AccidentsInsurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Accidents, Traffic: Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.Accidents, Occupational: Unforeseen occurrences, especially injuries in the course of work-related activities.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Insurance: Coverage by contract whereby one part indemnifies or guarantees another against loss by a specified contingency.Accident Prevention: Efforts and designs to reduce the incidence of unexpected undesirable events in various environments and situations.Chernobyl Nuclear Accident: April 25th -26th, 1986 nuclear power accident that occurred at Chernobyl in the former USSR (Ukraine) located 80 miles north of Kiev.Insurance, Long-Term Care: Health insurance to provide full or partial coverage for long-term home care services or for long-term nursing care provided in a residential facility such as a nursing home.Insurance, Life: Insurance providing for payment of a stipulated sum to a designated beneficiary upon death of the insured.Insurance, Accident: Insurance providing coverage for physical injury suffered as a result of unavoidable circumstances.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Accidents, HomeAccident Proneness: Tendency toward involvement in accidents. Implies certain personality characteristics which predispose to accidents.Insurance Carriers: Organizations which assume the financial responsibility for the risks of policyholders.Fukushima Nuclear Accident: Nuclear power accident that occurred following the Tohoku-Kanto earthquake of March 11, 2011 in the northern region of Japan.Radioactive Hazard Release: Uncontrolled release of radioactive material from its containment. This either threatens to, or does, cause exposure to a radioactive hazard. Such an incident may occur accidentally or deliberately.Insurance Pools: An organization of insurers or reinsurers through which particular types of risk are shared or pooled. The risk of high loss by a particular insurance company is transferred to the group as a whole (the insurance pool) with premiums, losses, and expenses shared in agreed amounts.Medically Uninsured: Individuals or groups with no or inadequate health insurance coverage. Those falling into this category usually comprise three primary groups: the medically indigent (MEDICAL INDIGENCY); those whose clinical condition makes them medically uninsurable; and the working uninsured.Organizational Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Accidents, AviationPolicy: A course or method of action selected to guide and determine present and future decisions.Insurance Selection Bias: Adverse or favorable selection bias exhibited by insurers or enrollees resulting in disproportionate enrollment of certain groups of people.United StatesWounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Insurance Benefits: Payments or services provided under stated circumstances under the terms of an insurance policy. In prepayment programs, benefits are the services the programs will provide at defined locations and to the extent needed.UkraineInsurance, Dental: Insurance providing coverage for dental care.Insurance, Health, Reimbursement: Payment by a third-party payer in a sum equal to the amount expended by a health care provider or facility for health services rendered to an insured or program beneficiary. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Insurance, Liability: Insurance against loss resulting from liability for injury or damage to the persons or property of others.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Insurance Claim Reporting: The design, completion, and filing of forms with the insurer.Automobile Driving: The effect of environmental or physiological factors on the driver and driving ability. Included are driving fatigue, and the effect of drugs, disease, and physical disabilities on driving.Universal Coverage: Health insurance coverage for all persons in a state or country, rather than for some subset of the population. It may extend to the unemployed as well as to the employed; to aliens as well as to citizens; for pre-existing conditions as well as for current illnesses; for mental as well as for physical conditions.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Insurance, Major Medical: Insurance providing a broad range of medical services and supplies, when prescribed by a physician, whether or not the patient is hospitalized. It frequently is an extension of a basic policy and benefits will not begin until the basic policy is exhausted.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.National Health Insurance, United StatesMedicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.Insurance, Hospitalization: Health insurance providing benefits to cover or partly cover hospital expenses.Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act: Public Law 104-91 enacted in 1996, was designed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the healthcare system, protect health insurance coverage for workers and their families, and to protect individual personal health information.Motorcycles: Two-wheeled, engine-driven vehicles.State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Cesium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of cesium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Cs atoms with atomic weights of 123, 125-132, and 134-145 are radioactive cesium isotopes.Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Insurance Claim Review: Review of claims by insurance companies to determine liability and amount of payment for various services. The review may also include determination of eligibility of the claimant or beneficiary or of the provider of the benefit; determination that the benefit is covered or not payable under another policy; or determination that the service was necessary and of reasonable cost and quality.Eligibility Determination: Criteria to determine eligibility of patients for medical care programs and services.Radioactive Pollutants: Radioactive substances which act as pollutants. They include chemicals whose radiation is released via radioactive waste, nuclear accidents, fallout from nuclear explosions, and the like.Radiation Monitoring: The observation, either continuously or at intervals, of the levels of radiation in a given area, generally for the purpose of assuring that they have not exceeded prescribed amounts or, in case of radiation already present in the area, assuring that the levels have returned to those meeting acceptable safety standards.Fees and Charges: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for health care services.Environmental Policy: A course of action or principle adopted or proposed by a government, party, business, or individual that concerns human interactions with nature and natural resources.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Insurance, Psychiatric: Insurance providing benefits to cover part or all of the psychiatric care.Craniocerebral Trauma: Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.Nuclear Power Plants: Facilities that convert NUCLEAR ENERGY into electrical energy.Financing, Personal: Payment by individuals or their family for health care services which are not covered by a third-party payer, either insurance or medical assistance.Medical Assistance: Financing of medical care provided to public assistance recipients.EnglandPolitics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: An Act prohibiting a health plan from establishing lifetime limits or annual limits on the dollar value of benefits for any participant or beneficiary after January 1, 2014. It permits a restricted annual limit for plan years beginning prior to January 1, 2014. It provides that a health plan shall not be prevented from placing annual or lifetime per-beneficiary limits on covered benefits. The Act sets up a competitive health insurance market.Radioactive Fallout: The material that descends to the earth or water well beyond the site of a surface or subsurface nuclear explosion. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Chemical and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Cost Sharing: Provisions of an insurance policy that require the insured to pay some portion of covered expenses. Several forms of sharing are in use, e.g., deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments. Cost sharing does not refer to or include amounts paid in premiums for the coverage. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Power Plants: Units that convert some other form of energy into electrical energy.Insurance, Physician Services: Insurance providing benefits for the costs of care by a physician which can be comprehensive or limited to surgical expenses or for care provided only in the hospital. It is frequently called "regular medical expense" or "surgical expense".Nuclear Reactors: Devices containing fissionable material in sufficient quantity and so arranged as to be capable of maintaining a controlled, self-sustaining NUCLEAR FISSION chain reaction. They are also known as atomic piles, atomic reactors, fission reactors, and nuclear piles, although such names are deprecated. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Emergencies: Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.Emergency Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with the evaluation and initial treatment of urgent and emergent medical problems, such as those caused by accidents, trauma, sudden illness, poisoning, or disasters. Emergency medical care can be provided at the hospital or at sites outside the medical facility.Wounds, Nonpenetrating: Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Income: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Great BritainRetrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Naval Medicine: The practice of medicine concerned with conditions affecting the health of individuals associated with the marine environment.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Social Security: Government sponsored social insurance programs.Ships: Large vessels propelled by power or sail used for transportation on rivers, seas, oceans, or other navigable waters. Boats are smaller vessels propelled by oars, paddles, sail, or power; they may or may not have a deck.Nuclear Fission: Nuclear reaction in which the nucleus of a heavy atom such as uranium or plutonium is split into two approximately equal parts by a neutron, charged particle, or photon.Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services: Insurance providing for payment of services rendered by the pharmacist. Services include the preparation and distribution of medical products.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Insurance, Disability: Insurance designed to compensate persons who lose wages because of illness or injury; insurance providing periodic payments that partially replace lost wages, salary, or other income when the insured is unable to work because of illness, injury, or disease. Individual and group disability insurance are two types of such coverage. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p207)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Motor Vehicles: AUTOMOBILES, trucks, buses, or similar engine-driven conveyances. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Whiplash Injuries: Hyperextension injury to the neck, often the result of being struck from behind by a fast-moving vehicle, in an automobile accident. (From Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Health Insurance Exchanges: State-provided health insurance marketplaces established under the PATIENT PROTECTION AND AFFORDABLE CARE ACT.Federal Government: The level of governmental organization and function at the national or country-wide level.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Nuclear Physics: The study of the characteristics, behavior, and internal structures of the atomic nucleus and its interactions with other nuclei. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Drowning: Death that occurs as a result of anoxia or heart arrest, associated with immersion in liquid.Food Contamination, RadioactiveCost Control: The containment, regulation, or restraint of costs. Costs are said to be contained when the value of resources committed to an activity is not considered excessive. This determination is frequently subjective and dependent upon the specific geographic area of the activity being measured. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Multiple Trauma: Multiple physical insults or injuries occurring simultaneously.Accidental Falls: Falls due to slipping or tripping which may result in injury.Mandatory Programs: Programs in which participation is required.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.TaiwanInfant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Thoracic Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the chest area.Fast Neutrons: Neutrons, the energy of which exceeds some arbitrary level, usually around one million electron volts.Injury Severity Score: An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.Trauma Severity Indices: Systems for assessing, classifying, and coding injuries. These systems are used in medical records, surveillance systems, and state and national registries to aid in the collection and reporting of trauma.CaliforniaModels, Econometric: The application of mathematical formulas and statistical techniques to the testing and quantifying of economic theories and the solution of economic problems.Poisoning: A condition or physical state produced by the ingestion, injection, inhalation of or exposure to a deleterious agent.Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Medical Staff, Hospital: Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.Tax Exemption: Status not subject to taxation; as the income of a philanthropic organization. Tax-exempt organizations may also qualify to receive tax-deductible donations if they are considered to be nonprofit corporations under Section 501(c)3 of the United States Internal Revenue Code.Emergency Medical Services: Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Protective Devices: Devices designed to provide personal protection against injury to individuals exposed to hazards in industry, sports, aviation, or daily activities.Taxes: Governmental levies on property, inheritance, gifts, etc.Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Skull Fractures: Fractures of the skull which may result from penetrating or nonpenetrating head injuries or rarely BONE DISEASES (see also FRACTURES, SPONTANEOUS). Skull fractures may be classified by location (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, BASILAR), radiographic appearance (e.g., linear), or based upon cranial integrity (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, DEPRESSED).Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Income Tax: Tax on the net income of an individual, organization, or business.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Nutrition Policy: Guidelines and objectives pertaining to food supply and nutrition including recommendations for healthy diet.Facial Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the soft tissue or bony portions of the face.Aid to Families with Dependent Children: Financial assistance provided by the government to indigent families with dependent children who meet certain requirements as defined by the Social Security Act, Title IV, in the U.S.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Social Control Policies: Decisions for determining and guiding present and future objectives from among alternatives.LondonQuality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Legislation as Topic: The enactment of laws and ordinances and their regulation by official organs of a nation, state, or other legislative organization. It refers also to health-related laws and regulations in general or for which there is no specific heading.Triage: The sorting out and classification of patients or casualties to determine priority of need and proper place of treatment.Compensation and Redress: Payment, or other means of making amends, for a wrong or injury.Automobiles: A usually four-wheeled automotive vehicle designed for passenger transportation and commonly propelled by an internal-combustion engine using a volatile fuel. (Webster, 1973)Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Social Welfare: Organized institutions which provide services to ameliorate conditions of need or social pathology in the community.Safety: Freedom from exposure to danger and protection from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. It suggests optimal precautions in the workplace, on the street, in the home, etc., and includes personal safety as well as the safety of property.Head Protective Devices: Personal devices for protection of heads from impact, penetration from falling and flying objects, and from limited electric shock and burn.Seat Belts: Restraining belts fastened to the frame of automobiles, aircraft, or other vehicles, and strapped around the person occupying the seat in the car or plane, intended to prevent the person from being thrown forward or out of the vehicle in case of sudden deceleration.Eye Injuries: Damage or trauma inflicted to the eye by external means. The concept includes both surface injuries and intraocular injuries.Public Sector: The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.Smoke-Free Policy: Prohibition against tobacco smoking in specific areas to control TOBACCO SMOKE POLLUTION.Liability, Legal: Accountability and responsibility to another, enforceable by civil or criminal sanctions.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Family Planning Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, to guide and determine present and future decisions on population control by limiting the number of children or controlling fertility, notably through family planning and contraception within the nuclear family.Maxillofacial Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the face and jaw (either upper, lower, or both).JapanOccupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Risk Management: The process of minimizing risk to an organization by developing systems to identify and analyze potential hazards to prevent accidents, injuries, and other adverse occurrences, and by attempting to handle events and incidents which do occur in such a manner that their effect and cost are minimized. Effective risk management has its greatest benefits in application to insurance in order to avert or minimize financial liability. (From Slee & Slee: Health care terms, 2d ed)Abdominal Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving organs in the abdominal cavity.Bicycling: The use of a bicycle for transportation or recreation. It does not include the use of a bicycle in studying the body's response to physical exertion (BICYCLE ERGOMETRY TEST see EXERCISE TEST).Workers' Compensation: Insurance coverage providing compensation and medical benefits to individuals because of work-connected injuries or disease.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Privatization: Process of shifting publicly controlled services and/or facilities to the private sector.Patient Admission: The process of accepting patients. The concept includes patients accepted for medical and nursing care in a hospital or other health care institution.Spinal Injuries: Injuries involving the vertebral column.Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)Occupational Injuries: Injuries sustained from incidents in the course of work-related activities.ScotlandInterviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Child Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the child.Malpractice: Failure of a professional person, a physician or lawyer, to render proper services through reprehensible ignorance or negligence or through criminal intent, especially when injury or loss follows. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)ExplosionsRailroads: Permanent roads having a line of rails fixed to ties and laid to gage, usually on a leveled or graded ballasted roadbed and providing a track for freight cars, passenger cars, and other rolling stock. Cars are designed to be drawn by locomotives or sometimes propelled by self-contained motors. (From Webster's 3d) The concept includes the organizational and administrative aspects of railroads as well.Emergency Treatment: First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Ambulances: A vehicle equipped for transporting patients in need of emergency care.BrazilEthnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Consumer Satisfaction: Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.Medical Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of medical care.Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Violence: Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.Medical Indigency: The condition in which individuals are financially unable to access adequate medical care without depriving themselves and their dependents of food, clothing, shelter, and other essentials of living.Employer Health Costs: That portion of total HEALTH CARE COSTS borne by an individual's or group's employing organization.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Managed Competition: A strategy for purchasing health care in a manner which will obtain maximum value for the price for the purchasers of the health care and the recipients. The concept was developed primarily by Alain Enthoven of Stanford University and promulgated by the Jackson Hole Group. The strategy depends on sponsors for groups of the population to be insured. The sponsor, in some cases a health alliance, acts as an intermediary between the group and competing provider groups (accountable health plans). The competition is price-based among annual premiums for a defined, standardized benefit package. (From Slee and Slee, Health Care Reform Terms, 1993)Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.
The relevant insurance policies must cover personal and occupational accidents. Pelé Law provides that the indemnity must ... insurance policies for athletes. Article 20 of Pelé Law and its 5 subsections regulate the establishment of leagues. The caput ... a PALC may have its terms suspended if the Athlete becomes unable to exercise his activity due to an occupational accident or ...
Thirty-six states currently allow alcohol exclusions in health care insurance policies via either explicit exclusions or ... "Supporting Repeal of the Uniform Accident and Sickness Policy Provision Law." August 2004 Cimons, Marlene. Challenging a Hidden ... State laws permitting intoxication exclusions in insurance contracts: implications for public health policy and practice. ... The insurance industry supports alcohol exclusion laws. On the other hand, the professional organization which regulates that ...
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Insurance cover for diving accidents may not be included in standard policies. There are a few organisations which focus ... and because human factors are cited as significant contributors to diving accidents in most accident investigations ... Examples of human error leading to accidents are available in vast numbers, as it is the direct cause of 60% to 80% of all ... Divers who have not practiced their skills for several months or years are at higher risk of accidents when first returning to ...
Michael Wiseman (Eric Close), an insurance executive who was killed in an accident; his brain has been implanted into a ... Lisa and Heather find themselves running out of money because the insurance company refuses to pay on Michael's policy, leading ... Michael's scheming and corrupt boss at the insurance company who is dead-set against paying on Michael's policy Special Agent # ... and works as an executive at an insurance company. When passed over for a promotion, Michael and his friend and co-worker Roger ...
... banking insurance, patents, fraud, and debt collection; all manner of accident and liability claims; enforcement of immigration ... The Division confronts significant policy issues, which often rise to constitutional dimensions, in defending and enforcing ... energy policies; commercial issues such as contract disputes, ...
The insurance policy simply provides that if an accident (the event) occurs involving the policy holder then some compensation ... For example, a personal injuries insurance policy does not transfer the risk of a car accident to the insurance company. The ... Purchase insurance policies for the risks that it has been decided to transferred to an insurer, avoid all risks that can be ... True self-insurance falls in this category. Risk retention is a viable strategy for small risks where the cost of insuring ...
The policies cover health, automobile, life, home, travel, pensions and annuities, personal accident insurance, and many other ... "Insurance Peru Full Rating Report - Pacifico Peruano-Suiza Compañia de Seguros y Reaseguros" (PDF). Fitch Ratings. "Company ... El Pacífico- Compañía de Seguros y Reaseguros S.A. or Pacifico Seguros (BVL: PSUIZAC1) is a leading insurance and reinsurance ... In addition, it offers corporate insurance products covering company's assets, which include heritage, engineering, transport, ...
Primary liability insurance coverage protects the truck from damage or injuries to other people as a result of a truck accident ... The policy is purchased with a maximum load limit per vehicle. Cargo insurance coverage limits can range from $10,000 to $ ... Here are some of the environmental issues that arise with trucking accidents: 14.4% of trucking accidents cause cargo to spill ... This truck insurance coverage is mandated by U.S. state and federal agencies, and proof of coverage is required to be sent to ...
... such as multiple claimant to a liability insurance policy injured in an accident before they are reduced to judgment or settled ... For example, suppose a person dies with a life insurance policy. However, the insurance company knows there will be a dispute ... The insurance company is the stakeholder, the claimants are the persons who might be beneficiaries under the policy, and the ... The insurance company believes that the deceased committed suicide, but the claimants believe the death was by accident. The ...
She had a large insurance policy on his life, taken just days before the accident. According to Brian Titley, author of Dark ...
When you have an Aflac policy, it's yours. You own it. Even if you change jobs or retire, you can take your Aflac policy with ... it's insurance for daily living. Major medical pays for doctors, hospitals and prescriptions. Aflac is insurance for daily ... It pays cash benefits directly to you, unless otherwise assigned, to help with daily expenses due to an illness or accident. " ... In conjunction with the campaign, Aflac created new policies-and revised existing policies-to expand availability to more ...
The insurance policy Romanian: Răspundere Civilă Auto it is also known as RCA. In case of an accident this insurance policy ... is a Romanian motor-vehicle liability insurance policy that covers damages caused to third parties. This insurance is legally ... "Motor vehicle liability insurance (RCA)". Biroului de Consiliere pentru Cetateni Cluj-Napoca (Office of Citizens Advice). March ... "The rules on compulsory insurance of auto civil liability have been published". Comisia de Supraveghere a Asigurãrilor ( ...
It is one of the most frequently claimed injuries on vehicle insurance policies. In the United Kingdom, 430,000 people made an ... Whiplash is commonly associated with motor vehicle accidents, usually when the vehicle has been hit in the rear; however, the ... In contrast, in many less wealthy countries, there may be limited access to care and insurance may only be available to the ... Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. "Q&A: Neck Injury". Retrieved 2007-09-18. "whiplash" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary ...
... than three fourths of the states require insurance companies to include chiropractic services in health and accident policies. ... In 1966 a policy passed by the AMA House of Delegates stating: "It is the position of the medical profession that chiropractic ... Indeed there is speculation that this was not an accident, but rather a case of patricide." A 1999 documentary study suggests D ... I urge a reconsideration of advertising and promotion policies in chiropractic." In an article on quackery, W.T. Jarvis has ...
Miron suffered a car accident and attempted to claim the injuries under his partner's insurance policy. However, the Ontario ... Miron sued the insurance company arguing that he was discriminated against and that the Insurance Act violated section 15. In a ... The Court held that an insurance benefit provided only to married couples discriminated against common-law couples. John Miron ... Insurance Act provided that benefits were only available to spouses who were legally married. ...
He pleaded guilty to impaired driving and tried to collect from the insurance policy to pay for the damages of his accident. ... He signed the rental agreement which contained an exclusion clause denying coverage for accidents that occur if the driver had ... Justice Charles Dubin, for the court, held that Clendenning could collect from the insurance. Dubin observed that: In modern ...
As a result of the accident, the city changed its policy regarding snow removal from bridges. The city was sued by Saskatchewan ... Government Insurance for the cost of the vehicle and its salvage. List of bridges in Canada List of bridges Circle Drive South ... The bridge was the scene of a notable accident on 30 December 2013, when Breanna Pegg lost control of her car after hitting ice ...
The Aetna Insurance Company issued life insurance policies on an undetermined number of African-American slaves, naming their ... 1891 - Aetna issued its first accident policy, purchased by Morgan Bulkeley himself. 1892 - Aetna held its first general agents ... "Pets Best Insurance > Pets Best Announces New Underwriter For Pet Insurance Policies". Petsbest.com. Archived from the original ... offering participating life insurance policies which paid dividends to policyholders just as the mutual life insurance policies ...
The program included sickness insurance, accident insurance, disability insurance, and a retirement pension, none of which were ... Leichter, Howard M. (1979). A comparative approach to policy analysis: health care policy in four nations. Cambridge: Cambridge ... Accident Insurance Law of 1884. Bismarck's government had to submit three draft bills before it could get one passed by the ... He added accident and old-age insurance as well as a form of socialized medicine. He did not completely succeed, however. ...
90 compensation from the MCC's insurance policy; which, at least, had the effect of ensuring a complete overhaul of insurance ... Titmus was involved in an accident shortly before the Third when, whilst swimming, he caught his foot in the propellor of a ... His very last appearance came by accident: attending the Middlesex v Surrey match in 1982 as a spectator (aged 49), he was ...
In order to disguise the hijacking as an accident, so his family would benefit from his $2.5 million life insurance policy, ... He sought to let his family collect on a $2.5 million life insurance policy provided by Federal Express. Calloway's efforts to ... another 1994 hijacking Aviation safety List of accidents and incidents involving commercial aircraft List of accidents and ... He planned to crash the aircraft hoping that he would appear to be an employee killed in an accident. ...
In domestic policy, Konow's time as Prime Minister saw the extension (in 1911) of accident insurance to seamen. In 1842 his ...
Burress's car insurance policy had been cancelled three days before the accident due to nonpayment of the premium. In 2012, he ... Later in the day, Burress reported to Giants Stadium as per team policy for injured but active players and was told he would be ...
... condo insurance, renters insurance, insurance for landlords, and mobile home insurance. The available policies for MetLife's ... Insurance serves to replace a portion of an individual's income during an extended period of a disabling illness or accident. ... and motorcycle policies and offers flood insurance policies as a participant in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), ... "Individual and Group Auto Insurance Policies". MetLife. MetLife. Retrieved 20 November 2014. "Group Auto Insurance". MetLife. ...
A work accident, workplace accident, occupational accident, or accident at work is a "discrete occurrence in the course of work" leading to physical or mental occupational injury.[1] According to the International Labour Organization (ILO), more than 337 million accidents happen on the job each year, resulting, together with occupational diseases, in more than 2.3 million deaths annually.[2] The phrase "in the course of work" can include work-related accidents happening off the company's premises, and can include accidents caused by third parties, according to Eurostat. The definition of work accident includes accidents occurring "while engaged in an economic activity, or at work, or carrying on the business ...
The health effects of the 1979 Three Mile Island nuclear accident are widely, but not universally, agreed to be very low. The American Nuclear Society concluded that average local radiation exposure was equivalent to a chest X-ray, and maximum local exposure equivalent to less than a year's background radiation. The U.S. BEIR report on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation states that "[t]he collective dose equivalent resulting from the radioactivity released in the Three Mile Island accident was so low that the estimated number of excess cancer cases to be expected, if any were to occur, would be negligible and undetectable." A variety of epidemiology studies have concluded that the accident has had no observable long term health effects. One dissenting study is "A reevaluation of cancer incidence near the Three Mile Island nuclear plant" by Dr. Steven Wing of the University of North Carolina. In ...
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The Abbots Ripton rail disaster occurred on 21 January 1876 at Abbots Ripton, then in the county of Huntingdonshire, England, now in Cambridgeshire, on the Great Northern Railway main line, part of the East Coast Main Line, and previously thought to be exemplary for railway safety. In the accident, the Special Scotch Express (known informally to railway workers as 'the Scotchman' although not officially the Flying Scotsman until after 1923) train from Edinburgh to London was involved in a collision, during a blizzard, with a coal train. An express travelling in the other direction then ran into the wreckage. The initial accident was caused by: over-reliance on signals and blockworking as allowing high-speed running even in adverse conditions systematic signal failure in the adverse conditions of that day due to a vulnerability to accumulation of snow and ice Additional factors in the second accident were: ...
A wound is a type of injury which happens relatively quickly in which skin is torn, cut, or punctured (an open wound), or where blunt force trauma causes a contusion (a closed wound). In pathology, it specifically refers to a sharp injury which damages the dermis of the skin. According to level of contamination, a wound can be classified as: Clean wound - made under sterile conditions where there are no organisms present, and the skin is likely to heal without complications. Contaminated wound - usually resulting from accidental injury; there are pathogenic organisms and foreign bodies in the wound. Infected wound - the wound has pathogenic organisms present and multiplying, exhibiting clinical signs of infection (yellow appearance, soreness, redness, oozing pus). Colonized wound - a chronic situation, containing pathogenic organisms, difficult to heal (i.e. bedsore). Open wounds can be classified according to the object that caused the wound: Incisions or incised wounds - ...
The Australian Cattle Dog (ACD), or simply Cattle Dog, is a breed of herding dog originally developed in Australia for droving cattle over long distances across rough terrain. This breed is a medium-sized, short-coated dog that occurs in two main colour forms. It has either brown or black hair distributed fairly evenly through a white coat, which gives the appearance of a "red" or "blue" dog. As with dogs from other working breeds, the Australian Cattle Dog is energetic and intelligent with an independent streak. It responds well to structured training, particularly if it is interesting and challenging. It was originally bred to herd by biting, and is known to nip running children. It forms a strong attachment to its owners, and can be protective of them and their possessions. It is easy to groom and maintain, requiring little more than brushing during the shedding period. The most common health problems are deafness and progressive blindness (both hereditary conditions) and ...
On June 20, 2017, Exelon Generation, the owners of Three Mile Island's Unit 1 sent to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission a formal notice of its intention to shut down the plant on September 30, 2019,[45] unless the Pennsylvania legislature rescues the nuclear industry, which is currently[when?] struggling to compete as newfound natural gas resources have driven down electricity prices.[46] Exelon Generation's Senior Vice President Bryan Hanson noted that once Three Mile Island is closed, it can never be reopened for use again.[45] Hanson explicitly stated the reason for the shutdown is because of the unprofitability of Unit 1. Unit 1 has lost the company over 300 million dollars over the last half-decade despite its being one of Exelon's best-performing power plants. Shut down of Unit 1 can go in two possible directions, the first being the immediate dismantlement immediately after the radioactive fuel has been moved away from the plant. The dismantlement can proceed after the spent fuel is ...
... was a Mansfield, Ohio based manufacturer of go-karts, minibikes, snowmobiles and other off-road vehicles founded by Mickey Rupp in 1959. Rupp Industries operated from 1959 until bankruptcy in 1978. Rupp vehicles are known for their performance and bright red coloring, particularly the snowmobiles and off-road vehicles. They have since become extremely collectible. Rupp Industries was born in 1959 when Mickey Rupp began assembling and selling go-karts from his basement. Originally Rupp Manufacturing, the name Rupp Industries was adopted by 1971. In that year Rupp employed 400, with 23 engineers in the R&D department and sales in the millions. In addition to their popular go-karts, Rupp began producing minibikes and snowmobiles in the early 1960s. Mickey Rupp sold the company in 1973 when it ran into financial trouble. Although the company would continue to produce dirt bikes, minibikes and snowmobiles, they would never regain financial stability and by 1978 went bankrupt. Mickey ...
... can cause dependence and/or addiction. Mixing with alcohol increases the risk of intoxication, increases respiratory depression, and increases liver toxicity when the butalbital is in combination with paracetamol (acetaminophen). Many opioid-dependent persons frequently use barbiturates as a potentiator to their normal dose of opiates in order to increase the effects, or with a less than normal dose as means of conserving their supply.[citation needed] Especially when used with the stronger narcotics, suicide or accidental death occurs much more frequently than first reported with one drug alone. Use of alcohol, benzodiazepines, and other CNS-depressants often also contribute to respiratory depression, coma, and in extreme cases fatality. When benzodiazepines are co-administered with barbiturates, the sum effect of the drugs is far greater than would be expected considering the effect of both drugs separately. This is due to complementary mechanisms at the GABAA ...
Conversely, an "Incident" is defined as "an occurrence, other than an accident, associated with the operation of an aircraft which affects or could affect the safety of operation." A "serious incident" is one that was nearly an accident, but which lacked the significant damage or injury, as defined above for the term "accident.". It is clear this article is about an airliner accident, according to the ICAO nomenclature which is subscribed to by virtually all industrialized nations, their official accident investigation bodies and all responsible aviation publications. Please do not revert back to the word "incident" without showing why you think that word is the proper one and without gaining consensus from other experienced aviation accident editors. EditorASC (talk) 04:55, 23 July 2016 (UTC). ...
The Learning Applied to Ground Vehicles (LAGR) program, which ran from 2004 until 2008, had the goal of accelerating progress in autonomous, perception-based, off-road navigation in robotic unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs). LAGR was funded by DARPA, a research agency of the United States Department of Defense. While mobile robots had been in existence since the 1960s, (e.g.Shakey), progress in creating robots that could navigate on their own, outdoors, off road, on irregular, obstacle-rich terrain had been slow. In fact no clear metrics were in place to measure progress. A baseline understanding of off-road capabilities began to emerge with the DARPA PerceptOR program in which independent research teams fielded robotic vehicles in unrehearsed Government tests that measured average speed and number of required operator interventions over a fixed course over widely spaced waypoints. These tests exposed the extreme challenges of off-road navigation. While the PerceptOR vehicles were equipped with ...
In 2004, it was reported that the road surface quality on certain stretches of the expressway was inferior due to the substandard quality of construction materials used.[16] In 2005, it was reported that a major accident took place on the expressway, resulting in a pileup that involved nine vehicles due to fog.[17] The Ahmedabad-Nadiad stretch is considered the most dangerous, with fatal accidents reported since the opening of the expressway.[18][19] The expressway has been referred to as not accident-prone when compared to the Mumbai Pune Expressway.[20] GSRTC buses are known to travel slowly on the expressway due to speed limits set prior to the opening of the expressway.[21] ...
Juan Pablo Montoya won the race ahead of teammate Kimi Räikkönen; McLaren's first 1-2 finish since the 2000 Austrian Grand Prix. Fernando Alonso finished 3rd and thus became World Champion for the first time, at the time the youngest ever champion at 24 years and 59 days surpassing Emerson Fittipaldi's record of 25 years and 273 days set in 1972. Jacques Villeneuve was forced to start from pit lane as a penalty for infringement of parc ferme regulations. After getting involved in an accident at the start of the race, Mark Webber was able to rejoin, over 20 laps behind the leaders and do some laps, sufficient to position himself fourth in the official qualifying order for the subsequent Grand Prix at Suzuka. Due to a driveshaft failure, this was Tiago Monteiro's only retirement of the 2005 season.. ...
... which are not paid by your medical insurance carrier. Policies are designed to cover injuries and accident-related expenses ... AD&D insurance can be purchased as a supplement to employee optional life insurance. If you die as the result of an accident, ... Accident Insurance: The MetLife Accident Plan can protect you and your family from the potential financial impact of an ... AD&D insurance may also pay all or a portion of your benefit if you are seriously injured in an accident. ...
Patients might be better served by purchasing combined health and life insurance policies and waiving their right to pursue ... If expensive defensive medicine can be avoided, that savings alone could pay for fairly large life insurance policies. Insurers ... The combined policy should encourage the insurer to profit by inexpensively delaying policyholders deaths. A health and life ... Patient, provider and insurer incentives could be realigned by combining health and life insurance, allowing the insurer to use ...
Benefits of Guaranteed Acceptance Whole Life Insurance Policy:. * *Your policy last your whole life Nursing Home life insurance ... It Pays 100% of face value after 2 years - Full Death Benefit paid in first two years for deaths due to an accident). ... Insurance No Medical Exam Life Insurance COPD life insurance Dementia life insurance Funeral Insurance Senior Life Insurance TV ... No Waiting Period Whole Life Insurance Policy. *What is the difference between a term life insurance policy and a whole life ...
Permanent and Universal Life Insurance. Online Rates and Applications, personal local service ... Oregon Online Life Insurance Quotes - OREGON TERM BROKER - Experts on Term, ... Insurance policy needs to be simple and easy, goal oriented. Some finance experts report that a life insurance coverage policy ... Phrase lifestyle insurance plans handles short-term needs. In this kind, just in case the insured suffers any sort of accident ...
As everyone dies sometime, these policies are more expensive than term insurance. In order to make them affordable, insurance ... of decreasing term assurance which pays out a tax free regular income if you are unable to work due to sickness or accident. ... For life insurance especially, the use of trusts is essential. Using a trust places the life policy outside your estate. Why ... 1 - How Life Insurance Works. Ill use both Insurance and Assurance in this podcast. The technical difference between the two ...
Life insurance is a great way to protect your family, not so much as an investment. ... Whole Life Insurance offers pros and cons but for most Americans term life insurance is a better option. ... Typically, term life insurance policies wont cover you after age 65. And once the term expires on a term policy, the premiums ... term life insurance plan even though its less affordable you cover yourself for the short term unlikely event of an accident ...
What is a Rider on a Life Insurance Policy?. When you purchase a life insurance policy, your policys terms and conditions are ... Stroke: A cerebrovascular accident or infarction (death) of brain tissue caused by hemorrhage, embolism, or thrombosis lasting ... This rider is available on both term life insurance and whole life insurance policies. Majority of life insurance companies ... It can be available to both permanent and term life insurance policies. Also, many non medical exam life insurance providers ...
Claim your insurance in a day now with Aflac! ... will be covered with Aflacs personal accident insurance policy ... Accident Insurance. Take advantage of Aflacs accident insurance policy to maintain peace of mind and help pay for emergency ... ACCIDENT - A36000 series. In Arkansas, Policies A36100AR-A36400AR, & A363OFAR. In Idaho, Policies A36100ID-A36400ID, & A363OFID ... In Oregon, Policies A36100OR-A36400OR, & A363OFOR. In Pennsylvania, Policies A36100PA-A36400PA. In Texas, Policies A36100TX- ...
... it is necessary to understand the coverage offered by the policy. Here are some important things to know about health insurance ... it is wrong to believe that your health insurance policy will cover you for accident injuries. Personal accident insurance is a ... Many insurance providers also offer add-on accident cover along with some of the best health insurance policies. If you are not ... While you now know the basics of personal accident insurance, knowing which is the best insurance policy can still be confusing ...
Help pay for costs not covered by your medical insurance with accident insurance. Learn more about how accident insurance works ... Commonly asked questions about accident insurance. What is accident insurance? Accident insurance is designed to pay a benefit ... Can I keep my accident insurance if I leave my job? Yes. You own your Colonial Life accident insurance policy. When your ... Depending on your policy, accident insurance can help cover expenses resulting from your covered accident like:. *Emergency ...
"Accident and Sickness" policy is defined as "blanket accident and health insurance" in New York Insurance Law § 4237(a)(3)(D) ( ... Blanket Accident and Health Insurance Policy. Question Presented:. May the insurer of a blanket accident and health insurance ... Any policy or contract of insurance which combines the coverage of blanket accident insurance and of blanket health insurance ... All benefits under any blanket accident, blanket health or blanket accident and health insurance policy shall be payable to the ...
This report is the result of Timetrics extensive market research covering the personal accident and health insurance industry ... Personal Accident and Health Insurance Policies and Premiums in Qatar to 2017: Market Databook. - Personal Accident and Health ... Personal Accident and Health Insurance Policies and Premiums in Denmark to 2017: Market Databook. - Personal Accident and ... Personal Accident and Health Insurance Policies and Premiums in the Netherlands to 2017: Market Databook. - Personal Accident ...
This report is the result of Timetrics extensive market research covering the personal accident and health insurance industry ... Personal Accident and Health Insurance Policies and Premiums in Latvia to 2017: Market Databook. - Personal Accident and Health ... Personal Accident and Health Insurance Policies and Premiums in Ireland to 2017: Market Databook. - Personal Accident and ... Personal Accident and Health Insurance Policies and Premiums in Estonia to 2017: Market Databook. - Personal Accident and ...
When someone is injured in a car accident the question is always whether their auto or health insurance will pay the medical ... Will My Health Insurance Policy Cover Me in a Car Accident?. Getting into a car accident is a frightening prospect. No matter ... If you are in a car accident and must receive immediate treatment it will be covered by your regular health insurance policy. ... The Role of Car Insurance in a Car Accident. As long as you have Personal Injury Protection on your car insurance the car ...
Accident Insurance Policy Information Accident Policy. While none of us can predict when an accident will occur, we can ... Life Insurance Policy. Life insurance can help provide the ultimate protection for your family, helping to ease financial ... Copyright © 2019 Family Heritage Life Insurance Company, All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy • Terms of Service • Disaster Area ... Intensive Care Policy. Severe illness or injury often strikes without warning and can require a stay in the intensive care unit ...
Buy Personal Accident Insurance policy is an Health Assurance accidental insurance plan from Max Bupa assures best personal ... accident coverage & premium of Personal accidentcare Plan Online in India. ... US IN ONE POLICY?. Yes, you can cover your family residing in India under one policy. Your health insurance policy can be used ... Group Health Insurance Maternity Rider Heartbeat Policy Wording Health Companion Policy Wording Group Criticare Policy Wording ...
Market Databook Personal Accident and Health Insurance Policies and Premiums in Georgia to - Market research report and ... Personal Accident and Health Insurance Policies and Premiums in Georgia to 2020: ... Service Industries»Financial Services»Insurance»Health Personal Accident and Health Insurance Policies and Premiums in Georgia ... Insurance Penetration (% ), 2011-2015. Table 15: Georgian Personal Accident & Health Insurance Policies and Premiums; Insurance ...
Market Databook Personal Accident and Health Insurance Policies and Premiums in Malaysia to - Market research report and ... Personal Accident and Health Insurance Policies and Premiums in Malaysia to 2018: ... Service Industries»Financial Services»Insurance»Health Personal Accident and Health Insurance Policies and Premiums in Malaysia ... Table 1: Insurance Industry Definitions. Table 2: Malaysian Personal Accident & Health Insurance Policies and Premiums; Gross ...
Personal Accident & Health Insurance) in Lebanon to 2021: Market Size, Growth and Forecast Analytics contains detailed ... Insurance General Insurance Health Insurance Insurance Company Reports Life Insurance Property Insurance Reinsurance Auto ... Health Insurance Policies, Premiums, Claims & Expenses (Personal Accident & Health Insurance) in Lebanon to 2021: Market Size, ... Insurance Density (US$ per Capita), 2012 - 2016. Table 23: Lebanese Personal Accident and Health Insurance; Insurance Density ( ...
Apollo Munich Individual Personal Accident Insurance ensures financial stability and extended coverage in case of inpatient ... Our Individual Personal Accident policy offers lifelong renewability i.e there is no maximum cover ceasing age in this policy. ... Individual Personal Accident Insurance ensures the financial stability for you and your family in the event of accident along ... Accident hospitalisation (in-patient) -. If any insured person suffers an accident during the policy period that required ...
Can I Stack Insurance Policies On Top Of Each Other? - Chicago Car Accident Lawyers Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers LLC. ... Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers LLC help victims and their families receive compensation for their injuries in Car Accident and Auto ... Stacking Insurance Policies After An Accident. It depends. Illinois courts do recognize anti-stacking provisions in insurance ... In Illinois underinsured and uninsured motorist accidents, you generally cannot stack insurance policies on top of each other ...
Research Disclosure Policy. Employment and Fellowships. Sitemap. Links to other Resources. Search. Privacy Policy ... Health Insurance, Treatment and Outcomes: Using Auto Accidents as Health Shocks. Joseph J. Doyle Jr.. NBER Working Paper No. ... Published: Doyle Jr., Joseph J. "Health Insurance, Treatment, and Outcomes: Using Auto Accidents as Health Shocks." Review of ... those who have private health insurance but do not have automobile insurance. The medically uninsured are found to receive ...
Research Disclosure Policy. Employment and Fellowships. Sitemap. Links to other Resources. Search. Privacy Policy ... The Effect of Automobile Insurance and Accident Liability Laws in Traffic Fatalities. Alma Cohen, Rajeev Dehejia. NBER Working ... "The Effect Of Automobile Insurance and Accident Liability Laws On Traffic Fatalities," Journal of Law and Economics, 2004, v47( ... This paper investigates the incentive effects of automobile insurance, compulsory insurance laws, and no-fault liability laws ...
... a proposal which is hereby agreed to be the basis of this Policy ... Policy Whereas the Insured has made to SBI General Insurance ... YOUR PERSONAL ACCIDENT INSURANCE POLICY Everything you need to know. PERSONAL ACCIDENT YOUR PERSONAL ACCIDENT INSURANCE POLICY ... PERSONAL ACCIDENT INSURANCE POLICY. Sections 5 to 9 Page 1 of 15 Ref: CAHP2 PERSONAL ACCIDENT INSURANCE POLICY Sections 5 to 9 ... PERSONAL ACCIDENT INSURANCE POLICY PERSONAL ACCIDENT INSURANCE POLICY In consideration of your having paid the premium for the ...
The Accident and Student Trip Travel Policy is a minimal medical policy solely for accidents, providing $5,000 Medical & ... Student Accident and Trip Travel Insurance. Student Accident and Trip Travel Insurance is provided to LSU students at no cost ... Master Accident Policy. Cost. On October 3, 2011, Student Government began paying all insurance cost for departments, student ... General Policy Information. Student Accident and Trip Travel Insurance provides coverage for students attending or ...
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