Acceleration: An increase in the rate of speed.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Otolithic Membrane: A gelatinous membrane overlying the acoustic maculae of SACCULE AND UTRICLE. It contains minute crystalline particles (otoliths) of CALCIUM CARBONATE and protein on its outer surface. In response to head movement, the otoliths shift causing distortion of the vestibular hair cells which transduce nerve signals to the BRAIN for interpretation of equilibrium.Deceleration: A decrease in the rate of speed.Gravitation: Acceleration produced by the mutual attraction of two masses, and of magnitude inversely proportional to the square of the distance between the two centers of mass. It is also the force imparted by the earth, moon, or a planet to an object near its surface. (From NASA Thesaurus, 1988)Reflex, Vestibulo-Ocular: A reflex wherein impulses are conveyed from the cupulas of the SEMICIRCULAR CANALS and from the OTOLITHIC MEMBRANE of the SACCULE AND UTRICLE via the VESTIBULAR NUCLEI of the BRAIN STEM and the median longitudinal fasciculus to the OCULOMOTOR NERVE nuclei. It functions to maintain a stable retinal image during head rotation by generating appropriate compensatory EYE MOVEMENTS.Rotation: Motion of an object in which either one or more points on a line are fixed. It is also the motion of a particle about a fixed point. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Vibration: A continuing periodic change in displacement with respect to a fixed reference. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Head Movements: Voluntary or involuntary motion of head that may be relative to or independent of body; includes animals and humans.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Vestibule, Labyrinth: An oval, bony chamber of the inner ear, part of the bony labyrinth. It is continuous with bony COCHLEA anteriorly, and SEMICIRCULAR CANALS posteriorly. The vestibule contains two communicating sacs (utricle and saccule) of the balancing apparatus. The oval window on its lateral wall is occupied by the base of the STAPES of the MIDDLE EAR.Gravity Sensing: Process whereby a cell, bodily structure, or organism (animal or plant) receives or detects a gravity stimulus. Gravity sensing plays an important role in the directional growth and development of an organism (GRAVITROPISM).Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Semicircular Canals: Three long canals (anterior, posterior, and lateral) of the bony labyrinth. They are set at right angles to each other and are situated posterosuperior to the vestibule of the bony labyrinth (VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH). The semicircular canals have five openings into the vestibule with one shared by the anterior and the posterior canals. Within the canals are the SEMICIRCULAR DUCTS.Running: An activity in which the body is propelled by moving the legs rapidly. Running is performed at a moderate to rapid pace and should be differentiated from JOGGING, which is performed at a much slower pace.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Gait: Manner or style of walking.Head: The upper part of the human body, or the front or upper part of the body of an animal, typically separated from the rest of the body by a neck, and containing the brain, mouth, and sense organs.Hypergravity: Condition wherein the force of gravity is greater than or is increased above that on the surface of the earth. This is expressed as being greater than 1 g.Coriolis Force: The apparent deflection (Coriolis acceleration) of a body in motion with respect to the earth, as seen by an observer on the earth, attributed to a fictitious force (Coriolis force) but actually caused by the rotation of the earth. In a medical context it refers to the physiological effects (nausea, vertigo, dizziness, etc.) felt by a person moving radially in a rotating system, as a rotating space station. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed & McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Eye Movements: Voluntary or reflex-controlled movements of the eye.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Vestibular Nerve: The vestibular part of the 8th cranial nerve (VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE). The vestibular nerve fibers arise from neurons of Scarpa's ganglion and project peripherally to vestibular hair cells and centrally to the VESTIBULAR NUCLEI of the BRAIN STEM. These fibers mediate the sense of balance and head position.Locomotion: Movement or the ability to move from one place or another. It can refer to humans, vertebrate or invertebrate animals, and microorganisms.Accelerometry: Qualitative and quantitative measurement of MOVEMENT patterns.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Postural Balance: A POSTURE in which an ideal body mass distribution is achieved. Postural balance provides the body carriage stability and conditions for normal functions in stationary position or in movement, such as sitting, standing, or walking.Flight, Animal: The use of wings or wing-like appendages to remain aloft and move through the air.Motion Perception: The real or apparent movement of objects through the visual field.Swimming: An activity in which the body is propelled through water by specific movement of the arms and/or the legs. Swimming as propulsion through water by the movement of limbs, tail, or fins of animals is often studied as a form of PHYSICAL EXERTION or endurance.Pursuit, Smooth: Eye movements that are slow, continuous, and conjugate and occur when a fixed object is moved slowly.Head Protective Devices: Personal devices for protection of heads from impact, penetration from falling and flying objects, and from limited electric shock and burn.Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials: Recorded electrical responses from muscles, especially the neck muscles or muscles around the eyes, following stimulation of the EAR VESTIBULE.Monitoring, Ambulatory: The use of electronic equipment to observe or record physiologic processes while the patient undergoes normal daily activities.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Echocardiography, Doppler: Measurement of intracardiac blood flow using an M-mode and/or two-dimensional (2-D) echocardiogram while simultaneously recording the spectrum of the audible Doppler signal (e.g., velocity, direction, amplitude, intensity, timing) reflected from the moving column of red blood cells.Tidal Waves: Water waves caused by the gravitational interactions between the EARTH; MOON; and SUN.Hand-Arm Vibration Syndrome: An occupational disorder resulting from prolonged exposure to vibration, affecting the fingers, hands, and forearms. It occurs in workers who regularly use vibrating tools such as jackhammers, power chain saws, riveters, etc. Symptoms include episodic finger blanching, NUMBNESS, tingling, and loss of nerve sensitivity.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Vestibular Nuclei: The four cellular masses in the floor of the fourth ventricle giving rise to a widely dispersed special sensory system. Included is the superior, medial, inferior, and LATERAL VESTIBULAR NUCLEUS. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Wrist: The region of the upper limb between the metacarpus and the FOREARM.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted: Computer-assisted processing of electric, ultrasonic, or electronic signals to interpret function and activity.Whiplash Injuries: Hyperextension injury to the neck, often the result of being struck from behind by a fast-moving vehicle, in an automobile accident. (From Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Joints: Also known as articulations, these are points of connection between the ends of certain separate bones, or where the borders of other bones are juxtaposed.Fingers: Four or five slender jointed digits in humans and primates, attached to each HAND.Walking: An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.Vestibular Diseases: Pathological processes of the VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH which contains part of the balancing apparatus. Patients with vestibular diseases show instability and are at risk of frequent falls.Saccule and Utricle: Two membranous sacs within the vestibular labyrinth of the INNER EAR. The saccule communicates with COCHLEAR DUCT through the ductus reuniens, and communicates with utricle through the utriculosaccular duct from which the ENDOLYMPHATIC DUCT arises. The utricle and saccule have sensory areas (acoustic maculae) which are innervated by the VESTIBULAR NERVE.Transducers: Any device or element which converts an input signal into an output signal of a different form. Examples include the microphone, phonographic pickup, loudspeaker, barometer, photoelectric cell, automobile horn, doorbell, and underwater sound transducer. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Neck Muscles: The neck muscles consist of the platysma, splenius cervicis, sternocleidomastoid(eus), longus colli, the anterior, medius, and posterior scalenes, digastric(us), stylohyoid(eus), mylohyoid(eus), geniohyoid(eus), sternohyoid(eus), omohyoid(eus), sternothyroid(eus), and thyrohyoid(eus).Hindlimb: Either of two extremities of four-footed non-primate land animals. It usually consists of a FEMUR; TIBIA; and FIBULA; tarsals; METATARSALS; and TOES. (From Storer et al., General Zoology, 6th ed, p73)Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Proprioception: Sensory functions that transduce stimuli received by proprioceptive receptors in joints, tendons, muscles, and the INNER EAR into neural impulses to be transmitted to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Proprioception provides sense of stationary positions and movements of one's body parts, and is important in maintaining KINESTHESIA and POSTURAL BALANCE.Arm: The superior part of the upper extremity between the SHOULDER and the ELBOW.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Ear, Inner: The essential part of the hearing organ consists of two labyrinthine compartments: the bony labyrinthine and the membranous labyrinth. The bony labyrinth is a complex of three interconnecting cavities or spaces (COCHLEA; VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH; and SEMICIRCULAR CANALS) in the TEMPORAL BONE. Within the bony labyrinth lies the membranous labyrinth which is a complex of sacs and tubules (COCHLEAR DUCT; SACCULE AND UTRICLE; and SEMICIRCULAR DUCTS) forming a continuous space enclosed by EPITHELIUM and connective tissue. These spaces are filled with LABYRINTHINE FLUIDS of various compositions.Head Injuries, Closed: Traumatic injuries to the cranium where the integrity of the skull is not compromised and no bone fragments or other objects penetrate the skull and dura mater. This frequently results in mechanical injury being transmitted to intracranial structures which may produce traumatic brain injuries, hemorrhage, or cranial nerve injury. (From Rowland, Merritt's Textbook of Neurology, 9th ed, p417)Nystagmus, Physiologic: Involuntary rhythmical movements of the eyes in the normal person. These can be naturally occurring as in end-position (end-point, end-stage, or deviational) nystagmus or induced by the optokinetic drum (NYSTAGMUS, OPTOKINETIC), caloric test, or a rotating chair.Motion: Physical motion, i.e., a change in position of a body or subject as a result of an external force. It is distinguished from MOVEMENT, a process resulting from biological activity.Hand: The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.Image Enhancement: Improvement of the quality of a picture by various techniques, including computer processing, digital filtering, echocardiographic techniques, light and ultrastructural MICROSCOPY, fluorescence spectrometry and microscopy, scintigraphy, and in vitro image processing at the molecular level.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Physical Phenomena: The entities of matter and energy, and the processes, principles, properties, and relationships describing their nature and interactions.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Spheniscidae: The sole family in the order Sphenisciformes, comprised of 17 species of penguins in six genera. They are flightless seabirds of the Southern Hemisphere, highly adapted for marine life.Football: A competitive team sport played on a rectangular field. This is the American or Canadian version of the game and also includes the form known as rugby. It does not include non-North American football (= SOCCER).Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Automobiles: A usually four-wheeled automotive vehicle designed for passenger transportation and commonly propelled by an internal-combustion engine using a volatile fuel. (Webster, 1973)Torso: The central part of the body to which the neck and limbs are attached.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Myocardial Contraction: Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Aerospace Medicine: That branch of medicine dealing with the studies and effects of flight through the atmosphere or in space upon the human body and with the prevention or cure of physiological or psychological malfunctions arising from these effects. (from NASA Thesaurus)Data Compression: Information application based on a variety of coding methods to minimize the amount of data to be stored, retrieved, or transmitted. Data compression can be applied to various forms of data, such as images and signals. It is used to reduce costs and increase efficiency in the maintenance of large volumes of data.Macaca mulatta: A species of the genus MACACA inhabiting India, China, and other parts of Asia. The species is used extensively in biomedical research and adapts very well to living with humans.Escape Reaction: Innate response elicited by sensory stimuli associated with a threatening situation, or actual confrontation with an enemy.Galaxies: Large aggregates of CELESTIAL STARS; COSMIC DUST; and gas. (From McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Acinonyx: A genus of long-legged, swift-moving felines (FELIDAE) from Africa (and formerly Asia) about the size of a small leopard.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Man-Machine Systems: A system in which the functions of the man and the machine are interrelated and necessary for the operation of the system.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: Methods developed to aid in the interpretation of ultrasound, radiographic images, etc., for diagnosis of disease.Brain Concussion: A nonspecific term used to describe transient alterations or loss of consciousness following closed head injuries. The duration of UNCONSCIOUSNESS generally lasts a few seconds, but may persist for several hours. Concussions may be classified as mild, intermediate, and severe. Prolonged periods of unconsciousness (often defined as greater than 6 hours in duration) may be referred to as post-traumatic coma (COMA, POST-HEAD INJURY). (From Rowland, Merritt's Textbook of Neurology, 9th ed, p418)LizardsEquipment Failure Analysis: The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Telemetry: Transmission of the readings of instruments to a remote location by means of wires, radio waves, or other means. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Diving: An activity in which the organism plunges into water. It includes scuba and bell diving. Diving as natural behavior of animals goes here, as well as diving in decompression experiments with humans or animals.Physical Stimulation: Act of eliciting a response from a person or organism through physical contact.Hair Cells, Vestibular: Sensory cells in the acoustic maculae with their apical STEREOCILIA embedded in a gelatinous OTOLITHIC MEMBRANE. These hair cells are stimulated by the movement of otolithic membrane, and impulses are transmitted via the VESTIBULAR NERVE to the BRAIN STEM. Hair cells in the saccule and those in the utricle sense linear acceleration in vertical and horizontal directions, respectively.Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Weightlessness: Condition in which no acceleration, whether due to gravity or any other force, can be detected by an observer within a system. It also means the absence of weight or the absence of the force of gravity acting on a body. Microgravity, gravitational force between 0 and 10 -6 g, is included here. (From NASA Thesaurus, 1988)Oculomotor Muscles: The muscles that move the eye. Included in this group are the medial rectus, lateral rectus, superior rectus, inferior rectus, inferior oblique, superior oblique, musculus orbitalis, and levator palpebrae superioris.Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.WingMotor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Models, Neurological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the neurological system, processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Ovum Transport: Transport of the OVUM or fertilized ovum (ZYGOTE) from the mammalian oviduct (FALLOPIAN TUBES) to the site of EMBRYO IMPLANTATION in the UTERUS.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Centrifugation: Process of using a rotating machine to generate centrifugal force to separate substances of different densities, remove moisture, or simulate gravitational effects. It employs a large motor-driven apparatus with a long arm, at the end of which human and animal subjects, biological specimens, or equipment can be revolved and rotated at various speeds to study gravitational effects. (From Websters, 10th ed; McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Physics: The study of those aspects of energy and matter in terms of elementary principles and laws. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Back: The rear surface of an upright primate from the shoulders to the hip, or the dorsal surface of tetrapods.Weight-Bearing: The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.Magnetocardiography: The measurement of magnetic fields generated by electric currents from the heart. The measurement of these fields provides information which is complementary to that provided by ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHY.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Mice, Inbred C57BLMicro-Electrical-Mechanical Systems: A class of devices combining electrical and mechanical components that have at least one of the dimensions in the micrometer range (between 1 micron and 1 millimeter). They include sensors, actuators, microducts, and micropumps.Torque: The rotational force about an axis that is equal to the product of a force times the distance from the axis where the force is applied.Conductometry: Determination of the quantity of a material present in a mixture by measurement of its effect on the electrical conductivity of the mixture. (Webster, 3d ed)Rheology: The study of the deformation and flow of matter, usually liquids or fluids, and of the plastic flow of solids. The concept covers consistency, dilatancy, liquefaction, resistance to flow, shearing, thixotrophy, and VISCOSITY.Friction: Surface resistance to the relative motion of one body against the rubbing, sliding, rolling, or flowing of another with which it is in contact.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Gravity, Altered: A change in, or manipulation of, gravitational force. This may be a natural or artificial effect.Jaw: Bony structure of the mouth that holds the teeth. It consists of the MANDIBLE and the MAXILLA.Vestibular Function Tests: A number of tests used to determine if the brain or balance portion of the inner ear are causing dizziness.Ventricular Function: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the HEART VENTRICLES.Cardiotocography: Monitoring of FETAL HEART frequency before birth in order to assess impending prematurity in relation to the pattern or intensity of antepartum UTERINE CONTRACTION.Orientation: Awareness of oneself in relation to time, place and person.Foot: The distal extremity of the leg in vertebrates, consisting of the tarsus (ANKLE); METATARSUS; phalanges; and the soft tissues surrounding these bones.Sports Equipment: Equipment required for engaging in a sport (such as balls, bats, rackets, skis, skates, ropes, weights) and devices for the protection of athletes during their performance (such as masks, gloves, mouth pieces).Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Kinesis: Locomotor behavior not involving a steering reaction, but in which there may be a turning random in direction. It includes orthokinesis, the rate of movement and klinokinesis, the amount of turning, which are related to the intensity of stimulation.Equidae: A family of hoofed MAMMALS consisting of HORSES, donkeys, and zebras. Members of this family are strict herbivores and can be classified as either browsers or grazers depending on how they feed.Hip: The projecting part on each side of the body, formed by the side of the pelvis and the top portion of the femur.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Air Bags: Automotive safety devices consisting of a bag designed to inflate upon collision and prevent passengers from pitching forward. (American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)Cerebellar Nuclei: Four clusters of neurons located deep within the WHITE MATTER of the CEREBELLUM, which are the nucleus dentatus, nucleus emboliformis, nucleus globosus, and nucleus fastigii.Perciformes: The most diversified of all fish orders and the largest vertebrate order. It includes many of the commonly known fish such as porgies, croakers, sunfishes, dolphin fish, mackerels, TUNA, etc.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Ribosome Subunits: The two dissimilar sized ribonucleoprotein complexes that comprise a RIBOSOME - the large ribosomal subunit and the small ribosomal subunit. The eukaryotic 80S ribosome is composed of a 60S large subunit and a 40S small subunit. The bacterial 70S ribosome is composed of a 50S large subunit and a 30S small subunit.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Motion Sickness: Disorder caused by motion, as sea sickness, train sickness, car sickness, air sickness, or SPACE MOTION SICKNESS. It may include nausea, vomiting and dizziness.Nystagmus, Optokinetic: Normal nystagmus produced by looking at objects moving across the field of vision.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Echidna: An oviparous burrowing mammal of the order Monotremata native to Australia, Tasmania, and New Guinea. It has hair mingled with spines on the upper part of the body and is adapted for feeding on ants.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Electrophysiology: The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Phantoms, Imaging: Devices or objects in various imaging techniques used to visualize or enhance visualization by simulating conditions encountered in the procedure. Phantoms are used very often in procedures employing or measuring x-irradiation or radioactive material to evaluate performance. Phantoms often have properties similar to human tissue. Water demonstrates absorbing properties similar to normal tissue, hence water-filled phantoms are used to map radiation levels. Phantoms are used also as teaching aids to simulate real conditions with x-ray or ultrasonic machines. (From Iturralde, Dictionary and Handbook of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Imaging, 1990)Mastoid: The posterior part of the temporal bone. It is a projection of the petrous bone.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Nonlinear Dynamics: The study of systems which respond disproportionately (nonlinearly) to initial conditions or perturbing stimuli. Nonlinear systems may exhibit "chaos" which is classically characterized as sensitive dependence on initial conditions. Chaotic systems, while distinguished from more ordered periodic systems, are not random. When their behavior over time is appropriately displayed (in "phase space"), constraints are evident which are described by "strange attractors". Phase space representations of chaotic systems, or strange attractors, usually reveal fractal (FRACTALS) self-similarity across time scales. Natural, including biological, systems often display nonlinear dynamics and chaos.Diffuse Axonal Injury: A relatively common sequela of blunt head injury, characterized by a global disruption of axons throughout the brain. Associated clinical features may include NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; PERSISTENT VEGETATIVE STATE; DEMENTIA; and other disorders.

Visual motion analysis for pursuit eye movements in area MT of macaque monkeys. (1/829)

We asked whether the dynamics of target motion are represented in visual area MT and how information about image velocity and acceleration might be extracted from the population responses in area MT for use in motor control. The time course of MT neuron responses was recorded in anesthetized macaque monkeys during target motions that covered the range of dynamics normally seen during smooth pursuit eye movements. When the target motion provided steps of target speed, MT neurons showed a continuum from purely tonic responses to those with large transient pulses of firing at the onset of motion. Cells with large transient responses for steps of target speed also had larger responses for smooth accelerations than for decelerations through the same range of target speeds. Condition-test experiments with pairs of 64 msec pulses of target speed revealed response attenuation at short interpulse intervals in cells with large transient responses. For sinusoidal modulation of target speed, MT neuron responses were strongly modulated for frequencies up to, but not higher than, 8 Hz. The phase of the responses was consistent with a 90 msec time delay between target velocity and firing rate. We created a model that reproduced the dynamic responses of MT cells using divisive gain control, used the model to visualize the population response in MT to individual stimuli, and devised weighted-averaging computations to reconstruct target speed and acceleration from the population response. Target speed could be reconstructed if each neuron's output was weighted according to its preferred speed. Target acceleration could be reconstructed if each neuron's output was weighted according to the product of preferred speed and a measure of the size of its transient response.  (+info)

Velocity associated characteristics of force production in college weight lifters. (2/829)

OBJECTIVE: To determine velocity specific isokinetic forces and cross sectional areas of reciprocal muscle groups in Olympic weight lifters. METHODS: The cross sectional area of the flexor or extensor muscles of the elbow or knee joint was determined by a B-mode ultrasonic apparatus in 34 college weight lifters and 31 untrained male subjects matched for age. Maximum voluntary force produced in the flexion and extension of the elbow and knee joints was measured on an isokinetic dynamometer at 60, 180, and 300 degrees/s. RESULTS: The average cross sectional area was 31-65% higher, and the force was 19-62% higher in weight lifters than in the untrained subjects. The ratio of force to cross sectional area was the same in both groups. The weight lifters showed a lower velocity associated decline in force than untrained subjects in the elbow and knee flexors but not in the extensors. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that for muscle contractions with velocities between 60 degrees/s and 300 degrees/s the difference in isokinetic force between weight lifters and untrained subjects can be primarily attributed to the difference in the muscle cross sectional area. However, the lower velocity associated decline in force implies that weight lifters may have a higher force per cross sectional area than untrained subjects at velocities above 300 degrees/s.  (+info)

Effects of tilt of the gravito-inertial acceleration vector on the angular vestibuloocular reflex during centrifugation. (3/829)

Effects of tilt of the gravito-inertial acceleration vector on the angular vestibuloocular reflex during centrifugation. Interaction of the horizontal linear and angular vestibuloocular reflexes (lVOR and aVOR) was studied in rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys during centered rotation and off-center rotation at a constant velocity (centrifugation). During centered rotation, the eye velocity vector was aligned with the axis of rotation, which was coincident with the direction of gravity. Facing and back to motion centrifugation tilted the resultant of gravity and linear acceleration, gravito-inertial acceleration (GIA), inducing cross-coupled vertical components of eye velocity. These components were upward when facing motion and downward when back to motion and caused the axis of eye velocity to reorient from alignment with the body yaw axis toward the tilted GIA. A major finding was that horizontal time constants were asymmetric in each monkey, generally being longer when associated with downward than upward cross coupling. Because of these asymmetries, accurate estimates of the contribution of the horizontal lVOR could not be obtained by simply subtracting horizontal eye velocity profiles during facing and back to motion centrifugation. Instead, it was necessary to consider the effects of GIA tilts on velocity storage before attempting to estimate the horizontal lVOR. In each monkey, the horizontal time constant of optokinetic after-nystagmus (OKAN) was reduced as a function of increasing head tilt with respect to gravity. When variations in horizontal time constant as a function of GIA tilt were included in the aVOR model, the rising and falling phases of horizontal eye velocity during facing and back to motion centrifugation were closely predicted, and the estimated contribution of the compensatory lVOR was negligible. Beating fields of horizontal eye position were unaffected by the presence or magnitude of linear acceleration during centrifugation. These conclusions were evaluated in animals in which the low-frequency aVOR was abolished by canal plugging, isolating the contribution of the lVOR. Postoperatively, the animals had normal ocular counterrolling and horizontal eye velocity modulation during off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR), suggesting that the otoliths were intact. No measurable horizontal eye velocity was elicited by centrifugation with angular accelerations +info)

Vertical eye position-dependence of the human vestibuloocular reflex during passive and active yaw head rotations. (4/829)

Vertical eye position-dependence of the human vestibuloocular reflex during passive and active yaw head rotations. The effect of vertical eye-in-head position on the compensatory eye rotation response to passive and active high acceleration yaw head rotations was examined in eight normal human subjects. The stimuli consisted of brief, low amplitude (15-25 degrees ), high acceleration (4,000-6,000 degrees /s2) yaw head rotations with respect to the trunk (peak velocity was 150-350 degrees /s). Eye and head rotations were recorded in three-dimensional space using the magnetic search coil technique. The input-output kinematics of the three-dimensional vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) were assessed by finding the difference between the inverted eye velocity vector and the head velocity vector (both referenced to a head-fixed coordinate system) as a time series. During passive head impulses, the head and eye velocity axes aligned well with each other for the first 47 ms after the onset of the stimulus, regardless of vertical eye-in-head position. After the initial 47-ms period, the degree of alignment of the eye and head velocity axes was modulated by vertical eye-in-head position. When fixation was on a target 20 degrees up, the eye and head velocity axes remained well aligned with each other. However, when fixation was on targets at 0 and 20 degrees down, the eye velocity axis tilted forward relative to the head velocity axis. During active head impulses, the axis tilt became apparent within 5 ms of the onset of the stimulus. When fixation was on a target at 0 degrees, the velocity axes remained well aligned with each other. When fixation was on a target 20 degrees up, the eye velocity axis tilted backward, when fixation was on a target 20 degrees down, the eye velocity axis tilted forward. The findings show that the VOR compensates very well for head motion in the early part of the response to unpredictable high acceleration stimuli-the eye position- dependence of the VOR does not become apparent until 47 ms after the onset of the stimulus. In contrast, the response to active high acceleration stimuli shows eye position-dependence from within 5 ms of the onset of the stimulus. A model using a VOR-Listing's law compromise strategy did not accurately predict the patterns observed in the data, raising questions about how the eye position-dependence of the VOR is generated. We suggest, in view of recent findings, that the phenomenon could arise due to the effects of fibromuscular pulleys on the functional pulling directions of the rectus muscles.  (+info)

Cervical electromyographic activity during low-speed rear impact. (5/829)

Whiplash motion of the neck is characterized by having an extension-flexion motion of the neck. It has been previously assumed that muscles do not play a role in the injury. Eight healthy males were seated in a car seat mounted on a sled. The sled was accelerated by a spring mechanism. Muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity was measured by wire electrodes in semi-spinalis capitis, splenius capitis, and levator scapulae. Surface EMG activity was measured over trapezius and sternocleidomastoideus. Wavelet analysis was used to establish the onset of muscle activity with respect to sled movement. Shorter reaction times were found to be as low as 13.2 ms from head acceleration and 65.6 ms from sled acceleration. Thus the muscles could influence the injury pattern. It is of interest that clinical symptoms are often attributed to muscle tendon injuries.  (+info)

Transformations in flagellar structure of Rhodobacter sphaeroides and possible relationship to changes in swimming speed. (6/829)

Rhodobacter sphaeroides is a photosynthetic bacterium which swims by rotating a single flagellum in one direction, periodically stopping, and reorienting during these stops. Free-swimming R. sphaeroides was examined by both differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy, which allows the flagella of swimming cells to be seen in vivo, and tracking microscopy, which tracks swimming patterns in three dimensions. DIC microscopy showed that when rotation stopped, the helical flagellum relaxed into a high-amplitude, short-wavelength coiled form, confirming previous observations. However, DIC microscopy also revealed that the coiled filament could rotate slowly, reorienting the cell before a transition back to the functional helix. The time taken to reform a functional helix depended on the rate of rotation of the helix and the length of the filament. In addition to these coiled and helical forms, a third conformation was observed: a rapidly rotating, apparently straight form. This form took shape from the cell body out and was seen to form directly from flagella that were initially in either the coiled or the helical conformation. This form was always significantly longer than the coiled or helical form from which it was derived. The resolution of DIC microscopy made it impossible to identify whether this form was genuinely in a straight conformation or was a low-amplitude, long-wavelength helix. Examination of the three-dimensional swimming pattern showed that R. sphaeroides changed speed while swimming, sometimes doubling the swimming speed between stops. The rate of acceleration out of stops was also variable. The transformations in waveform are assumed to be torsionally driven and may be related to the changes in speed measured in free-swimming cells. The roles of and mechanisms that may be involved in the transformations of filament conformations and changes in swimming speed are discussed.  (+info)

Horizontal vestibuloocular reflex evoked by high-acceleration rotations in the squirrel monkey. I. Normal responses. (7/829)

The horizontal angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-frequency, high-acceleration rotations was studied in five squirrel monkeys with intact vestibular function. The VOR evoked by steps of acceleration in darkness (3,000 degrees /s(2) reaching a velocity of 150 degrees /s) began after a latency of 7.3 +/- 1.5 ms (mean +/- SD). Gain of the reflex during the acceleration was 14.2 +/- 5.2% greater than that measured once the plateau head velocity had been reached. A polynomial regression was used to analyze the trajectory of the responses to steps of acceleration. A better representation of the data was obtained from a polynomial that included a cubic term in contrast to an exclusively linear fit. For sinusoidal rotations of 0.5-15 Hz with a peak velocity of 20 degrees /s, the VOR gain measured 0.83 +/- 0.06 and did not vary across frequencies or animals. The phase of these responses was close to compensatory except at 15 Hz where a lag of 5.0 +/- 0.9 degrees was noted. The VOR gain did not vary with head velocity at 0.5 Hz but increased with velocity for rotations at frequencies of >/=4 Hz (0. 85 +/- 0.04 at 4 Hz, 20 degrees /s; 1.01 +/- 0.05 at 100 degrees /s, P < 0.0001). No responses to these rotations were noted in two animals that had undergone bilateral labyrinthectomy indicating that inertia of the eye had a negligible effect for these stimuli. We developed a mathematical model of VOR dynamics to account for these findings. The inputs to the reflex come from linear and nonlinear pathways. The linear pathway is responsible for the constant gain across frequencies at peak head velocity of 20 degrees /s and also for the phase lag at higher frequencies being less than that expected based on the reflex delay. The frequency- and velocity-dependent nonlinearity in VOR gain is accounted for by the dynamics of the nonlinear pathway. A transfer function that increases the gain of this pathway with frequency and a term related to the third power of head velocity are used to represent the dynamics of this pathway. This model accounts for the experimental findings and provides a method for interpreting responses to these stimuli after vestibular lesions.  (+info)

Horizontal vestibuloocular reflex evoked by high-acceleration rotations in the squirrel monkey. II. Responses after canal plugging. (8/829)

The horizontal angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) evoked by high-frequency, high-acceleration rotations was studied in four squirrel monkeys after unilateral plugging of the three semicircular canals. During the period (1-4 days) that animals were kept in darkness after plugging, the gain during steps of acceleration (3, 000 degrees /s(2), peak velocity = 150 degrees /s) was 0.61 +/- 0.14 (mean +/- SD) for contralesional rotations and 0.33 +/- 0.03 for ipsilesional rotations. Within 18-24 h after animals were returned to light, the VOR gain for contralesional rotations increased to 0. 88 +/- 0.05, whereas there was only a slight increase in the gain for ipsilesional rotations to 0.37 +/- 0.07. A symmetrical increase in the gain measured at the plateau of head velocity was noted after animals were returned to light. The latency of the VOR was 8.2 +/- 0. 4 ms for ipsilesional and 7.1 +/- 0.3 ms for contralesional rotations. The VOR evoked by sinusoidal rotations of 0.5-15 Hz, +/-20 degrees /s had no significant half-cycle asymmetries. The recovery of gain for these responses after plugging was greater at lower than at higher frequencies. Responses to rotations at higher velocities for frequencies >/=4 Hz showed an increase in contralesional half-cycle gain, whereas ipsilesional half-cycle gain was unchanged. A residual response that appeared to be canal and not otolith mediated was noted after plugging of all six semicircular canals. This response increased with frequency to reach a gain of 0.23 +/- 0.03 at 15 Hz, resembling that predicted based on a reduction of the dominant time constant of the canal to 32 ms after plugging. A model incorporating linear and nonlinear pathways was used to simulate the data. The coefficients of this model were determined from data in animals with intact vestibular function. Selective increases in the gain for the linear and nonlinear pathways predicted the changes in recovery observed after canal plugging. An increase in gain of the linear pathway accounted for the recovery in VOR gain for both responses at the velocity plateau of the steps of acceleration and for the sinusoidal rotations at lower peak velocities. The increase in gain for contralesional responses to steps of acceleration and sinusoidal rotations at higher frequencies and velocities was due to an increase in the gain of the nonlinear pathway. This pathway was driven into inhibitory cutoff at low velocities and therefore made no contribution for rotations toward the ipsilesional side.  (+info)

Strong relationships were identified between cadence and peak vertical acceleration (r = .96, P , .05) and peak loading rate (r = .98, P , .05). Regression analyses indicated cadences of 157 ± 12 steps/min (2.6 ± 0.2 steps/s) and 122 ± 10 steps/min (2.0 ± 0.2 steps/s) corresponded with the 4.9 g peak vertical acceleration and 43 BW/s peak loading rate thresholds, respectively. ...
Abstract: We study the effects of acceleration on fermionic Gaussian states of localized modes of a Dirac field. We consider two wave-packets in a Gaussian state and transform these to an accelerated frame of reference. In particular, we formulate the action of this transformation as a fermionic quantum channel. Having developed the general framework for fermions, we then investigate the entanglement of the vacuum, as well as the entanglement in Bell states. We find that with increasing acceleration vacuum entanglement increases, while the entanglement of Bell states decreases. Notably, our results have an immediate operational meaning given the localization of the modes ...
Reference: Avenirova E.D., Savin B.M., Sytinskii Ia., Effect of oxygen starvation and acceleration on the glutaminic and gamma-aminobutyric acid content in the brain tissue, Voprosy meditsinskoi khimii, 1964, vol: 10(6), 595-600 ...
Background: Aspects of physical functioning, including balance and gait, are affected after surgery for lower limb musculoskeletal tumors. These are not routinely measured but likely are related to how well patients function after resection or amputation for a bone or soft tissue sarcoma. Small, inexpensive portable accelerometers are available that might be clinically useful to assess balance and gait in these patients, but they have not been well studied.. Questions/purposes: In patients treated for lower extremity musculoskeletal tumors, we asked: (1) Are accelerometer-based body-worn monitor assessments of balance, gait, and timed up and go tests (TUG) feasible and acceptable? (2) Do these accelerometer-based body-worn monitor assessments produce clinically useful data (face validity), distinguish between patients and controls (discriminant validity), reflect findings obtained using existing clinical measures (convergent validity) and standard manual techniques in clinic (concurrent ...
1] The first in situ sounding of a post-seismic infrasound wavefront is presented, using data from the GOCE mission. The atmospheric infrasounds following the great Tohoku earthquake (on 11 March 2011) induce variations of air density and vertical acceleration of the GOCE platform. These signals are detected at two positions along the GOCE orbit corresponding to a crossing and a doubling of the infrasonic wavefront created by seismic surface waves. Perturbations up to 11% of air density and 1.35 × 10 − 7 m/s2 of vertical acceleration are observed and modeled with two different solid-atmosphere coupling codes. These perturbations are a due to acoustic waves creating vertical velocities up to 130 m/s. Amplitudes and arrival times of these perturbations are reproduced respectively within a factor 2, and within a 60 s time window. Waveforms present a good agreement with observed data. The vertical acceleration to air density perturbation ratio is higher for these acoustic waves than for gravity ...
A simply formed speed change transmission device capable of continuously changing an engine drive force in each of speed ranges classified in multiple stages by utilizing a continuously variable transmission (10) and planetary transmission mechanisms (P1, P2, P3), and clutches (C1, C2). The speed change transmission device includes a main transmission device (B) for synthesizing an output from the continuously variable transmission (10) with a drive force from an engine (1) by the first, second, and third planetary transmission mechanisms (P1, P2, P3), and outputting the synthesized drive force from an output shaft (41) through a clutch part (C) having the first and second clutches (C1, C2). The speed change transmission device further includes an auxiliary transmission device (20) for changing and outputting the drive force of the main transmission device (B) from the output shaft (41).
A high acceleration cockpit design test/evaluation program was conducted, using a full scale design aid. Alternate configurations were compared using this full scale design aid in a formally structured evaluation including mission related task elements. Test criteria considered evaluation of control/display and cockpit design options, including seat location, motion, and pilot anthropometry, with a balance between the physical and operational test measures and objectives using Air Force provided pilot subjects. (Author)*Jet fighters
Last week benchmarks were published of Intel`s New Sandy Bridge Acceleration architecture (SNA) that showed several performance improvements for 2D and 3D, but the new acceleration architecture still wasn`t mature with a few regressions compared to the normal UXA back-end. While the focus of this SNA support is on speeding up operations for Sandy Bridge (SNB) and forthcoming Ivy Bridge (IVB) hardware, SNA is supported for older Intel graphics processors too. Here are some benchmarks of the Sandy Bridge New Acceleration architecture when using the Ironlake and Gen3 back-ends."" Business software left the office and moved into the home long ago. If youve ever lost the password to Word, ZIP or PDF file in misguided attempt to protect data from prying eyes, this guide to Decrypting Document and File Passwords is a life saver. PCSTATS Tips ...
Accumulated signal noise will cause the integrated values to drift from the true value when measuring orientation angles of wearable sensors. This work proposes a novel method to reduce the effect of this drift to accurately measure human gait using wearable sensors. Firstly, an infinite impulse response (IIR) digital 4th order Butterworth filter was implemented to remove the noise from the raw gyro sensor data. Secondly, the mode value of the static state gyro sensor data was subtracted from the measured data to remove offset values. Thirdly, a robust double derivative and integration method was introduced to remove any remaining drift error from the data. Lastly, sensor attachment errors were minimized by establishing the gravitational acceleration vector from the acceleration data at standing upright and sitting posture. These improvements proposed allowed for removing the drift effect, and showed an average of 2.1°, 33.3°, 15.6° difference for the hip knee and ankle joint flexion/extension angle,
Contents of the 15 Chapter for This High Performance Inertial Sensors Market Study:-. Chapter 1: to describe Global High Performance Inertial Sensors Market Introduction, product scope, market overview, market opportunities, market risk, market driving force;. Chapter 2: to analyze the top manufacturers of Global High Performance Inertial Sensors Market, with sales, revenue, and price of Global High Performance Inertial Sensors Market, in 2016 and 2017;. Chapter 3: to display the competitive situation among the top manufacturers, with sales, revenue and market share in 2016 and 2017;. Chapter 4: to show the Global High Performance Inertial Sensors market by regions, with sales, revenue and market share of Global High Performance Inertial Sensors Market, for each region, from 2012 to 2017;. Chapter 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9: to analyze the key regions, with sales, revenue and market share by key countries in these regions;. Chapter 10 and 11: to show the market by type and application, with sales market ...
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By embracing the latest technological innovations and streamlining back-office operations, retailers can accelerate their online growth and...
In the present paper, the magnetohydrodynamics effects on flow parameters of blood carrying magnetic nanoparticles flowing through a stenosed artery under the influence of periodic body acceleration are investigated. Blood is assumed to behave as a Casson fluid. The governing equations are nonlinear and solved numerically using finite difference schemes. The effects of stenotic height, yield stress, magnetic field, particle concentration and mass parameters on wall shear stress, flow resistance and velocity distribution are analysed. It is found that wall shear stress and flow resistance values are considerably enhanced when an external magnetic field is applied. The velocity values of fluid and particles are appreciably reduced when a magnetic field is applied on the model. It is significant to note that the presence of nanoparticles, magnetic field and yield stress tend to increase the plug core radius. Increased wall shear stress and flow resistance affects the circulation of blood in the human
For evaluating physical function or physical activity, wearable sensors must capture kinematic or dynamic dimensions such as translational and rotational accelerations, velocities and displacements or forces and moments. Sensor measurement is captured either directly or indirectly and then further processed using additional information (e.g. boundary conditions) including those of human kinetics computer models.. The most commonly-used wearable sensors are inertial measurement units (IMUs). They contain individual or combined one-, two- or three-dimensional accelerometers and gyroscopes and have become accessible regarding measurement accuracy, size, cost, energy consumption or onboard pre-processing power through mass production, for example for automotive stability programmes and smartphones. Also magnetometers, GPS and barometer sensors are available, mostly in sensor fusion with an IMU. Wearable sensors that measure forces are yet less common and in orthopaedic publications seem restricted ...
Obesity treatment and prevention in youth is challenging. Thus, we are developing the KNOWME Network, a suite of wearable, Bluetooth-enabled wireless devices for monitoring obesity-related behaviors in minority youth. Here we present the Bluetooth-enabled Accelerometer (BEA), developed to address a lack of Bluetooth-enabled, research-quality accelerometers. The BEA provides information about body movement and orientation using an accelerometer and gyroscope combination that interfaces directly with a mobile phone/computer in real time. The accuracy of BEA-based models was assessed by estimating walking speed. Purpose: To develop personalized models for estimating treadmill walking speed using the BEA. Methods: Five subjects (4 male, 1 female; age 35 ± 12) walked at 7 speeds ranging from 2.5 to 4.0 miles per hour (mph) for 5 minutes per speed while wearing the BEA on the right hip. The BEA recorded motion information with a tri-axial accelerometer and tri-axial gyroscope and transmitted it via ...
The weight of the object at the south pole is greater than its weight at the equator because the Earths gravitational acceleration at the south pole is greater than the Earths gravitational acceleration at ...
So lets see... If this thing lands at the same vertical height it was launched at then (Vsin theta)^2/(2*y_max)=g and the horizontal distance is Vi^2*sin(2*theta)/g and V*cos(theta)=distance in x/time. 3 equations, 3 unknowns ...
We are already familiar with the concepts of linear velocity and linear acceleration, so angular velocity and angular acceleration are not too difficult to understand. Angular velocity is, quite sim
Disables mouse acceleration on a computer. As written, the script disables acceleration; however, if you want to enable acceleration, just change the strValue variable to = 1.
The chain of a workshop crane is 50 m long and has a mass of 3 kg/m. It is partially wound on a drum and the effective radius from the axis of the drum to the chain centre line is 0.2 m. The drum itself, including shaft and gear wheel has a mass of 100 kg and has a radius of gyration of 0.15 m. A steel block with a mass of 500 kg is to be lifted from a point 20 m below the level of the axis of the drum. If a torque of 1.3 kNm is applied to the drum, what will be the initial vertical acceleration of the steel block ...
We investigated the individual muscle contribution to arm motion to better understand the complex muscular coordination underlying three-dimensional (3D) reaching tasks of the upper limb (UL). The individual contributions of biceps, triceps, deltoid anterior, medius, posterior and pectoralis major to the control of specific degrees of freedom (DOFs) were examined: using a scaled musculoskeletal model, the muscle excitations that reproduce the kinematics were calculated using computed muscle control and a forward simulation was generated. During consequent perturbation analyses, the muscle excitation of selected muscles was instantaneously increased and the resulting effect on the specific DOF was studied to quantify the muscle contribution. The calculated muscle contributions were compared to the responses elicited during electrical stimulation experiments. Innovative in our findings is that muscle action during reaching clearly depended on the reaching trajectory in 3D space. For the majority of the
Measures taken from the chest and left leg indicate low risk of injuries to these body regions in a crash of this severity. Forces on the head when the dummy moved forward into the airbag indicate that injuries to the head would be possible. A high head acceleration occurred when the dummys head hit the window sill/B-pillar, indicating that further injuries to the head would be possible. Forces on the right tibia and acceleration on the right foot indicate that injuries to the lower leg and foot would be possible.. ...
Measures taken from the chest and left leg indicate low risk of injuries to these body regions in a crash of this severity. Forces on the head when the dummy moved forward into the airbag indicate that injuries to the head would be possible. A high head acceleration occurred when the dummys head hit the window sill/B-pillar, indicating that further injuries to the head would be possible. Forces on the right tibia and acceleration on the right foot indicate that injuries to the lower leg and foot would be possible.. ...
With hardware 3D acceleration, three-dimensional rendering uses the graphics processor on your video card instead of taking up valuable CPU resources drawing 3D images. Its also referred to as "hardware acceleration" instead of "software acceleration" because without this 3D acceleration your CPU is forced to draw everything itself using the Mesa software rendering libraries, which takes up quite a bit of processing power. While Xorg typically supports 2D hardware acceleration, it often lacks hardware 3D acceleration. Three-dimensional hardware acceleration is valuable in situations requiring rendering of 3D objects such as games, 3D CAD and modeling. ...
Imagine a force F acting on some object at a distance r from its axis of rotation. We can break up the force into tangential (Ftan), radial (Frad) (see Figure 1). (This is assuming a two-dimensional scenario. For three dimensions -- a more realistic, but also more complicated situation -- we have three components of force: the tangential component Ftan, the radial component Frad and the z-component Fz. All components of force are mutually perpendicular, or normal.) From Newtons Second Law, Ftan = m atan However, we know that angular acceleration ...
Demand for a refined Heavy Commercial Vehicle (HCV) is increasing due to rapid Indian economic growth, while the operating conditions and road infrastructures are still in a transition state of development. The same vehicle model will be operated in a range of operating road conditions like mining sites, construction sites, and highways with varying payloads and speeds by customers that are spread across the country. This variety of road inputs, payloads and speeds has made ride tuning as one of the major challenging process in the development process. This paper describes the attempt to assess ride comfort of HCV with fully suspended cab using numerical based simulation tools and its correlation with physical test results. The best suspension combination was finalized based on vertical and pitch acceleration at Center of Gravity (CG) of the cab. The trend of vertical acceleration obtained from the virtual model was correlated with the same obtained from physical test ...
Mathias wrote: , Dear ng, , , Im looking for a reference about whether the vestibular system yields , an acceleration and/or velocity signal (e.g. used for the head direction , and place cell system). Googling for this I found a website... , http://paperairplane.mit.edu/16.423J/Space/SBE/neurovestibular/NeuroVestibular/2_Physiology/PhysSub3.html , ... that claims the vestibular system outputs a velocity and not an , acceleration signal over the range of normal head movements. , Unfortunately there is no reference and Im not even certain about which , species they talk. , , Any reference on this topic would be highly appreciated, , Mathias Anderson and Eliasmiths book Neural Engineering: Computation, Representation, and Dynamics in Neurobiological Systems, has a good discussion and several references. You can find information about the book here: http://compneuro.uwaterloo.ca/bookinfo.html A paper available on-line: Eliasmith, C., M. B. Westover, and C. H. Anderson (2002). A general ...
Wearable kinematic sensors can be used to study head injury biomechanics based on kinematics and, more recently, based on tissue strain metrics using kinematics-driven brain models. These sensors require in-situ calibration and there is currently no data conveying wearable ability to estimate tissue strain. We simulated head impact (n = 871) to a 50th percentile Hybrid III (H-III) head wearing a hockey helmet instrumented with wearable GForceTracker (GFT) sensors measuring linear acceleration and angular velocity. A GFT was also fixed within the H-III head to establish a lower boundary on systematic errors. We quantified GFT errors relative to H-III measures based on peak kinematics and cumulative strain damage measure (CSDM). The smallest mean errors were 12% (peak resultant linear acceleration) and 15% (peak resultant angular velocity) for the GFT within the H-III. Errors for GFTs on the helmet were on average 54% (peak resultant linear acceleration) and 21% (peak resultant angular velocity). ...
Introduction: Periodic acceleration (pGz) is a non-invasive method of increasing pulsatile shear stress to the endothelium. pGz is achieved by the sinusoidal head to foot motion to the supine body. pGz increases endogenous production of nitric oxide in whole animal models and isolated perfused vessel preparations, and is cardioprotective when applied prior to, during and after ischemia reperfusion. In part, the protective effects of pGz are attributable to nitric oxide (NO). The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether pGz up-regulates NOS isoforms in the endomyocardium. Methods and results: Fifteen swine weight 15-20kg, were anesthetized, instrumented to measure hemodynamics and randomized. Ten animals received 1h of pGz at 180cycles/min and Gz±3.9m/s2 [pGz] in addition to conventional ventilatory support and five served as time controls. Results: pGz produced a 2.3±0.4 and a 6.6±0.1 fold significant increase in eNOS and phosphorylated eNOS, 3.6±1.1 fold increase in nNOS, and ...
The SenseWear armband monitor utilizes multiple heat detecting sensors in addition to a tri-axial accelerometer to assess physical activity, which considerably enhances its accuracy in comparison to other commonly used monitors. We have tested varying functions of the SenseWear armband relative to the doubly-labelled method, portable indirect calorimetry system, etc. The Sensewear was widely accepted as perhaps the most valid research grade tool. While it is no longer commercially available, our lab still uses it in studies as a de-facto "alloyed standard" for comparisons with other monitors and assessments. ...
DB2 10.5 with BLU Acceleration was announced on April 3 and now its time to learn what was announced and how you can benefit from the new features. If youre attending IDUG later this month, youll be at an advantage and will get a headstart in learning! IDUG DB2 Tech Conference in Orlando, Florida, USA 2013 Orlando, Florida April 29th - May 3rd, 2013 Here are the sessions that are focused on the latest features: Tuesday April 30 DB2: Database Software for the Era of Big Data with Bob Picciano DB2 for LUW: Recent Enhancements & Trends with Matt Huras...
Acceleration requires power from muscles to increase the kinetic energy of the centre of mass (CoM). The muscle-specific powers associated with near-maximal accelerations for a range of bipeds are high: accelerating turkeys (Roberts & Scales 2002) can reach a mean of 55-60 W kg−1 over a complete gait cycle. Similar values are achieved by sprinting humans (Cavagna et al. 1971; Janssen et al. 2000). Accelerating wallabies (McGowan et al. 2005) achieve 114 W kg−1 hindlimb muscle mass-specific power for a complete gait cycle (although this is probably an overestimate as it ignores power from trunk muscles). Therefore, muscles have been reasonably hypothesized as performing maximally during maximal accelerations (Roberts & Scales 2002). Our interest here is whether muscle power presents the single limit accounting for maximal acceleration and deceleration. If so, the main selective pressure concerning acceleration is the amount of power locomotor muscles can produce and the reduction of ...
DEFINITION In this Release Agreement, the term "SPORT" shall include all activities, events or services provided, arranged, organized, conducted, sponsored or authorized by the Releasees and shall include, but is not limited to: "SPORT"; "SPORT" rental; orientational and instructional courses, seminars and sessions; travel, transport and accommodation; and other such activities, events and services in any way connected with or related to "SPORT". PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT I have been advised to wear all protective equipment that is required by the rules and regulations of the governing body for my sport. ASSUMPTION OF RISKS I am aware that "SPORT" involves many risks, dangers and hazards. The risks, dangers and hazards, including but not limited to: loss of balance; difficulty or inability to control ones speed and direction; variation or steepness in terrain; rapid or uncontrolled acceleration on hills and inclines; mechanical failure of equipment; variation or changes in the playing surface ...
Sure, there are plenty of lightweight XC forks out there, but racing demands so much more. Nimble handling, gram-obsessed weight, buttery damping-combined they all make the difference between a good fork and a great fork. And with this in mind, the all-new RockShox SID World Cup Brain fork has been completely redesigned to meet the demands of XC racing, and hyperbole aside, we can confidently say that it sets the bar for race-worthy performance. The new SID has many new features, but the main attraction is its use of our proprietary Brain technology. Made famous on the rear of our Worlds-winning Epic, the Brain system knows the difference between rider and terrain inputs-staying firm in hard accelerations on smooth ground, and effectively soaking up imperfections when the trail decides to fight back. This translates to the highest efficiency possible when hammering up climbs, and smooth compression on the descents-all without ever having to flick a switch. The World Cup Brain edition of the SID is not
Bourke, A.K. and van de Ven, P. and Gamble, M. and OConnor, R. and Murphy, K. and Bogan, E. and McQuade, E. and Finucane, P. and \OLaighin, G. and Nelson, J. (2010) Assessment of waist-worn tri-axial accelerometer based fall-detection algorithms using continuous unsupervised activities Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2010 Annual International Conference of the IEEE , pp.2782-2785 [Details] ...
V. Vishwanath, Hereld, M., Morozov, V., and Papka, M. E., "Topology-Aware Data Movement and Staging for I/O Acceleration on Blue Gene/P Supercomputing Systems.", in Proc. 2011 International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis, Seattle, Washington, 2011. ...
V. Vishwanath, Hereld, M., Morozov, V., and Papka, M. E., "Topology-Aware Data Movement and Staging for I/O Acceleration on Blue Gene/P Supercomputing Systems.", in Proc. 2011 International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis, Seattle, Washington, 2011. ...
Added an additional kernel (from the bcm2711-kernel-bis weekly autobuild). This second kernel is used when booting the RPi4, lives at /boot/kernel8-p4.img, and is a tweaked version, as the name suggests, of a completely separate configuration: bcm2711_defconfig, as opposed to bcmrpi3_defconfig. The two kernels have distinguished release names, and so separate subdirectories in /lib/modules, but as they are built together, they share a common kernel tree tip commit. The kernel version used in this release includes (on the bcm2711 build) the recently-upstreamed PR#3144 (which allows the full 4GiB of RAM to be used, where present) and PR#3063 (which enables the use of V3D acceleration on the Pi4). The two kernels have auto-generated ebuilds by which they are installed: sys-kernel/bcmrpi3-kernel-bis-bin and sys-kernel/bcm2711-kernel-bis-bin, respectively ...
Accelerometers provide a measure of step-count. Reliability and validity of step-count and pedal-revolution count measurements by the GT3X+ accelerometer, placed at different anatomical locations, is absent in the literature. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability and validity of step and pedal-revolution counts produced by the GT3X+ placed at different anatomical locations during running and bicycling. Twenty-two healthy adults (14 men and 8 women) completed running and bicycling activity bouts (5 minutes each) while wearing 6 accelerometers: 2 each at the waist, thigh and shank. Accelerometer and video data were collected during activity. Excellent reliability and validity were found for measurements taken from accelerometers mounted at the waist and shank during running (Reliability: intraclass correlation (ICC) ≥ 0.99; standard error of measurement (SEM) ≤1.0 steps;
The new biomechanics lab is used for teaching undergraduate and postgraduate biomechanics modules. This purpose-built space enables students to gain the practical skills involved within the sport biomechanics environment. It also enables researchers to conduct high quality sports, exercise and health biomechanics research. The lab includes:. • Four custom built housings for force plates (Kistler). • A custom made rig that houses a 16-camera motion analysis system (Vicon). • An active-marker motion analysis system (CODA). • Six inertial measurement units (Vicon). • Three wearable sensors (APDM). • A wireless surface electromyography system (Delsys). • An electrical muscle and nerve stimulator (Digitimer). • A wireless neuromuscular stimulator (Chattanooga). • A treadmill. ...
Hi, there Share an article talked about WAN acceleration. It mentions what WAN acceleration is, and then comes to how it works. I think its worth to read! Here are some quotes from the full article. Why WAN acceleration is one of the hottest projects in IT? What is WAN acceleration? WAN acceleration can drastically improve the speed of file transfers and the performance of many applications for your branch offices and remote workers. And since at least half, and by some estimates up
Techniques for detection and treatment of myocardial ischemia are described that monitor both the electrical and dynamic mechanical activity of the heart to detect and verify the occurrence of myocardial ischemia in a more reliable manner. The occurrence of myocardial ischemia can be detected by monitoring changes in an electrical signal such as an ECG or EGM, and changes in dynamic mechanical activity of the heart that are sensed by an accelerometer sensor. The heart acceleration signal can be obtained from an single- or multiple-axis accelerometer and/or a pressure sensor deployed within or near the heart. The techniques correlate contractility changes detected by an accelerometer or pressure sensor with changes in the ST electrogram segment detected by the electrodes to increase the reliability of ischemia detection.
NX is a computer program that handles remote X Window System connections. It can greatly improve the performance of the X Windows, to the point that it can be usable over a slow link such as a dial-up modem. NX also provides sessions, which will allow a user to disconnect from the session and reconnect to it at a later time, while keeping the state of all running applications inside the session. This gives users a virtual desktop thats running at NERSC.
Gimbal Calibration With IMU MPU-6050: Some gimbals are hard to calibrate because there is no way to graph the position in real time.This instructable will show you how to graph the position of a 2 axis gimbal for tuning a PID. To achieve that Im using a second IMU and an Arduino lin...
In this packet we continue our discussion on acceleration by relating it to displacement, velocity, and time. We will derive equations which describe the linear motion of an object under constant acceleration. Finally we will go over some practice problems to help determine how to choose the right governing equation. The two equations we will be deriving are: An equation dependent on acceleration, initial velocity, displacement, and time An equation dependent on acceleration, velocity, and displacement
Looking for Accelerations? Find out information about Accelerations. change in the velocity velocity, change in displacement with respect to time. Displacement is the vector counterpart of distance, having both magnitude and... Explanation of Accelerations
See the attached file for proper format and graph. A bicycle contains a big chain ring with 52 teeth and a radius rbc = 16 cm, with a pedal arm length rp = 19 cm. Attached to the rear wheel is a cog having a choice of gears.
At the recent European X.Org Developers Meeting KDE developer and Trolltech employee Zack Rusin presented a new acceleration architecture named Exa (eyecandy X architecture) for X.org. Being based on KAA (KDrive acceleration architecture) its designed to be an alternative to the currently used XAA (XFree86 acceleration architecture) with better acceleration of XRender which
At the recent European X.Org Developers Meeting KDE developer and Trolltech employee Zack Rusin presented a new acceleration architecture named Exa (eyecandy X architecture) for X.org. Being based on KAA (KDrive acceleration architecture) its designed to be an alternative to the currently used XAA (XFree86 acceleration architecture) with better acceleration of XRender which
Consider for example that in marathon running, lasting 125 minutes, the gap between the best in the world and 40th best is only 4%, and you realize that its normal for elite performers to be bunched within a few percent of one another. Then consider that a drafting effect of only 5% would offset a potential performance effect of 4%, and suddenly, the size of the groups is expected. This doesnt take into account attacks and the ability to change pace quickly, but when the group is so big to begin with, even rapid accelerations are buffered because there are sufficient riders to gradually pull back attacks. Only those at their limit are gapped permanently, and thats what we saw today - the top 5 or 6 were riding at one level, and those behind, in the elite group but not in the top 5, were benefitting from repeated accelerations and then slower periods of regrouping. Had the pace been hard and consistent, that group would have thinned, but still, seven or eight at the front of the race, thats a ...
8 Other possible causes of unintended acceleration *8.1 Electronic throttle control system *8.1.1 ABC News acceleration ... By 1986, more than 2,000 injuries had been blamed on sudden acceleration with sudden acceleration complaints totaling over 10 ... The resulting unexpected sudden acceleration would lead to panic, with the driver thinking that the acceleration system had ... Car and Driver, Motor Trend, and Ward's Auto also compared the 2009-10 Toyota recalls to the Audi sudden acceleration cases of ...
From acceleration to geometry[edit]. In exploring the equivalence of gravity and acceleration as well as the role of tidal ... Gravity and acceleration[edit]. Ball falling to the floor in an accelerating rocket (left) and on Earth (right). The effect is ... When the lower observer sends a light signal to the higher observer, the acceleration causes the light to be red-shifted, as ... this relative acceleration is minuscule, while for skydivers on opposite sides of the Earth, the effect is large. Such ...
Age acceleration effects due to HIV-1 infection[edit]. Infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV) is associated ... A significant age acceleration effect could be detected in brain (7.4 years) and blood (5.2 years) tissue due to HIV-1 ...
"Constant Acceleration". Retrieved 24 May 2011.. *^ U.S. Air Force Research Report no. AU ARI 93-8: LEO On The Cheap. Retrieved ... Electromagnetic acceleration[edit]. Electrical launch systems include mass drivers, railguns, and coilguns. All of these ... Forms of ground launch limited to a given maximum acceleration (such as due to human g-force tolerances if intended to carry ... For both Gen 1-2 systems, the mouth of the tube would be open during vehicle acceleration, with air kept out by ...
Impact of rocket acceleration[edit]. Another important aspect to GCRs is the impact of the rocket acceleration on the ... A rocket acceleration of only 0.001 g (10 mm/s²) will cause buoyancy effects to decrease core containment by 35% if all other ... Unless an outside force is relied upon (i.e. magnetic forces, rocket acceleration), the only way to limit fuel-propellant ...
Acceleration. 0 to 55 mph (0 to 89 km/h) in 4 seconds. ...
acceleration: a. m s−2. T−2. angular acceleration: α. rad s−2. ...
In addition, several technical improvements were made for better acceleration, altered door functions to enable faster boarding ...
... acceleration).[35] Gorbachev reinvigorated the party ideology by adding new concepts and updating older ones.[35] A positive ...
Acceleration. 0 to 55 mph (0 to 89 km/h) in 3 seconds. ...
Acceleration. 1.6 mph per second (2.5 km/h per second; 0.70m/s/s[1]). ...
It relates the acceleration of a body to the applied force via Newton's law, F = m × a: force equals mass times acceleration. A ... Weight of a 1 kg mass at the Earth's surface is m × g; mass times the acceleration due to gravity, which is 9.81 newtons at the ... Since the acceleration due to gravity is local and varies by location and altitude on the Earth, weight is unsuitable for ... Acceleration due to gravity.. Note the lowercase letters (neither "metres" nor "seconds" were named after people), the space ...
Increased acceleration. • Increased alertness and attention to task. *^ a b c Malenka RC, Nestler EJ, Hyman SE (2009). "Chapter ...
Plasma (from Ancient Greek πλάσμα​, meaning 'moldable substance'[1]) is one of the four fundamental states of matter, and was first described by chemist Irving Langmuir[2] in the 1920s.[3] Plasma can be artificially generated by heating or subjecting a neutral gas to a strong electromagnetic field to the point where an ionized gaseous substance becomes increasingly electrically conductive, and long-range electromagnetic fields dominate the behaviour of the matter.[4] Plasma and ionized gases have properties and display behaviours unlike those of the other states, and the transition between them is mostly a matter of nomenclature[2] and subject to interpretation.[5] Based on the surrounding environmental temperature and density, partially ionized or fully ionized forms of plasma may be produced. Neon signs and lightning are examples of partially ionized plasma.[6] The Earth's ionosphere is a plasma and the magnetosphere contains plasma in the Earth's surrounding space environment. The ...
The quake had a duration of approximately 10-20 seconds, and its peak ground acceleration of 1.8g (16.7 m/s2)[7] was the ... The quake produced unusually strong ground accelerations in the range of 1.0 g. Damage was also caused by fire and landslides. ...
Increased acceleration. • Increased alertness and attention to task. *^ a b Frati P, Kyriakou C, Del Rio A, Marinelli E, ... In 1980, Chandler and Blair47 showed significant increases in knee extension strength, acceleration, anaerobic capacity, time ...
Latimer Clark's (1891) "Dictionary of Measures" contains celo (acceleration), vel or velo (velocity) and pulse (momentum) as ... To convert between the absolute and gravitational FPS systems one needs to fix the standard acceleration g which relates the ...
The solar tidal force is 46% as large as the lunar.[40] More precisely, the lunar tidal acceleration (along the Moon-Earth axis ... See also: Tidal acceleration. Earth's tidal oscillations introduce dissipation at an average rate of about 3.75 terawatts.[42] ... where g is the gravitational acceleration at the Earth's surface.[41] Venus has the largest effect of the other planets, at ... at the Earth's surface) is about 1.1 × 10−7 g, while the solar tidal acceleration (along the Sun-Earth axis, at the Earth's ...
Quantity acceleration = l1 · t−2, dim acceleration = L1 · T−2. possible units: m1 · s−2, km1 · Ms−2, etc. ... acceleration. =. mass. ×. length. time. 2. =. M. L. T. 2. =. M. L. T. −. 2. {\displaystyle {\text{dim}}~F={\text{mass}}\times ... m = mass, a = acceleration. Thermal. T. δ. S. /. δ. r. {\displaystyle T\delta S/\delta r}. S entropy, T = temperature, r = ... the second derivative (d2x/dt2 = (dx/dt) / dt, acceleration) has dimension LT−2. ...
Humans have always altered their environment. The advent of agriculture around 10000 years ago led to a radical change in land use that still continues. But, the relatively small human population had little impact on a global scale until the start of the industrial revolution in 1750. This event, followed by the invention of the Haber-Bosch process in 1909, which allowed large-scale manufacture of fertilizers, led directly to rapid changes to many of the planet's most important physical, chemical and biological processes. The 1950s marked a shift in gear: global change began accelerating. Between 1950 and 2010, the population more than doubled. In that time, rapid expansion of international trade coupled with upsurges in capital flows and new technologies, particularly information and communication technologies, led to national economies becoming more fully integrated. There was a tenfold increase in economic activity and the world's human population became more tightly connected than ever ...
reaction rate acceleration. *milder reaction conditions. *higher chemical yield. *lower energy usage ...
Beschleunigungsanzeiger = Acceleration display Verzögerungsanzeiger = Delaying display Used to indicate the train driver that ...
acceleration principle. *access to land and development. *accounting and economics. *adaptive estimation ...
Earth-surface gravitational acceleration. 9.80665 m/s2 M. Molar mass of dry air. 0.0289644 kg/mol ...
is the gravitational acceleration. For a body of water open to the air, p. 0. {\displaystyle p_{0}}. would be the atmospheric ...
... resulting in a recent acceleration in range collapse. Thus, a decline of at least 30% in abundance and extent of occurrence is ...
What causes a whiplash? Most whiplash injuries result from a collision that includes sudden acceleration or deceleration. Many ... Most whiplash injuries result from a collision that includes sudden acceleration or deceleration. Many whiplash injuries occur ...
Techniques for series acceleration are often applied in numerical analysis, where they are used to improve the speed of ... Series acceleration techniques may also be used, for example, to obtain a variety of identities on special functions. Thus, the ... In mathematics, series acceleration is one of a collection of sequence transformations for improving the rate of convergence of ... Two classical techniques for series acceleration are Eulers transformation of series[1] and Kummers transformation of series. ...
acceleration (countable and uncountable, plural accelerations) *(uncountable) The act of accelerating, or the state of being ... acceleration accelerationen accelerationer accelerationerna Genitive accelerations accelerationens accelerationers ... From French accélération or more likely directly from Latin accelerātiō ("a hastening, acceleration")[1]. Equivalent to ... The boosters produce an acceleration of 20 metres per second per second.. *(Can we date this quote?) Isaac Taylor A period of ...
Adobe acquisition acceleration helps you to create and enrich high lifetime value audience segment, and deliver dynamic offers ... Acquisition acceleration is the ability to engage high-value customers at a faster pace and a lower cost, no matter where they ...
I/O Acceleration Technology, a component of Intel® Virtualization Technology for Connectivity, improves data flow and system ... I/O Acceleration for Consolidated Workloads. Server consolidation requires large numbers of virtual machines (VMs) per physical ... Intel® I/O Acceleration Technology (Intel® I/OAT), a component of Intel® Virtualization Technology for Connectivity, improves ... The features of Intel I/OAT enhance data acceleration across the computing platform. ...
Cache Acceleration Software (Intel® CAS) caches frequently accessed data to improve server application performance. ... Intel® Cache Acceleration Software (Intel® CAS) software is licensed per SSD and includes one year of standard support. Intel® ... Intel® Cache Acceleration Software (Intel® CAS) installs in moments. Whether you are using VMs or dedicated servers, you will ... They got it by deploying Intel® Cache Acceleration Software (CAS) 3.0 on the Intel® SSD data center family for PCIe* in their ...
FineGround Networks announces that its patent-pending application acceleration software platform, the Condenser, will support ... FineGround Acceleration Software Supports WebSphere By: Darryl K. Taft , May 07, 2002 ... The Campbell, Calif., company focuses on enterprise Web application acceleration.. "Our approach is a bit different from other ... on Tuesday announced that its patent-pending application acceleration software platform, the Condenser, will support the IBM ...
Check out Business Acceleration Systems events, learn more, or contact this organizer. ... Business Acceleration System is using Eventbrite to organize 1 upcoming events. ...
Acceleration of chemical reaction fronts. II. Gas-phase-diffusion limited frontal dynamics ... this additional gas-phase transport may lead to an acceleration of the propagating reaction front. ...
... incorporates the capability for modeling non-constant vehicle acceleration, where the acceleration rate varies with speed, ... In each case, the full-throttle acceleration of the vehicles modeled in PC-Crash showed good agreement with the acceleration of ... incorporates the capability for modeling non-constant vehicle acceleration, where the acceleration rate varies with speed, ... Vehicle Acceleration Modeling in PC-Crash 2014-01-0464. PC-Crash™, a widely used crash analysis software package, ...
Topics may include preparing a design for acceleration, improving simulation acceleration performance, creating synthesizable ... testbenches, an introduction to transaction-based and UVM acceleration, and design debugging using Palladium XP I/II. This ... transaction-based acceleration, UVM acceleration, and synthesizable testbench acceleration. ... Topics may include preparing a design for acceleration, improving simulation acceleration performance, creating synthesizable ...
a. Trenton nothing to hold. nowhere to go. this is Trenton -- on the platform, a father smokes with his two teenage daughters, both girls trying not to look impossibly young -- heavy Eagles jackets, silver hoop earrings, ponytails peeking through matching baseball caps. In Trenton, Christmas has come and gone. snow sits heavy over this city -- rowhouses and water towers flash by, gaunt and awkward. we lurch forward. the tracks stretch on this way for miles. b. Bristol = quiet dull metal scraps jut from the snow like scabs a blank high school football field a penitentiary the Grundy Industrial & Office Complex stretches like Babel into the ashen sky at the post office, an american flag hangs, tattered, from its pole UNHAPPY WITH THAT CAR YOUR DRIVING? Go to Northeast Lincoln Mercury. c. Croyden the train kicks up snowpuff and the sun emerges, cold and dizzyingly bright. on the cracked wooden platform, one patient woman, icecaked boots and the Zober Development Co. smokestacks coughing soot that ...
Acceleration, in physics, is the rate of change of velocity of an object with respect to time. An objects acceleration is the ... Acceleration, in physics, is the rate of change of velocity of an object with respect to time. An objects acceleration is the ... Acceleration, in physics, is the rate of change of velocity of an object with respect to time. An objects acceleration is the ... Acceleration vector a, not parallel to the radial motion but offset by the angular and Coriolis accelerations, nor tangent to ...
If acceleration is constant, use v = va + act, s = So + vat + ½ act2, v2 = VB + 2ac( s - so) to determine the velocity or ... If acceleration is a function of displacement, integrate a ds = v dv to obtain the velocity as a function of position. • ... The acceleration may be represented as the ma vector on the kinetic diagram.* • Identify the unknowns in the problem. ... When applying the equation of motion, it is important that the acceleration of the particle be measured with respect to a ...
Whats the real problem behind Toyotas unintended acceleration? PM senior automotive editor Mike Allen delves into modern car ... So what to make of the unintended acceleration cases popping up by the dozens? Not the ones explainable by problem sticky ... Whats the real problem behind Toyotas unintended acceleration? Is it simply a sticky pedal, or is the problem more ... Plus, sudden unintended acceleration (SUA) is notoriously difficult to diagnose because, more often then not, the problem cant ...
Recent acceleration of human adaptive evolution. John Hawks, Eric T. Wang, Gregory M. Cochran, Henry C. Harpending, Robert K. ... Recent acceleration of human adaptive evolution. John Hawks, Eric T. Wang, Gregory M. Cochran, Henry C. Harpending, Robert K. ... Recent acceleration of human adaptive evolution. John Hawks, Eric T. Wang, Gregory M. Cochran, Henry C. Harpending, and Robert ... The results above demonstrate the extent of acceleration: the recent rate must be one to two orders of magnitude higher than ...
If youre considering using TCP acceleration, its important to talk with your proposed vendor(s) to make sure you understand ... TCP acceleration and spoofing acknowledgements. * One technique for accelerating traffic using TCP acceleration. * ... The acceleration device then saves a copy so it can be retransmitted if needed between the other acceleration device. The final ... the end-points and the acceleration devices. Of course, this acceleration is much more pronounced for large file transfers than ...
... use in Mac OS X Snow Leopard is destined to also play a significant role in boosting embedded graphics and video acceleration ... but also enable support for higher quality video acceleration. ... Future iPhones to wield OpenCL acceleration. By Prince McLean ... use in Mac OS X Snow Leopard is destined to also play a significant role in boosting embedded graphics and video acceleration ...
The Technology Readiness Acceleration Center at USD trains graduate students in development and commercialization of novel ... The Technology Readiness Acceleration Center (TRAC) is a new multi-institution technology commercialization center that ...
Unintended Acceleration: Toyotas Recall Crisis. Case Number: 5-311-504, Year Published: 2011 ... after multiple deaths and injuries were attributed to accidents resulting from the unintended and uncontrolled acceleration of ...
Nominations are open for the 2nd Annual B2B Growth Acceleration Awards, which celebrate the tenacity, excellence, and ... Thank you to all of the nominees of the B2B Growth Acceleration Awards! Here are your 2017 winners!. Sales Growth Achievement. ... ZoomInfo is excited to announce the 2nd Annual B2B Growth Acceleration Awards, which celebrate the tenacity, excellence, and ...
This year, three managers attended the Management Acceleration Programme, and I am happy to say that they are on their way to ... Here is a sample of what participants have to say about the value of the Management Acceleration Programme. ...
Michigan becomes the first state to join the State Digital Acceleration (SDA) program ... Country Digital Acceleration. "Technology truly will enable countries to change the lives of their citizens, to really change ... Ciscos Country Digital Acceleration Strategy is a long-term partnership with national leadership, industry & academia. By ... Ciscos Country Digital Acceleration Strategy is a long-term partnership with national leadership, industry & academia. ...
... Date: Thu Jan 7 10:04:37 1999. Posted By: Charlene Wolf-Hall, Faculty, Food Science, ...
  • Plus, sudden unintended acceleration (SUA) is notoriously difficult to diagnose because, more often then not, the problem can't be repeated in front of a mechanic. (popularmechanics.com)
  • The National Highway Traffic Safety Agency says "pedal misapplication" is the most probable cause for the vast majority of sudden acceleration incidents in which no vehicle malfunction is evident. (deseretnews.com)
  • The conclusions of the yearlong study by the U.S. safety agency closely parallels findings by Transport Canada, which last month closed its probe after determining sudden acceleration was due to driver error.However, NHTSA declined to characterize the cause of sudden acceleration as driver error, saying that term could imply "carelessness or willfulness in failing to operate a car properly. (deseretnews.com)
  • NHTSA defined sudden acceleration as occurring when a car allegedly accelerates to full power from standstill after being placed in gear, and that stepping on the brakes does not stop the vehicle. (deseretnews.com)
  • NHTSA also said that poor pedal design could play a role in sudden acceleration but was unwilling to recommend changes because additional studies are needed to determine if those changes would create other undesired effects, like increased braking response time. (deseretnews.com)
  • NHTSA, which has conducted more than 100 investigations of unwanted power surges dating back to the late 1970s covering 20 automakers, said its findings "may be difficult to accept" by drivers who believe they were applying the brake while experiencing sudden acceleration. (deseretnews.com)
  • However it said extensive testing failed to turn up any defects in cruise control systems, electronic idle control systems, brakes, or transmissions which would produce sufficient power to create what it calls sudden acceleration. (deseretnews.com)
  • The agency also noted that not all reports of unwanted acceleration could be called sudden acceleration. (deseretnews.com)
  • Bennett said Audi would probably not sue CBS, which in November 1986 aired a report on its "60 Minutes" television program unfavorably portraying Audi's cars as prone to sudden acceleration. (deseretnews.com)
  • Several other domestic and import carmakers have since adopted the device, which both NHTSA and Transport Canada said have proven their worth as a deterrent to sudden acceleration. (deseretnews.com)
  • LOS ANGELES -- A U.S. judge gave preliminary approval Friday to a $1 billion-plus settlement with Toyota Motor Corp. in cases involving problems of sudden, unintended acceleration by its vehicles, a plaintiffs' attorney said. (dailyherald.com)
  • The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said yesterday that it might expand its investigation into "sudden acceleration" mishaps involving Audi 5000S cars with three-speed automatic transmissions. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Sudden acceleration" occurs when a vehicle moves forward at high speed from a standstill in reaction to light or moderate pressure on the accelerator pedal. (washingtonpost.com)
  • The petition says that one out of every 500 Audi 5000S cars sold in the United States since 1978 has been involved in sudden-acceleration accidents, resulting in some serious injuries. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Sudden acceleration if very often caused by drivers who press the gas pedal when they intend to press the brake,' he said. (wired.com)
  • A new investigative report, complete with an automotive professor from a major college, claims to show proof of an inherent design flaw with Toyota's electronics that can cause a vehicle to experience unintended sudden acceleration. (leftlanenews.com)
  • Brian Ross of ABC News has tracked down a college professor, Dave Gilbert, from Southern Illinois University, in order to investigate Gilbert's claim that the electronics could possibly be to blame for the cases of sudden acceleration in modern Toyota vehicles. (leftlanenews.com)
  • Gilbert has so far been able to replicate the short-induced unintended sudden acceleration on a Lexus, Toyota Tundra , Avalon and on a Matrix. (leftlanenews.com)
  • Gilbert also went on to explain that he has attempted to recreate the same short with vehicles made by other manufacturers as well, as a basis for comparison, and found that other makes did not experience the unintended sudden acceleration. (leftlanenews.com)
  • Last week, the National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration said it would review a defect petition that cited 127 consumer complaints of alleged unintended acceleration of Tesla electric vehicles that may have contributed to or caused 110 crashes and 52 injuries. (yahoo.com)
  • or "metre per second per second", as the velocity in metres per second changes by the acceleration value, every second. (wikipedia.org)
  • The boosters produce an acceleration of 20 metres per second per second. (wiktionary.org)
  • Acceleration in SI units is measured in metres per second per second (m/s 2 ), or in imperial units in feet per second per second (ft/s 2 ). (wiktionary.org)
  • Hello Stuart, On Wednesday, 20 May 2020, Stuart Cuddy wrote and made these points on the subject of "Does your CPU support hardware SHA1 acceleration? (mail-archive.com)
  • The UNWTO Acceleration Programme is a training event especially designed for our Member States' tourism officials, travel associations, tourism boards, DMOs, in order to develop innovation and digital transformation skills and provide practical tools for project implementation. (unwto.org)
  • Cisco's Country Digital Acceleration Strategy is a long-term partnership with national leadership, industry & academia. (cisco.com)
  • We work closely with senior leaders to help them shape their organization's approach to human capital and deliver high-impact innovation and digital acceleration. (heidrick.com)
  • In an "elastic" collision (where the colliding objects don't change shape and energy is not lost), the collision is instantaneous, and force and acceleration are not involved at all. (gamedev.net)
  • In late 2009 Toyota became the subject of media and U.S. government scrutiny after multiple deaths and injuries were attributed to accidents resulting from the unintended and uncontrolled acceleration of its cars. (northwestern.edu)
  • WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Justice Department has reached a $1 billion settlement with Toyota Motor Corp over the automaker's handling of consumer complaints tied to unintended vehicle acceleration and is set to announce the agreement as early as Wednesday, CNN reported. (yahoo.com)
  • The acceleration issue prompted Toyota to recall millions of vehicles beginning in 2009. (yahoo.com)
  • Toyota has recalled more than 14 million vehicles worldwide due to acceleration problems in several models and brake defects with the Prius hybrid. (dailyherald.com)
  • After more than a thousand complaints of unintended acceleration - and reports of 42 fatal accidents - Toyota has recalled millions of vehicles. (wired.com)
  • Toyota at first believed that what Gilbert described would not produce any unintended acceleration. (leftlanenews.com)
  • PC-Crash™, a widely used crash analysis software package, incorporates the capability for modeling non-constant vehicle acceleration, where the acceleration rate varies with speed, weight, engine power, the degree of throttle application, and the roadway slope. (sae.org)
  • Intel® I/O Acceleration Technology (Intel® I/OAT), a component of Intel® Virtualization Technology for Connectivity, improves data flow across the platform to enhance system performance. (intel.com)
  • The features of Intel I/OAT enhance data acceleration across the computing platform. (intel.com)
  • Intel® I/O Acceleration Technology moves data more efficiently through servers. (intel.com)
  • Intel® Cache Acceleration Software (Intel® CAS), combined with high-performance Solid State Drives (SSDs), increases data center performance via intelligent caching rather than extreme spending. (intel.com)
  • They got it by deploying Intel® Cache Acceleration Software (CAS) 3.0 on the Intel® SSD data center family for PCIe* in their existing Ceph* environment. (intel.com)
  • Save time and money with confidence: Purchase an Intel® SSD Data Center (Intel® SSD DC) together with Intel® Cache Acceleration Software (Intel® CAS) and you may be eligible for discount (vs. purchasing separately), and ease software management compliance and overhead. (intel.com)
  • Intel® Cache Acceleration Software (Intel® CAS) software is licensed per SSD and includes one year of standard support. (intel.com)
  • Intel® Data Center SSD's when paired with Intel® Cache Acceleration Software (Intel® CAS) is a solution that addresses the most challenging data center workloads. (intel.com)
  • Intel® Cache Acceleration Software (Intel® CAS) installs in moments. (intel.com)
  • A 120-day trial version of Intel® Cache Acceleration Software (Intel® CAS) is available, choose your platform and get started. (intel.com)
  • Sysbench Database Testing: Intel® Cache Acceleration Software (Intel® CAS) for Linux* v2.7.0, Intel® Xeon® E5-2680 processor @ 2.70GHz x2, CentOS* 6.5 kernel, 3.10.24, 32GB RAM, 50% of database cached, Intel® Solid State Drive DC P37000 Series 400GB, Sysbench v0.4.12 (16 threads, max request=1000). (intel.com)
  • Microsoft Hyper-V* Virtualization: Intel® Cache Acceleration Software (Intel® CAS) for Windows* v2.7.0, Intel® Xeon® E5-2670 processor @ 2.60GHz, Microsoft Windows* Server 2012 R2, 128GB RAM, Intel® SSD DC P3700 Series 400GB, 8x SAS RAID 5 as main storage. (intel.com)
  • Dedicated PowerVR cores built into an ARM or Intel Atom SoC or "System on a Chip" will not only provide improved graphics power for gaming, but also enable support for higher quality video acceleration. (appleinsider.com)
  • The Red Hat-Intel Solution Acceleration Program will give customers real-time access to the critical information, tools and support they need to build and optimize high-value Linux solutions on Intel-based platforms," said Jon Bork, Director of Intel's Open Source Program Office. (redhat.com)
  • The Intel® Data Analytics Acceleration Library (Intel® DAAL) helps speed big data analytics by providing highly optimized algorithmic building blocks for all data analysis stages (Pre-processing, Transformation, Analysis, Modeling, Validation, and Decision Making) for offline, streaming and distributed analytics usages. (intel.com)
  • 2. A sensor for detecting angular rate or acceleration as recited in claim 1, wherein said vibrator further includes a beam having a principal surface thereof formed in a (110) crystal plane parallel to the principal surface of the silicon substrate. (google.com)
  • 5. A sensor for detecting angular rate or acceleration as recited in claim 1, wherein said vibrator is formed by crystallographic anisotropic etching or reactive ion etching. (google.com)
  • Founded in 1999, Acceleration has offices in Buenos Aires, Cape Town, Dubai, Johannesburg, London and New York and and employs 148 marketing technologists. (wpp.com)
  • https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/questions/1109701 Actual results: On a Samsung SM-T231 (7' Android 4.4.2 tablet) the canvas freezes and will not update. (mozilla.org)
  • There are two types of Fermi acceleration: first-order Fermi acceleration (in shocks) and second-order Fermi acceleration (in the environment of moving magnetized gas clouds). (wikipedia.org)
  • External shocks tend to produce growth accelerations that eventually fizzle out, while economic reform is a statistically significant predictor of growth accelerations that are sustained. (repec.org)
  • Stories like that make you wonder why drivers don't follow a few simple steps to remedy any sort of unintended acceleration - namely apply the brake, or put the car in neutral. (wired.com)
  • In the research reported here, PC-Crash 9.0 was used to model the full-throttle acceleration capabilities of three vehicles with automatic transmissions - a 2006 Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptor (CVPI), a 2000 Cadillac DeVille DTS, and a 2003 Ford F150. (sae.org)
  • Microsoft product expert Curt Simmons introduces you to ISA Server 2000, Microsoft's new Internet acceleration and security product. (informit.com)
  • Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server 2000 has received a lot of attention during its beta development and recent release into the marketplace-and rightly so. (informit.com)
  • ISA Server is Microsoft's first server product that combines smart-caching features for Internet acceleration with multilayered IP firewall protection. (informit.com)
  • where ACCELERATION defines how many times faster the cursor will move than the default speed, when the cursor moves more than THRESHOLD pixels in a short time. (archlinux.org)
  • The U.S. Attorney's Office in Manhattan has been probing allegations the Japanese company misled U.S. authorities after the complaints about the unintended acceleration emerged. (yahoo.com)
  • Unintended acceleration is nothing new, and just about every automaker has been the subject of such complaints at some point. (wired.com)
  • Earlier this year, Freescale extended security capabilities by including a cryptographic acceleration unit (CAU) in its ColdFire MCF52235 32-bit MCU for Ethernet communications. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • FineGround Networks announces that its patent-pending application acceleration software platform, the Condenser, will support the IBM WebSphere Application Server. (eweek.com)
  • All of our hosting plans include: *30 day money back guarantee *Daily Backups *Web-based Control Panel *Unlimited Email Forwarders *Unlimited Email Aliases *Unlimited Email Auto-responders *Web Statistics *PHP 5 support *CGI Access *Password Protected Directories *Shared SSL *Easy-install PHP Scripts *Easy-install CGI Scripts Net Acceleration is located in San Francisco, CA and has been designing web and mobile applications for over 10 years. (webhostinggeeks.com)
  • Engineers investigating the Audi incidents couldn't find any evidence within the cars to support drivers' stories of unintended acceleration, Schmidt said. (wired.com)
  • The research reported here offers a validation of this capability, demonstrating that PC-Crash can be used to realistically model the build-up of a vehicle's speed under maximal acceleration. (sae.org)
  • It also found that in all cases, a vehicle's braking power was sufficient to stop a car, even under full acceleration. (deseretnews.com)
  • The automaker argued that its vehicles are designed to avoid unintended acceleration, noting that its system will default to cutting off motor torque if the two independent position sensors on its accelerator pedals register any error. (yahoo.com)
  • The results suggest that multiple accelerometers aid in recognition because conjunctions in acceleration feature values can effectively discriminate many activities. (psu.edu)
  • The result is that there is greater overall throughput because the propagation delay is decreased from being end-to-end propagation time to the propagation delay between individual components - the end-points and the acceleration devices. (networkworld.com)
  • Speed equals acceleration divided by time. (google.com)
  • The distance-time graph for acceleration is always a straight line. (google.com)
  • Tensor components are at the same time components of the two three-dimensional vectors - acceleration field strength and the solenoidal acceleration vector. (wikiversity.org)
  • Sources close to one of the holdout firms said the hedge funds don't see any real threat from acceleration, as any such process could be too cumbersome for some exchange bondholders and take a long time to be completed. (reuters.com)
  • This is something that you need to understand - the zero to 60 mph (96 km/h) acceleration time has been achieved in an astonishing 1.513 seconds and within a distance of just 100 feet. (inautonews.com)
  • Imagination Technologies has posted a series of job openings for OpenCL engineers, indicating that the open, general purpose GPU parallelism technology Apple spearheaded for use in Mac OS X Snow Leopard is destined to also play a significant role in boosting embedded graphics and video acceleration on the company's future handheld products. (appleinsider.com)
  • This paper applies a new experimental method based on "discrete choice analysis" and "information acceleration" to directly examine how decisions are made in a way that is behaviourally sound. (repec.org)
  • This week, he announced new actions as part of the Broadband Acceleration Initiative, which is described as "a comprehensive effort to remove barriers to broadband build-out, including streamlining the deployment of mobile broadband infrastructure, such as towers, distributed antenna systems (DAS) and small cells. (hothardware.com)
  • Central to the Identity Revenue Acceleration Initiative is ensuring customers receive real value and utility leading to overall improvement in customer experience. (prweb.com)
  • Net Acceleration provides more than simply optimization. (webhostinggeeks.com)
  • What is WAN Optimization (WAN Acceleration)? (techtarget.com)
  • WAN optimization -- also known as WAN acceleration -- is the category of technologies and techniques used to maximize the efficiency of data's flow across a wide area network ( WAN ), between organizations' centralized data centers and their remote locations. (techtarget.com)