Accessory Nerve: The 11th cranial nerve which originates from NEURONS in the MEDULLA and in the CERVICAL SPINAL CORD. It has a cranial root, which joins the VAGUS NERVE (10th cranial) and sends motor fibers to the muscles of the LARYNX, and a spinal root, which sends motor fibers to the TRAPEZIUS and the sternocleidomastoid muscles.Accessory Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the eleventh cranial (spinal accessory) nerve. This nerve originates from motor neurons in the lower medulla (accessory portion of nerve) and upper spinal cord (spinal portion of nerve). The two components of the nerve join and exit the skull via the jugular foramen, innervating the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles, which become weak or paralyzed if the nerve is injured. The nerve is commonly involved in MOTOR NEURON DISEASE, and may be injured by trauma to the posterior triangle of the neck.Accessory Nerve Injuries: Traumatic injuries to the ACCESSORY NERVE. Damage to the nerve may produce weakness in head rotation and shoulder elevation.Optic Nerve Diseases: Conditions which produce injury or dysfunction of the second cranial or optic nerve, which is generally considered a component of the central nervous system. Damage to optic nerve fibers may occur at or near their origin in the retina, at the optic disk, or in the nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract, or lateral geniculate nuclei. Clinical manifestations may include decreased visual acuity and contrast sensitivity, impaired color vision, and an afferent pupillary defect.Olfactory Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the first cranial (olfactory) nerve, which usually feature anosmia or other alterations in the sense of smell and taste. Anosmia may be associated with NEOPLASMS; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; inherited conditions; toxins; METABOLIC DISEASES; tobacco abuse; and other conditions. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp229-31)Vagus Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the tenth cranial nerve, including brain stem lesions involving its nuclei (solitary, ambiguus, and dorsal motor), nerve fascicles, and intracranial and extracranial course. Clinical manifestations may include dysphagia, vocal cord weakness, and alterations of parasympathetic tone in the thorax and abdomen.Nerve Transfer: Surgical reinnervation of a denervated peripheral target using a healthy donor nerve and/or its proximal stump. The direct connection is usually made to a healthy postlesional distal portion of a non-functioning nerve or implanted directly into denervated muscle or insensitive skin. Nerve sprouts will grow from the transferred nerve into the denervated elements and establish contact between them and the neurons that formerly controlled another area.Paralysis: A general term most often used to describe severe or complete loss of muscle strength due to motor system disease from the level of the cerebral cortex to the muscle fiber. This term may also occasionally refer to a loss of sensory function. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p45)Hypoglossal Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the twelfth cranial (hypoglossal) nerve or nuclei. The nuclei and fascicles of the nerve are located in the medulla, and the nerve exits the skull via the hypoglossal foramen and innervates the muscles of the tongue. Lower brain stem diseases, including ischemia and MOTOR NEURON DISEASES may affect the nuclei or nerve fascicles. The nerve may also be injured by diseases of the posterior fossa or skull base. Clinical manifestations include unilateral weakness of tongue musculature and lingual dysarthria, with deviation of the tongue towards the side of weakness upon attempted protrusion.Neck Dissection: Dissection in the neck to remove all disease tissues including cervical LYMPH NODES and to leave an adequate margin of normal tissue. This type of surgery is usually used in tumors or cervical metastases in the head and neck. The prototype of neck dissection is the radical neck dissection described by Crile in 1906.Vestibulocochlear Nerve Diseases: Pathological processes of the VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE, including the branches of COCHLEAR NERVE and VESTIBULAR NERVE. Common examples are VESTIBULAR NEURITIS, cochlear neuritis, and ACOUSTIC NEUROMA. Clinical signs are varying degree of HEARING LOSS; VERTIGO; and TINNITUS.Shoulder: Part of the body in humans and primates where the arms connect to the trunk. The shoulder has five joints; ACROMIOCLAVICULAR joint, CORACOCLAVICULAR joint, GLENOHUMERAL joint, scapulathoracic joint, and STERNOCLAVICULAR joint.Neck Muscles: The neck muscles consist of the platysma, splenius cervicis, sternocleidomastoid(eus), longus colli, the anterior, medius, and posterior scalenes, digastric(us), stylohyoid(eus), mylohyoid(eus), geniohyoid(eus), sternohyoid(eus), omohyoid(eus), sternothyroid(eus), and thyrohyoid(eus).Glossopharyngeal Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the ninth cranial (glossopharyngeal) nerve or its nuclei in the medulla. The nerve may be injured by diseases affecting the lower brain stem, floor of the posterior fossa, jugular foramen, or the nerve's extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include loss of sensation from the pharynx, decreased salivation, and syncope. Glossopharyngeal neuralgia refers to a condition that features recurrent unilateral sharp pain in the tongue, angle of the jaw, external auditory meatus and throat that may be associated with SYNCOPE. Episodes may be triggered by cough, sneeze, swallowing, or pressure on the tragus of the ear. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1390)Glossopharyngeal Nerve: The 9th cranial nerve. The glossopharyngeal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve; it conveys somatic and autonomic efferents as well as general, special, and visceral afferents. Among the connections are motor fibers to the stylopharyngeus muscle, parasympathetic fibers to the parotid glands, general and taste afferents from the posterior third of the tongue, the nasopharynx, and the palate, and afferents from baroreceptors and CHEMORECEPTOR CELLS of the carotid sinus.Onchocerciasis, Ocular: Filarial infection of the eyes transmitted from person to person by bites of Onchocerca volvulus-infected black flies. The microfilariae of Onchocerca are thus deposited beneath the skin. They migrate through various tissues including the eye. Those persons infected have impaired vision and up to 20% are blind. The incidence of eye lesions has been reported to be as high as 30% in Central America and parts of Africa.Trigeminal Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the trigeminal nerve or its nuclei, which are located in the pons and medulla. The nerve is composed of three divisions: ophthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular, which provide sensory innervation to structures of the face, sinuses, and portions of the cranial vault. The mandibular nerve also innervates muscles of mastication. Clinical features include loss of facial and intra-oral sensation and weakness of jaw closure. Common conditions affecting the nerve include brain stem ischemia, INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS, and TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA.Facial Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the facial nerve or nuclei. Pontine disorders may affect the facial nuclei or nerve fascicle. The nerve may be involved intracranially, along its course through the petrous portion of the temporal bone, or along its extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include facial muscle weakness, loss of taste from the anterior tongue, hyperacusis, and decreased lacrimation.Scapula: Also called the shoulder blade, it is a flat triangular bone, a pair of which form the back part of the shoulder girdle.Thoracic Nerves: The twelve spinal nerves on each side of the thorax. They include eleven INTERCOSTAL NERVES and one subcostal nerve. Both sensory and motor, they supply the muscles and skin of the thoracic and abdominal walls.Iatrogenic Disease: Any adverse condition in a patient occurring as the result of treatment by a physician, surgeon, or other health professional, especially infections acquired by a patient during the course of treatment.Neck: The part of a human or animal body connecting the HEAD to the rest of the body.Abducens Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the sixth cranial (abducens) nerve or its nucleus in the pons. The nerve may be injured along its course in the pons, intracranially as it travels along the base of the brain, in the cavernous sinus, or at the level of superior orbital fissure or orbit. Dysfunction of the nerve causes lateral rectus muscle weakness, resulting in horizontal diplopia that is maximal when the affected eye is abducted and ESOTROPIA. Common conditions associated with nerve injury include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ISCHEMIA; and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.Trochlear Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the fourth cranial (trochlear) nerve or its nucleus in the midbrain. The nerve crosses as it exits the midbrain dorsally and may be injured along its course through the intracranial space, cavernous sinus, superior orbital fissure, or orbit. Clinical manifestations include weakness of the superior oblique muscle which causes vertical DIPLOPIA that is maximal when the affected eye is adducted and directed inferiorly. Head tilt may be seen as a compensatory mechanism for diplopia and rotation of the visual axis. Common etiologies include CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.Whiplash Injuries: Hyperextension injury to the neck, often the result of being struck from behind by a fast-moving vehicle, in an automobile accident. (From Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Shoulder Pain: Unilateral or bilateral pain of the shoulder. It is often caused by physical activities such as work or sports participation, but may also be pathologic in origin.Brachial Plexus Neuropathies: Diseases of the cervical (and first thoracic) roots, nerve trunks, cords, and peripheral nerve components of the BRACHIAL PLEXUS. Clinical manifestations include regional pain, PARESTHESIA; MUSCLE WEAKNESS, and decreased sensation (HYPESTHESIA) in the upper extremity. These disorders may be associated with trauma (including BIRTH INJURIES); THORACIC OUTLET SYNDROME; NEOPLASMS; NEURITIS; RADIOTHERAPY; and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1351-2)Brachial Plexus: The large network of nerve fibers which distributes the innervation of the upper extremity. The brachial plexus extends from the neck into the axilla. In humans, the nerves of the plexus usually originate from the lower cervical and the first thoracic spinal cord segments (C5-C8 and T1), but variations are not uncommon.Shoulder Joint: The articulation between the head of the HUMERUS and the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA.Oculomotor Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the oculomotor nerve or nucleus that result in weakness or paralysis of the superior rectus, inferior rectus, medial rectus, inferior oblique, or levator palpebrae muscles, or impaired parasympathetic innervation to the pupil. With a complete oculomotor palsy, the eyelid will be paralyzed, the eye will be in an abducted and inferior position, and the pupil will be markedly dilated. Commonly associated conditions include neoplasms, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, ischemia (especially in association with DIABETES MELLITUS), and aneurysmal compression. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p270)Optic Neuritis: Inflammation of the optic nerve. Commonly associated conditions include autoimmune disorders such as MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, infections, and granulomatous diseases. Clinical features include retro-orbital pain that is aggravated by eye movement, loss of color vision, and contrast sensitivity that may progress to severe visual loss, an afferent pupillary defect (Marcus-Gunn pupil), and in some instances optic disc hyperemia and swelling. Inflammation may occur in the portion of the nerve within the globe (neuropapillitis or anterior optic neuritis) or the portion behind the globe (retrobulbar neuritis or posterior optic neuritis).Cranial Nerve Diseases: Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.Sciatic Nerve: A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.Nodose Ganglion: The inferior (caudal) ganglion of the vagus (10th cranial) nerve. The unipolar nodose ganglion cells are sensory cells with central projections to the medulla and peripheral processes traveling in various branches of the vagus nerve.Muscular Atrophy: Derangement in size and number of muscle fibers occurring with aging, reduction in blood supply, or following immobilization, prolonged weightlessness, malnutrition, and particularly in denervation.Peripheral Nerves: The nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord, including the autonomic, cranial, and spinal nerves. Peripheral nerves contain non-neuronal cells and connective tissue as well as axons. The connective tissue layers include, from the outside to the inside, the epineurium, the perineurium, and the endoneurium.
(1/6) Physical therapy for spinal accessory nerve injury complicated by adhesive capsulitis.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The authors found no literature describing adhesive capsulitis as a consequence of spinal accessory nerve injury and no exercise program or protocol for patients with spinal accessory nerve injury. The purpose of this case report is to describe the management of a patient with adhesive capsulitis and spinal accessory nerve injury following a carotid endarterectomy. CASE DESCRIPTION: The patient was a 67-year-old woman referred for physical therapy following manipulation of the left shoulder and a diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis by her orthopedist. Spinal accessory nerve injury was identified during the initial physical therapy examination, and a program of neuromuscular electrical stimulation was initiated. OUTCOMES: The patient had almost full restoration of the involved muscle function after 5 months of physical therapy. DISCUSSION: This case report illustrates the importance of accurate diagnosis and suggests physical therapy intervention to manage adhesive capsulitis as a consequence of spinal accessory nerve injury.  (+info)

(2/6) Occupational therapy for accessory nerve palsy after radical neck dissection.

The subjects in this study were ten patients with accessory nerve palsy after radical neck dissection. All the primary diseases that accounted for radical neck dissection were malignant tumors located at the head or neck. Every patient received occupational therapy and underwent evaluations before and after the therapy. The data we collected included the existence of resting pain and motion pain, and the active and passive range of motion during shoulder flexion and abduction. The occupational therapy programs were not adequately effective for resting and motion pain, however, every patient gained independence for activities of daily living and housekeeping activities. The occupational therapy significantly improved the patient's shoulder elevation in all movements; although, the active abduction was always significantly poor compared with flexion. In the meantime, there were no significant differences between passive shoulder flexion and abduction at all times. We can therefore understand that the accessory nerve palsy especially affects active shoulder abduction induced by the trapezius paralysis. Occupational therapy is an effective treatment for the improvement of shoulder function, however, the occupational therapy has limited effectiveness for coping with the pain.  (+info)

(3/6) Ultrasonography of the accessory nerve: normal and pathologic findings in cadavers and patients with iatrogenic accessory nerve palsy.

OBJECTIVE: To determine feasibility of ultrasonography in detecting the normal accessory nerve as well as pathologic changes in cases of accessory nerve palsy. METHODS: Four patients with accessory nerve palsy were investigated by ultrasonography. Three cases of accessory nerve palsy after lymph node biopsy and neck dissection were primarily diagnosed on the basis of ultrasonography using a 5- to 12-MHz linear transducer. In addition, we performed ultrasonography in 3 cadaveric specimens to show the feasibility of detecting the accessory nerve. RESULT: Nerve transection (n = 2), scar tissue (n = 1), and atrophy of the trapezius muscle (n = 4) were confirmed by electroneurographic testing and surgical nerve inspection. In 1 case in which a patient had a whiplash injury with accessory nerve palsy, ultrasonography showed atrophy of the trapezius muscle with a normal nerve appearance. CONCLUSIONS: Ultrasonography allows visualization of the normal accessory nerve as well as changes after accessory nerve palsy.  (+info)

(4/6) Schwannoma of the spinal accessory nerve--case report.

A 60-year-old woman presented with a rare schwannoma arising from a spinal accessory nerve at the C1-2 levels manifesting as cervico-occipital pain. The tumor was removed by surgery with the involved segment of the nerve. She had no postoperative neurological deficit. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma. Surgical removal is recommended for such cases.  (+info)

(5/6) An unusual presentation of whiplash injury: long thoracic and spinal accessory nerve injury.

Whiplash injuries from motor vehicle accidents are very common. The usual presentation and course of this condition normally results in resolution of symptoms within a few weeks. Brachial plexus traction injuries without any bone or joint lesion of the cervical spine have been reported before. We report a case where a gentleman was involved in a rear end vehicle collision, sustained a whiplash injury and was later found to have a long thoracic nerve palsy and spinal accessory nerve palsy. Although isolated injuries of both nerves following a whiplash injury have been reported, combined injury of the two nerves following a whiplash injury is very uncommon and is being reported for the first time.  (+info)

(6/6) Idiopathic spinal accessory nerve palsy. A case report.

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*  Nucleus ambiguus
The muscles supplied by the vagus (included with this is the cranial part of the accessory nerve), such as levator veli ... but likely plays a role in bronchospastic diseases like COPD/emphysema (in which inhaled anticholinergic medications such as ... The cranial nerve nuclei schematically represented; dorsal view. Motor nuclei in red; sensory in blue. Nuclei of origin of ... The nucleus ambiguus contains the cell bodies of nerves that innervate the muscles of the soft palate, pharynx, and larynx ...
*  Brachial plexus
... the trapezius muscle innervated by the spinal accessory nerve (CN XI) and an area of skin near the axilla innervated by the ... They can be caused by stretching, diseases, and wounds to the lateral cervical region (posterior triangle) of the neck or the ... the axillary nerve, the radial nerve, the median nerve, and the ulnar nerve. Due to both emerging from the lateral cord the ... median nerve, medial cord, and ulnar nerve. The five roots are the five anterior rami of the spinal nerves, after they have ...
*  Accessory nerve disorder
Patients with spinal accessory nerve palsy often exhibit signs of lower motor neuron disease such as diminished muscle mass, ... Injury to the spinal accessory nerve can cause an accessory nerve disorder or spinal accessory nerve palsy, which results in ... A winged scapula may also be suggestive of abnormal spinal accessory nerve function, as described above. In assessing range of ... A winged scapula due to spinal accessory nerve damage will often be exaggerated on arm abduction. Strength testing is similar ...
*  Accessory nerve
Weakness in both muscles may point to a more general disease process such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Guillain-Barre ... and accessory nerves. The accessory nerve (top left) travels down through the jugular foramen with the other two nerves, and ... "Is the cranial accessory nerve really a portion of the accessory nerve? Anatomy of the cranial nerves in the jugular foramen". ... The spinal accessory nerve continues alone and heads backwards and downwards. In the neck, the accessory nerve crosses the ...
*  Cranial nerve disease
Facial nerve (VII) (More on facial nerve palsy below) Accessory nerve disorder - Accessory nerve (XI) Pavlou, E., Gkampeta, A ... Eyes Oculomotor nerve palsy - Oculomotor nerve (III) Fourth nerve palsy - Trochlear nerve (IV) Sixth nerve palsy - Abducens ... The facial nerve is the seventh of 12 cranial nerves. This cranial nerve controls the muscles in the face. Facial nerve palsy ... Cranial nerve disease is an impaired functioning of one of the twelve cranial nerves. Although it could theoretically be ...
*  List of diseases (A)
... chorea Acanthocytosis Acanthosis nigricans Acatalasemia Accessory deep peroneal nerve Accessory navicular bone Accessory ... This is a list of diseases starting with the letter "A". Diseases Alphabetical list 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T ... extrinsic allergic Alves Dos Santos Castello syndrome Alzheimer's disease Alzheimer's disease, early-onset Alzheimer's disease ... Alpers disease Alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency Alpha-2 deficient collagen disease Alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase deficiency ...
*  Passive accessory intervertebral movements
The technique is contraindicated by bone disease, malignancy, pregnancy, vertebral artery insufficiency, active ankylosing ... spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis, spinal instability, acute irritation or compression of the nerve root, and recent whiplash. ... Passive accessory intervertebral movements (PAIVM) refers to a spinal physical therapy assessment and treatment technique ...
*  Fazio-Londe disease
Other cranial nerves involved were vagus, trigeminal, spinal accessory nerve, abducent, occulomotor and glossopharyngeal in ... Fazio-Londe disease (FLD), also called progressive bulbar palsy of childhood, is a very rare inherited motor neuron disease of ... In the Gomez review facial nerve was affected in all cases while hypoglossal nerve was involved in all except one case. ... Post mortem examination of cases have found depletion of nerve cells in the nuclei of cranial nerves. The histologic ...
*  Anconeus muscle
... from the posterior cord of the brachial plexus called the nerve to the anconeus. The somatomotor portion of radial nerve ... There are no specific acquired injuries that exclusively affect the anconeus muscle; however, any disease that compromises ... muscular functions, particularly arm extension (i.e. muscular dystrophy) will affect this particular accessory muscle. ... or any injury that damages the radial nerve. Harm inflicted upon the radial nerve through these mechanisms can paralyze the ...
*  Leontiasis ossea
It is not a disease in itself, but a symptom of other diseases, including Paget's disease, fibrous dysplasia, ... Exophthalmos gradually develops, going on later to a complete loss of sight due to compression of the optic nerve by the ... the nose and its accessory sinuses. ... In the somewhat less common form of this rare disease the ... Lee VS, Webb MS Jr, Martinez S, McKay CP, Leight GS Jr (April 1996). "Uremic leontiasis ossea: "bighead" disease in humans? ...
*  Carl Friedrich Otto Westphal
... which is an accessory nucleus of the oculomotor nerve (cranial nerve number III; CN III). He was the first physician to provide ... A large portion of his written work dealt with diseases of the spinal cord and neuropathological issues. He trained a number of ... He also demonstrated a relationship between tabes dorsalis (nerve degeneration in the spinal cord) and paralysis in the ... He is credited with providing an early diagnosis of "pseudosclerosis", a disease known today as hepatolenticular degeneration. ...
*  Madras motor neuron disease
... and 9th to the 12th cranial nerves (in order: glossopharyngeal nerve, vagus nerve, accessory nerve, spinal accessory nerve). ... Madras motor neuron disease (MMND) is a rare motor neuron disease originating in South India. Two other forms of the disease ... Madras motor neuron disease (MMND) is a motor neuron disease affecting primarily lower motor neurons. It is similar to ... Navaneetham, Duraiswamy (February 2010). "Madras Motor Neuron Disease". Foundation for Research on Rare Diseases and Disorders ...
*  Nail (anatomy)
However, most times it is a nail technician who will note a subtle change in nail disease. Inherited accessory nail of the ... It is the part of the nail bed that is beneath the nail and contains nerves, lymph and blood vessels. The matrix produces cells ... Nail disease can be very subtle and should be evaluated by a dermatologist with a focus in this particular area of medicine. ... List of cutaneous conditions Nail disease Nail fetish Onychogryphosis, overgrown, claw-like nails Onumah, Neh; Scher, Richard K ...
*  Bradshaw Lecture
Nerve Stretching for the Relief or Cure of Pain 1882 Sir James Paget - Some New and Rare Diseases (Inaugural lecture) "Bradshaw ... Heath, C. (1892). "The Surgery of the Nose and Accessory Cavities: An Abstract of the Bradshaw Lecture delivered at the Royal ... Some Diseases of the Thyroid Gland 1892 Samuel Gee, On the Signs of Acute Peritoneal Diseases 1891 William Henry Allchin, The ... Operative Treatment of Malignant Disease 1920 Berkeley Moynihan, The Spleen and some of its Diseases 1919 Sir Charles Alfred ...
*  Neck dissection
IIa contains nodes in the region anterior to the spinal accessory nerve and IIb postero-superior to the nerve. Region III: ... 4) The staging of head and neck cancer includes a classification for nodal disease. It is important to note the critical ... Region V: posterior triangle group of lymph nodes located along the lower half of the spinal accessory nerve and the transverse ... 6. Anderson, Peter E., The Role of Comprehensive Neck Dissection With Preservation of the Spinal Accessory Nerve in the ...
*  Hindbrain
... the glossopharyngeal nerve (CN IX), vagus nerve (CN X), accessory nerve (CN XI), hypoglossal nerve (CN XII), and a portion of ... A rare disease of the rhombencephalon-"rhombencephalosynapsis"-is characterized by a missing vermis resulting in a fused ... the trigeminal nerve (CN V), abducens nerve (CN VI), facial nerve (CN VII), and a portion of the vestibulocochlear nerve (CN ... in terms of the genes that it expresses and its position in between the brain and the nerve cord. On this basis, it has been ...
*  Hypoglossal nerve
Motor neuron disease is the most common disease affecting the hypoglossal nerve. The hypoglossal nerve is tested by examining ... It then travels close to the vagus nerve and spinal division of the accessory nerve, spirals downwards behind the vagus nerve ... The hypoglossal nerve may be connected (anastamosed) to the facial nerve to attempt to restore function when the facial nerve ... Because of the close proximity of the nerve to other structures including nerves, arteries, and veins, it is rare for the nerve ...
*  Cardiac function curve
Parasympathetic inflow within the myocardium is probably best described by influence of the vagus nerve and spinal accessory ... The higher pressures normally occur only in disease, in conditions such as heart failure, where the heart is unable to pump ... In vivo however, extrinsic factors such as an increase in activity of the sympathetic nerves, and a decrease in vagal tone ...
*  Menace reflex
... in particular the cortical nerve, has suffered from nerve damage. Cortical damage, particularly cerebral lesions, can cause ... It is mediated by tectobulbar fibres in the rostral colliculi of the midbrain passing from the optic tract to accessory nuclei ... Veterinary medicine: a textbook of the diseases of cattle, sheep, pigs, goats and horses (9th ed.). Elsevier Health Sciences. p ... The facial nerve is mediated through a corticotectopontocerebellar pathway. Francis Heed Adler (1953). Physiology of the eye: ...
*  Guttural pouch
The glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory and hypoglossal nerves; the sympathetic trunk leaving from the cranial cervical ganglion ... Guttural pouch mycosis (GPM) is a fungal disease that is rare but potentially life-threatening. GPM is of unknown pathogenesis ... also if glossopharyngeal nerve is involved); and Horner's syndrome from the involvement of sympathetic nerves. Involvement of ... The facial nerve is in contact with the dorsal part of the pouch. The external carotid artery passes ventral to the medial ...
*  Brainstem
The nuclei of the glossopharyngeal nerve (IX), vagus nerve (X), accessory nerve (XI) and hypoglossal nerve (XII) are located in ... Diseases of the brainstem can result in abnormalities in the function of cranial nerves that may lead to visual disturbances, ... Oculomotor nerve nucleus: This is the third cranial nerve nucleus. Trochlear nerve nucleus: This is the fourth cranial nerve. ... The nuclei of the trigeminal nerve (V), abducens nerve (VI), facial nerve (VII) and vestibulocochlear nerve (VIII) are located ...
*  Lytico-bodig disease
Diaphragm and respiratory accessory muscles can become paralyzed necessitating mechanical ventilation to facilitate breathing. ... harshly evident within the destroyed nerve cells." Looking at other samples of hypothalamus, spinal cord, and cortex, all were ... The disease resembles Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's. First reports of the disease ... The disease was shown to be familial but not genetic. Chamorro who grew up outside of Guam had not developed the disease, and ...
*  Cranial nerves
... accessory nerve (XI), and hypoglossal nerve (XII). (There may be a thirteenth cranial nerve, the terminal nerve (nerve O or N ... Trauma to the skull, disease of bone such as Paget's disease, and injury to nerves during neurosurgery (such as tumor removal) ... the optic nerve (II), oculomotor nerve (III), trochlear nerve (IV), trigeminal nerve (V), abducens nerve (VI), facial nerve ( ... the accessory nerve (XI) and hypoglossal nerve (XII) do not exist, with the accessory nerve (XI) being an integral part of the ...
*  Spleen
Polysplenia is a congenital disease manifested by multiple small accessory spleens, rather than a single, full-sized, normal ... There are other openings present for lymphatic vessels and nerves. Like the thymus, the spleen possesses only efferent ... An accessory spleen is a small splenic nodule extra to the spleen usually formed in early embryogenesis. Accessory spleens are ... These accessory spleens are non-functional. The word spleen comes from the Ancient Greek σπλήν (splḗn), and is the idiomatic ...
*  Library of Congress Classification:Class R -- Medicine
Diseases of the nose, accessory sinuses, and nasopharynx RF460-547 Laryngology. Diseases of the throat RG104-104.7 Operative ... Bedsores RL701-751 Diseases due to psychosomatic and nerve disorders. Dermatoneuroses RL760-785 Diseases due to parasites RL790 ... Allergy RC620-627 Nutritional diseases. Deficiency diseases RC627.5-632 Metabolic diseases RC633-647.5 Diseases of the blood ... Urology RC924-924.5 Diseases of the connective tissues RC925-935 Diseases of the musculoskeletal system RC952-1245 Special ...
*  Spinal cord
Nerve rootlets combine to form nerve roots. Likewise, sensory nerve rootlets form off right and left dorsal lateral sulci and ... From above T1, proprioceptive primary axons enter the spinal cord and ascend ipsilaterally until reaching the accessory cuneate ... Spinal cord injury can also be non-traumatic and caused by disease (transverse myelitis, polio, spina bifida, Friedreich's ... It is made of 31 segments from which branch one pair of sensory nerve roots and one pair of motor nerve roots. The nerve roots ...
*  ICD-10 Chapter XIX: Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes
Injury of abducent nerve (S04.5) Injury of facial nerve (S04.6) Injury of acoustic nerve (S04.7) Injury of accessory nerve ( ... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision (ICD-10) is a coding of ... Injury of ulnar nerve at upper arm level (S44.1) Injury of median nerve at upper arm level (S44.2) Injury of radial nerve at ... Injury of nerves at wrist and hand level (S64.0) Injury of ulnar nerve at wrist and hand level (S64.1) Injury of median nerve ...
Accessory nerve disorder - Wikipedia  Accessory nerve disorder - Wikipedia
Patients with spinal accessory nerve palsy often exhibit signs of lower motor neuron disease such as diminished muscle mass, ... Injury to the spinal accessory nerve can cause an accessory nerve disorder or spinal accessory nerve palsy, which results in ... A winged scapula may also be suggestive of abnormal spinal accessory nerve function, as described above. In assessing range of ... A winged scapula due to spinal accessory nerve damage will often be exaggerated on arm abduction. Strength testing is similar ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessory_nerve_disorder
spinal accessory nerve  spinal accessory nerve
... cell carcinoma into the lymph nodes of the neck reduce survival and is the most important factor in the spread of the disease. ... spinal accessory nerve, squamous cell carcinoma, sternocleidomastoid on November 28, 2011. by chzechze. ...
more infohttp://www.intelligentdental.com/tag/spinal-accessory-nerve/
PPT - The Cranial Nerves XI-XII Accessory  Nerve and Hypoglossal Nerve PowerPoint Presentation - ID:1863308  PPT - The Cranial Nerves XI-XII Accessory Nerve and Hypoglossal Nerve PowerPoint Presentation - ID:1863308
List the nuclei related to accessory and hypoglossal nerves in the brain stem. Slideshow 1863308 by sai ... The Cranial Nerves XI-XII Accessory Nerve and Hypoglossal Nerve. Dr. Zeenat Zaidi Dr . Essam Eldin Salama. Objectives . At the ... The Cranial Nerves XI-XII Accessory Nerve and Hypoglossal Nerve - PowerPoint PPT Presentation. ... The Cranial Nerves XI-XII Accessory Nerve and Hypoglossal Nerve. Dr. Zeenat Zaidi Dr . Essam Eldin Salama. Objectives . At the ...
more infohttps://www.slideserve.com/sai/the-cranial-nerves-xi-xii-accessory-nerve-and-hypoglossal-nerve
What are the indications for an Eden-Lange procedure to treat a spinal accessory nerve (SAN) injury?  What are the indications for an Eden-Lange procedure to treat a spinal accessory nerve (SAN) injury?
Drugs & Diseases , Otolaryngology and Facial Plastic Surgery , Accessory Nerve Injury Q&A ... Ultrasonography of the accessory nerve: normal and pathologic findings in cadavers and patients with iatrogenic accessory nerve ... Lateral pectoral nerve transfer for spinal accessory nerve injury. J Neurosurg Spine. 2017 Jan. 26 (1):112-5. [Medline]. ... Reconstruction of accessory nerve defects with sternocleidomastoid muscle-great auricular nerve flap. Br J Plast Surg. 2005 Mar ...
more infohttps://www.medscape.com/answers/1298684-124499/what-are-the-indications-for-an-eden-lange-procedure-to-treat-a-spinal-accessory-nerve-san-injury
Clinical implications of scapular dyskinesis in shoulder injury: the 2013 consensus statement from the scapular summit |...  Clinical implications of scapular dyskinesis in shoulder injury: the 2013 consensus statement from the 'scapular summit' |...
Neurological causes include cervical radiculopathy, long thoracic or spinal accessory nerve palsy. Soft tissue mechanisms for ... Effect of posture on acromiohumeral distance with arm elevation in rotator cuff disease using ultrasonography. J Orthop Sports ... spinal accessory and dorsal scapular nerve palsies, evaluated by appropriate muscle testing, typical scapular position and ... Suprascapular nerve block disrupts the normal pattern of scapular kinematics. Clin Biomech 2006;21:545-53. ...
more infohttp://bjsm.bmj.com/content/47/14/877
Left Shoulder Pain: Causes, Diagnosis and Treatment  Left Shoulder Pain: Causes, Diagnosis and Treatment
Disease conditions like Angina, Arthritis, Bursitis, heart attack, lung cancer, Shingles and Rotator Cuff syndrome can also ... Such pain is also associated with nerves in the joints or spinal region. ... Accessories *Cords *Document Holders *Ergonomic Foot Pedals , Computer Foot Switches *Heating Solutions ... Left shoulder pain usually occurs on account of injury or disease. Usually known as referred pain, such shoulder pain actually ...
more infohttp://www.ergonomicsmadeeasy.com/left-shoulder-pain-causes-diagnosis-and-treatment/
Accessory Nerve Diseases  Accessory Nerve Diseases
... - 2 Studies Found. Status. Study Recruiting. Study Name: Genetic Studies of Strabismus, Congenital ...
more infohttp://webhealthnetwork.com/clinicaltrials-search.php?q=Accessory+Nerve+Diseases
Accessory Nerve Disease disease: Malacards - Research Articles, Drugs, Genes, Clinical Trials  Accessory Nerve Disease disease: Malacards - Research Articles, Drugs, Genes, Clinical Trials
MalaCards based summary : Accessory Nerve Disease, is also known as accessory nerve diseases. The drugs Lidocaine and Central ... MalaCards integrated aliases for Accessory Nerve Disease:. Name: Accessory Nerve Disease 12 ... Comorbidity relations with Accessory Nerve Disease via Phenotypic Disease Network (PDN): Familial Atrial Fibrillation Heart ... Drugs for Accessory Nerve Disease (from DrugBank, HMDB, Dgidb, PharmGKB, IUPHAR, NovoSeek, BitterDB):. (show all 8) #. Name. ...
more infohttps://www.malacards.org/card/accessory_nerve_disease
Timothy D. Steege, M.D. | Seattle, WA  Timothy D. Steege, M.D. | Seattle, WA
Accessory Nerve Disease. *Accessory Nerve Injury. *Acoustic Neurofibromatosis. *Acoustic Neuroma. *Acute Inflammatory ... Sexually Transmitted Diseases Urinary Tract Infection Foot Pain Ankle Injury Hip Pain Knee Pain View More ...
more infohttps://www.swedish.org/swedish-physicians/profile.aspx?name=timothy+d+steege&id=160292
Charles S. Cobbs, M.D. | Seattle, WA  Charles S. Cobbs, M.D. | Seattle, WA
Accessory Nerve Disease. *Accessory Nerve Injury. *Acoustic Neurofibromatosis. *Acoustic Neuroma. *Acromegaly. *Acute ... Sexually Transmitted Diseases Urinary Tract Infection Foot Pain Ankle Injury Hip Pain Knee Pain View More ...
more infohttps://www.swedish.org/swedish-physicians/profile.aspx?name=charles+s+cobbs&id=158622
Dr. Edward Fiore Aulisi, MD - MedStar Health  Dr. Edward Fiore Aulisi, MD - MedStar Health
accessory nerve disease. *accessory nerve injury. *acoustic neurofibromatosis. *acoustic neuroma. *acromegaly. *acute ...
more infohttps://www.medstarhealth.org/doctor/dr-edward-fiore-aulisi-md/
Dr. Edward Fiore Aulisi, MD - MedStar Washington Hospital Center  Dr. Edward Fiore Aulisi, MD - MedStar Washington Hospital Center
accessory nerve disease. *accessory nerve injury. *acoustic neurofibromatosis. *acoustic neuroma. *acromegaly. *acute ...
more infohttps://www.medstarwashington.org/doctor-profile/1457328155/
Zhongzeng Li, MD, PhD | Olympia,WA  Zhongzeng Li, MD, PhD | Olympia,WA
accessory nerve disease. *accessory nerve injury. *acoustic neurofibromatosis. *acute inflammatory demyelinating ...
more infohttp://www.providence.org/doctors/profile.aspx?region=wa&reset=true&name=li+zhongzeng&id=160038
Certified pharmacy online - Levitra.Best Deal and Ultimate Quality Warranted  Certified pharmacy online - Levitra.Best Deal and Ultimate Quality Warranted
On the accessory nerve, causing mild disease unlikely. Children retain drops by feeling fluctuations in a contrast medium is an ... D; trophoblastic disease; lumbosacral nerve involvement is less obvious. P encourages change levitra 20 mg generic death. A ... The optic nerve palsy, or there discharge from the less painful stimulus to prevent dehydration. The perfect labs. Post- ... Proceeding in a disease, in the popliteal and inappropriate for larger ones through being given. All levitra.com cheap levitra ...
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Smells the roses | definition of smells the roses by Medical dictionary  Smells the roses | definition of smells the roses by Medical dictionary
... bone disease near the olfactory nerve, disease of the nasal accessory sinuses, meningitis, or tumors or syphilis affecting the ... In rare instances, injury or disease causes such damage to the olfactory nerve that loss of the sense of smell is permanent. ... The olfactory cells are connected to the brain by the first cranial nerve (olfactory nerve). Air currents do not flow directly ... includes the olfactory sense organs, olfactory nerves, and the nerve cells of the olfactory bulb of the brain. ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/smells+the+roses
Smelled out | definition of smelled out by Medical dictionary  Smelled out | definition of smelled out by Medical dictionary
... bone disease near the olfactory nerve, disease of the nasal accessory sinuses, meningitis, or tumors or syphilis affecting the ... In rare instances, injury or disease causes such damage to the olfactory nerve that loss of the sense of smell is permanent. ... The olfactory cells are connected to the brain by the first cranial nerve (olfactory nerve). Air currents do not flow directly ... includes the olfactory sense organs, olfactory nerves, and the nerve cells of the olfactory bulb of the brain. ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/smelled+out
Plus it  Plus it
The marginal mandibular nerve and the accessory nerve are often injured during neck dissection (16). Modified radical neck ... This suggests a role for identification of sentinel levels for first echelon disease assessment using a disease-specific agent ... Spinal accessory nerve and lymphatic neck dissection]. Rev Stomatol Chir Maxillofac 1997;98:138-42. ... Perhaps most commonly, shoulder dysfunction and pain occur after neck dissection due to accessory nerve injury (11-14). More ...
more infohttp://clincancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/23/16/4744
The Fiber Disease - Page 614 - Biology-Online  The Fiber Disease - Page 614 - Biology-Online
277.1-55] __ Nerve palsy; accessory, bulbar, facial, hypoglossal, trigeminal loss of the ability to move or control movement) [ ... Here are two terms for you to look up al, which may help you to determine who I am, and what the causal agent of our disease is ... Also, the brown spots on us is from (my opinion here) the leaf blot disease that plants get,.,,,,still know for a fact that the ... Porphyria Cutanea Tarda......Me? I'm at a toss up between choosing this disease or the one I posted about 2 days ago.....can't ...
more infohttps://www.biology-online.org/biology-forum/viewtopic.php?t=1958&p=71806&hilit=Organic+brain+syndrome
The Fiber Disease - Page 614 - Biology-Online  The Fiber Disease - Page 614 - Biology-Online
277.1-55] __ Nerve palsy; accessory, bulbar, facial, hypoglossal, trigeminal loss of the ability to move or control movement) [ ... Here are two terms for you to look up al, which may help you to determine who I am, and what the causal agent of our disease is ... Also, the brown spots on us is from (my opinion here) the leaf blot disease that plants get,.,,,,still know for a fact that the ... Porphyria Cutanea Tarda......Me? I'm at a toss up between choosing this disease or the one I posted about 2 days ago.....can't ...
more infohttps://www.biology-online.org/biology-forum/viewtopic.php?t=1958&p=71806&hilit=Bulbar
Rare Diseases Awareness Ribbons - A | Personalized Cause  Rare Diseases Awareness Ribbons - A | Personalized Cause
Blue Jeans awareness ribbons and Zebra awareness ribbons for rare diseases that begin with the letter A. Source of rare ... Accessory deep peroneal nerve. Accessory pancreas. ACDC. Aceruloplasminemia. Acetyl CoA acetyltransferase 2 deficiency. Acetyl- ... Alzheimer disease type 1. Alzheimer disease type 2. Alzheimer disease type 3. Alzheimer disease type 4. Alzheimer's disease ... RARE DISEASES AND DISORDERS - A. Blue Jeans Awareness Ribbon for Rare Diseases as Designated by Global Genes®. Our Custom Blue ...
more infohttps://www.personalizedcause.com/rare-diseases-and-disorders-awareness-ribbons-a
  • For example, during a functional neck dissection that injures the spinal accessory nerve, injury prompts the surgeon to cautiously preserve branches of C2, C3, and C4 spinal nerves that provide supplemental innervation to the trapezius muscle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Interruption of the nerve supply to the sternocleidomastoid muscle results in an asymmetric neckline, while weakness of the trapezius muscle can produce a drooping shoulder, winged scapula, and a weakness of forward elevation of the shoulder. (wikipedia.org)
  • G. Szekely and C. Matesz, "Topography and organization of cranial nerve nuclei in the sand lizard, Lacerta agilis ," Journal of Comparative Neurology , vol. 267, no. 4, pp. 525-544, 1988. (hindawi.com)
  • It causes progressive bulbar paralysis due to involvement of motor neurons of the cranial nerve nuclei. (wikipedia.org)
  • Interruption of the nerve supply to the sternocleidomastoid muscle results in an asymmetric neckline, while weakness of the trapezius muscle can produce a drooping shoulder, winged scapula, and a weakness of forward elevation of the shoulder. (wikipedia.org)
  • The endings of the sensory nerves that detect odors, the olfactory receptors, can quickly adapt to an odor and cease to be stimulated by it after a few minutes of full exposure. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The sensory ganglia are directly correspondent to dorsal root ganglia of spinal nerves and are known as cranial sensory ganglia. (wikipedia.org)
  • He has specific expertise in the treatment of spinal cord tumors as well as metastatic disease of the spine. (swedish.org)
  • Because Latin was the lingua franca (common language) of the study of Anatomy when the nerves were first documented, recorded, and discussed, many nerves maintain Latin or Greek names, including the trochlear nerve (IV), named according to its structure, as it supplies a muscle that attaches to a pulley (Greek: trochlea). (wikipedia.org)
  • The authors said that the consistent findings of gliosis shows that inflammation in central nervous system is a key factor in how the disease harms people. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cranial nerves, however, emerge from the central nervous system above this level. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cranial nerves are considered components of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), although on a structural level the olfactory, optic and terminal nerves are more accurately considered part of the central nervous system (CNS). (wikipedia.org)
  • Diseases of the nervous system Including speech disorders RC435-571 Psychiatry RC475-489 Therapeutics. (wikipedia.org)
  • As it courses downwards, the nerve pierces through the sternocleidomastoid muscle while sending it motor branches, then continues down until it reaches the trapezius muscle to provide motor innervation to its upper part. (wikipedia.org)
  • This innervation pattern follows the rules of innervation of the musculature of the posterior forearm (extensor) compartment by the radial nerve. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is possible for a disorder of more than one cranial nerve to occur at the same time, if a trauma occurs at a location where many cranial nerves run together, such as the jugular fossa. (wikipedia.org)
  • The expression of NCS-1 increases in bipolar disorder and some forms of schizophrenia and decreases in inflammatory bowel disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • [ 2 ] Abnormalities or deficiencies in any of the 7 ocular surface components may worsen dry eye disease, yet promise opportunities for effective therapeutic intervention. (medscape.com)
  • Abnormalities of the cranial nerves are present 50-70% of cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sustainability of vesicle to surgical team of their progress to acute confusional state, stroke, abscess, respiratory infection, reflux disease. (tribrendan.com)
  • Clinical endocrinology RC666-701 Diseases of the circulatory (Cardiovascular) system RC705-779 Diseases of the respiratory system RC799-869 Diseases of the digestive system. (wikipedia.org)
  • This list is extensive to include often under-funded, unknown diseases and disorders that need equal attention to those that receive a great deal of funding and recognition. (personalizedcause.com)
  • Understanding the key players and their roles in the TLR/IL-1R pathway is important because the presence of mutations causing the abnormal regulation of Toll/IL-1R signaling leading to a variety of acute inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Melanotic Cancer) 1922 William Thorburn, On the Surgery of the Spinal Cord 146 1921 Sir Holburt Jacob Waring, Operative Treatment of Malignant Disease 1920 Berkeley Moynihan, The Spleen and some of its Diseases 1919 Sir Charles Alfred Ballance, The Surgery of the Heart 1918 D'Arcy Power, Cancer of the Tongue 1917 Sir John Bland-Sutton, Misplaced and Missing Organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • At a point at the level of the angle of the mandible, the hypoglossal nerve emerges from behind the posterior belly of the digastric muscle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Incorporating an intravenously delivered, cancer-specific agent to intraoperatively localize regional metastatic disease and improve staging accuracy represents an evolutionary leap in surgical diagnostics and treatment. (aacrjournals.org)
  • The nail then acts as a counter-force when the end of the finger touches an object, thereby enhancing the sensitivity of the fingertip, though the nail itself has no nerve endings. (wikipedia.org)