Biostatistics: The application of STATISTICS to biological systems and organisms involving the retrieval or collection, analysis, reduction, and interpretation of qualitative and quantitative data.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Biometry: The use of statistical and mathematical methods to analyze biological observations and phenomena.Epidemiology: Field of medicine concerned with the determination of causes, incidence, and characteristic behavior of disease outbreaks affecting human populations. It includes the interrelationships of host, agent, and environment as related to the distribution and control of disease.Statistics as Topic: The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Clinical Medicine: The study and practice of medicine by direct examination of the patient.Schools, Health Occupations: Schools which offer training in the area of health.Education, Dental, Graduate: Educational programs for dental graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic dental sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced dental degree.EncyclopediasSolutions: The homogeneous mixtures formed by the mixing of a solid, liquid, or gaseous substance (solute) with a liquid (the solvent), from which the dissolved substances can be recovered by physical processes. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Life Expectancy: Based on known statistical data, the number of years which any person of a given age may reasonably expected to live.Pharmacopoeias as Topic: Authoritative treatises on drugs and preparations, their description, formulation, analytic composition, physical constants, main chemical properties used in identification, standards for strength, purity, and dosage, chemical tests for determining identity and purity, etc. They are usually published under governmental jurisdiction (e.g., USP, the United States Pharmacopoeia; BP, British Pharmacopoeia; P. Helv., the Swiss Pharmacopoeia). They differ from FORMULARIES in that they are far more complete: formularies tend to be mere listings of formulas and prescriptions.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Quality-Adjusted Life Years: A measurement index derived from a modification of standard life-table procedures and designed to take account of the quality as well as the duration of survival. This index can be used in assessing the outcome of health care procedures or services. (BIOETHICS Thesaurus, 1994)Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Life Tables: Summarizing techniques used to describe the pattern of mortality and survival in populations. These methods can be applied to the study not only of death, but also of any defined endpoint such as the onset of disease or the occurrence of disease complications.Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.RNA, Guide: Small kinetoplastid mitochondrial RNA that plays a major role in RNA EDITING. These molecules form perfect hybrids with edited mRNA sequences and possess nucleotide sequences at their 5'-ends that are complementary to the sequences of the mRNA's immediately downstream of the pre-edited regions.Dyslexia: A cognitive disorder characterized by an impaired ability to comprehend written and printed words or phrases despite intact vision. This condition may be developmental or acquired. Developmental dyslexia is marked by reading achievement that falls substantially below that expected given the individual's chronological age, measured intelligence, and age-appropriate education. The disturbance in reading significantly interferes with academic achievement or with activities of daily living that require reading skills. (From DSM-IV)Dyslexia, Acquired: A receptive visual aphasia characterized by the loss of a previously possessed ability to comprehend the meaning or significance of handwritten words, despite intact vision. This condition may be associated with posterior cerebral artery infarction (INFARCTION, POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY) and other BRAIN DISEASES.Textbooks as Topic: Books used in the study of a subject that contain a systematic presentation of the principles and vocabulary of a subject.ReadingWorkplace: Place or physical location of work or employment.Articulation Disorders: Disorders of the quality of speech characterized by the substitution, omission, distortion, and addition of phonemes.Occupational Health Nursing: The practice of nursing in the work environment.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Phonetics: The science or study of speech sounds and their production, transmission, and reception, and their analysis, classification, and transcription. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Dependent Ambulation: To move about or walk on foot with the use of aids.Directories as Topic: Lists of persons or organizations, systematically arranged, usually in alphabetic or classed order, giving address, affiliations, etc., for individuals, and giving address, officers, functions, and similar data for organizations. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)New HampshireCountertransference (Psychology): Conscious or unconscious emotional reaction of the therapist to the patient which may interfere with treatment. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Psychotherapy: A generic term for the treatment of mental illness or emotional disturbances primarily by verbal or nonverbal communication.Transference (Psychology): The unconscious transfer to others (including psychotherapists) of feelings and attitudes which were originally associated with important figures (parents, siblings, etc.) in one's early life.Psychoanalytic Therapy: A form of psychiatric treatment, based on Freudian principles, which seeks to eliminate or diminish the undesirable effects of unconscious conflicts by making the patient aware of their existence, origin, and inappropriate expression in current emotions and behavior.DirectoryHate: An enduring attitude or sentiment toward persons or objects manifested by anger, aversion and desire for the misfortune of others.Counseling: The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.Professional-Patient Relations: Interactions between health personnel and patients.Accident Proneness: Tendency toward involvement in accidents. Implies certain personality characteristics which predispose to accidents.Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm: Dyssomnias associated with disruption of the normal 24 hour sleep wake cycle secondary to travel (e.g., JET LAG SYNDROME), shift work, or other causes.Sleep Disorders: Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Sleep: A readily reversible suspension of sensorimotor interaction with the environment, usually associated with recumbency and immobility.Work Schedule Tolerance: Physiological or psychological effects of periods of work which may be fixed or flexible such as flexitime, work shifts, and rotating shifts.Jet Lag Syndrome: A chronobiologic disorder resulting from rapid travel across a number of time zones, characterized by insomnia or hypersomnolence, fatigue, behavioral symptoms, headaches, and gastrointestinal disturbances. (From Cooper, Sleep, 1994, pp593-8)Disorders of Excessive Somnolence: Disorders characterized by hypersomnolence during normal waking hours that may impair cognitive functioning. Subtypes include primary hypersomnia disorders (e.g., IDIOPATHIC HYPERSOMNOLENCE; NARCOLEPSY; and KLEINE-LEVIN SYNDROME) and secondary hypersomnia disorders where excessive somnolence can be attributed to a known cause (e.g., drug affect, MENTAL DISORDERS, and SLEEP APNEA SYNDROME). (From J Neurol Sci 1998 Jan 8;153(2):192-202; Thorpy, Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine, 2nd ed, p320)Phototherapy: Treatment of disease by exposure to light, especially by variously concentrated light rays or specific wavelengths.Circadian Rhythm: The regular recurrence, in cycles of about 24 hours, of biological processes or activities, such as sensitivity to drugs and stimuli, hormone secretion, sleeping, and feeding.
(1/19) Risk of upper limb injury in left handed children: a study in Greece.

OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether left handed children are at increased risk for injuries, particularly upper limb injuries. SETTING: Athens, Greece, during a six month period in 1995-96. METHODS: Cases were 129 children 4-14 years old with unintentional upper limb injuries from a population based injury database. Two control children matched for gender and age were selected from among those seen at the same medical institution for minor, non-injury ailments. On the basis of information provided by the children and their guardians, sociodemographic variables were recorded, hand preference was assessed, and each child's activity score was calculated through an abbreviated version of Achenbach's scale. RESULTS: Left handed children have a moderately increased upper limb injury risk with a tendency of recurrence of this injury. The risk of upper limb injury is also raised among children of young fathers, whereas it appears to be inversely related to crowding index and activity score--three variables that were controlled for as potential confounders. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides limited support for the hypothesis that left handed children are at increased risk for injury. The excess risk, if genuine, is likely to be limited to cultural settings in which right handedness is perceived as the norm.  (+info)

(2/19) The child with repeated injuries--a family problem.

Recurrent injuries in children should be regarded as a symptom complex rather than a diagnosis of ;accident proneness'. Investigation, which may include much listening will often reveal a family with emotional problems. The family doctor who can see the family as a whole is often best placed to offer or co-ordinate help.  (+info)

(3/19) Individual characteristics in occupational accidents due to imbalance: a case-control study of the employees of a railway company.

BACKGROUND: Falls are frequent occupational accidents, and are responsible for a significant amount of lost working time and, more importantly, for a high mortality. The factors involved in falling mechanisms can be of external or individual origin, the latter being less well identified. AIMS: To assess the relations between certain individual characteristics and occupational accidents due to imbalance. METHODS: A total of 427 male employees, who had been victims of at least one occupational accident with sick leave due to imbalance (cases) and 427 controls were recruited among the employees of a large French railway company. A standardised questionnaire on life conditions and professional factors, and a description of the accidents was filled in by an occupational physician for each subject. RESULTS: Some job categories were more affected by a specific release mechanism of work related falls. Certain individual characteristics such as smoking, alcohol consumption, inactivity, sleep disorders, and request for a job change were correlated with the occurrence of occupational accidents. Sick leaves of eight days or over were more frequent in older and overweight injured workers. Some lesions were linked with the specific fall released mechanisms. CONCLUSIONS: Individual characteristics can increase the risk of occupational accidents, especially falling. This study identified subjects most at risk on whom prevention related to working conditions and falls could be focused.  (+info)

(4/19) Age, flight experience, and risk of crash involvement in a cohort of professional pilots.

Federal aviation regulations prohibit airline pilots from flying beyond the age of 60 years. However, the relation between pilot age and flight safety has not been rigorously assessed using empirical data. From 1987 to 1997, the authors followed a cohort of 3,306 commuter air carrier and air taxi pilots who were aged 45-54 years in 1987. During the follow-up period, the pilots accumulated a total of 12.9 million flight hours and 66 aviation crashes, yielding a rate of 5.1 crashes per million pilot flight hours. Crash risk remained fairly stable as the pilots aged from their late forties to their late fifties. Flight experience, as measured by total flight time at baseline, showed a significant protective effect against the risk of crash involvement. With adjustment for age, pilots who had 5,000-9,999 hours of total flight time at baseline had a 57% lower risk of a crash than their less experienced counterparts (relative risk = 0.43, 95% confidence interval: 0.21, 0.87). The protective effect of flight experience leveled off after total flight time reached 10,000 hours. The lack of an association between pilot age and crash risk may reflect a strong "healthy worker effect" stemming from the rigorous medical standards and periodic physical examinations required for professional pilots.  (+info)

(5/19) The fast and the fatal: street racing fatal crashes in the United States.

The objective of this study was to determine the annual incidence of fatal motor vehicle crashes involving street racing and to describe the characteristics of these crashes compared to other fatal crashes in the United States. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Fatality Analysis Reporting System data for 1998-2001 were used for the analyses. There were 149 568 fatal crashes and 315 (0.21%) involved street racing and 399 fatalities occurred in these crashes. In contrast to other fatal crashes, street racing fatal crashes were more likely to occur on urban roadways and were nearly six times more likely to occur at travel speeds> or = 65 mph. Compared with other drivers involved in fatal crashes, street racers were more likely to be teenagers, male, and have previous crashes and driving violations. Street racing involves risky driving behaviors and warrants further attention.  (+info)

(6/19) Current helmet and protective equipment usage among previously injured ATV and motorcycle riders.

Injury recidivism among trauma patients may be related to an individual pattern of high risk behaviors. The extent to which an injury episode modifies this behavior pattern is unknown. A self report, voluntary, anonymous, cross sectional survey was administered to motorcycle and all-terrain vehicle (ATV) riders at a popular recreation site. Data included demographics, injury history, and current usage of helmet and protective gear. Two hundred eighty surveys were completed. History of ATV/motorcycle related minor and major injury were reported by 21% and 9%, respectively. Persons with a history of minor ATV/motorcycle injury only were less likely to use a helmet or protective equipment (78% v 74%, p = 0.58 and 49% v 41%, p = 0.29). Persons with a history of any major ATV/motorcycle injury were also less likely to use a helmet or protective equipment (77% v 56%, p = 0.03 and 48% v 40%, p = 0.53). These findings suggest a pattern of persistent high risk behavior among previously injured persons.  (+info)

(7/19) Determinants of accident proneness: a case-control study in railway workers.

BACKGROUND: Accident proneness or workers who have more frequent occupational injuries is common but the role of occupational and individual factors has rarely been studied. AIM: To assess the relationships of certain occupational and individual characteristics with frequency of occupational injuries. METHOD: This case-control study included 1305 male workers with occupational injuries during 1999-2000 and 1305 controls from a railway company. A standardized questionnaire was completed by the occupational physician in the presence of the subject. The data were analysed using logistic regression. RESULTS: Having more than one injury was associated with short service in the present job, younger age, sleep disorders, smoking, requesting a job change, physical disability and lack of physical activity. Safety training was negatively related to injury frequency. Short service in the present job was the only significant factor for single injuries. CONCLUSION: This study identified a number of work and individual factors that predicted occupational injury frequency and may be useful in designing preventative measures. Occupational physicians could assist workers to be more aware of the risks and to find remedial measures.  (+info)

(8/19) Falls in a rehabilitation setting: functional independence and fall risk.

AIM: With this study we wanted to determine the incidence, characteristics and consequences of falls in our rehabilitation setting. METHODS: An observational study was carried out in a rehabilitation setting for postacute orthopedic and neurological inpatients. Three-hundred and twenty patients were enrolled. Falls risk factors (Downton index [DI] and other known parameters), disability (functional independence measure [FIM]) and balance (Berg balance scale [BBS]) were assessed at admission. Falls that occurred during the rehabilitation stay were prospectively classified (St. Louis Older Adult Service and Information System [OASIS] system) and analyzed. RESULTS: Forty patients experienced a fall (12.5%). The faller group was characterized by a major clinical complexity; 70% of fallers were neurological patients and 30% presented cognitive impairment (mini mental state examination [MMSE] <24). They presented a statistically significant worse score on FIM (motor and cognitive), BBS and DI at admission, with 74% predictability of falls as measured by total FIM score and age. Falls recorded with the OASIS classification showed a prevalence (52.5%) for not bipedal (wheelchair transfer) and self-generated falls; 35% were intrinsic falls (caused by subject-specific factors) and 12.5% extrinsic falls (caused by environmental factors). Falls resulted in only minor clinical consequences, except for one rib fracture, but led to a significant increase in length of stay. CONCLUSIONS: In a rehabilitation centre, for good management of resources and safe prescriptions of a patient's independence in activities of daily living, fall risk is better evaluated with appropriate scales.  (+info)

*  Accident-proneness
"Accident Proneness". Psychosomatic Medicine. 6 (1): 88-94. Cresswell, W.L.; Frogatt, P. (1961-1962). "Accident Proneness, or ... Arbous, A.G.; Kerrich, J.E. (December 1951). "Accident Statistics and the Concept of Accident-Proneness". Biometrics. 7 (4): ... with a relatively small proportion of workers accounting for most of the accidents. Further work on accident-proneness was ... Research into accident-proneness is of great interest in safety engineering, where human factors such as pilot error, or errors ...
*  Carelessness
Study: Carelessness Spurs Many Credit Card Penalties Accident Statistics and the Concept of Accident-Proneness. ... Carelessness has been hypothesized to be one possible cause of accident-proneness. In any education environment, careless ...
*  Eric Edgar Cooke
Many of Cooke's jobs put him in the hospital due to his accident-proneness. At a job in the factory of Harris, Scarfe and ... Cooke was frequently hospitalised for head injuries and had suspected brain damage because of his accident-proneness. Later it ...
*  Shift work sleep disorder
... and accident proneness. Shift work is often combined with extended hours of duty, so fatigue can be a compounding factor. The ...
*  Technical failure
Absolute probability judgement Accident-proneness Human reliability Human-machine system Latent human error Order and disorder ...
*  G factor (psychometrics)
Many social behavior problems, such as dropping out of school, chronic welfare dependency, accident proneness, and crime, are ... For example, a person may fail to perform at a maximal level on an IQ test due to his or her anxiety and stress-proneness. The ... Gottfredson, L.S. (2007). Innovation, fatal accidents, and the evolution of general intelligence. In M. J. Roberts (Ed.), ...
*  Accident Prone
"Accident Prone" (song), a single released by the British rock band Status Quo Accident-proneness. ... Accident Prone may refer to: Accident Prone (album), an album by Ira Losco " ...
*  Clumsy
... or clumsiness may refer to: Accident-proneness Developmental coordination disorder, a motor skills disorder which brings ...
*  2002 Jalandhar MiG-21 crash
"Prior to discussion on the accident proneness or otherwise of the MiG-21 aircraft, the figures of loss of 221 aircraft and 100 ... During this period, 221 MiG-21 were never lost nor 100 pilots lost their lives in MiG-21 accidents. The figures as reported ... Other sources blame the accident rate on failures in the pilot training system. A similar crash occurred on June 14, 1986, when ... the IAF lost over 100 pilots in 283 accidents. During its service life, the IAF has lost at least 116 aircraft to crashes (not ...
*  Counterphobic attitude
Accident-proneness Counterdependency Exposure therapy Extraversion Overcompensation Reaction formation Russian roulette ... Traffic accidents have been linked to a counterphobic, manic attitude in the driver. Julia Kristeva considered that language ... Traffic Accidents (2008) p. 166 Julia Kristeva, Powers of Horror (1982) p. 41 Adam Phillips, On Flirtation (1994) p. 82-3 Selma ...
*  List of MeSH codes (F01)
... accident proneness MeSH F01.145.022 --- adolescent behavior MeSH F01.145.113 --- behavior, animal MeSH F01.145.113.055 --- ...
*  Milroy Lectures
Personal factors in accident proneness 1956 Richard Selwyn Francis Schilling, Chronic respiratory disease amongst cotton and ... The Medical Aspects of the Prevention of Road Accidents 1961 Henry George Miller, Accident neurosis 1962 R.F.L. Logan, The ...
*  Accident
... analysis Root cause analysis Accident-proneness Idiot proof Injury Injury prevention List of accidents and disasters ... 1994 Non-linear models System accident Systems-Theoretic Accident Model and Process (STAMP) Functional Resonance Accident Model ... Accidents during the execution of work or arising out of it are called work accidents. According to the International Labour ... Aviation accidents and incidents Bicycle safety Car Automobile safety Traffic collision List of rail accidents Tram accident ...
*  Moose Johnson
As a 14-year-old in 1900, he suffered an accident in which he survived a 2,300 volt electrical shock, but the incident resulted ... Johnson's proneness to injury was a result of his physical style of play and the retaliation that came with it, and he was ...
*  Friedrich Hayek
Where, as in the case of sickness and accident, neither the desire to avoid such calamities nor the efforts to overcome their ... In this text, Hayek also opposed conservatism for "its hostility to internationalism and its proneness to a strident ...
*  Thomism
Besides the absolute accidents there is also the relative accident, relation. Although by reason of its own character relation ... its proneness to error. For although, without at all giving expression to what I think, I consider all this in my own mind, ... accidents). Substances are things which exist per se or in their own right. Accidents are qualities that apply to other things ... "And because accidents are not composed of matter and form, their genus cannot be taken from matter and their difference from ...
*  Dog behavior
... with studies showing that adults are usually killed through accidents with humans, therefore other dogs need to be co-opted ... ", "Curiosity/Fearlessness, "Chase-proneness", "Sociability and Aggressiveness" and "Shyness-Boldness". A meta-analysis of 51 ...
Dyslexia in the workplace | Personnel Today  Dyslexia in the workplace | Personnel Today
Dyslexia has implications relating to work performance, accuracy and possible accident proneness. Some dyslexics have most ...
more infohttps://www.personneltoday.com/hr/dyslexia-in-the-workplace/
Accident-proneness - Wikipedia  Accident-proneness - Wikipedia
"Accident Proneness". Psychosomatic Medicine. 6 (1): 88-94. Cresswell, W.L.; Frogatt, P. (1961-1962). "Accident Proneness, or ... Arbous, A.G.; Kerrich, J.E. (December 1951). "Accident Statistics and the Concept of Accident-Proneness". Biometrics. 7 (4): ... with a relatively small proportion of workers accounting for most of the accidents. Further work on accident-proneness was ... Research into accident-proneness is of great interest in safety engineering, where human factors such as pilot error, or errors ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accident-proneness
What Should You Do When You Suspect Child Abuse? | Scholastic  What Should You Do When You Suspect Child Abuse? | Scholastic
accident-proneness;. *poor concentration;. *academic failure;. *increased aggression;. *hanging around school before and after ...
more infohttps://www.scholastic.com/teachers/articles/teaching-content/what-should-you-do-when-you-suspect-child-abuse/
Wiley Reference Works - Encyclopedia of Biostatistics  Wiley Reference Works - Encyclopedia of Biostatistics
Accident proneness. Accuracy. Adaptive and dynamic methods of treatment assignment. Adaptive sampling. Additive hazard models. ... Yule-Walker equations Accident and emergency medicine. Z. Zygosity determination. Preface The first duty of the Editors-in- ...
more infohttp://www.wiley.com/legacy/products/subject/reference/armitage_toc.html
CISDOC database  CISDOC database
Topics: accident proneness; age-linked differences; assembly-line work; causes of accidents; cohort study; location of injury; ... Most accidents in this sector occur in repair shops, but the incidence of reported accidents is below the average for all ... among male assembly workers in the Swedish automobile industry were measured for all accidents aggregated and for six accidents ... Results suggest that accident ratios tend to be higher among younger assemblers of both sexes, and lower among older ones, for ...
more infohttp://www.ilo.org/dyn/cisdoc2/cismain.listDocs?p_lang=en&p_bsubject=910&p_page=3&p_pagesize=50&p_template=NORMALPAGE
Theories of Multiple Intelligence  Theories of Multiple Intelligence
Accident-proneness * Acquiescence * Aging * Alcoholism * Authoritarianism * Conservatism (of social views) * Crime * ... His ability to see the implications of the accident eventually lead to the development of penicillin. Selective combination is ...
more infohttp://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/2242985/posts?page=20
The epidemiology of traumatic event exposure worldwide: results from the World Mental Health Survey Consortium | Psychological...  The epidemiology of traumatic event exposure worldwide: results from the World Mental Health Survey Consortium | Psychological...
Accident proneness, does it exist? A review and meta-analysis. Accident Analysis and Prevention 39, 556-564. ... psychoactive substances and non-fatal road traffic accidents - a case-control study. BMC Public Health 12, 734. ... being in a life-threatening automobile accident, and experiencing a life-threatening illness or injury - accounted for over ...
more infohttps://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/psychological-medicine/article/epidemiology-of-traumatic-event-exposure-worldwide-results-from-the-world-mental-health-survey-consortium/F06E14BA4DF09A29CCA81909C285ABE9
Occupational Stress | HubPages  Occupational Stress | HubPages
Accident proneness. EMOTIONAL. 1. Emotional outbursts and crying. 2. Irritability. 3. Depression ...
more infohttps://hubpages.com/health/-occupational-stress
Symptoms of Stress, Stress Reduction - Go Herbal Remedies  Symptoms of Stress, Stress Reduction - Go Herbal Remedies
Accident proneness. Diet for Stress. *Patients suffering from this emotional melancholy are advised to restrict themselves to ... There might be diminished sex drive and proneness toward different types of addictions like smoking, alcoholism or drug ...
more infohttp://goherbalremedies.com/symptoms-of-stress/
Reports IMATI Milano  Reports IMATI Milano
Bayesian forecasting for accident proneness evaluation. 95.9 F. Ruggeri and B. Vidakovic A Bayesian Decision Theoretic Approach ...
more infohttp://www.imati.cnr.it/index.php/reports-imati-milano?nbsp
Carelessness - Wikipedia  Carelessness - Wikipedia
Study: Carelessness Spurs Many Credit Card Penalties Accident Statistics and the Concept of Accident-Proneness. ... Carelessness has been hypothesized to be one possible cause of accident-proneness. In any education environment, careless ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carelessness
Correlates of Consumer Safety Behavior by Richard Staelin and Alan G. Weinstein  Correlates of Consumer Safety Behavior by Richard Staelin and Alan G. Weinstein
One of the major methodological problems in studies of accident proneness is that reportable accidents occur infrequently and a ... "accident proneness.". Another study involved an analysis of over 300 case histories of industrial accidents (Hirshfeld and ... The concept of "accident proneness" (Farmer and Chambers, 1926) has been proposed but not consistently demonstrated to exist. ... Also, the results tend to confirm the fact that most accidents are the result of poor use behavior. Some of the accidents ...
more infohttp://www.acrwebsite.org/volumes/5653/volumes/v01/NA-01
Counsellor Caroline Riddell, Andover, Hampshire, SP11 - Counselling Directory  Counsellor Caroline Riddell, Andover, Hampshire, SP11 - Counselling Directory
Accident proneness Ageing Issues Agoraphobia. Asthma Blushing Boarding School Issues Claustrophobia Compulsions (Checking/ ...
more infohttp://www.counselling-directory.org.uk/counsellors/caroline-riddell
Healthy happiness: effects of happiness on physical health and the consequences for preventive health care | SpringerLink  Healthy happiness: effects of happiness on physical health and the consequences for preventive health care | SpringerLink
... the correlation can also be due to a greater degree of accident proneness in unhappy countries. ... As yet this seems to be the case only for policies that aim at promoting exercise and preventing problem drinking and accidents ... Another aim is to reduce of accidents in road traffic and workplaces. In this case synergy is more likely, since comparative ... Longevity does not capture the good health of people who dye prematurely as a result of an accident. ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10902-006-9042-1
Shift work sleep disorder - Wikipedia  Shift work sleep disorder - Wikipedia
... and accident proneness. Shift work is often combined with extended hours of duty, so fatigue can be a compounding factor.[15] ... 7][1] All these factors can affect work efficiency and cause accidents.[7] All these consequences are dangerous for the ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shift_work_sleep_disorder
Alternative Medicine Practices, Healing At Home  Alternative Medicine Practices, Healing At Home
I struggled through my teens with more varied diagnoses which included rheumatic fever, sinusitis, and accident proneness. I ... I had developed an extremely weak bladder causing me to be incontinent (wetting accidents) so often that I needed to wear ... an accident. I no longer need to wear that protection. 6 months later I steadily have more improvements. The exhaustion I was ...
more infohttps://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/Testimonials/Testimonials
Concepts |
	
		Statistics Finland
	  Concepts | Statistics Finland
In practice, accident proneness also varies within the same occupation or industry by task, for instance.. Accident frequency ... In practice, accident proneness also varies within the same occupation or industry by task, for instance.. The accident ... Accident frequency The variation of accident incidence risks prevailing in different industries or professional and other such ... Accident incidence rate The variation of accident incidence risks prevailing in different industries or occupational and other ...
more infohttp://www.tilastokeskus.fi/meta/kas/index_en.html?A
  • The early work on this subject dates back to 1919, in a study by Greenwood and Woods, who studied workers at a British munitions factory and found that accidents were unevenly distributed among workers, with a relatively small proportion of workers accounting for most of the accidents. (wikipedia.org)
  • Five types - witnessing death or serious injury, the unexpected death of a loved one, being mugged, being in a life-threatening automobile accident, and experiencing a life-threatening illness or injury - accounted for over half of all exposures. (cambridge.org)
  • With the technology explosion which has produced a myriad of new, sophisticated consumer products this accident rate could increase markedly. (acrwebsite.org)
  • Thus, it has been argued by Oi (1973) that the appropriate goal of public policy toward product safety should be the maximization of the economic welfare of consumers not the minimization of accident costs. (acrwebsite.org)
  • Although substantial research has been devoted to this subject, there still seems to be no conclusive evidence either for or against the existence of accident proneness in this sense. (wikipedia.org)