Accessory Nerve Injuries: Traumatic injuries to the ACCESSORY NERVE. Damage to the nerve may produce weakness in head rotation and shoulder elevation.Accessory Nerve: The 11th cranial nerve which originates from NEURONS in the MEDULLA and in the CERVICAL SPINAL CORD. It has a cranial root, which joins the VAGUS NERVE (10th cranial) and sends motor fibers to the muscles of the LARYNX, and a spinal root, which sends motor fibers to the TRAPEZIUS and the sternocleidomastoid muscles.Accessory Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the eleventh cranial (spinal accessory) nerve. This nerve originates from motor neurons in the lower medulla (accessory portion of nerve) and upper spinal cord (spinal portion of nerve). The two components of the nerve join and exit the skull via the jugular foramen, innervating the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles, which become weak or paralyzed if the nerve is injured. The nerve is commonly involved in MOTOR NEURON DISEASE, and may be injured by trauma to the posterior triangle of the neck.Peripheral Nerve Injuries: Injuries to the PERIPHERAL NERVES.Nerve Transfer: Surgical reinnervation of a denervated peripheral target using a healthy donor nerve and/or its proximal stump. The direct connection is usually made to a healthy postlesional distal portion of a non-functioning nerve or implanted directly into denervated muscle or insensitive skin. Nerve sprouts will grow from the transferred nerve into the denervated elements and establish contact between them and the neurons that formerly controlled another area.Paralysis: A general term most often used to describe severe or complete loss of muscle strength due to motor system disease from the level of the cerebral cortex to the muscle fiber. This term may also occasionally refer to a loss of sensory function. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p45)Neck Dissection: Dissection in the neck to remove all disease tissues including cervical LYMPH NODES and to leave an adequate margin of normal tissue. This type of surgery is usually used in tumors or cervical metastases in the head and neck. The prototype of neck dissection is the radical neck dissection described by Crile in 1906.Shoulder: Part of the body in humans and primates where the arms connect to the trunk. The shoulder has five joints; ACROMIOCLAVICULAR joint, CORACOCLAVICULAR joint, GLENOHUMERAL joint, scapulathoracic joint, and STERNOCLAVICULAR joint.Sciatic Nerve: A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.Neck Muscles: The neck muscles consist of the platysma, splenius cervicis, sternocleidomastoid(eus), longus colli, the anterior, medius, and posterior scalenes, digastric(us), stylohyoid(eus), mylohyoid(eus), geniohyoid(eus), sternohyoid(eus), omohyoid(eus), sternothyroid(eus), and thyrohyoid(eus).Glossopharyngeal Nerve: The 9th cranial nerve. The glossopharyngeal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve; it conveys somatic and autonomic efferents as well as general, special, and visceral afferents. Among the connections are motor fibers to the stylopharyngeus muscle, parasympathetic fibers to the parotid glands, general and taste afferents from the posterior third of the tongue, the nasopharynx, and the palate, and afferents from baroreceptors and CHEMORECEPTOR CELLS of the carotid sinus.Cranial Nerve Injuries: Dysfunction of one or more cranial nerves causally related to a traumatic injury. Penetrating and nonpenetrating CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; NECK INJURIES; and trauma to the facial region are conditions associated with cranial nerve injuries.Scapula: Also called the shoulder blade, it is a flat triangular bone, a pair of which form the back part of the shoulder girdle.Iatrogenic Disease: Any adverse condition in a patient occurring as the result of treatment by a physician, surgeon, or other health professional, especially infections acquired by a patient during the course of treatment.
(1/18) Physical therapy for spinal accessory nerve injury complicated by adhesive capsulitis.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The authors found no literature describing adhesive capsulitis as a consequence of spinal accessory nerve injury and no exercise program or protocol for patients with spinal accessory nerve injury. The purpose of this case report is to describe the management of a patient with adhesive capsulitis and spinal accessory nerve injury following a carotid endarterectomy. CASE DESCRIPTION: The patient was a 67-year-old woman referred for physical therapy following manipulation of the left shoulder and a diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis by her orthopedist. Spinal accessory nerve injury was identified during the initial physical therapy examination, and a program of neuromuscular electrical stimulation was initiated. OUTCOMES: The patient had almost full restoration of the involved muscle function after 5 months of physical therapy. DISCUSSION: This case report illustrates the importance of accurate diagnosis and suggests physical therapy intervention to manage adhesive capsulitis as a consequence of spinal accessory nerve injury.  (+info)

(2/18) Levator scapulae and rhomboid transfer for paralysis of trapezius. The Eden-Lange procedure.

Spinal accessory nerve palsy leads to painful disability of the shoulder, carrying an uncertain prognosis. We reviewed the long-term outcome in 16 patients who were treated for pain, weakness of active elevation and asymmetry of the shoulder and the neck due to chronic paralysis of the trapezius muscle, as a result of nerve palsy. Of four patients who were treated conservatively, none regained satisfactory function, although two became pain-free. The other 12 patients were treated operatively with transfer of the levator scapulae to the acromion and the rhomboid muscles to the infraspinatus fossa (the Eden-Lange procedure). At a mean follow-up of 32 years, the clinical outcome of the operatively treated patients was excellent in nine, fair in two, and poor in one patient, as determined by the Constant score. Pain was adequately relieved in 11 and overhead function was restored in nine patients. Pre-operative electromyography had been carried out in four patients. In two, who eventually had a poor outcome, a concomitant long thoracic and dorsal scapular nerve lesion had been present. The Eden-Lange procedure gives very satisfactory long-term results for the treatment of isolated paralysis of trapezius. In the presence of an additional serratus anterior palsy or weak rhomboid muscles, the procedure is less successful in restoring shoulder function.  (+info)

(3/18) Accessory nerve injury.

This article discusses a Supreme Court judgment involving an injury to the spinal accessory nerve which occurred during the excision of a lymph node mass in the posterior triangle of the neck.1 In this case, the medical practitioner was found to have been negligent for failing to diagnose the nerve injury in the postoperative period, and not for the actual injury to the nerve during the procedure.  (+info)

(4/18) An unusual presentation of whiplash injury: long thoracic and spinal accessory nerve injury.

Whiplash injuries from motor vehicle accidents are very common. The usual presentation and course of this condition normally results in resolution of symptoms within a few weeks. Brachial plexus traction injuries without any bone or joint lesion of the cervical spine have been reported before. We report a case where a gentleman was involved in a rear end vehicle collision, sustained a whiplash injury and was later found to have a long thoracic nerve palsy and spinal accessory nerve palsy. Although isolated injuries of both nerves following a whiplash injury have been reported, combined injury of the two nerves following a whiplash injury is very uncommon and is being reported for the first time.  (+info)

(5/18) Surgical treatment of winged scapula.

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(6/18) Spinal accessory nerve palsy following gunshot injury: a case report.

Injuries to the spinal accessory nerve are rare and mostly iatrogenic. Pain, impaired ability to raise the ipsilateral shoulder, and scapular winging on abduction of the arm are the most frequently noted clinical manifestations. As a seldom case, a 20 year-old male with spinal accessory nerve palsy after penetrating trauma by gunshot was reported. Three months after the injury, he was complaining about left arm pain in abduction to shoulder level and a decreased range of movement. On physical examination, wasting of the left trapezium with loss of nuchal ridge and drooping of the shoulder were found. On neurological examination of the left trapezius and sternomastoid muscles, motor function were 3/5 and wide dysesthesia on the neck, shoulder and arm was present. The bullet entered just above the clavicle and exited from trapezium. Radiological studies were normal, where electromyography (EMG) showed neuropathic changes. Surgical exploration showed the intact nerve lying on its natural course and we performed external neurolysis for decompression. The postoperative period was uneventful. Dysesthesia has diminished slowly. He was transferred to physical rehabilitation unit. In his clinical control after 3 months he had no dysesthesia and neurological examination of the left trapezius and sternomastoid muscles motor function were 4/5. EMG showed recovery in the left spinal accessory nerve.  (+info)

(7/18) Vernet's syndrome caused by large mycotic aneurysm of the extracranial internal carotid artery after acute otitis media--case report.

An 85-year-old man presented with a rare large aneurysm of the extracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) due to acute otitis media manifesting as Vernet's syndrome 2 weeks after the diagnosis of right acute otitis media. Angiography of the right extracranial ICA demonstrated an irregularly shaped large aneurysm with partial thrombosis. The aneurysm was treated by proximal ICA occlusion using endovascular coils. The ICA mycotic aneurysm was triggered by acute otitis media, and induced Vernet's syndrome as a result of direct compression to the jugular foramen. Extracranial ICA aneurysms due to focal infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of lower cranial nerve palsy, although the incidence is thought to be very low.  (+info)

(8/18) Accessory nerve palsy.

After apparently uncomplicated excision of benign lesions in the posterior cervical triangle, two patients had shoulder pain. In one, neck pain and trapezius weakness were not prominent until one month after surgery. Inability to elevate the arm above the horizontal without externally rotating it, and prominent scapular displacement on arm abduction, but not on forward pushing movements, highlighted the trapezius dysfunction and differentiated it from serratus anterior weakness. Spinal accessory nerve lesions should be considered when minor surgical procedures, lymphadenitis, minor trauma, or tumours involved the posterior triangle of the neck.  (+info)

*  Posterior triangle of the neck
Spinal accessory nerve (Cranial Nerve XI) Branches of cervical plexus Roots and trunks of brachial plexus Phrenic nerve (C3,4,5 ... The external jugular vein's superficial location within the posterior triangle also makes it vulnerable to injury. It is also ... belly of omohyoid muscle Anterior Scalene Middle Scalene Posterior Scalene Levator Scapulae Muscle Splenius The accessory nerve ...
*  Accessory nerve disorder
Injury to the spinal accessory nerve can cause an accessory nerve disorder or spinal accessory nerve palsy, which results in ... London J, London NJ, Kay SP (1996). "Iatrogenic accessory nerve injury". Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. 78 ... Medical procedures are the most common cause of injury to the spinal accessory nerve. In particular, radical neck dissection ... For example, during a functional neck dissection that injures the spinal accessory nerve, injury prompts the surgeon to ...
*  Accessory nerve
Injury to the spinal accessory nerve is most commonly caused by medical procedures that involve the head and neck. Injury can ... and accessory nerves. The accessory nerve (top left) travels down through the jugular foramen with the other two nerves, and ... "Is the cranial accessory nerve really a portion of the accessory nerve? Anatomy of the cranial nerves in the jugular foramen". ... One-sided weakness of the trapezius may indicate injury to the nerve on the same side of an injury to the spinal accessory ...
*  Winged scapula
... a winged scapula is also caused by trapezius and rhomboid palsy involving the accessory nerve and the dorsal scapular nerve, ... There are numerous ways in which the long thoracic nerve can sustain trauma-induced injury. These include, but are not limited ... Severe atrophy of the trapezius is seen with accidental damage to the spinal accessory nerve during lymph node biopsy of the ... Clinical treatments may also cause injury to the long thoracic nerve (iatrogenesis from forceful manipulation, mastectomies ...
*  Nerve point of neck
The spinal accessory nerve can often be found 1 cm above Erb's point. Erb's point is formed by the union of the C5 and C6 nerve ... Injury to Erb's point is commonly sustained at birth or from a fall onto the shoulder. The nerve roots normally involved are C5 ... At the nerve trunk, branches of suprascapular nerves and the nerve to the subclavius also merge. The merged nerve divides into ... From here, the accessory nerve courses through the posterior triangle of the neck to enter the anterior border of the trapezius ...
*  Guttural pouch
The glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory and hypoglossal nerves; the sympathetic trunk leaving from the cranial cervical ganglion ... This anatomical adaptation acts to protect friable brain tissue from injury due to overheating. Odd-toed perrisodactyls such as ... also if glossopharyngeal nerve is involved); and Horner's syndrome from the involvement of sympathetic nerves. Involvement of ... The facial nerve is in contact with the dorsal part of the pouch. The external carotid artery passes ventral to the medial ...
*  ICD-10 Chapter XIX: Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes
Injury of abducent nerve (S04.5) Injury of facial nerve (S04.6) Injury of acoustic nerve (S04.7) Injury of accessory nerve ( ... Injury of cranial nerves (S04.0) Injury of optic nerve and pathways (S04.1) Injury of oculomotor nerve (S04.2) Injury of ... Injury of ulnar nerve at upper arm level (S44.1) Injury of median nerve at upper arm level (S44.2) Injury of radial nerve at ... Injury of nerves at wrist and hand level (S64.0) Injury of ulnar nerve at wrist and hand level (S64.1) Injury of median nerve ...
*  Flexor pollicis longus muscle
The anterior interosseous nerve (a branch of the median nerve) and the anterior interosseous artery and vein pass downward on ... An occasionally present accessory long head of the flexor pollicis longus muscle is called 'Gantzer's muscle'. It may cause ... Injuries to tendons are particularly difficult to recover from due to the limited blood supply they receive. The flexor ... The flexor pollicis longus is supplied by the anterior interosseous(C8-T1) branch of the median nerve (C5-T1). Slips may ...
*  Hypoglossal nerve
It then travels close to the vagus nerve and spinal division of the accessory nerve, spirals downwards behind the vagus nerve ... "A case with unilateral hypoglossal nerve injury in branchial cyst surgery". Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve ... The hypoglossal nerve may be connected (anastamosed) to the facial nerve to attempt to restore function when the facial nerve ... Because of the close proximity of the nerve to other structures including nerves, arteries, and veins, it is rare for the nerve ...
*  Teres minor muscle
The suprascapular, axillary, and radial nerves. Teres minor muscle Accessory muscles of the scapula This article incorporates ... There are two types of rotator cuff injuries: acute tears and chronic tears. Acute tears occur as a result of a sudden movement ... A pseudoganglion has no nerve cells but nerve fibres are present. Damage to the fibers innervating the teres minor is ... The nerve should be detected adjacent to the vessel. In an elevated arm position the axillary neurovascular bundle can be seen ...
*  Cranial nerve disease
Facial nerve (VII) (More on facial nerve palsy below) Accessory nerve disorder - Accessory nerve (XI) Pavlou, E., Gkampeta, A ... Recovery rate also depends on the cause of the facial nerve palsy (e.g. infections, perinatal injury, congenital dysplastic). ... Eyes Oculomotor nerve palsy - Oculomotor nerve (III) Fourth nerve palsy - Trochlear nerve (IV) Sixth nerve palsy - Abducens ... The facial nerve is the seventh of 12 cranial nerves. This cranial nerve controls the muscles in the face. Facial nerve palsy ...
*  Diastematomyelia
Tethering may also develop after spinal cord injury and scar tissue can block the flow of fluids around the spinal cord. Fluid ... Each hemicord contains a central canal, one dorsal horn (giving rise to a dorsal nerve root), and one ventral horn (giving rise ... Diastematomyelia is a "dysraphic state" of unknown embryonic origin, but is probably initiated by an accessory neurenteric ... is a true duplication of spinal cord in which these are two dural sacs with two pairs of anterior and posterior nerve roots. ...
*  Phrenic nerve
The accessory phrenic nerve connects to the phrenic nerve in the thorax or the root of the neck. In canines the phrenic nerve ... Brachial plexus injuries can cause paralysis to various regions in the arm, forearm, and hand depending on the severed nerves. ... The contribution of the 5th cervical nerve may stem from an accessory phrenic nerve. Phrenic nerve in its early course close to ... If the accessory phrenic nerve is present, it lies lateral to the main nerve and descends posterior and occasionally inferior ...
*  Pectoralis major muscle
... and less energetic injuries. The injury is characterized by sudden and acute pain in the chest wall and shoulder area, bruising ... and exit the medial cord as the medial pectoral nerve. The medial pectoral nerve then communicates the action potential across ... Sternalis - an accessory muscle found in some individuals that may have embryonic origin from the pectoralis major. Tra ... The pectoralis major receives dual motor innervation by the medial pectoral nerve and the lateral pectoral nerve, also known as ...
*  Cranial nerves
... accessory nerve (XI), and hypoglossal nerve (XII). (There may be a thirteenth cranial nerve, the terminal nerve (nerve O or N ... and injury to nerves during neurosurgery (such as tumor removal) are other possible causes of cranial nerve damage. The Graeco- ... the optic nerve (II), oculomotor nerve (III), trochlear nerve (IV), trigeminal nerve (V), abducens nerve (VI), facial nerve ( ... the accessory nerve (XI) and hypoglossal nerve (XII) do not exist, with the accessory nerve (XI) being an integral part of the ...
*  Neck
In addition to nerves coming from and within the human spine, the accessory nerve and vagus nerve both cranial nerves, travel ... strained muscle or other soft tissue injury Cervical herniated disc Cervical spinal stenosis Osteoarthritis Vascular sources of ... The eleventh or spinal accessory nerve corresponds to a line drawn from a point midway between the angle of the jaw and the ... Sensation to the front areas of the neck comes from the roots of nerves C2-4, and at the back of the neck from the roots of C4- ...
*  Human body
Nerves connect the spinal cord and brain to the rest of the body. All major bones, muscles, and nerves in the body are named, ... arise as the result of injury or trauma, or have a number of different mechanisms or provoking factors. As life expectancy ... with the exception of anatomical variations such as sesamoid bones and accessory muscles. Blood vessels carry blood throughout ... The nervous system receives information from the body, and transmits this to the brain via nerve impulses and neurotransmitters ...
*  Nav1.8
VGSCs have been shown to increase in density after nerve injury. Therefore, VGSCs can be modulated by many different ... causes the upregulation of Nav1.8 in sensory neurons via the accessory protein p11 (annexin II light chain). It has been shown ... "Na+ Channel lmmunolocalization in Peripheral Mammalian Axons and Changes following Nerve Injury and Neuroma Formation". The ... Therefore, nociceptors are easily sensitised by agents such as bradykinin and nerve growth factor, which are released at the ...
*  Anconeus muscle
... or any injury that damages the radial nerve. Harm inflicted upon the radial nerve through these mechanisms can paralyze the ... will affect this particular accessory muscle. Heterotopic ossification can result from certain trauma as it is an abnormal ... from the posterior cord of the brachial plexus called the nerve to the anconeus. The somatomotor portion of radial nerve ... Trauma to the nerve supply of the anconeus muscle can usually result from a shoulder dislocation or fractures of the upper part ...
*  Auricle (anatomy)
Cutaneous sensation to these areas is via the trigeminal nerve, the attendant nerve of the 1st branchial arch. The final three ... En route accessory auricles (also known as preauricular tags) may be left behind. The first three hillocks are derived from the ... There are various visible ear abnormalities: traumatic injury infection wart, mole, birthmark scars, including keloids cyst ... These portions of the ear are supplied by the cervical plexus and a small portion by the facial nerve. This explains why ...
*  Tarbosaurus
... differing only in the positions of some cranial nerve roots, including the trigeminal and accessory nerves. Tyrannosaurid ... Hand injuries, by contrast, are more likely to be obtained while in contact with struggling prey. The presence of stress ... as were the optic nerve and the oculomotor nerve, which controls eye movement. Unlike Tyrannosaurus, which had forward-facing ... The nerve had a well-developed vestibular component as well, which implies a good sense of balance and coordination. In ...
*  Local anesthetic nerve block
"Common Regional Nerve Blocks" (PDF). UWHC Acute Pain Service. Retrieved 8 August 2017. David Hardman. "Nerve Injury After ... will be blocked so this block should only be done on patients who have use of their accessory respiratory muscles. The block ... Local anesthetic nerve block (local anesthetic regional nerve blockade, or often simply nerve block) is a short-term nerve ... The local anesthetic bathes the nerve and numbs the area of the body that is innervated by that nerve. The goal of the nerve ...
*  Facial motor nucleus
The facial motor nucleus is a collection of neurons in the brainstem that belong to the facial nerve (cranial nerve VII). These ... the spinal accessory nucleus. Like all lower motor neurons, cells of the facial motor nucleus receive cortical input from the ... a lower motor neuron lesion to the facial motor nucleus results in paralysis of facial muscles on the same side of the injury. ... The cranial nerve nuclei schematically represented; dorsal view. Motor nuclei in red; sensory in blue. Nuclei of origin of ...
*  Middle meningeal artery
A head injury (e.g., from a road traffic accident or sports injury) is required to rupture the artery. Emergency treatment ... The course and connections of the facial nerve in the temporal bone. Human brain dura mater This article incorporates text in ... In approximately half of subjects it branches into an accessory meningeal artery. Very rarely the ophthalmic artery may arise ... It is vulnerable to injury at this point, where the skull is thin. Rupture of the artery may give rise to an epidural hematoma ...
*  Bradshaw Lecture
Heath, C. (1892). "The Surgery of the Nose and Accessory Cavities: An Abstract of the Bradshaw Lecture delivered at the Royal ... Marshall, J. (1883). "Bradshaw Lecture on Nerve-Stretching for the Relief or Cure of Pain". BMJ. 2: 1173-9. doi:10.1136/bmj. ... 1916 Charters James Symonds, Laminectomy in Gunshot Injuries of the Spinal Cord 1915 Sir Anthony Bowlby, Wounds in War 1914 Sir ... Makins, G. H. (1913). "The Bradshaw Lecture ON GUNSHOT INJURIES OF THE ARTERIES: Delivered before the Royal College of Surgeons ...
*  Spinal cord
Nerve rootlets combine to form nerve roots. Likewise, sensory nerve rootlets form off right and left dorsal lateral sulci and ... More severe injuries may result in paraplegia, tetraplegia (also known as quadriplegia), or full body paralysis below the site ... From above T1, proprioceptive primary axons enter the spinal cord and ascend ipsilaterally until reaching the accessory cuneate ... It is made of 31 segments from which branch one pair of sensory nerve roots and one pair of motor nerve roots. The nerve roots ...
What are the indications for an Eden-Lange procedure to treat a spinal accessory nerve (SAN) injury?  What are the indications for an Eden-Lange procedure to treat a spinal accessory nerve (SAN) injury?
A time interval of over 20 months after SAN injury Failed surgical reconstruction of the SAN Delayed diagnosis of a spontaneous ... Accessory Nerve Injury Q&A What are the indications for an Eden-Lange procedure to treat a spinal accessory nerve (SAN) injury? ... Lateral pectoral nerve transfer for spinal accessory nerve injury. J Neurosurg Spine. 2017 Jan. 26 (1):112-5. [Medline]. ... Ultrasonography of the accessory nerve: normal and pathologic findings in cadavers and patients with iatrogenic accessory nerve ...
more infohttps://www.medscape.com/answers/1298684-124499/what-are-the-indications-for-an-eden-lange-procedure-to-treat-a-spinal-accessory-nerve-san-injury
Accessory nerve disorder - Wikipedia  Accessory nerve disorder - Wikipedia
Injury to the spinal accessory nerve can cause an accessory nerve disorder or spinal accessory nerve palsy, which results in ... London J, London NJ, Kay SP (1996). "Iatrogenic accessory nerve injury". Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. 78 ... Medical procedures are the most common cause of injury to the spinal accessory nerve. In particular, radical neck dissection ... For example, during a functional neck dissection that injures the spinal accessory nerve, injury prompts the surgeon to ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessory_nerve_disorder
Clinical implications of scapular dyskinesis in shoulder injury: the 2013 consensus statement from the scapular summit |...  Clinical implications of scapular dyskinesis in shoulder injury: the 2013 consensus statement from the 'scapular summit' |...
Neurological causes include cervical radiculopathy, long thoracic or spinal accessory nerve palsy. Soft tissue mechanisms for ... In cases of nerve injury, fracture, AC separation or muscle detachment, the injury creates the dyskinesis which affects ... Superior labral injuries. A high incidence of association of scapular dyskinesis with labral injuries has been described.63 ,64 ... fatigue or nerve injury, and is usually treated by rehabilitation.11 In addition to the altered scapular position, abnormal ...
more infohttp://bjsm.bmj.com/content/47/14/877
PPT - The Cranial Nerves XI-XII Accessory  Nerve and Hypoglossal Nerve PowerPoint Presentation - ID:1863308  PPT - The Cranial Nerves XI-XII Accessory Nerve and Hypoglossal Nerve PowerPoint Presentation - ID:1863308
List the nuclei related to accessory and hypoglossal nerves in the brain stem. Slideshow 1863308 by sai ... The Cranial Nerves XI-XII Accessory Nerve and Hypoglossal Nerve. Dr. Zeenat Zaidi Dr . Essam Eldin Salama. Objectives . At the ... Functional and Structural Repair of Peripheral Nerve Injury by Adipose-Derived Stem Cells: An Experimental Study ... The Cranial Nerves XI-XII Accessory Nerve and Hypoglossal Nerve - PowerPoint PPT Presentation. ...
more infohttps://www.slideserve.com/sai/the-cranial-nerves-xi-xii-accessory-nerve-and-hypoglossal-nerve
Inhibition of the potassium channel KCa3.1 by senicapoc reverses tactile allodynia in rats with peripheral nerve injury -...  Inhibition of the potassium channel KCa3.1 by senicapoc reverses tactile allodynia in rats with peripheral nerve injury -...
In order to evaluate the role of KCa3.1 in the maintenance of mechanical allodynia following peripheral nerve injury, we used ... Inhibition of the potassium channel KCa3.1 by senicapoc reverses tactile allodynia in rats with peripheral nerve injury. ... In vivo, senicapoc showed high CNS penetrance and when administered to rats with peripheral nerve injury, it significantly ... KCa3.1 inhibitor senicapoc is effective at reducing mechanical hypersensitivity in a rodent model of peripheral nerve injury. ...
more infohttp://sophion.com/publications/inhibition-potassium-channel-kca3-1-senicapoc-reverses-tactile-allodynia-rats-peripheral-nerve-injury/
Left Shoulder Pain: Causes, Diagnosis and Treatment  Left Shoulder Pain: Causes, Diagnosis and Treatment
Actually, the simple act of rolling over in bed can cause a cuff injury, an injury to one or more of the four muscles and ... Such pain is also associated with nerves in the joints or spinal region. ... Accessories *Cords *Document Holders *Ergonomic Foot Pedals , Computer Foot Switches *Heating Solutions ... An injury to the rotator cuff on the left side of the body could cause left shoulder pain. The wrong sort of movement in the ...
more infohttp://www.ergonomicsmadeeasy.com/left-shoulder-pain-causes-diagnosis-and-treatment/
Iatrogenic injury to the accessory nerve.  Iatrogenic injury to the accessory nerve.
Accessory Nerve: injuries, Accessory Nerve: anatomy & histology, Suture Techniques, Electromyography, Humans, Iatrogenic ... Accessory Nerve: injuries,Accessory Nerve: anatomy & histology,Suture Techniques,Electromyography,Humans,Iatrogenic Disease, ... Iatrogenic injury to the accessory nerve.. Bostrom, Daniella and Dahlin, Lars LU (2007) In Scandinavian Journal of Plastic and ... The incidence of such nerve injuries during lymph node biopsies is 3%-10%, but the diagnosis is often delayed. Symptoms are ...
more infohttps://lup.lub.lu.se/search/publication/541098
Same modality nerve reconstruction for accessory nerve injuries  Same modality nerve reconstruction for accessory nerve injuries
In this article, two clinical cases are presented where accessory nerve injuries are repaired with either a motor nerve ... These cases provide a stimulus to consider the use of motor nerve grafts or transfers in the repair of motor nerve deficits. ... such as the medial antebrachial cutaneous or the sural nerve. The practice of using sensory grafts to repair motor nerve ... The standard repair of a nerve gap under tension is to use a sensory autograft, ...
more infohttps://insights.ovid.com/othns/200812000/00006372-200812000-00020
What is the role of electrodiagnostic test in the management of a spinal accessory nerve (SAN) injury?  What is the role of electrodiagnostic test in the management of a spinal accessory nerve (SAN) injury?
Electrodiagnostic tests can be used in the management of SAN injury as follows: To monitor upper trapezius recovery of function ... Accessory Nerve Injury Q&A What is the role of electrodiagnostic test in the management of a spinal accessory nerve (SAN) ... Lateral pectoral nerve transfer for spinal accessory nerve injury. J Neurosurg Spine. 2017 Jan. 26 (1):112-5. [Medline]. ... Ultrasonography of the accessory nerve: normal and pathologic findings in cadavers and patients with iatrogenic accessory nerve ...
more infohttps://www.medscape.com/answers/1298684-124479/what-is-the-role-of-electrodiagnostic-test-in-the-management-of-a-spinal-accessory-nerve-san-injury
Patient outcome after surgical management of the spinal accessory nerve injury: A long-term follow-up study  Patient outcome after surgical management of the spinal accessory nerve injury: A long-term follow-up study
... having surgery to correct spinal accessory nerve injury. Neurolysis was the procedure in 24 cases, direct nerve repair for 9 ... A lesion in the spinal accessory nerve is typically iatrogenic: related to lymph node biopsy or excision. This injury may cause ... Patient outcome after surgical management of the spinal accessory nerve injury: A long-term follow-up study. Göransson, Harry; ... patients, and nerve grafting for 4. Time elapsed between the injury and the surgical operation ranged from 2 to 120 months. The ...
more infohttp://tampub.uta.fi/handle/10024/100218
Spinal Accessory Nerve Injury Induced by Manipulation Therapy: A Case Report  Spinal Accessory Nerve Injury Induced by Manipulation Therapy: A Case Report
Keywords: Spinal accessory nerve; Manipulation INTRODUCTION. Spinal accessory nerve (SAN) injury mostly occurs during surgical ... radial nerve on spiral groove, brachial plexus, and SAN [9]. Phrenic nerve injury and long thoracic nerve injury following ... Spinal accessory nerve (SAN) injury mostly occurs during surgical procedures. SAN injury caused by manipulation therapy has ... Accessory nerve palsies. Pract Neurol 2010;10:191-4. 4. Porter P, Fernandez GN. Stretch-induced spinal accessory nerve palsy: a ...
more infohttps://www.e-arm.org/journal/view.php?number=4043&viewtype=pubreader
2019 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code S04.70XA: Injury of accessory nerve, unspecified side, initial encounter  2019 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code S04.70XA: Injury of accessory nerve, unspecified side, initial encounter
Injury of accessory nerve. 2016 2017 2018 2019 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code Applicable To*Injury of 11th cranial nerve ... Injury to accessory nerve. ICD-10-CM S04.70XA is grouped within Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v36.0): *073 Cranial and ... Injury of accessory nerve, unspecified side, initial encounter. 2016 2017 2018 2019 Billable/Specific Code *S04.70XA is a ... Short description: Injury of accessory nerve, unspecified side, init encntr. *The 2019 edition of ICD-10-CM S04.70XA became ...
more infohttps://www.icd10data.com/ICD10CM/Codes/S00-T88/S00-S09/S04-/S04.70XA
ICD-10 Diagnosis Code S04.71XS Injury of accessory nerve, right side, sequela  ICD-10 Diagnosis Code S04.71XS Injury of accessory nerve, right side, sequela
Short Description: Injury of accessory nerve, right side, sequela Long Description: Injury of accessory nerve, right side, ... Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00-T98) * Injuries to the head (S00-S09) *Injury of ... There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. Some are the result of ... Your peripheral nerves are the ones outside your brain and spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve ...
more infohttp://icdlist.com/icd-10/s0471xs
Search of: senior [AGE-GROUP] AND exercise [TREATMENT] | Recruiting, Not yet recruiting, Available Studies - List Results -...  Search of: senior [AGE-GROUP] AND exercise [TREATMENT] | Recruiting, Not yet recruiting, Available Studies - List Results -...
Accessory Nerve Injury. *Fatigue. *Behavioral: Therapeutic Exercise. *Behavioral: Therapeutic + Lower Body Exercise ... Change of Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) over time. 60. All. 50 Years to 85 Years (Adult, Senior). ... Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) assessed by direct microneurography. *Peak Oxygen Uptake (Peak VO2) assessed by gas ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?term=senior+%5BAGE-GROUP%5D+AND+exercise+%5BTREATMENT%5D&recr=Open&show_rss=Y
Search of: senior [AGE-GROUP] AND exercise [TREATMENT] | Recruiting, Not yet recruiting, Available Studies - List Results -...  Search of: senior [AGE-GROUP] AND exercise [TREATMENT] | Recruiting, Not yet recruiting, Available Studies - List Results -...
Accessory Nerve Injury. *Fatigue. *Behavioral: Therapeutic Exercise. *Behavioral: Therapeutic + Lower Body Exercise ... Change of Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) over time. 60. All. 50 Years to 85 Years (Adult, Senior). ... Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) assessed by direct microneurography. *Peak Oxygen Uptake (Peak VO2) assessed by gas ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?term=senior+%5BAGE-GROUP%5D+AND+exercise+%5BTREATMENT%5D&recr=Open&show_down=Y
Peripheral Nerve Injury | Johns Hopkins Medicine Health Library  Peripheral Nerve Injury | Johns Hopkins Medicine Health Library
Peripheral nerve injury can be caused by accidents or trauma, and may be mild or severe. In some cases, surgery is necessary to ... Spinal Accessory Nerve Injury. One particular type of peripheral nerve damage is spinal accessory nerve injury. The spinal ... What causes peripheral nerve injury?. Injury to the peripheral nerve network can happen through:. * Laceration (a cut or tear ... Doctors are likely to recommend physical therapy for mild spinal accessory nerve injury. Surgery may be needed for more severe ...
more infohttps://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/healthlibrary/conditions/adult/nervous_system_disorders/Peripheral_Nerve_Injury_22,PeripheralNerveInjury
Timothy D. Steege, M.D. | Seattle, WA  Timothy D. Steege, M.D. | Seattle, WA
Accessory Nerve Injury. *Acoustic Neurofibromatosis. *Acoustic Neuroma. *Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating ... Sexually Transmitted Diseases Urinary Tract Infection Foot Pain Ankle Injury Hip Pain Knee Pain View More ...
more infohttps://www.swedish.org/swedish-physicians/profile.aspx?name=timothy+d+steege&id=160292
Charles S. Cobbs, M.D. | Seattle, WA  Charles S. Cobbs, M.D. | Seattle, WA
Accessory Nerve Injury. *Acoustic Neurofibromatosis. *Acoustic Neuroma. *Acromegaly. *Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating ... Sexually Transmitted Diseases Urinary Tract Infection Foot Pain Ankle Injury Hip Pain Knee Pain View More ...
more infohttps://www.swedish.org/swedish-physicians/profile.aspx?name=charles+s+cobbs&id=158622
Impingement of spinal cord - New Doctor Insights  Impingement of spinal cord - New Doctor Insights
Neuroforaminal narrowing suggest that the nerve root exiting that foramen may be getting "pinched". Follow up with your doctor. ... Are spinal accessory nerve injuries sometimes confused for impingement syndrome? Dr. Walter Husar Dr. Husar ... Spinal cord injury: Is an injury to the actual cord of portions of neurons that extend from the base of your brain down the ... Numbness, paralysis: Spinal cord injury affects the function of things below the site of the injury. There is a direct ...
more infohttps://www.healthtap.com/topics/impingement-of-spinal-cord
Collection : Visual Vignettes : American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation  Collection : Visual Vignettes : American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
Ultrasound Imaging of the Accessory Nerve Injury in a Patient with Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Polyneuropathy. ... Peroneus Longus Strain Injury Associated with Common Peroneal Nerve Palsy in a Soccer Player. Jellad, Anis; Nouira, Asma; Zrig ... Injury of the Oculomotor Nerve After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Diffusion Tensor Tractography Study. Seo, You Sung; ... Ultrasound Imaging in the Management of a Rare Superficial Fibular Nerve Injury. Ata, Ayse Merve; Kara, Murat; Özçakar, Levent ...
more infohttp://journals.lww.com/ajpmr/pages/collectiondetails.aspx?TopicalCollectionID=4
  • Interruption of the nerve supply to the sternocleidomastoid muscle results in an asymmetric neckline, while weakness of the trapezius muscle can produce a drooping shoulder, winged scapula, and a weakness of forward elevation of the shoulder. (wikipedia.org)
  • In patients with damage to the spinal accessory nerve, shoulder elevation will be diminished, and the patient will be incapable of raising the shoulders against the examiner's resistance. (wikipedia.org)
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