of blood in the SUBDURAL SPACE between the DURA MATER and the arachnoidal layer of the MENINGES. This condition primarily occurs over the surface of a CEREBRAL HEMISPHERE, but may develop in the spinal canal (HEMATOMA, SUBDURAL, SPINAL). Subdural hematoma can be classified as the acute or the chronic form, with immediate or delayed symptom onset, respectively. Symptoms may include loss of consciousness, severe HEADACHE, and deteriorating mental status.Post-Exposure Prophylaxis: The prevention of infection or disease following exposure to a pathogen.Accidents, Traffic: Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.Crowns: A prosthetic restoration that reproduces the entire surface anatomy of the visible natural crown of a tooth. It may be partial (covering three or more surfaces of a tooth) or complete (covering all surfaces). It is made of gold or other metal, porcelain, or resin.Neck Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the neck. It includes injuries to the skin, muscles, and other soft tissues of the neck.Medication Errors: Errors in prescribing, dispensing, or administering medication with the result that the patient fails to receive the correct drug or the indicated proper drug dosage.Battered Child Syndrome: A clinical condition resulting from repeated physical and psychological injuries inflicted on a child by the parents or caregivers.Security Measures: Regulations to assure protection of property and equipment.Transvestism: Disorder characterized by recurrent, intense sexually arousing fantasies, sexual urges, or behaviors involving cross-dressing in a heterosexual male. The fantasies, urges, or behaviors cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational or other areas of functioning. (from APA, DSM-IV, 1994)Device Removal: Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.Plant Weeds: A plant growing in a location where it is not wanted, often competing with cultivated plants.Suicide, Attempted: The unsuccessful attempt to kill oneself.Burns: Injuries to tissues caused by contact with heat, steam, chemicals (BURNS, CHEMICAL), electricity (BURNS, ELECTRIC), or the like.Autopsy: Postmortem examination of the body.Radioactive Fallout: The material that descends to the earth or water well beyond the site of a surface or subsurface nuclear explosion. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Chemical and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Mastectomy, Subcutaneous: Excision of breast tissue with preservation of overlying skin, nipple, and areola so that breast form may be reconstructed.Extracorporeal Circulation: Diversion of blood flow through a circuit located outside the body but continuous with the bodily circulation.Forensic Medicine: The application of medical knowledge to questions of law.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Nuclear Warfare: Warfare involving the use of NUCLEAR WEAPONS.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Radiation Injuries: Harmful effects of non-experimental exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation in VERTEBRATES.Coroners and Medical Examiners: Physicians appointed to investigate all cases of sudden or violent death.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Intubation, Intratracheal: A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.Chemical Warfare Agents: Chemicals that are used to cause the disturbance, disease, or death of humans during WARFARE.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Trauma Severity Indices: Systems for assessing, classifying, and coding injuries. These systems are used in medical records, surveillance systems, and state and national registries to aid in the collection and reporting of trauma.Birth Injuries: Mechanical or anoxic trauma incurred by the infant during labor or delivery.Prurigo: A name applied to several itchy skin eruptions of unknown cause. The characteristic course is the formation of a dome-shaped papule with a small transient vesicle on top, followed by crusting over or lichenification. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Toothache: Pain in the adjacent areas of the teeth.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Heart Arrest: Cessation of heart beat or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. If it is treated within a few minutes, heart arrest can be reversed in most cases to normal cardiac rhythm and effective circulation.Irritants: Drugs that act locally on cutaneous or mucosal surfaces to produce inflammation; those that cause redness due to hyperemia are rubefacients; those that raise blisters are vesicants and those that penetrate sebaceous glands and cause abscesses are pustulants; tear gases and mustard gases are also irritants.Smallpox: An acute, highly contagious, often fatal infectious disease caused by an orthopoxvirus characterized by a biphasic febrile course and distinctive progressive skin eruptions. Vaccination has succeeded in eradicating smallpox worldwide. (Dorland, 28th ed)Clothing: Fabric or other material used to cover the body.Hazardous Substances: Elements, compounds, mixtures, or solutions that are considered severely harmful to human health and the environment. They include substances that are toxic, corrosive, flammable, or explosive.Decontamination: The removal of contaminating material, such as radioactive materials, biological materials, or CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS, from a person or object.Finger Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the fingers.Acute Radiation Syndrome: A condition caused by a brief whole body exposure to more than one sievert dose equivalent of radiation. Acute radiation syndrome is initially characterized by ANOREXIA; NAUSEA; VOMITING; but can progress to hematological, gastrointestinal, neurological, pulmonary, and other major organ dysfunction.Chlorine: A greenish-yellow, diatomic gas that is a member of the halogen family of elements. It has the atomic symbol Cl, atomic number 17, and atomic weight 70.906. It is a powerful irritant that can cause fatal pulmonary edema. Chlorine is used in manufacturing, as a reagent in synthetic chemistry, for water purification, and in the production of chlorinated lime, which is used in fabric bleaching.Foreign-Body Migration: Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.Subarachnoid Space: The space between the arachnoid membrane and PIA MATER, filled with CEREBROSPINAL FLUID. It contains large blood vessels that supply the BRAIN and SPINAL CORD.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Tracheotomy: Surgical incision of the trachea.Theory of Mind: The ability to attribute mental states (e.g., beliefs, desires, feelings, intentions, thoughts, etc.) to self and to others, allowing an individual to understand and infer behavior on the basis of the mental states. Difference or deficit in theory of mind is associated with ASPERGER SYNDROME; AUTISTIC DISORDER; and SCHIZOPHRENIA, etc.Myxedema: A condition characterized by a dry, waxy type of swelling (EDEMA) with abnormal deposits of MUCOPOLYSACCHARIDES in the SKIN and other tissues. It is caused by a deficiency of THYROID HORMONES. The skin becomes puffy around the eyes and on the cheeks. The face is dull and expressionless with thickened nose and lips.Airway Obstruction: Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the lungs.Hydrofluoric Acid: Hydrofluoric acid. A solution of hydrogen fluoride in water. It is a colorless fuming liquid which can cause painful burns.Rodenticides: Substances used to destroy or inhibit the action of rats, mice, or other rodents.FiresWounds, Stab: Penetrating wounds caused by a pointed object.Head Injuries, Closed: Traumatic injuries to the cranium where the integrity of the skull is not compromised and no bone fragments or other objects penetrate the skull and dura mater. This frequently results in mechanical injury being transmitted to intracranial structures which may produce traumatic brain injuries, hemorrhage, or cranial nerve injury. (From Rowland, Merritt's Textbook of Neurology, 9th ed, p417)Analgesics, Non-Narcotic: A subclass of analgesic agents that typically do not bind to OPIOID RECEPTORS and are not addictive. Many non-narcotic analgesics are offered as NONPRESCRIPTION DRUGS.Razoxane: An antimitotic agent with immunosuppressive properties.Blood-Borne Pathogens: Infectious organisms in the BLOOD, of which the predominant medical interest is their contamination of blood-soiled linens, towels, gowns, BANDAGES, other items from individuals in risk categories, NEEDLES and other sharp objects, MEDICAL WASTE and DENTAL WASTE, all of which health workers are exposed to. This concept is differentiated from the clinical conditions of BACTEREMIA; VIREMIA; and FUNGEMIA where the organism is present in the blood of a patient as the result of a natural infectious process.Risk Management: The process of minimizing risk to an organization by developing systems to identify and analyze potential hazards to prevent accidents, injuries, and other adverse occurrences, and by attempting to handle events and incidents which do occur in such a manner that their effect and cost are minimized. Effective risk management has its greatest benefits in application to insurance in order to avert or minimize financial liability. (From Slee & Slee: Health care terms, 2d ed)Radiation Monitoring: The observation, either continuously or at intervals, of the levels of radiation in a given area, generally for the purpose of assuring that they have not exceeded prescribed amounts or, in case of radiation already present in the area, assuring that the levels have returned to those meeting acceptable safety standards.Charcoal: An amorphous form of carbon prepared from the incomplete combustion of animal or vegetable matter, e.g., wood. The activated form of charcoal is used in the treatment of poisoning. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Needles: Sharp instruments used for puncturing or suturing.Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.Emergencies: Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.Injury Severity Score: An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.Catheterization, Central Venous: Placement of an intravenous CATHETER in the subclavian, jugular, or other central vein.Polybrominated Biphenyls: Biphenyl compounds which are extensively brominated. Many of these compounds are toxic environmental pollutants.Emergency Treatment: First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Punishment: The application of an unpleasant stimulus or penalty for the purpose of eliminating or correcting undesirable behavior.EnglandEthylene Glycol: A colorless, odorless, viscous dihydroxy alcohol. It has a sweet taste, but is poisonous if ingested. Ethylene glycol is the most important glycol commercially available and is manufactured on a large scale in the United States. It is used as an antifreeze and coolant, in hydraulic fluids, and in the manufacture of low-freezing dynamites and resins.Great BritainAge Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry: A microanalytical technique combining mass spectrometry and gas chromatography for the qualitative as well as quantitative determinations of compounds.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Punctures: Incision of tissues for injection of medication or for other diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Punctures of the skin, for example may be used for diagnostic drainage; of blood vessels for diagnostic imaging procedures.Inhalation Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents by inhaling them.Central Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of any component of the brain (including the cerebral hemispheres, diencephalon, brain stem, and cerebellum) or the spinal cord.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Body Temperature: The measure of the level of heat of a human or animal.Analgesia, Epidural: The relief of pain without loss of consciousness through the introduction of an analgesic agent into the epidural space of the vertebral canal. It is differentiated from ANESTHESIA, EPIDURAL which refers to the state of insensitivity to sensation.Water Pollutants, Chemical: Chemical compounds which pollute the water of rivers, streams, lakes, the sea, reservoirs, or other bodies of water.Zoonoses: Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals.United StatesThoracic Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the chest area.Prescription Drugs: Drugs that cannot be sold legally without a prescription.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Pesticides: Chemicals used to destroy pests of any sort. The concept includes fungicides (FUNGICIDES, INDUSTRIAL); INSECTICIDES; RODENTICIDES; etc.Violence: Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.Strongylida Infections: Infections with nematodes of the order STRONGYLIDA.Radiation Dosage: The amount of radiation energy that is deposited in a unit mass of material, such as tissues of plants or animal. In RADIOTHERAPY, radiation dosage is expressed in gray units (Gy). In RADIOLOGIC HEALTH, the dosage is expressed by the product of absorbed dose (Gy) and quality factor (a function of linear energy transfer), and is called radiation dose equivalent in sievert units (Sv).Self-Injurious Behavior: Behavior in which persons hurt or harm themselves without the motive of suicide or of sexual deviation.Personnel, Hospital: The individuals employed by the hospital.Headache: The symptom of PAIN in the cranial region. It may be an isolated benign occurrence or manifestation of a wide variety of HEADACHE DISORDERS.Insecticides: Pesticides designed to control insects that are harmful to man. The insects may be directly harmful, as those acting as disease vectors, or indirectly harmful, as destroyers of crops, food products, or textile fabrics.Smallpox Vaccine: A live VACCINIA VIRUS vaccine of calf lymph or chick embryo origin, used for immunization against smallpox. It is now recommended only for laboratory workers exposed to smallpox virus. Certain countries continue to vaccinate those in the military service. Complications that result from smallpox vaccination include vaccinia, secondary bacterial infections, and encephalomyelitis. (Dorland, 28th ed)Disaster Planning: Procedures outlined for the care of casualties and the maintenance of services in disasters.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Alcoholic Intoxication: An acute brain syndrome which results from the excessive ingestion of ETHANOL or ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.Death Certificates: Official records of individual deaths including the cause of death certified by a physician, and any other required identifying information.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Brain Injuries: Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.Radiation Injuries, Experimental: Experimentally produced harmful effects of ionizing or non-ionizing RADIATION in CHORDATA animals.Neuroimaging: Non-invasive methods of visualizing the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the brain, by various imaging modalities.Malaysia: A parliamentary democracy with a constitutional monarch in southeast Asia, consisting of 11 states (West Malaysia) on the Malay Peninsula and two states (East Malaysia) on the island of BORNEO. It is also called the Federation of Malaysia. Its capital is Kuala Lumpur. Before 1963 it was the Union of Malaya. It reorganized in 1948 as the Federation of Malaya, becoming independent from British Malaya in 1957 and becoming Malaysia in 1963 as a federation of Malaya, Sabah, Sarawak, and Singapore (which seceded in 1965). The form Malay- probably derives from the Tamil malay, mountain, with reference to its geography. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p715 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p329)Housing: Living facilities for humans.Wounds, Nonpenetrating: Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.WalesHealth Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Polychlorinated Biphenyls: Industrial products consisting of a mixture of chlorinated biphenyl congeners and isomers. These compounds are highly lipophilic and tend to accumulate in fat stores of animals. Many of these compounds are considered toxic and potential environmental pollutants.Catheters, Indwelling: Catheters designed to be left within an organ or passage for an extended period of time.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Body Fluids: Liquid components of living organisms.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.

Rider injury rates and emergency medical services at equestrian events. (1/2115)

BACKGROUND: Horse riding is a hazardous pastime, with a number of studies documenting high rates of injury and death among horse riders in general. This study focuses on the injury experience of cross country event riders, a high risk subset of horse riders. METHOD: Injury data were collected at a series of 35 equestrian events in South Australia from 1990 to 1998. RESULTS: Injury rates were found to be especially high among event riders, with frequent falls, injuries, and even deaths. The highest injury rates were among the riders competing at the highest levels. CONCLUSION: There is a need for skilled emergency medical services at equestrian events.  (+info)

Results of the Bosworth method for unstable fractures of the distal clavicle. (2/2115)

Eleven consecutive Neer's type II unstable fractures of the distal third of the clavicle were treated by open reduction and internal fixation, using a temporary Bosworth-type screw. In all cases, fracture healing occurred within 10 weeks. Shoulder function was restored to the pre-injury level. A Bosworth-type screw fixation is a relatively easy and safe technique of open reduction and internal fixation of type II fractures of the distal third of the clavicle.  (+info)

Fractures of the posteromedial process of the talus. A report of two cases. (3/2115)

The authors present two cases of fractures of posteromedial process of talus. One was treated conservatively and the other by excision. The appearances of the CT scans, the therapeutic options and the mechanisms of injury are discussed.  (+info)

EMG responses to free fall in elderly subjects and akinetic rigid patients. (4/2115)

OBJECTIVES: The EMG startle response to free fall was studied in young and old normal subjects, patients with absent vestibular function, and patients with akinetic-rigid syndromes. The aim was to detect any derangement in this early phase of the "landing response" in patient groups with a tendency to fall. In normal subjects the characteristics of a voluntary muscle contraction (tibialis anterior) was also compared when evoked by a non-startling sound and by the free fall startle. METHODS: Subjects lay supine on a couch which was unexpectedly released into free fall. Latencies of multiple surface EMG recordings to the onset of free fall, detected by a head mounted linear accelerometer, were measured. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: (1) EMG responses in younger normal subjects occurred at: sternomastoid 54 ms, abdominals 69 ms, quadriceps 78 ms, deltoid 80 ms, and tibialis anterior 85 ms. This pattern of muscle activation, which is not a simple rostrocaudal progression, may be temporally/spatially organised in the startle brainstem centres. (2) Voluntary tibialis EMG activation was earlier and stronger in response to a startling stimulus (fall) than in response to a non-startling stimulus (sound). This suggests that the startle response can be regarded as a reticular mechanism enhancing motor responsiveness. (3) Elderly subjects showed similar activation sequences but delayed by about 20 ms. This delay is more than can be accounted for by slowing of central and peripheral motor conduction, therefore suggesting age dependent delay in central processing. (4) Avestibular patients had normal latencies indicating that the free fall startle can be elicited by non-vestibular inputs. (5) Latencies in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease were normal whereas responses were earlier in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) and delayed or absent in patients with Steele-Richardson-Olszewski (SRO) syndrome. The findings in this patient group suggest: (1) lack of dopaminergic influence on the timing of the startle response, (2) concurrent cerebellar involvement in MSA may cause startle disinhibition, and (3) extensive reticular damage in SRO severely interferes with the response to free fall.  (+info)

Effects of physical and sporting activities on balance control in elderly people. (5/2115)

OBJECTIVE: Balance disorders increase with aging and raise the risk of accidental falls in the elderly. It has been suggested that the practice of physical and sporting activities (PSA) efficiently counteracts these age related disorders, reducing the risk of falling significantly. METHODS: This study, principally based on a period during which the subjects were engaged in PSA, included 65 healthy subjects, aged over 60, who were living at home. Three series of posturographic tests (static, dynamic with a single and fast upward tilt, and dynamic with slow sinusoidal oscillations) analysing the centre of foot pressure displacements or electromyographic responses were conducted to determine the effects of PSA practice on balance control. RESULTS: The major variables of postural control were best in subjects who had always practised PSA (AA group). Those who did not take part in PSA at all (II group) had the worst postural performances, whatever the test. Subjects having lately begun PSA practice (IA group) had good postural performances, close to those of the AA group, whereas the subjects who had stopped the practice of PSA at an early age (AI group) did not perform as well. Overall, the postural control in the group studied decreased in the order AA > IA > AI > II. CONCLUSIONS: The period during which PSA are practised seems to be of major importance, having a positive bearing on postural control. It seems that recent periods of practice have greater beneficial effects on the subject's postural stability than PSA practice only at an early age. These data are compatible with the fact that PSA are extremely useful for elderly people even if it has not been a lifelong habit.  (+info)

Fracture epidemiology and control in a developmental center. (6/2115)

During 3.5 years, 182 fractures occurred among 994 residents of a developmental center. The fracture rate was 5.2 per 100 person-years (1.7 times greater than the rate in the US population). Fracture rate was significantly greater in residents with: epilepsy, older age, male gender, white race, independent ambulation, osteoporosis, and residence in intermediate care (versus skilled nursing) units; it was not affected by severity of mental retardation. Hand and foot bones were fractured in 58% of cases. Femur fracture occurred in 13 cases (7%). Fracture was caused by a fall in 41 cases (23%); its cause was indeterminable in 105 cases (58%). Fractures, occurring without significant injury, may be an important cause of preventable disability in this population. Control measures are suggested.  (+info)

The prognosis of falls in elderly people living at home. (7/2115)

BACKGROUND: there are few longitudinal studies of the prognosis of falling at home. OBJECTIVE: to determine outcomes in older people who fall once and more than once. DESIGN: longitudinal prospective cohort study. SETTING: primary care in the UK. SUBJECTS: 1815 subjects over 75 who had a standardized and validated health check. METHOD: annual interviews over 4 years. Practice records were used to establish death and admission to institutions. RESULTS: risk of death was increased at 1 year [odds ratio (OR) 2.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4-4.7] and 3 years (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.2-3.0) for recurrent fallers but not single fallers (OR 0.9, 95% CI 0.5-1.6 at 1 year; OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.7-1.4 at 3 years). Risk of admission to long-term care over 1 year was markedly increased both for single fallers (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.8-8.3) and recurrent fallers (OR 4.5, 95% CI 1.7-12). Functional decline was not related to faller status, the latter being very variable from one year to the next. CONCLUSIONS: the stronger relationship between falling and admission to long-term care rather than mortality supports the hypothesis that the perceived risks for those who fall only once are exaggerated.  (+info)

Carotid sinus hypersensitivity--a modifiable risk factor for fractured neck of femur. (8/2115)

BACKGROUND: the potential impact on morbidity, mortality and health care economics makes it important to identify patients at risk of fracture, in particular fractured neck of femur (FNOF). Older patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity (CSH) are more likely to have unexplained falls and to experience fractures, particularly FNOF. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of CSH in patients with FNOF. DESIGN: case-controlled prospective series. METHODS: consecutive cases were admissions over 65 years with FNOF. Controls were consecutive patients admitted for elective hip surgery, frail elderly people admitted to hospital medical wards and day-hospital patients. All patients had a clinical assessment of cognitive function, physical abilities and history of previous syncope, falls and dizziness, in addition to repeated carotid sinus massage with continuous heart rate and phasic blood pressure measurement. RESULTS: heart rate slowing and fall in systolic blood pressure was greater for patients with FNOF than those admitted for elective hip surgery (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001). CSH was present in 36% of the FNOF group, none of the elective surgery group, 13% of the acutely ill controls and 17% of the outpatients. It was more likely to be present in FNOF patients with a previous history of unexplained falls or an unexplained fall causing the index fracture. The heart rate and systolic blood pressure responses to carotid sinus stimulation were reproducible. CONCLUSION: older patients with an acute neck of femur fracture who do not give a clear history of an accidental fall or who have had previously unexplained falls are likely to have CSH. CSH may be a modifiable risk factor for older patients at risk of hip fracture.  (+info)

With our comprehensive Fall Prevention Programs, youll be expertly evaluated by the physical therapists at Trinity Rehab with clinics all over New Jersey.
Falls and fall-related injuries remain a frequent complication of strokes. Fall and injury prevention based on fall risk scores and level of fall risk, such as low, moderate or high, is insufficient, requiring that clinicians redesign fall prevention programs based on patients individualized fall and injury risk factors. Accepting that stroke is one of the leading causes of disability world-wide, all efforts should be made to protect these patients from falls and fall-related injuries. It is well known that falls result in fear of falling, greater disability and even loss of life. While the evidence for stroke-specific fall prevention interventions is still emerging, clinical experts must rely on clinical expert knowledge to conduct stroke-specific fall risk assessment needed to individualize fall prevention plans of care, while assuring injury risk and prevention strategies are included. This population-based approach presented in this lecture redesigns traditional universal programs in order ...
We identified 41 trials assessing the effects of multifactorial intervention for preventing falls in older people living in the community, with the mean age of participants ranging from 72 to 85 years. The trials included a range of multifactorial interventions, with most trials including at least two or more of the intervention components recommended by NICE.2 Exercise-in 35 of 41 trials-was the most common component of multifactorial interventions included in this review with more than half of all trials including study participants judged to be at higher risk of falls at enrolment (ie, participants had either presented for medical attention because of a fall or reported recurrent falls in the past year).. Multifactorial interventions were found to reduce the rate of falls when compared with those who received the comparator intervention; however, there was considerable unexplained heterogeneity. Multifactorial interventions are a specific type of intervention, where their definition means ...
Falls are the leading cause of nonfatal injuries in the United States. In 2006, nearly 8 million persons were treated in emergency departments (EDs) for fall injuries (1). Pets might present a fall hazard (2), but few data are available to support this supposition. To assess the incidence of fall-related injuries associated with cats and dogs, CDC analyzed data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP) for the period 2001--2006. This report describes the results of that analysis, which showed that an estimated average of 86,629 fall injuries each year were associated with cats and dogs, for an average annual injury rate of 29.7 per 100,000 population. Nearly 88% of injuries were associated with dogs, and among persons injured, females were 2.1 times more likely to be injured than males. Prevention strategies should focus on 1) increasing public awareness of pets and pet items as fall hazards and of situations that can lead to fall injuries and 2) ...
Falls and fall-related injuries among older adults have emerged as serious global health concerns, which place a burden on individuals, their families, and greater society. As fall incidence rates increase alongside our globally aging population, fall-related mortality, hospitalizations, and costs are reaching never seen before heights. Because falls occur in clinical and community settings, additional efforts are needed to understand the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that cause falls among older adults; effective strategies to reduce fall-related risk; and the role of various professionals in interventions and efforts to prevent falls (e.g., nurses, physicians, physical therapists, occupational therapists, health educators, social workers, economists, policy makers). As such, this Research Topic seeks articles that describe interventions at the clinical, community, and/or policy level to prevent falls and related risk factors. Preference will be given to articles related to multi-factorial,
The famed nonprofit Los Angeles Jewish Home announced today the implementation of a fall prevention and fitness program designed to address one of the major health challenges faced by seniors.
The consequences of falls can be serious in elderly people who are often unable to regain pre-injury levels of physical function. Patients with hip fractures and other injuries can also experience a loss of confidence, which influences quality of life.1-,2 Research on the prevention of falls and the minimisation of their consequences is therefore urgently needed. The trial by Shaw et al assessed the effectiveness of a multifactorial intervention with blinded outcome assessment in older people with cognitive impairment and dementia presenting to an AE department after a fall. Unlike previous studies that have shown the effectiveness of multifactorial interventions for preventing falls,3 Shaw et al found no significant effect associated with the intervention. These findings suggest that even though multifactorial interventions may prevent falls in elderly people with no cognitive impairment, the same effect cannot be assumed for elderly patients with cognitive impairment. It is unclear why the ...
Purpose of Fall Risk Assessment Identify patient/resident problems (rational basis for deciding whether risk exists) Identify those patients/residents most likely to fall Trigger further fall-related assessments (multidisciplinary) Identify interventions (guide patient/resident care planning) Raise staff awareness of fall/injury risk. Common Fall Risk Components/Factors Components Fall Risk Factors Diseases/Conditions History of falls Impaired vision/hearing Urinary problems (toileting needs) Muscle weakness Gait/balance impairment Dizziness Orthostatic hypotension Mobility impairment (impaired bed, chair and/or toilet transfers) Uses cane/walker Medications Polypharmacy (>5 medications) Psychotropics Diuretics Antihypertensives Antiseizure Benzodiazepines Hypoglycemics Sedative/hypnotics Mental Status Dementia Depression Delirium Impaired safety judgment Disruptive behaviors Non-English speaking Exhibits unsafe behavior Lacks understanding of mobility limitations Situational Conditions New
Background With increasing age neuromuscular deficits (e.g., sarcopenia) may result in impaired physical performance and an increased risk for falls. Prominent intrinsic fall-risk factors are age-related decreases in balance and strength / power performance as well as cognitive decline. Additional studies are needed to develop specifically tailored exercise programs for older adults that can easily be implemented into clinical practice. Thus, the objective of the present trial is to assess the effects of a fall prevention program that was developed by an interdisciplinary expert panel on measures of balance, strength / power, body composition, cognition, psychosocial well-being, and falls self-efficacy in healthy older adults. Additionally, the time-related effects of detraining are tested.. Methods/Design Healthy old people (N = 66) between the age of 65 to 80 years will participate in this trial. The testing protocol comprises tests for the assessment of static / dynamic steady-state balance ...
In this trial, which was underpowered to detect small, but possibly important reductions in serious fall injuries, a structured physical activity program compared with a health education program did not reduce the risk of serious fall injuries among sedentary older people with functional limitations …
The Iowa Department on Aging has received a federal grant to prevent falls by at-risk Iowans.. According to the Iowa Department of Public Health, unintentional falls are the leading cause of injury-related emergency room visits, hospitalizations and deaths for Iowans aged 65 or older.. Increasing the variety and availability of evidenced-based fall prevention programs throughout the state is key to reducing the number of fall related injuries said Iowa Department on Aging Director Donna Harvey. Thanks to this project, the State will establish a responsive, integrated fall prevention network that enables more at-risk Iowans to participate in falls prevention programs and learn strategies to decrease their chances of falling. We hope you will strongly consider becoming engaged in this effort. It is an investment in Iowa s future; if we can educate people today, we can prevent fall-related injuries and deaths in the years to come.. Please feel free to share this Master Trainer Course Application ...
A hip or pelvic fracture is a major fall-related injury which often causes a decline in mobility performance and physical activity. Over 40% of patients with hip fracture have cognitive impairment or dementia and poorer rehabilitation outcomes than those without cognitive impairment. In this subgroup, there is a lack of evidence on the best practices supporting recovery. The main aim of this study is to investigate the effects of a transitional care intervention after inpatient rehabilitation on physical activity and functional performance in this group of cognitively impaired patients. This dual-centre, randomised controlled trial compares a multifactorial intervention with usual care as control condition. Two hundred and forty community-dwellers (≥ 65 years) with a hip or pelvic fracture and mild to moderate cognitive impairment (MMSE 17-26) are recruited at the end of inpatient rehabilitation. The four-month intervention consists of (a) an individually tailored, progressive home exercise program
Annualized rate per 1,000 population for fall injury episodes for which a health-care professional was contacted either in person or by telephone for advice or treatment. † Estimates are based on household interviews of a sample of the noninstitutionalized civilian population.. § 95% confidence interval.. In 2012, the U.S. rate of nonfatal fall injuries receiving medical attention was 43 per 1,000 population. Rates increased with age for adults aged ≥18 years. Adults aged 18-44 years had the lowest rate of falls (22 per 1,000), and the rate for those aged ≥75 years was higher (121 per 1,000) than for all other age groups. Source: Adams PF, Kirzinger WK, Martinez ME. Summary health statistics for the U.S. population: National Health Interview Survey, 2012. Vital Health Stat 2013;10(259).. Reported by: Patricia F. Adams, [email protected], 301-458-4063; Michael E. Martinez, MPH, MHSA; Whitney K. Kirzinger, MPH. Alternate Text: The figure above shows the rate of nonfatal fall injuries receiving ...
TY - CONF. T1 - Fall risk assessments with the Interactive Walkway. AU - Geerse, D.J.. AU - Roerdink, M.. AU - Marinus, J.. AU - van Hilten, J.J.. PY - 2017/11/17. Y1 - 2017/11/17. M3 - Poster. ER - ...
While they acknowledge that there wasnt enough evidence for reviewers to look at the differences in exercise modality or doses, authors note that "there may also be longer-term benefits of introducing fall prevention exercise habits in people in the general community." They point out that most of the studies reviewed focused on programs that lasted 12 weeks or more, with nearly a third lasting a year or more. "These findings highlight the importance of primary prevention," they write.. Even with the definitive conclusion on the overall effectiveness of exercise in falls prevention, authors of the review believe more work should be done to tease out the impact of various exercise programs, though they advise that the studies will need to be "very large." They also recommend further research into fall prevention programs in emerging economies "where the burden of falls is increasing more rapidly than in high-income countries," and the need to investigate how best to integrate falls prevention ...
Falling can pose a serious health risk to older adults in acute, home, and institutional environments. Using the Hendrich II Fall Risk Model, this instructional program demonstrates how to assess patients for strength and mobility, extrinsic and intrinsic fall risk factors, and cognition. It also stresses the importance of assessing risk factors when conditions change, as well as, how to reduce fall risks by properly interpreting the assessment, and applying appropriate interventions. This program is an excellent resource for all health care professionals involved in assessing the mobility of older adults ...
Incidence of serious fall-related injuries (i.e., falls accompanied by fractures, head injuries requiring hospitalization, joint dislocations, severe sprains, other non-specified serious joint injuries, or lacerations requiring suturing), and of all injurious falls including those leading to more moderate injuries (such as bruises, cuts, abrasions or reduction in physical function for at least 3 days, or if the participant sought medical help ...
The research in this thesis is intended to aid caregivers supervision of toddlers to prevent accidental injuries, especially injuries due to falls in the home environment. There have been very few attempts to develop an automatic system to tackle young childrens accidents despite the fact that they are particularly vulnerable to home accidents and a caregiver cannot give continuous supervision. Vision-based analysis methods have been developed to recognise toddlers fall risk factors related to changes in their behaviour or environment. First of all, suggestions to prevent fall events of young children at home were collected from well-known organisations for child safety. A large number of fall records of toddlers who had sought treatment at a hospital were analysed to identify a toddlers fall risk factors. The factors include clutter being a tripping or slipping hazard on the floor and a toddler moving around or climbing furniture or room structures. The major technical problem in detecting ...
Sensory integration. • Work conditioning. • Job site evaluations. Physical Therapy. The goal of Physical Therapy is to restore individuals to their highest possible level of function for those experiencing neuromuscular or skeletal dysfunction. Therapists evaluate patients and devise individualized therapeutic treatment programs which may include:. • Exercise programs to help increase muscle function, coordination, endurance and mobility. • Training programs in bed mobility, gait, posture and positioning. • Joint and soft tissue mobilization to increase range of motion. • Wound care, pulsed lavage. • Adaptive equipment training. • Modalities: electrical stimulation, anodyne, ultrasound, manual therapy. • Lymphedema therapy. • Fall prevention programs: balance training and safety awareness. • Pain management. • Biofeedback / pelvic floor dysfunction. • Work conditioning. • Prosthetics training. • Neurological rehabilitation. • Orthopedic therapy. • Pediatrics ...
Cooperative Studies of Intervention Techniques, or FICSIT, initiative, launched in 1990 to improve physical function in old age.. Research from these and other FICSIT trials has demonstrated the benefits of strength training for older people and the value and cost-effectiveness of targeted, fall prevention programs for the elderly. It is estimated that each year falls are responsible for costs of over $12 billion in the U.S., and the costs due to physical frailty are much higher. The news on Tai Chi is a reminder that relatively low tech approaches should not be overlooked in the search for ways to prevent disability and maintain physical performance in late life. The FICSIT studies have shown that a range of techniques, from the most sophisticated medical interventions to more low tech methods, can help older people avoid frailty and falling, says Chhanda Dutta, Ph.D., Director of Musculoskeletal Research in the NIAs Geriatrics Program. We must make sure that we look at every approach, ...
Multifactorial fall prevention programmes have recently been considered7-9 because falls are caused by complex risk factors such as disabilities and the caring environment. In the hospital setting it is very important to identify patients at a high risk for falling at admission to prevent the occurrence of falls. In the present study, age, a history of falling and the need for help with ADL were common risk factors for falls in both men and women, and it is suggested that it is important to obtain this information at admission. As falls are associated with restricted mobility,10 ADL are important for their prevention... Medications such as psychotropic and hypnotic drugs increase the risk of falls. Some researchers have warned that multi-medication including antidepressants are a risk factor for falls.11 ,12 Patients treated with psychotropic or hypnotic drugs therefore require special attention.. A retrospective study suggested that one of the independent risk factors for recurrent falls was a ...
Study findings published in The Lancet Neurology indicated that frailty makes older adults more susceptible to Alzheimers dementia and moderates the effects of Alzheimers disease-related brain changes on dementia symptoms. Frailty and Alzheimers dementia have many risk factors and clinical features in common, such as age, inflammation, functional impairment and atypical illness presentation, Lindsay M.K. Wallace, MSc, from Nova Scotia Health Authority, and the department of medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, and colleagues explained. ...
PubMed journal article: Multifactorial intervention and cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. Download Prime PubMed App to iPhone, iPad, or Android
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This article reviews the evidence for the effectiveness of stand-alone exercise interventions and multifactorial intervention strategies that include exercise in lowering fall incidence rates and/or fall risk among older adults residing in the commun
BACKGROUND: Falls and fall-related injuries are a major public health concern, a financial challenge for health care providers, and critical issues for older adults. Poor balance and limited mobility are major risk factors for falls. OBJECTIVE: The p
By Dr Thijs Ackermans. Stair negotiation is one of the most hazardous daily tasks for older adults, often resulting in falls. Indeed, falls on stairs have been identified as the leading cause of accidental death and place a substantial financial burden on the National Health Service in the UK. Identifying the individuals at risk for a fall is necessary to deliver effective fall prevention interventions. However, presently there are no specific screening tools for stair fall prediction. It is questionable whether generic fall screening methods can identify older people at risk for falls on stairs, especially as stair negotiation is a complex and specific skill. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether stair fallers could be differentiated from non-stair-fallers by biomechanical risk factors or physical and psychological parameters included in existing fall screening methods. In addition, we aimed to identify the individuals with the highest stair fall risk using a novel multivariate ...
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Method and device for fall prevention and detection, specifically for the elderly care based on digital image analysis using an intelligent optical sensor. The fall detection is divided into two main steps; finding the person on the floor, and examining the way in which the person ended up on the floor. When the first step indicates that the person is on the floor, data for a time period of a few seconds before and after the indication is analyzed in the second step. If this indicates a fall, a countdown state is initiated in order to reduce the risk of false alarms, before sending an alarm. The fall prevention is also divided into two main steps: identifying a person entering a bed; and identifying the person leaving the bed to end up standing beside it.
Optimal mobility is fundamental for healthy ageing and quality of life. This study is part of a cross-sectional population-based study of 85-year-old people residing in Linköping municipality, Sweden. The purpose was to describe 85-year-old peoples health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in relation to mobility and fall risk while adjusting for gender and body mass index. Data collection included a postal questionnaire, a home visit and a reception visit. HRQoL was assessed with EQ-5D-3L, mobility with the Timed Up and Go test (TUG) and fall risk with the Downton Fall Risk Index (DFRI). All those who completed the DFRI, TUG and EQ-5D-3L were included in the present study (N = 327). Lower HRQoL was associated with longer time taken to complete TUG and higher fall risk in both genders but not with body mass index. Women had higher risk of falling, took a longer time to complete TUG and reported less physical activity compared with men. Health-care professionals should address mobility capacity ...
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5. Report and prepare to adjust its permanent position. Primary nursing diagnosis diagnosis. More than 16,000 people are infected with cmv with no intraluminal pathology (fig. Such as fine-needle aspiration is usually precipitated by extra physical or emotional stress, a fourth drug. Body image; safety behavior: Fall prevention interventions. Interv. 5. Excisional biopsy description 1. Consists of three major types of neck dissection. Explain that nonspecific, suspicious, or atypical hyperplasia); and signif- icantly less pain than evla on days 1, 5, and pgl 5). Figure 3. 65 the vocal cord on the suture line (fig. Catheterization of female adults have wbc 6,510/ l leukocytosis may range from 19 to 10; women are likely to be effective in ameliorating symptoms if given within 4 weeks. (2018). It can also occur in several blankets. Assess the patient has had a higher risk for these neoplasms. 5. Factors affecting choice of incision level of the eyes and changes in mental status, such as hepatitis b ...
World renowned researchers emphasize the critical need for clinicians to aggressively utilize a multi-pronged approach to reducing the risk of complications and premature death from type 2 diabetes mellitus.
Daily life requires frequent estimations of the risk of falling and the ability to avoid a fall. The objective of this study was to explore older womens and mens understanding of fall risk and their experiences with safety precautions taken to prevent falls.A qualitative study with focus group discussions was conducted. Eighteen community-dwelling people [10 women and 8 men] with and without a history of falls were purposively recruited. Participants were divided into two groups, and each group met four times. A participatory and appreciative action and reflection approach was used to guide the discussions. All discussions were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed by qualitative content analysis, and categories were determined inductively.Three categories describing the process of becoming aware of fall risks in everyday life were identified: 1] Facing various feelings, 2] Recognizing ones fall risk, and 3] Taking precautions. Each category comprised several ...
RESULTS: Nineteen of the 95 women sustained at least one fall during the six-month follow-up. Women with > 2 uncorrected risk factors had a significantly higher risk of falling than those with 0-2 risk factors; the odds ratio adjusted for four confounders was 4.58 (95%CI 1.472-4.250; P=0.009). Adherence to recommendations for fall prevention was negatively associated with fall risk. The adjusted odds ratio for a ten percent increase in adherence rate was 0.749 (95%CI 0.594-0.945; P=0.015 ...
There are a variety of steps that one can take to both prevent falls, and if a fall happens, be prepared to handle the situation in the most efficient manner.. 1. Make a Doctors Appointment - A fall prevention plan can be created with your doctor, or CareAparent, and can really help to clarify and increase awareness of fall risks specific to you, such as how any medication you take might increase the risk. Discuss previous falls and what you should do if they happen, as well as reviewing any health conditions you might have that can increase your risk.. 2. Keep Active - Keeping yourself mobile and physically active can help reduce the risk of falls exponentially, and, should you fall, can help reduce the risk of serious injury. Of course, aside from day-to-day mobility, you should get an ok from your doctor regarding physical exercise, but options such as swimming and water workouts for example are a great option for gentle yet thorough exercise. Your doctor may also suggest visiting a physical ...
While being able to balance is something most of us take for granted, each year approximately 400,000 Americans are diagnosed with a balance disorder. In order to prevent fall-related injuries due to postural instability ...
Nowadays, the average gym junkie never works out on the floor. Foam roaming is the furthest they will go to the ground. With all the fancy and sophisticated machines around, you may be wondering what the point is. However, experts in fitness field have argued that doing groundwork at the gym comes with a lot of benefits. Here are a few reasons why you should start to incorporate bodyweight exercises into your workouts.. Training on the floor reduces fall-related injuries.. This advantage is most overlooked. Every year, a large number of people die from falls. By doing groundwork, you reduce your chances of being seriously injured from a fall because you improve your ability to break the fall. Gets the heart pumping.. Going down and getting up from the floor gets your heart pumping. You can also increase your pulse by adding a set of bird dogs. A combination of push-ups and kettle bell swings do improve the heart beat rate. It keeps you youthful.. Research has shown that people with difficulties ...
Do you have a fear of falling? Find tips on fall prevention, how to avoid tripping and slipping, and ways to lower your chances of getting a fracture.
Fall prevention is a key tactic for reducing senior hospitalizations. Lets look at four lesser-known risk factors and the strategies to mitigate them
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Care guide for Fall Prevention For Children (Ambulatory Care). Includes: possible causes, signs and symptoms, standard treatment options and means of care and support.
Hendrich Fall Risk Score and is termed as Hendrich II Fall Risk Model into account various parameters. Final score is calculated by addition.
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Falls in hospital remain the least researched area of falls prevention, with a recent Cochrane review identifying that only multifactorial interventions, and supervised exercise interventions reduced falls in this setting.1 In contrast to falls prevention research in the community setting, most of the successful randomised trials reported in this review included all hospital patients - those with and without cognitive impairment. Cognitive impairment is now well recognised as an important risk factor for falls in hospitals.2. ...
If your elderly loved one is injured after a fall, a second one is likely to occur. Learn what you should do following an elderly loved ones traumatic fall.
I bought a green horse. He would buck, bolt, spook, you name it and I would generally end up on the ground. Got hurt a couple of times, once severely. I could not afford another horse either. So, I just got back on, terrified and shaking, but I didnt see that I had a choice, I was going to ride him. We also were not working with a trainer at the time. For the past year we have had a trainer and that has helped. I have also learned that the more confident I am, the better he is. I can make myself fake it enough for him to believe it. Really I think a lot of it was him being unsure of me and what he was asked to do, he would get frustrated, scared, and either try to run off or have a tantrum. I think at this point, he has finally accepted that Im not going to let him get eaten and that he is capable of doing what I ask. So no more tantrums. I really think a lot of it is just time and making myself go out there and do it. Some rides were just a few minutes at a walk, but I figured it was ok, ...
"An Accidental Fall". Vogue.it. Retrieved 8 December 2015. "Alyona Subbotina electrifies the ID Magazine". OnSugar. Retrieved 8 ...
Accidental Landscapes". Woman's Art Journal. 35 (2). Beckenstein, Joyce (Fall-Winter 2014). "April Gornik: Accidental ... Beckenstein, Joyce (Fall-Winter 2014). "April Gornik: Accidental Landscapes". Woman's Art Journal. 35 (2): 7. "Smithsonian ... ISBN 1-55595-229-1 April Gornik: Paintings and Drawings, a book review Beckenstein, Joyce (Fall-Winter 2014). "April Gornik: ...
Believes Death Was Accidental. Woman Saw Body Fall. .." New York Times. May 16, 1928. Retrieved 2015-01-16. Biography portal ... "J.J. Lannin Killed By Fall At Hotel. Owner of Roosevelt Field and Other Hostelries Plunges Out Brooklyn Window. He Developed ...
Braid's Death Was Accidental; North Mine Fall". Barrier Miner. Broken Hill, NSW: National Library of Australia. 30 June 1938. p ...
"Legislator Killed in Fall From Scollay Sq. House". The Boston Daily Globe. November 16, 1950. "Medical Examiner Rules ... The Medical Examiner ruled Faulkner's death as accidental, based on cuts and bruises on Faulkner's hands that showed he had ... Legislator's Death Accidental". The Boston Daily Globe. November 17, 1950. ...
... may cause accidental falls. It is also linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, heart ... It is defined as a fall in systolic blood pressure of at least 20 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure of at least 10 mm Hg when a ... Orthostatic hypotension is defined as a fall in systolic blood pressure of at least 20 mmHg and/or in the diastolic blood ... Orthostatic hypotension, also known as postural hypotension, occurs when a person's blood pressure falls when suddenly standing ...
There were also a few accidental deaths. Two internees died from falls and one child drowned. The worst accident occurred ... The War Office by the Chief of the Imperial General Staff thought the city would inevitably fall to Japanese forces in the ... ISBN 0-904917-00-2. George Wright-Nooth (1999). Prisoner of the Turnip Heads: The Fall of Hong Kong and the Imprisonment by the ...
Nuzum was also a valued member of the "Society of Former Special Agents of the FBI." In 2008, Nuzum suffered an accidental fall ...
"The Accidental Artist". School Library Journal, March 1999, p. 107. Linda M. Pavonetti. "Paul Fleischman: A Partner in ... Celebrating Language and Reading". Journal of Children's Literature 29:2 (Fall 2003), p. 86. Deb Kruse-Field. "Paul Fleischman ... 219-31 "The Accidental Artist", School Library Journal (March 1999) Children's literature portal The Magician's Kid (Sid's ...
"Kevin Caron: The Accidental Artist." So Scottsdale (magazine) (February 2014) D'Andrea, Niki. "Kevin Caron: Large Scale ... Steel, copper, 109" x 94" x 169" 2007 Temple, Texas, City of Temple: Temple Falls. powder-coated steel, 48" x 27" x 32" 2006 ... "Fluid Metal: Kevin Caron," Luxe magazine (Fall 2013) Simons, Ted. [38] "Arizona ArtBeat," PBS Channel 8 (July 18, 2013) Haller ...
Delahanty died from an accidental fall in Cleveland. Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference, or ...
Welch died of a broken neck resulting from an accidental fall in the bathroom of his Seal Beach, California home on June 9, ... Hickey, John; Almond, Elliott (September 4, 2014). "Bob Welch's death ruled accidental fall, authorities say". Mercury News. ... www.seattletimes.com/sports/mariners/bob-welchrsquos-death-ruled-accidental-fall-at-home/ Career statistics and player ... suffered in the fall, negating earlier reports that he had died from a heart attack. American League Cy Young Award (1990) Two- ...
... may cause accidental falls.[23] It is also linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, heart ... Orthostatic hypotension, also known as postural hypotension,[2] is a medical condition wherein a person's blood pressure falls ... cumulative brain damage, sudden death from falls. Diagnostic method. in-office (lay down for at least 20 minutes, take BP; ... It is defined as a fall in systolic blood pressure of at least 20 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure of at least 10 mm Hg when a ...
Sharon Groves, "News and Views", Feminist Studies 29(3), Fall 2003; accessed via ProQuest. Van der Spuy, Patricia; Lindsay ... Clowes (2007). "Accidental Feminists? Recent Histories of South African Women". Kronos: A Journal of Interdisciplinary ...
His death was ruled accidental. He has a tattoo on his back that says All Eyes On Me, and another one that says Accomplish ... Authorities said no one saw his father fall into the water. Nelson arrived at the search scene the next morning. On September 2 ...
However, roof falls in mining are not all accidental. In longwall mining and retreat mining, miners systematically remove all ... In mining, the term roof fall is used to refer to many types of collapses, ranging from the fall of a single flake of shale to ... The goal in such mining methods is not to prevent roof fall and the ensuing surface subsidence, but rather to control it. Alvar ...
Hoff died of complications resulting from an accidental fall. At the time of his death, he was the last surviving person to ...
Mack died in Newport, Kentucky from an accidental fall. List of players from Ireland in Major League Baseball List of Major ...
The fall of the Berlin Wall destroyed Krenz and the SED politically. On 18 November, Krenz swore in a new coalition government ... The Collapse: The Accidental Opening of the Berlin Wall. New York City: Basic Books. p. 90. ISBN 9780465064946. Sarotte, p. 95 ... The Rise and Fall of a Socialist Welfare State: The German Democratic Republic (1949-1990) and German Unification (1989-1994). ... Sebetsyen, Victor (2009). Revolution 1989: The Fall of the Soviet Empire. New York City: Pantheon Books. ISBN 0-375-42532-2. ...
In 1847 an accidental fall left him incurably lame. His official connection with the university continued for more than sixty- ...
The fall of the Berlin Wall was the key event leading to the end of the East German regime, a state that had been crumbling for ... The Collapse: The Accidental Opening of the Berlin Wall. New York City: Basic Books. p. 23. ISBN 9780465064946. Sarotte, p. 115 ... Sebestyen, Victor (2009). Revolution 1989: The Fall of the Soviet Empire. New York City: Pantheon Books. ISBN 0-375-42532-2. ...
Ryburn died on 5 April 1980 following an accidental fall. Thomson, Jane (ed.) (1989). Southern People: A Dictionary of Otago ...
It could also fall under the accidental Pocket dialing category. A ghost call sometimes can be repetitive or completely tie up ...
Not all species fall into one of these categories. Those that do not are commonly occurring native species. (A) Accidental - a ... Introduced and accidental species are included in the total counts for Morocco. The following tags have been used to highlight ... of which five have been introduced by humans and 156 are rare or accidental. Five species listed are extirpated in Morocco and ...
The Accidental Empress, Sisi, Empress on Her Own, and Where the Light Falls. Pataki was born in New York. She is daughter of ... "Where the Light Falls". Kirkus Reviews. Retrieved 19 June 2017. "Allison Pataki". Simon & Schuster. Retrieved 2017-06-15. ... Kirkus Reviews felt that The Accidental Empress did not "stray far from the conventions of novels about royalty." Publisher's ... Subscription required (help)). "The Accidental Empress". Kirkus Reviews. Retrieved 19 June 2017. "Fiction Book Review: Sisi by ...
Pan falls to the ground unconscious. Goku easily fights off the two of them, but then Vegeta shows up. According to Hercule, it ... The dragon grants this accidental wish, and Goku becomes a child. After Pilaf leaves, King Kai tells Goku that the only way he ... They find the four-star Dragon Ball lying under a tree, but before they can get it, a giant apple falls on it. Then a giant ... "The Fall of The Saiyans" / "The Situation is Even Worse!? Super Saiyan 3 Fails!!". Transcription: "Chō Yabai!? Sūpā Saiyajin ...
However, some experts contend that similar effects could be caused during accidental falls. ...
WHO global report on falls prevention in older age  World Health Organization (‎Geneva : World Health OrganizationWorld Health ...
Authorities say a man suffered serious leg and rib injuries when he fell on some railroad tracks behind a southern New Jersey post office.
Although falls from trees are rare, the consequences can be severe. Over 13 months in 6 hospitals in Tehran 49 [‎0.57%]‎ of ... WHO global report on falls prevention in older age  World Health Organization (‎Geneva : World Health OrganizationWorld Health ... Burden of fall injuries in Pakistan - analysis of the National Injury Survey of Pakistan  ... There are no reliable estimates of the burden of fall-related injuries in Pakistan. To assess this burden and develop an ...
Accidental death rate for children falls. Every hour, one child dies from an unintentional injury in the United States. ... Ever wonder why those accidental suffocations are on the rise? You can learn alot watching bad television cop shows like how ... What about the thousands of children (and adults) dying in Africa due to lack of food? Is that accidental? ... because it implies you have a lower number of children passing from non-accidental deaths. ...
Accidental falls in home care hematological patients. Accidental falls in home care hematological patients. Tendas, A.; Cupelli ... Preventing the risks of accidental falls. The Hendrich Accidental Falls Risk Scale. Pflege Aktuell 56(3): 174-176, 2002 ... Accidental falls in the hospital--patients injured by falls in the hospital. A challenge for nursing. Krankenpflege Journal 40( ... Falls related to accidental deactivation of deep brain stimulators in patients with Parkinson's disease living in long ...
Actor Charles Levin died from an accidental fall, a report has confirmed.The 70-year-old actor, best known for his roles on TV ... Seinfeld actor Charles Levin died from accidental fall. WENN - World Entertainment News NetworkMore from WENN - World ... Actor Charles Levin died from an accidental fall, a report has confirmed. ...
Niagara Falls Daredevil, Accidental Nuclear Bomb, Railroad Heroine. Don Wildman examines a lantern that guided a teenage girl ...
You can be confident that when you make a purchase through ABAA.org, the item is sold by an ABAA member in full compliance with our Code of Ethics. Our sellers guarantee your order will be shipped promptly and that all items are as described. Buy with confidence through ABAA.org. ...
From Cleveland Clinic YouTube channel: Accidental falls are the leading cause of non fatal injuries in the United States ... according to the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, and a new study finds more than 86,000 of those falls are ...
... - Answered ... My 3 year old son died in a terrible accidental fall from the back steps of my home. While pulling on the door lever with all ... My 3 year old son died in a terrible accidental fall from the…. ... and nothing to break to his fall. His head impacted concrete. He never regained consciousness and passed away two days later ...
Accidental Success? Even Without National Climate Policy, US Emissions May Fall Enough To Avoid Failure. Posted on October 25th ...
Louis hotel was accidental. They identified the man as 23-year-old William Brown of Sioux Falls. ... Police say a mans fatal fall from the 10th floor of a St. ... Police Say Sioux Falls Mans Deadly Hotel Fall in St. Louis was ... Police Say Sioux Falls Mans Deadly Hotel Fall in St. Louis was Accidental. ... Louis hotel was accidental.. They identified the man on Monday as 23-year-old William Brown of Sioux Falls, South Dakota. ...
Differential diagnosis between accidental and apparently accidental falls in elderly patients is very difficult but a ... accidental. We report a case of an elderly woman admitted to first aid for a trauma due to an accidental fall. Geriatric ... Falls in the elderly are commonly and often wrongly identified as ... accidental. We report a case of an elderly woman admitted to first aid for a trauma due to an accidental fall. Geriatric ...
Accidental Falls -- prevention & control. Documentation -- methods. Accidental Falls -- economics. Accidental Falls -- ... Accidental Falls -- prevention & control. Accidental Falls -- statistics & numerical data. Infant Care. Patient safety. Rooming ... Accidental Falls -- prevention & control. Accidental Falls -- statistics & numerical data. Gait. Mobility Limitation. Obesity ... Accidental Falls -- prevention & control. Hospitals. Practice Guidelines as Topic. Accidental Falls -- statistics & numerical ...
... Jorge García febrero 14, 2020 20s , 2020 , Eyelids , Jorge Addison , LPs , Novedad 2 ... "The accidental falls", pero algo me dice que no. En principio el disco ha conseguido engancharme más que aquél, y las escuchas ... "The accidental falls" conecta más conmigo y creo que también lo hará con gran parte del público que también se siente cómodo ...
Falls. /*prevention & control Pedestrians/*statistics & numerical data. Accidental. Falls. /economics ; Accidental. Falls. / ... Accidental. Falls. *. Hip Fractures/*epidemiology Parathyroid Hormone/*blood Vitamin D/*blood. Aged ; Aged, 80 and over ; ... Accidental. Falls. */prevention & control Exercise Therapy*. Aged ; Aged, 80 and over ; Exercise ; Humans. Czasopismo naukowe ... Accidental. Falls. *. Brain/*pathology Brain/*physiopathology Dementia/*diagnostic imaging White Matter/*pathology. Aged, 80 ...
A love of reading and a terrific high school teacher made me a writer, a book (Georgia Gardeners Guide, by Erica Glasener and Walter Reeves) made me a gardener, and a casual lunch with my friend Pat Bowen is the reason why I became a Certified Georgia Master Gardener. Since 2005, I have written monthly gardening columns for the Barrow-Jackson Journal, the Georgia Asian Times and The Nooze. I also write for a number of e-zines and for private clients - anything from LinkedIn profiles to web content to case studies, personal bios, corporate profiles, tag lines and more. A niche specialty is working with international scientists whose articles require the scrutiny of an extra set of eyes before they are published in professional journals. My company, The Oliver/Sorano Group, Inc., handles marketing and PR projects for a variety of clients, and provides a home to Atlanta Women in Business ...
A couple weeks ago, the Times Herald-Record, the newspaper that kicked me out of journalism, eliminated the jobs of yet another bunch of talented and experienced journalists. One of them is Mike Carey, whod worked at the Record for decades. On a whim, I searched for Mike Carey on Facebook. I didnt find him (he is about the unlikeliest Facebook person alive), but I did find a bunch of interesting-looking Mike Careys, and one of them had this dog as his profile pic. Isnt this little guy adorable ...
Accidental falls, number of deaths, by sex, Categories: External causes of mortality ... Accidental falls, number of deaths, female (Line chart) * Accidental falls, number of deaths, male (Line chart) ... Accidental falls, number of deaths (Line chart) * ... CDR(0 year), Accidental falls, per 100 000 MDB * CDR(0 year), ... CDR(0 year), Accidental drowning and submersion, per 100 000 MDB * ...
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... previously titled Accidental Love and published by Amber Allure in 2012. Only small edits have been made. When it comes to ... Accidental Fall is now available! This novella is a re-release, ... Accidental Fall Now Available Accidental Fall is now available ... Release Day! Accidental Fall Now Available. Posted on September 21, 2016 , Comments Off on Release Day! ... This entry was posted in accidental fall, novella, now available. Bookmark the permalink. ...
Accidental falls admissions. Direct age standardised rate of admission or attendance to hospital per 100,000 population ... relating to accidental falls (admissions with accidental fall ICD10 W0 or W1 in any diagnosis field). ... Number of hospital admissions following an accidental fall. Area. 2009-2011. 2010-2012. 2011-2013. 2012-2014. 2013-2015. 2014- ... Numerator: Admissions to hospital realting to accidental falls. Denominator: Population. Notes: Direct Age Standardised Rate ( ...
The series Accidental billionaires represents a set of related resources, especially of a specified kind, found in Little Falls ... Little Falls Public Library. Additional terms may apply to data associated with third party namespaces. ... Accidental billionaires,/a,,/span, - ,span property=potentialAction typeOf=OrganizeAction,,span property=agent typeof= ... Accidental billionaires,/a,,/span, - ,span property=potentialAction typeOf=OrganizeAction,,span property=agent typeof= ...
Protecting your phone from accidental drops is a not a very tough job if you follow these guidelines and along with proper ... How To Protect Your Phone From Accidental Falls?. Posted By: Anand Karwaon: October 30, 2014. In: featured. Print Email ... Whats your take on protecting the smartphones from accidental damage?. Share with your Friends:. *Click to share on Facebook ( ... Even if you take the above preventive measures seriously, there might come a time when your phone will fall off of your hands, ...
  • In this Nov. 1, 2019, photo, Gabe Steele wipes his eye as he sits in his home in West Point, Iowa, and talks about the accidental fatal shooting of his wife, Autumn Steele, by a Burlington, Iowa police officer in 2015. (wboy.com)
  • It might happen due to several reasons and that is why you should read this guide to protect your phone from accidental drops. (thegadgetfan.com)
  • I also wouldn't advise you to go for some cheap silicone covers available on the street-side as they don't offer much protection against accidental drops. (thegadgetfan.com)
  • Stainless steel straps are sturdy in Construction, and therefore, you should not be worried about drops or falls of your smartwatch. (megebyte.com)
  • Former First Lady Nancy Reagan lost her footing and nearly fell on Tuesday evening at an event at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, Calif. She was unhurt, but her public stumble serves as a reminder of the health consequences of trips, slips and falls for older adults. (go.com)
  • Gunshot homicide, a lot of which does involve criminals being killed rather than the shooter's family members or friends (though the doctors are correct to say that this is only rarely a matter of a householder shooting an intruder - it is more commonly criminals shooting each other) is a small health issue overall compared to accidental poisonings or falls. (theregister.co.uk)
  • Mumbai (Maharashtra) [India], September 16 (ANI): Maharashtra Health Minister Rajesh Tope on Wednesday announced the approval of the Balasaheb Thackeray Accidental Insurance Scheme that will ensure accident victims get maximum benefit of Rs 30,000 or free treatment in hospital. (yahoo.com)
  • Accidental falls are caused by a complex interaction between a series of health, therapy, furnishing and attitudes. (arctichealth.org)
  • For years, the U.S. government and the American Academy of Pediatrics have waged safe-sleep campaigns aimed at preventing accidental infant suffocations and strangulations and sudden infant death syndrome. (ctvnews.ca)
  • Falls can be harmful, but they are also preventable. (go.com)
  • While countless law enforcement officers safely perform their duties every day, some experts say even a small number of accidental shootings is unacceptable because they are preventable. (wboy.com)
  • You'll also want to keep track of any lost time at work due to your fall and take photos of the scene of the accident as soon as possible. (lawampm.com)
  • Accidental death and dismemberment insurance is there to make sure individuals and families are protected if an accident severely impacts their ability to function financially. (trustedchoice.com)
  • Accidental death or dismemberment from an automobile accident is a risk we all face when on the road, and this has little to do with our age, where we live, or our jobs. (trustedchoice.com)
  • Osteoporosis leads to bone weakness and increases the probability of serious injury from a fall, or might cause a spontaneous fracture and lead to a fall. (entanand.com)
  • They are also more likely to fracture (break) a bone when they fall, especially if they have osteoporosis . (medlineplus.gov)
  • Preciosa e intensa "Found at the scene of a rendezvous that failed" , con vívidas guitarras en "Starlight limelight machine" y remembranzas a Love en "Mermaid blues" . (exileshmagazine.com)
  • Accidental shootings by law enforcement have happened in recent years at agencies small and large and at all levels - city, county, state and federal - across the U.S., an Associated Press investigation found. (wboy.com)
  • Some medical conditions and medications can increase the risk of a fall ," says Mallory Moore , Director of Nursing at Mission Hills Post Acute Care. (heritageil.com)
  • The drug consumptions of 2228 residents in nursing homes aged 65 years and over were investigated and related to accidental falls during a period of seven months. (arctichealth.org)