Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm: A type of automatic, not reentrant, ectopic ventricular rhythm with episodes lasting from a few seconds to a minute which usually occurs in patients with acute myocardial infarction or with DIGITALIS toxicity. The ventricular rate is faster than normal but slower than tachycardia, with an upper limit of 100 -120 beats per minute. Suppressive therapy is rarely necessary.Cardiac Complexes, Premature: A group of cardiac arrhythmias in which the cardiac contractions are not initiated at the SINOATRIAL NODE. They include both atrial and ventricular premature beats, and are also known as extra or ectopic heartbeats. Their frequency is increased in heart diseases.Tachycardia: Abnormally rapid heartbeat, usually with a HEART RATE above 100 beats per minute for adults. Tachycardia accompanied by disturbance in the cardiac depolarization (cardiac arrhythmia) is called tachyarrhythmia.Arrhythmias, Cardiac: Any disturbances of the normal rhythmic beating of the heart or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. Cardiac arrhythmias can be classified by the abnormalities in HEART RATE, disorders of electrical impulse generation, or impulse conduction.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Chlorpheniramine: A histamine H1 antagonist used in allergic reactions, hay fever, rhinitis, urticaria, and asthma. It has also been used in veterinary applications. One of the most widely used of the classical antihistaminics, it generally causes less drowsiness and sedation than PROMETHAZINE.Heart Ventricles: The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.Heart Block: Impaired conduction of cardiac impulse that can occur anywhere along the conduction pathway, such as between the SINOATRIAL NODE and the right atrium (SA block) or between atria and ventricles (AV block). Heart blocks can be classified by the duration, frequency, or completeness of conduction block. Reversibility depends on the degree of structural or functional defects.Methylhistamines: Histamine substituted in any position with one or more methyl groups. Many of these are agonists for the H1, H2, or both histamine receptors.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Circadian Rhythm: The regular recurrence, in cycles of about 24 hours, of biological processes or activities, such as sensitivity to drugs and stimuli, hormone secretion, sleeping, and feeding.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Nurses: Professionals qualified by graduation from an accredited school of nursing and by passage of a national licensing examination to practice nursing. They provide services to patients requiring assistance in recovering or maintaining their physical or mental health.Hospice Care: Specialized health care, supportive in nature, provided to a dying person. A holistic approach is often taken, providing patients and their families with legal, financial, emotional, or spiritual counseling in addition to meeting patients' immediate physical needs. Care may be provided in the home, in the hospital, in specialized facilities (HOSPICES), or in specially designated areas of long-term care facilities. The concept also includes bereavement care for the family. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Hospices: Facilities or services which are especially devoted to providing palliative and supportive care to the patient with a terminal illness and to the patient's family.BooksBook SelectionBook Reviews as Topic: Critical analyses of books or other monographic works.Rare BooksBook PricesBooks, Illustrated: Books containing photographs, prints, drawings, portraits, plates, diagrams, facsimiles, maps, tables, or other representations or systematic arrangement of data designed to elucidate or decorate its contents. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p114)Reference Books, Medical: Books in the field of medicine intended primarily for consultation.Procainamide: A class Ia antiarrhythmic drug that is structurally-related to PROCAINE.Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Electric Countershock: An electrical current applied to the HEART to terminate a disturbance of its rhythm, ARRHYTHMIAS, CARDIAC. (Stedman, 25th ed)Anti-Arrhythmia Agents: Agents used for the treatment or prevention of cardiac arrhythmias. They may affect the polarization-repolarization phase of the action potential, its excitability or refractoriness, or impulse conduction or membrane responsiveness within cardiac fibers. Anti-arrhythmia agents are often classed into four main groups according to their mechanism of action: sodium channel blockade, beta-adrenergic blockade, repolarization prolongation, or calcium channel blockade.Atrial Fibrillation: Abnormal cardiac rhythm that is characterized by rapid, uncoordinated firing of electrical impulses in the upper chambers of the heart (HEART ATRIA). In such case, blood cannot be effectively pumped into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES). It is caused by abnormal impulse generation.Acecainide: A major metabolite of PROCAINAMIDE. Its anti-arrhythmic action may cause cardiac toxicity in kidney failure.Heart Conduction System: An impulse-conducting system composed of modified cardiac muscle, having the power of spontaneous rhythmicity and conduction more highly developed than the rest of the heart.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Etiocholanolone: The 5-beta-reduced isomer of ANDROSTERONE. Etiocholanolone is a major metabolite of TESTOSTERONE and ANDROSTENEDIONE in many mammalian species including humans. It is excreted in the URINE.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Heart Rupture, Post-Infarction: Laceration or tearing of cardiac tissues appearing after MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Sodium Potassium Chloride Symporter Inhibitors: Agents that inhibit SODIUM-POTASSIUM-CHLORIDE SYMPORTERS which are concentrated in the thick ascending limb at the junction of the LOOP OF HENLE and KIDNEY TUBULES, DISTAL. They act as DIURETICS. Excess use is associated with HYPOKALEMIA and HYPERGLYCEMIA.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Commotio Cordis: A sudden CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIA (e.g., VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION) caused by a blunt, non-penetrating impact to the precordial region of chest wall. Commotio cordis often results in sudden death without prompt cardiopulmonary defibrillation.Death, Sudden: The abrupt cessation of all vital bodily functions, manifested by the permanent loss of total cerebral, respiratory, and cardiovascular functions.Baseball: A competitive nine-member team sport including softball.Thoracic Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the chest area.Thoracic Wall: The outer margins of the thorax containing SKIN, deep FASCIA; THORACIC VERTEBRAE; RIBS; STERNUM; and MUSCLES.Ventricular Fibrillation: A potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia that is characterized by uncoordinated extremely rapid firing of electrical impulses (400-600/min) in HEART VENTRICLES. Such asynchronous ventricular quivering or fibrillation prevents any effective cardiac output and results in unconsciousness (SYNCOPE). It is one of the major electrocardiographic patterns seen with CARDIAC ARREST.Ectopia Cordis: A rare developmental defect in which the heart is abnormally located partially or totally outside the THORAX. It is the result of defective fusion of the anterior chest wall. Depending on the location of the heart, ectopia cordis can be thoracic, thoracoabdominal, abdominal, and cervical.Digitalis: A genus of toxic herbaceous Eurasian plants of the Plantaginaceae which yield cardiotonic DIGITALIS GLYCOSIDES. The most useful species are Digitalis lanata and D. purpurea.Access to Information: Individual's rights to obtain and use information collected or generated by others.Borago: A plant genus of the family BORAGINACEAE.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Heart Defects, Congenital: Developmental abnormalities involving structures of the heart. These defects are present at birth but may be discovered later in life.Peer Review, Research: The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.Atrioventricular Node: A small nodular mass of specialized muscle fibers located in the interatrial septum near the opening of the coronary sinus. It gives rise to the atrioventricular bundle of the conduction system of the heart.Tachycardia, Atrioventricular Nodal Reentry: Abnormally rapid heartbeats caused by reentry of atrial impulse into the dual (fast and slow) pathways of ATRIOVENTRICULAR NODE. The common type involves a blocked atrial impulse in the slow pathway which reenters the fast pathway in a retrograde direction and simultaneously conducts to the atria and the ventricles leading to rapid HEART RATE of 150-250 beats per minute.Tachycardia, Ectopic Junctional: A rare form of supraventricular tachycardia caused by automatic, not reentrant, conduction initiated from sites at the atrioventricular junction, but not the ATRIOVENTRICULAR NODE. It usually occurs during myocardial infarction, after heart surgery, or in digitalis intoxication with a HEART RATE ranging from 140 to 250 beats per minute.Bundle of His: Small band of specialized CARDIAC MUSCLE fibers that originates in the ATRIOVENTRICULAR NODE and extends into the membranous part of the interventricular septum. The bundle of His, consisting of the left and the right bundle branches, conducts the electrical impulses to the HEART VENTRICLES in generation of MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION.

Antitachycardia burst pacing for pleomorphic reentrant ventricular tachycardias associated with non-coronary artery diseases: a morphology specific programming for ventricular tachycardias. (1/8)

To study the role of antitachycardia burst pacing in patients with reentrant pleomorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT) associated with non-coronary artery diseases, the efficacy of antitachycardia pacing and appropriate antitachycardia pacing cycle length were evaluated in each pleomorphic VT morphology of seven patients. Seven patients were included in this study. Clinically documented pleomorphic VTs were reproduced in an electrophysiologic study. For each VT, rapid ventricular pacing was attempted from the apex of the right ventricle at a cycle length which was 20 ms shorter than that of VT and repeated after a decrement of the cycle length in steps of 10 ms until the VT was terminated or accelerated. All 16 VTs could be entrained by the rapid pacing, and 13 of the 16 VTs (81%) were terminated, whereas pacing-induced acceleration was observed in the other 3 VTs of the 3 patients. VT cycle length (VTCL), block cycle length (BCL) which was defined as the longest VT interrupting paced cycle length, %BCL/VTCL and entrainment zone which was defined as VTCL minus BCL, varied in each VT morphology of each patient. In two patients, antitachycardia pacing was effective in all VT morphologies and the maximum difference of the %BCL/VTCL among the pleomorphic VTs was less than 10%. Thus, antitachycardia pacing seemed to be beneficial for these patients. In the other 5 patients, a difference of more than 10% in %BCL/VTCL was observed among the pleomorphic VT morphologies and/or at least one VT morphology showed pacing-induced acceleration. Compared to the 13 terminated VTs, three accelerated VTs had a wide entrainment zone [160 +/- 44 vs 90 +/- 48 ms, p < 0.04] and small %BCL/VTCL [61 +/- 6 vs 77 +/- 11%,p<0.03]. In pleomorphic VTs associated with non-coronary artery diseases, responses to rapid pacing was not uniform; VT might be terminable or accelerated even in the same patient. We need to pay close attention when programming antitachycardia pacing in patients with pleomorphic VT.  (+info)

The D allele of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene and reperfusion-induced ventricular arrhythmias in patients with acute myocardial infarction. (2/8)

The renin-angiotensin system may play a pivotal role in reperfusion ventricular arrhythmias (RVA). The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphism and RVA in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a case-control study. Patients who had undergone successful coronary intervention for AMI were enrolled (n= 127, male/female: 97/30, mean age, 62.6 years). The incidence of RVA was continuously monitored by ECG at a coronary care unit. The severity of ventricular arrhythmias was evaluated in terms of the Lown's grade and patients with a high risk of ventricular arrhythmias that may cause sudden cardiac death (Lown's grade > or =2) within 5 h of coronary intervention were defined as cases (n=59), and otherwise as controls (n=68). A receiver operating characteristic curve was used to determine the discriminatory ability of continuous variables and to produce dummy variables for use in a logistic regression analysis. Cases had a significantly higher body mass index, higher maximal levels of serum creatine kinase, and a shorter time preceding coronary intervention than controls. The severity of coronary atherosclerosis was similar between the 2 groups. The frequency distribution of ACE genotypes in cases differed from that in controls (II/ID/DD: 22.0%/52.6%/25.4% vs 44.1%/41.4%/14.7%, p<0.05, by the Mantel-Haenzel chi-square test). The ACE-D allele had additive and dominant effects with regard to the occurrence of significant ventricular arrhythmias after adjusting for other risk factors. The ACE-D allele may play a pivotal role in sudden cardiac death in patients with AMI.  (+info)

Five cases of aconite poisoning: toxicokinetics of aconitines. (3/8)

Aconite poisoning was examined in five patients (four males and one female) aged 49 to 78 years old. The electrocardiogram findings were as follows: ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation in case 1, premature ventricular contraction and accelerated idioventricular rhythm in case 2, AIVR in case 3, and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in cases 4 and 5. The patient in case 1 was given percutaneous cardiopulmonary support because of unstable hemodynamics, whereas the other patients were treated with fluid replacement and antiarrhythmic agents. The main aconitine alkaloid in each patient had a half-life that ranged from 5.8 to 15.4 h over the five cases, and other detected alkaloids had half-lives similar to the half-life of the main alkaloid in each case. The half-life of the main alkaloid in case 1 was about twice as long as the half-lives in the other cases, and high values for the area under the blood concentration-time curve and the mean residence time were only observed in case 1. These results suggest that alkaloid toxicokinetics parameters may reflect the severity of toxic symptoms in aconite poisoning.  (+info)

Electrophysiological study and 'slow' ventricular tachycardia predict appropriate therapy: results from a single-centre implantable cardiac defibrillator follow-up. (4/8)

AIMS: To account for appropriate and inappropriate therapies and cardiac death (CD) in a cohort of consecutive implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) eligible patients and to identify baseline predictors of these outcomes. METHODS AND RESULTS: During follow-up of 288 consecutive ICD-treated patients, clinical, biochemical, echocardiographic, arteriographic, and electrophysiological (EP) data at baseline were individually matched with survival data and electrograms retrieved during device interrogation. Predictors of therapy and CD were identified by multivariate analyses. Eighty-eight per cent of cases were secondary prevention and 12% were primary prevention. About 770 patient-years of ICD follow-up were analysed. Median follow-up was 22.7 months. Forty-eight per cent of patients had appropriate therapy for at least one ventricular tachyarrhythmia. Seventy per cent of tachycardias were successfully treated with anti-tachy pacing alone. Overall risk of therapy was higher for patients with ischaemic heart disease (IHD) than with non-IHD (51 vs. 37%; P = 0.049). Low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), positive EP study, and 'slow' ventricular tachycardia predicted appropriate therapy. Cardiac death was predicted by nephropathy, low LVEF, amiodarone use, and supraventricular tachycardia (SVT). Inappropriate therapy affected 12.2% of patients and was predicted by known SVT and IHD. CONCLUSION: Electrophysiological study and slow VT predicted appropriate therapy. Amiodarone use predicted CD. Inappropriate therapy remains an important issue largely predictable by SVT.  (+info)

Reentrant ventricular tachycardia originating in the right ventricular outflow tract: slow conduction identified by right coronary artery ostium pacing. (5/8)

A case of reentrant ventricular tachycardia (VT) originating from the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) is described. An electrophysiological study revealed that programmed stimulation from the right ventricle apex induced 2 types of VT with similar left bundle branch block configuration and inferior axis. Yet, VT cycle length (CL) was different; one was stable, sustained VT with a CL of 360 ms and the other was hemodynamically intolerable VT with a CL of 330 ms. Similarly for both VTs, perfect pace mapping was obtained at the anterior septum beneath the pulmonary valve in the RVOT, and exits of both VTs were very close. Entrainment mapping during stable VT was performed and the anterior septum RVOT was designated as the exit for the stable VT. Intriguingly, entrainment pacing from the ostium of the right coronary artery showed that the post-pacing interval was identical to VTCL. The stimulus to QRS interval was very long (340 ms) during entrainment with concealed fusion, and the right coronary artery ostium was therefore consistent with the VT reentry circuit inner loop or the upper portion of the VT reentry circuit exit. These findings suggest that the stable VT reentry circuit had a slow conduction zone from the ostium of the right coronary artery to the exit in the anterior septum RVOT. When radiofrequency catheter ablation was performed at the 2 exits of the anterior septum RVOT, both VTs then could not be induced.  (+info)

More pronounced diastolic left ventricular dysfunction in patients with accelerated idioventricular rhythm after reperfusion by primary percutaneous coronary intervention. (6/8)

OBJECTIVE: Reperfusion-induced accelerated idioventricular rhythm (AIVR) during primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI) may be a sign of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. We compared LV dynamic effects of reperfusion between patients with and without reperfusion-induced AIVR during pPCI for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). METHODS: We studied 15 consecutive patients, who presented with their first acute anterior STEMI within 6 hours after onset of symptoms, and in whom LV pressure-volume (PV) loops were directly obtained during pPCI. Immediate effects of pPCI on LV function were compared between patients with (n = 5) and without (n = 10) occurrence of AIVR after reperfusion, as well as the direct effects of AIVR on LV function compared to sinus rhythm. RESULTS: Patients with reperfusion-induced AIVR showed more pronounced diastolic LV dysfunction before the onset of the arrhythmia, i.e., a delayed active relaxation expressed by Tau (53 +/- 15 vs. 39 +/- 6 ms; p = 0.03), a worse compliance curve (p = 0.01), and a higher end-diastolic stiffness (p = 0.07). At the end of the procedure, AIVR patients showed less improvement in diastolic LV function, indicated by a downward shift of the compliance curve (-3.1 +/- 2.3 vs. -7.5 +/- 1.4 mmHg; p = 0.001), a decrease in end-diastolic stiffness (13 +/- 18 vs. 34 +/- 15%; p = 0.03) and end-diastolic pressure (12 +/- 8 vs. 29 +/- 19%; p = 0.07). CONCLUSION: STEMI patients with reperfusion-induced AIVR after pPCI showed more pronounced diastolic LV dysfunction before and after AIVR than patients without AIVR, which suggests that diastolic LV dysfunction contributes to the occurrence of AIVR and that AIVR is a sign of diastolic LV dysfunction.  (+info)

Acute haemodynamic effects of accelerated idioventricular rhythm in primary percutaneous coronary intervention. (7/8)

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Accelerated idioventricular rhythm associated with propranolol treatment in a child. (8/8)

Accelerated idioventricular rhythm (AIVR) is a ventricular arrhythmia most commonly seen in adults with underlying cardiac disease. It is important to establish the diagnosis when it occurs to differentiate this benign phenomenon from dangerous ventricular tachycardia. We present the case of a healthy child who developed episodes of AIVR associated with propranolol treatment. Her 24-hour electrocardiography recording showed AIVR with difference between sinus and ventricular beats. The arrhythmia resolved with the discontinuation of propranolol, and eventually the case was in sinus rhythm. This patient is the first case of AIVR associated with propranolol treatment in the literature.  (+info)

12 lead EKG shows a slow and wide complexes with intermittent narrow complex beats. The 5th and 10th beats are sinus node originated complexes (sinus rhythm) and close examination of these beats will give a clue to understand the cause of the wide complex rhythm. ST elevation indicates an acute myocardial infarction. The wide complex beats represent accelerated idioventricular rhythm which is usually seen following reperfusion in acute MI ...
I have been in nursing for 33 years and have worked in a variety of settings including hospice, long term care, med-surg, supervision, cath lab, ER, special procedures and critical care. I enjoy working as a float nurse because it gives me a variety of clinical experiences. I am also a CPR, ACLS, and PALS instructor at our local hospital.. ...
Exploring all aspects of research related to disorders of the heart and circulatory system, BMC Cardiovascular Disorders is a well-established open access ...
Incessant ventricular tachycardia, for atrial or ventricular overdrive pacing 5. Recurrent sinus pauses (greater than 3 seconds) not responsive to atropine Class IIb 1. Bifascicular block of indeterminate age 2. New or age-indeterminate isolated RBBB Class III 1. First-degree heart block 2. Type I second-degree AV block with normal hemodynamics 3. Accelerated idioventricular rhythm 4. BBB or fascicular block known to exist before acute myocardial infarction PACING DURING CARDIAC CATHETERIZATION During catheterization of the right side of the heart, manipulation of the catheter may induce a transient RBBB in up to 10% of patients. Quality of life and clinical outcomes in elderly patients treated with ventricular pacing as compared with dual-chamber pacing. N Engl J Med 1998;338:1097-1104. Ventricular pacing or dual cahmber pacing for sinus node dysfunction. N Engl J Med 2002;346:1854-1862. Morley CA, Sutton R. Carotid sinus syncope. Int J Cardiol 1984;6:287-293. Manolis AS, Linzer M, Estes NAM. ...
Results Females in all three groups had significantly increased septal myocardial ECV compared with males (0.29±0.03 vs 0.25±0.03, p,0.01). Septal myocardial ECV was higher in ALMS than hypertensive and controls (0.28±0.02 vs 0.25±0.03 vs 0.24±0.03, p,0.05). Three male older ALMS patients (mean 43±5 years vs 27±10 years) without a history of infantile CM had patchy diffuse LE in non-coronary artery territories with an increased ECV compared to remote normal myocardium (ECV 0.41±0.08 vs 0.27±0.03, p,0.05). MAPSE was reduced in patients with ALMS and hypertension compared to controls (13±2 cm/s vs 12±3 cm/s vs 17±2 cm/s, p,0.01. There were no differences in LV ejection fraction, LV mass or LA volumes. Septal myocardial ECV was negatively correlated with a MAPSE in patients with ALMS (r=−0.64, p,0.05). NT-BNP was not correlated with septal ECV but was increased in patients with LGE (median 178 pmol/l vs 44 pmol/l).. ...
A method of manufacturing a capacitor for use in an implantable cardiac defibrillator by forming a set of conductive sheets with the same profile having a sacrificial portion. An alignment figure is formed in each sheet, and the sheets are stacked and aligned by registering the alignment figures with each other. The sacrificial portions are removed from each of the sheets, which are secured together and positioned in a capacitor housing. Each sheet may include two major portions joined by the sacrificial portion, so that each major portion may become part of a separate capacitor stack after the sacrificial portion is removed, doubling manufacturing throughput.
We describe a scar-related reentrant ventricular tachycardia circuit with a proximal segment in an endocardial basal septal scar and an exit in a region of slow conduction in a non-overlapping region of epicardial basal lateral scar. The 12-lead EKG
BACKGROUND: Elevated levels of osteoprotegerin, a secreted tumor necrosis factor-related molecule, might be associated with adverse outcomes in patients with coronary artery disease. We measured plasma osteoprotegerin concentrations on hospital admission, at discharge, and at 1 and 6 months after discharge in a predefined subset (n=5135) of patients with acute coronary syndromes in the PLATO (Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes) trial. METHODS AND RESULTS: The associations between osteoprotegerin and the composite end point of cardiovascular death, nonprocedural spontaneous myocardial infarction or stroke, and non-coronary artery bypass grafting major bleeding during 1 year of follow-up were assessed by Cox proportional hazards models ...
In a fly, butterfly, locust and dragonfly we examined the responses of a variety of directional motionsensitive neurons which run from the brain down the ventral cord. The stimulus was a sinusoidally modulated moving pattern of regular stripes presented at a range of velocities in random order for either 0.1 s or 2.0 s. The response was measured as the total number of spikes to each stimulus. The neurons fall into two groups, fast and slow. The responses of the fast type rise progressively to a peak contrast frequency at 15-20 Hz for all four insects, and decline at higher contrast frequencies. The responses of slow neurons rise rapidly to a peak at 1-10 Hz and then decline more slowly across the range where the fast neurons are at their peak. The existence of two groups of neurons with overlapping response ranges to different velocities of the same pattern, presented in exactly the same way, provides the insect with a means of measuring angular velocity irrespective of contrast, spatial ...
The AV is a semilunar valve with three cusps located close to the center of the heart. The aortic root is not a specific structure, per se, but includes the AV annulus, cusps, sinuses of Valsalva, coronary artery ostia, sinotubular junction, and proximal ascending aorta. The LVOT is the outflow portion of the LV just inferior to the AV. All these structures are examined in detail with TEE by using four cross-sections.. The mid esophageal AV short axis view (Figure 3h) is obtained from the mid esophageal window by advancing or withdrawing the probe until the AV comes into view and then turning the probe to center the AV in the display. The image depth is adjusted to between 10 and 12 cm to position the AV in the middle of the display. Next, the multiplane angle is rotated forward to approximately 30 to 60 degrees until a symmetrical image of all three cusps of the aortic valve comes into view. This cross-section is the only view that provides a simultaneous image of all three cusps of the AV. The ...
Myocarditis is simply inflammation of the heart muscle. The etiology is varied and may be secondary to a variety of infections, systemic diseases, drugs, and toxins, Viral myocarditis is usually self limited but can lead to chronic dilated cardiomyopathy and sudden cardiac death. Patients often present with chest pain, elevated cardiac enzyme levels, and ECG changes, making differentiation from acute infarction difficult. On contrast enhanced MRI, the presence of focal delayed enhancement in a non-coronary artery distribution together with wall motion abnormalities correlates strongly with acute or subacute myocarditis. The enhancement becomes less intense and more diffuse over time. Myocarditis lesions occur predominantly in the lateral free wall. Contrast enhancement does not typically affect the subendocardium like infarction. Myocardial necrosis of myocarditis is also usually less confluent than infarction.. ...
DATA SYNTHESIS: 12 studies totalling 32 779 patients met the inclusion criteria. A neutral effect was reported in three studies (n=1148) for appropriate implantable cardiac defibrillator intervention (odds ratio 0.90, 95% confidence interval 0.55 to 1.46) and in six studies (n=31 111) for sudden cardiac death (0.81, 0.52 to 1.25). 11 studies (n=32 439 and n=32 519) provided data on the effects of fish oil on all cause mortality (0.92, 0.82 to 1.03) and a reduction in deaths from cardiac causes (0.80, 0.69 to 0.92). The dose-response relation for DHA and EPA on reduction in deaths from cardiac causes was not significant ...
Learn how cardiac specialists use an implantable cardiac defibrillator for arrhythmia treatment at the Heart & Vascular Center, Brigham and Womens Hospital
Of 111,293 ICD (implantable cardiac defibrillator) implantations included in the analysis, 78,857 (70.9%) were performed by electrophysiologists, 24,399 (21.9%) by nonelectrophysiologist cardiologists, 1,862 (1.7%) by thoracic surgeons, and 6,175 (5.5%) by other specialists. Compared with patients whose ICD was implanted by electrophysiologists, patients whose ICD was implanted by either nonelectrophysiologist cardiologists or thoracic surgeons were at increased risk of complications in both unadjusted (electrophysiologists, 3.5% [2743/78 857]; nonelectrophysiologist cardiologists, 4.0% [970/24 399]; thoracic surgeons, 5.8% [108/1862]; P < .001) and adjusted analyses (relative risk [RR] for nonelectrophysiologist cardiologists, 1.11 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.01-1.21]; RR for thoracic surgeons, 1.44 [95% CI, 1.15-1.79]). ...
The primary objective is to establish the role of genetics in life-threatening arrhythmias leading to sudden cardiac death (SCD) and the potential utility of genetic markers in risk stratification of patients to receive an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD). The successful accomplishment of this goal would serve as the basis for future work on a specific diagnostic test that can be used to assess risks of threatening arrhythmias in order to quality patients for implantation of an ICD.. ...
Research by UB cardiologists suggests that imaging for loss of nerve function in the heart may help identify patients who are at high risk of sudden cardiac arrest and therefore most likely to benefit from an implantable cardiac defibrillator. ...
Figure 3: Follow up electrocardiogram demonstrating frequent ventricular ectopy. Conclusion: Sawtooth cardiomyopathy had been previously proposed as the diagnosis based on the patients prior invasive study. Disordered cardiac embryogenesis was also suspected. To date the patient has not received any therapies from his implantable cardiac defibrillator. Perspective: While similar morphology has been previously described, underlying mechanisms of this unusual form of myocardial disease remains unknown.1 Further investigations that would be potentially informative, such as genetic testing and endomyocardial biopsy with precise characterization of ultrastructural abnormalities have not been pursued at this time.2. References ...
CTEPH should be considered in all patients with unexplained PH and the first step in diagnosis should be obtaining the patients medical history. Pulmonary embolism is the most common cause of CTEPH. Although it was previously estimated that up to 63% of patients with CTEPH have no history of acute pulmonary embolism [2], recent data from an international prospective registry of patients with newly diagnosed CTEPH suggest a much lower value. Previous pulmonary embolism was confirmed for 74.8% of patients and deep-vein thrombosis in 56.1% [5], which is in line with findings from other recent studies [4]. Other risk factors that may suggest the presence of CTEPH include ventriculo-atrial shunt, indwelling catheters and leads (such as chronic dialysis catheters and pacemakers or automated implantable cardiac defibrillator leads), splenectomy, thyroid replacement therapy, inflammatory bowel disease and a history of malignancy [7, 8].. Obtaining the patients history should be followed by physical ...
Tammy, please take heart and please, please give yourself some time to recover. It is amazing how the brain can recover from things. After my sons last chemo treatment, he was so ill. He had serious brain edema...a lot of swelling. This is how bad he was: he was in diapers. He could not talk, could not say his name, could not feed himself, could not walk. He was sitting and drooling. He would stare off into space and it seemed like he was not aware we were in the room. He would do "purposeless random repetitive motions" like tapping or rocking. I thought his life as it had been was over...that our David was lost to us. He was like a stranger to us.. Well, he recovered, Tammy. He came back from all of that. He is back just about 100%. He still has quite a bit of fatigue and hes pretty weak, but thats improving too. Its unbelievable. The doctors said thats what brain swelling will do to you. I dont know if you have issues with swelling but that could be part of your problem since its common ...
im fairly pleased with the CPU performace of the 50g for my cross developments and regard it as a hardware platform. when using hpgcc, im switching off the slow mode to get the full speed. presumably the slow mode is also off for normal use - or is the machine underclocked by default. if so that could be interesting.. i suspect that HP would have used a slower processor if they hadnt needed the saturn emulation. so from their point of view, the use of a 75MHz ARM9 was an unavoidable mistake. i have always thought that hp calculators were too slow. this time around, i see the mistake as an advantage in that the calculator is, at last, not too slow and can actually do some really interesting stuff. more ram would be useful too :-) hopefully hp will begin see their mistake as an asset and intentionally posit cheap/low power and fast cpus.. i agree that the 35s is too slow, embarrassingly underperforming its predecessors in some tests. this has let down, otherwise, quite a nice calculator. ...
Looking for online definition of Cardiac defibrillator in the Medical Dictionary? Cardiac defibrillator explanation free. What is Cardiac defibrillator? Meaning of Cardiac defibrillator medical term. What does Cardiac defibrillator mean?
Areas of Interest: Heart rhythm disorders in children and those with congenital heart disease. Invasive electrophysiology study. Radio frequency (RF) and Cryoablation. Transvenous pacemaker and implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) placement and system management. Inherited arrhythmia disorders. Sudden cardiac death of the young ...
A watch battery or button cell is a small single cell battery shaped as a squat cylinder typically 5 to 25 mm (0.197 to 0.984 in) in diameter and 1 to 6 mm (0.039 to 0.236 in) high - resembling a button. A metal can forms the bottom body and positive terminal of the cell. An insulated top cap is the negative terminal. Button cells are used to power small portable electronics devices such as wrist watches, pocket calculators, artificial cardiac pacemakers, implantable cardiac defibrillators, automobile keyless entry transmitters, and hearing aids. Wider variants are usually called coin cells. Devices using button cells are usually designed around a cell giving a long service life, typically well over a year in continuous use in a wristwatch. Most button cells have low self-discharge and hold their charge for a long time if not used. Relatively high-power devices such as hearing aids may use a zinc-air battery which have much higher capacity for a given size, but dry out after a few weeks even if ...
An implantable cardiac stimulator integrates the functions of bradycardia and anti-tachycardia pacing-type therapies, and cardioversion and defibrillation shock-type therapies. The stimulator is progr
An implantable cardiac stimulation device provides measurement of intrinsic heart activity metrics while sustaining pacing of the heart. The device includes a pulse generator that delivers pacing pulses to a first chamber of corresponding chambers of a heart, and a sensing circuit that senses a conducted evoked response of a second chamber of the corresponding chambers of the heart in response to the pacing pulse to provide an electrical signal representing the conducted evoked response. The device further includes a measuring circuit that measures a metric of the electrical signal to approximate a corresponding metric of an intrinsic electrical feature of the second chamber.
Learn more about the evolution of fast and slow protein supplements and how they differentially affect muscle protein synthesis and breakdown...
Not to get all science-y on you, but you want some beta oxidation in your life. Beta oxidation is when your body is using its fatty acid molecules (aka burning fat). This is the slow burn youve always heard about. Your body is in a beta oxidation state when you are in low-intensity cardiovascular (aerobic) activity. This doesnt burn as many calories as quickly as anaerobic (like HIIT) workouts, but there needs to be both in your weekly routine. I dont know about you, but I like it when I know my body is using its fatty acid (aka fat storage) immediately, even if its a longer workout. If you want to really get into the nitty gritty, try to find the happy medium for you thats using both your aerobic system and your anaerobic system. That way you get the best burn of both worlds ...
|p style=text-indent:20px;|Reaction-diffusion equations appear in biology and chemistry, and combine linear diffusion with different kind of reaction terms. Some of them are remarkable from the mathematical point of view, since they admit families of travelling waves that describe the asymptotic behaviour of a larger class of solutions |inline-formula||tex-math id=M1|\begin{document}$ 0\leq u(x, t)\leq 1 $\end{document}|/tex-math||/inline-formula| of the problem posed in the real line. We investigate here the existence of waves with constant propagation speed, when the linear diffusion is replaced by the slow doubly nonlinear diffusion. In the present setting we consider bistable reaction terms, which present interesting differences w.r.t. the Fisher-KPP framework recently studied in [|xref ref-type=bibr rid=b5|5|/xref|]. We find different families of travelling waves that are employed to describe the wave propagation of more general solutions and to study the stability/instability of the
An implantable cardiac monitor detected atrial fibrillation (Afib) with overall accuracy approaching 100%, results of a multicenter clinical study showed.
A new implantable defibrillator accurately detects abnormal heart rhythms and shocks the heart back into normal rhythm, yet has no wires touching the heart, new research shows. The device, called a subcutaneous implantable cardiac defibrillator (S-ICD), is placed under the patients skin and has a wire under the skin along the left side of the breast bone. "The device detects life-threatening arrhythmias from normal rhythms, and once it notices the life-threatening rhythm it will automatically shock the heart back to its normal rhythm," said lead researcher Dr. Martin Burke, director of the Heart Rhythm Center at the University of Chicago. The advantage of the device is its durability - it lasts longer because there is not as much flexibility in the wiring, Burke said. Wires in standard implantable defibrillators need to be flexible to pass through blood vessels to the heart. "This makes the system enticing for younger patients who have risk of cardiac arrest who currently dont get standard ...
We offer the full breadth of the most advanced, leading-edge protocols for the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac rhythm abnormalities, also known as arrhythmias. These include device therapies, invasive EP studies and interventional electrophysiology.. Device-based treatments include pacemakers for slow rhythms, implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) for abnormally fast rhythms that can result in sudden death, and cardiac resynchronization therapy (biventricular devices) for advanced heart failure.. Interventional electrophysiology utilizes radiofrequency energy (heat) or cryotherapy (cold) to selectively ablate or eliminate the source or the structures critical for an arrhythmia to perpetuate. The target for ablation can be pinpointed with an invasive EP study, where electrode catheters are strategically placed in the heart, permitting precise mapping of an arrhythmia.. Interventional cardiology includes:. ...
Band teacher Scot Cannell, 50, and his cardiologists at the University of Michigan would come up with a solution at each low point in treating his heart disease: an implantable cardiac defibrillator to keep his heart rhythm in check, then a left ventricular assist device to support his weakened heart.. In life and in Cannells world of music, hitting the high notes often takes hard work. Three years after being diagnosed with cardiomyopathy, Cannells best option for living was a heart transplant.. "I had no family history of heart disease and I found myself in need of a new heart," says Cannell, of Saline, Mich., a husband and father of three. "I dealt with it all with great support and humor whenever we could.. "The scariest part was hearing during the transplant evaluation that I had end stage heart failure. A nurse could see it upset me and she put a hand on my shoulder and told me, End stage heart disease is just what its called. It doesnt mean the end is here. " Continue reading ...
Hugo Campos is a proponent of this movement: He uses aFitBit device to keep track of his daily activity level, a Withings blood pressure monitor, a WiFi scale, and a Zeo sleep monitor. He cannot, however, access the data in his implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) because such data is off limit to patients. The data from his ICD can, however, be accessed by his physician and the devices manufacturer.. In his quest to learn about his condition and ICDs, Campos attends cardiology conferences, takes classes on how to program ICDs, and "does everything [he] can to raise [his] own level of health literacy," as he explained in a recent TEDx talk. He firmly supports the e-patient movement, in which "networked patients are shifting from being just mere passengers to becoming responsible drivers of their care.". Campos explains in the talk that he wants "to paint a broader picture in high resolution of what [his] health looks like." But Campos, who is at risk for sudden cardiac arrest, gets no data ...
Heart attack - A heart attack occurs when the blood supply to part of the heart muscle itself - the myocardium - is severely reduced or stopped. The reduction or stoppage happens when one or more of the coronary arteries supplying blood to the heart muscle is blocked. This is usually caused by the buildup of plaque (deposits of fat-like substances), a process called atherosclerosis. The plaque can eventually burst, tear or rupture, creating a snag where a blood clot forms and blocks the artery. This leads to a heart attack ...
Antibiotic rotation has been previously studied with varied results. The theory behind antibiotic rotation is that intermittently changing antibiotic classes will reduce the ecological selective pressure that drives the emergence of antibiotic resistance.. This study compares the effect of 2 types of antibiotic rotation on Gram-negative colonisation in the ICU and also compares both interventions with standard care.. The two interventions apply to the empiric treatment and are: 1) fast rotation, i.e. every other patient another class and 2) slow rotation, i.e. every other 1.5month another preferred class for empiric Gram-negative antibiotic therapy. ...
The content of the unit is divided into several major themes: (1) Membrane transport and electrical phenomena in cells-this is concerned with the physical rules and the molecular mechanisms that govern the movement of salts, solutes and water across cell membranes, how these are linked to cell volume and membrane voltages and how they are coupled in tissues to achieve secretion and absorption that is fundamental to the operation of many organ systems; (2) Electrical and chemical communication between cells, including how nerve cells transmit rapid electrical and chemical signals for information processing in the nervous system, and slow chemical signalling pathways; (3) The cellular basis of sensation and how sensory stimuli are detected by specialised cells and converted into electrical signals for use by the nervous system. This section includes a consideration of the chemo-electrical interactions that occur between cells in early stages of sensory pathways; and (4) Generation of mechanical ...
DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Severe sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. It is the leading cause of death in non-coronary intensive care units (ICUs) in the ... ...
E794-06(2018) Standard Test Method for Melting And Crystallization Temperatures By Thermal Analysis crystallization temperature~ melting temperature~
Purified sarcolemmal and light vesicle (intracellular) fractions of beta-adrenergic receptors were used to examine the effects of propranolol on receptor translocation in guinea pig heart. Guinea pigs were given propranolol (0.15 mg/kg/hr) via minipumps for 7 days and either killed or made ischemic for 1 hour via a coronary ligature. Propranolol treatment led to an externalization of beta-receptors from light vesicle to sarcolemmal fractions. This externalization increased the number of surface beta-adrenergic receptors that were functional, as assessed by isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. After chronic propranolol treatment, ischemia did not further alter receptor distribution. These results suggest that externalization of beta-adrenergic receptors from a light vesicle fraction to the sarcolemma contributes to up-regulation of beta-receptors that occur in response to both propranolol treatment and ischemia. Because propranolol-treated animals show blunting in externalization ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. T2 - A review. AU - Hensley, Nadia. AU - Dietrich, Jennifer. AU - Nyhan, Daniel. AU - Mitter, Nanhi. AU - Yee, May Sann. AU - Brady, Mary Beth. PY - 2015/3/4. Y1 - 2015/3/4. N2 - Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a relatively common disorder that anesthesiologists encounter among patients in the perioperative period. Fifty years ago, HCM was thought to be an obscure disease. Today, however, our understanding and ability to diagnose patients with HCM have improved dramatically. Patients with HCM have genotypic and phenotypic variability. Indeed, a subgroup of these patients exhibits the HCM genotype but not the phenotype (left ventricular hypertrophy). There are a number of treatment modalities for these patients, including pharmacotherapy to control symptoms, implantable cardiac defibrillators to manage malignant arrhythmias, and surgical myectomy and septal ablation to decrease the left ventricular outflow obstruction. Accurate diagnosis is vital ...
The BIOTRONIK sponsored REPLACE study1,2 is the first prospective, multicenter trial to examine a broad range of complications related to replacement of all companies cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIED) which includes both pacemakers and ICDs (implantable cardiac defibrillators)
Percutaneous pulmonary venous atrial puncture was performed under computed tomography guidance to successfully place an automated implantable cardiac defibrillator into a 26-year-old patient with extracardiac Fontan conduit who had presented with two out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. The procedure avoided the need for lead placement at thoracotomy ...
By way of background, Zoll Medical makes the only wearable external cardiac defibrillator on the market, marketed as "LifeVest." The device is fairly simple: it consists of (1) a vest-like wearable garmet that contains EKG electrodes to sense a persons heart rhythm and and front and back electrode pads to deliver shock therapy and (2) a monitoring computer that can respond to the development of potentially left-threatening rhythm problems by automatically rupturing hidden gel-packs under the electrode pads before delivering a defibrillation shock to the patient to restore normal rhythm. Clinically, heart rhythm specialists have used these devices to assure our patients are protected from the development of life-threatening heart rhythm disorders as they begin medical therapy for their condition. After three months of medical therapy (according to our guidelines) if a persons heart muscle does not improve sufficiently, they are candidates for surgical implantation of a permanent (internal) ...
Methods and devices for cardiac signal analysis in implantable cardiac therapy systems. Several signal processing and/or conditioning methods are shown including R-wave detection embodiments including the use of thresholds related to previous peak amplitudes. Also, some embodiments include sample thresholding to remove extraneous data from sampled signals. Some embodiments include weighting certain samples more heavily than other samples within a sampled cardiac signal for analysis.
Regarding cybersecurity vulnerabilities identified in a wireless telemetry technology used for communication between Medtronics implantable cardiac devices, clinic programmers, and home monitors.
Miss *Flower* UPDATE & Video #2. As promised, we are now providing the second video and most recent update on the 7 week old Maremma puppy.. At Alta Vista Animal Emergency, the truly wonderful Dr. Jones did a thorough exam including a neuro assessment. She then conversed with Tanya, myself and her amazing temp fosters Randy/Emily.. The next step was for Dr. Jones to reach out to Dr. Jull, the neurologist and discuss a plan to be put in place.. Miss Flower has now been scheduled to see Dr. Jull @ 11:30 AM tomorrow.. Miss Flower was placed on the following medications to help slow down the firing of her brain, to calm her down re: agitation and she was also placed on Omeprazole 5 mg - 1 BID. She was put on Keppra 250 mg ½ tablet TID and Trazodone 50 mg ½-3/4 tablet to be given BID and can be given up to TID.. We received the results of her bloodwork a few minutes ago and they are normal for a puppy of her age. Tanya will be dropping off a urine sample as part of the panel that we paid for over ...
Hi, I hope somebody can help me with this question, as I cant seem to get a straight answer from the doctor. My husband has had an internal cardiac defibrillator for a year now, without any problems a...
Our website is designed for anybody that is seeking information on heart rhythm problems and some of the treatments available. The heart rhythm problems we treat include: atrial fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, supra-ventricular tachycardia, atrial fibrillation. Our procedures and diagnostic tests used to treat these heart rhythm problems include: radio-frequency ablation, cryo-ablation, atrial fibrillation ablation, atrial flutter ablation, cardiac catheterisation, heart rhythm monitoring, implantable cardiac defibrillators, pacemakers and superventricular tachycardia ablation. The website also introduces our team of consultants and details our full range of procedures.. For general queries about our services, please click here and we will respond within 72 hours. To arrange a consultation, you will need to be referred to us by your GP.. ...
An accelerating ventricular tachycardia ending in fibrillation can be initiated in isolated hearts by procaine injections after the administration of epinephrine, but not in untreated hearts. The run of tachycardia consists of a supraventricular or idioventricular impulse followed by an accelerating train of premature systoles coupled to it. Fibrillation results when the train reaches a frequency of 10 to 12 per second. In hearts with their bundles of His cut, epinephrine injections alone cause only a ventricular tachycardia of constant frequency. Therefore, the initiation of ventricular arrhythmias by procaine must entail the production of A-V blockade and some process which causes the tachycardia to accelerate.. ...
A self-diagnostic system for an implantable cardiac device such as a pacemaker, cardioverter, or resynchronization device which utilizes a subcutaneous ECG channel is described. The subcutaneous ECG channel allows the device to, in real time and independent of the standard pacing and sensing circuitry, verify the presence of pacing spikes, chamber senses, and other device outputs and hence establish and verify device integrity.
Accelerated idioventricular rhythm which looks like slow ventricular tachycardia is a sign of a successful reperfusion. No ... Dalzell JR, Jackson CE (April 2009). "When the rhythm makes the diagnosis". J Emerg Med. 41 (2): 182-4. doi:10.1016/j.jemermed. ... treatment of this rhythm is needed as it rarely changes into a more serious rhythm. Perfusion scanning Reperfusion injury TIMI ...
加速性心室自主節律Accelerated idioventricular rhythm ...
... and Accelerated idioventricular rhythm, involving a ventricular focus, are also examples. Idioventricular tachycardia is ... An automatic tachycardia is a cardiac arrhythmia which involves an area of the heart generating an abnormally fast rhythm, ... These tachycardias, or fast heart rhythms, differ from reentrant tachycardias (AVRT and AVNRT) in which there is an abnormal ... a pacemaker assumes control of the heart rhythm in overdrive pacing. In some cases ablation of the ectopic focus may be ...
Accelerated idioventricular rhythm Andersen-Tawil syndrome (Andersen cardiodysrhythmic periodic paralysis, Andersen syndrome, ... Heart block Inappropriate sinus tachycardia Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome Junctional escape beat Junctional rhythm Left ...
... accelerated idioventricular rhythm MeSH C23.550.073.845.880.095 --- tachycardia, atrioventricular nodal reentry MeSH C23.550. ...
Hypotension not due to arrhythmia Bradycardia Accelerated idioventricular rhythm Elderly patients Pseudocholinesterase ...
... runs lasting longer than three beats are referred to as ventricular tachycardia Accelerated idioventricular rhythm Monomorphic ... The resulting heart rhythm depends on where the first signal begins: If it is the sinoatrial node, the rhythm remains normal ... it can produce a sustained abnormal rhythm. Rhythms produced by an ectopic focus in the atria, or by the atrioventricular node ... A slow rhythm (less than 60 beats/min), is labelled bradycardia. This may be caused by a slowed signal from the sinus node ( ...
IVR is a three-letter abbreviation that may refer to: Accelerated idioventricular rhythm Interactive voice response ...
... accelerated idioventricular rhythm MeSH C14.280.067.845.880.095 --- tachycardia, atrioventricular nodal reentry MeSH C14.280. ...
If the rate is >40 bpm, it is called accelerated idioventricular rhythm. The rate of 20-40 is the "intrinsic automaticity" of ... escape rhythm). This is called Idioventricular Rhythm. Ventricular signals are transmitted cell-to-cell between cardiomyocytes ...
... is a ventricular rhythm with a rate of between 40 and 120 beats per minute. Idioventricular ... The accelerated idioventricular rhythm occurs when depolarization rate of a normally suppressed focus increases to above that ... "Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm: Overview - eMedicine". Retrieved 2008-12-21. Moens, A.L.; Claeys, M.J.; Timmermans, J.P.; ... Accelerated idioventricular rhythm is the most common reperfusion arrhythmia in humans. However, ventricular tachycardia and ...
Accelerated idioventricular rhythm. *Catecholaminergic polymorphic. *Torsades de pointes. Premature contraction. *Atrial. * ... Both of these rhythms normally last for only a few seconds to minutes (paroxysmal tachycardia), but if VT persists it is ... In general, it is an irregular, narrow complex rhythm. However, it may show wide QRS complexes on the ECG if a bundle branch ... It may be difficult to determine the rhythm's regularity when the rate exceeds 150 beats per minute. Depending on the patient's ...
Accelerated idioventricular rhythm. *Catecholaminergic polymorphic. *Torsades de pointes. Premature contraction. *Atrial. * ... then the condition is termed junctional rhythm. On the surface ECG, premature junctional contractions will appear as a normally ...
Accelerated idioventricular rhythm. *Accelerated phase chronic myelogenous leukemia. *Accessory breast. *Accessory auricle ...
Accelerated idioventricular rhythm. *Catecholaminergic polymorphic. *Torsades de pointes. Premature contraction. *Atrial. * ... Bigeminy is a heart rhythm problem in which there are repeated rhythms heart beats, one long and one shorter. Most often this ... When the atrial rhythm is irregular (as in atrial fibrillation or sinus arrythmia) the presence of bigeminy depends on the ... is used to refer to the dependence of bigeminy on the ventricular cycle length in irregular rhythms.[3] ...
Accelerated idioventricular rhythm. *Catecholaminergic polymorphic. *Torsades de pointes. Premature contraction. *Atrial. * ...
Accelerated idioventricular rhythm. *Catecholaminergic polymorphic. *Torsades de pointes. Premature contraction. *Atrial. * ...
Accelerated idioventricular rhythm. *Catecholaminergic polymorphic. *Torsades de pointes. Premature contraction. *Atrial. * ... and the Heart Rhythm Society. Endorsed by the International Society for Computerized Electrocardiology". J. Am. Coll. Cardiol. ...
Accelerated idioventricular rhythm. *Catecholaminergic polymorphic. *Torsades de pointes. Premature contraction. *Atrial. * ... is called an escape rhythm, the lower rhythm having escaped from the dominance of the upper rhythm. As a rule, premature ... "Junctional escape rhythm". ECG Interpretation: An Incredibly Easy! Pocket Guide (4th ed.). Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. 2007 ... Location of the pacemaker can also change its effect on the SA node and its rhythm. An ectopic pacemaker located in the atria ...
Accelerated idioventricular rhythm. *Catecholaminergic polymorphic. *Torsades de pointes. Premature contraction. *Atrial. * ... While the sinoatrial node typically regulates the heartbeat during normal sinus rhythm, PACs occur when another region of the ... the associated P wave appears different from those seen in normal sinus rhythm. Typically, the atrial impulse propagates ...
Accelerated idioventricular rhythm. *Catecholaminergic polymorphic. *Torsades de pointes. Premature contraction. *Atrial. * ... which may terminate into a dangerous heart rhythm known as ventricular fibrillation, which often leads to death.[51] ... "Traditional Framingham risk factors fail to fully account for accelerated atherosclerosis in systemic lupus erythematosus". ... "Psychosocial stress and atherosclerosis: family and work stress accelerate progression of coronary disease in women. The ...
Accelerated idioventricular rhythm. *Catecholaminergic polymorphic. *Torsades de pointes. Premature contraction. *Atrial. * ... Multifocal (or multiform) atrial tachycardia (MAT) is an abnormal heart rhythm,[1] specifically a type of supraventricular ... Theophylline can cause a number of different abnormal heart rhythms when in excess, and thus further predisposes COPD patients ... this is technically not a tachycardia and it is then termed multifocal atrial rhythm).[2] ...
Accelerated idioventricular rhythm. *Catecholaminergic polymorphic. *Torsades de pointes. Premature contraction. *Atrial. * ... and decay-accelerating factor (DAF). However, other proteins have also been identified that allow Coxsackieviruses to bind to ...
Accelerated idioventricular rhythm. *Catecholaminergic polymorphic. *Torsades de pointes. Premature contraction. *Atrial. * ... "Heart Rhythm Society. Archived from the original on 2 May 2014. Retrieved 7 June 2014.. ... Heart attack, high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythm, excessive alcohol use, infection, heart damage[2][3]. ... Sympathetic activity may also cause potentially fatal abnormal heart rhythms. An increase in the physical size of the heart's ...
Accelerated idioventricular rhythm. *Catecholaminergic polymorphic. *Torsades de pointes. Premature contraction. *Atrial. * ...
Accelerated idioventricular rhythm. *Catecholaminergic polymorphic. *Torsades de pointes. Premature contraction. *Atrial. * ...
AIVR is currently defined as an enhanced ectopic ventricular rhythm with at least 3 consecutive ventricular beats, which is ... faster than normal intrinsic ventricular escape rhythm (≤40 bpm), but slower than ventricular tachycardia (at least 100-120 bpm ... Accelerated idioventricular rhythm (AIVR) was first described by Thomas Lewis in 1910. ... encoded search term (Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm) and Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm What to Read Next on Medscape. ...
Accelerated idioventricular rhythm is a ventricular rhythm with a rate of between 40 and 120 beats per minute. Idioventricular ... The accelerated idioventricular rhythm occurs when depolarization rate of a normally suppressed focus increases to above that ... "Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm: Overview - eMedicine". Retrieved 2008-12-21. Moens, A.L.; Claeys, M.J.; Timmermans, J.P.; ... Accelerated idioventricular rhythm is the most common reperfusion arrhythmia in humans. However, ventricular tachycardia and ...
Accelerated idioventricular rhythm (AIVR) is a ventricular rhythm consisting of three or more consecutive monomorphic beats, ... Postresuscitation accelerated idioventricular rhythm: A potential prognostic factor for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest ... 5. Grimm W, Hoffmann J, Menz V, Schmidt C, Müller HH, Maisch B. Significance of accelerated idioventricular rhythm in ... ECG diagnosis: Accelerated idioventricular rhythm. Perm J 2018;22:17-173. DOI: https://doi.org/10.7812/TPP/17-173 ...
Suggest treatment for PVC and accelerated idioventricular rhythm. Ask a Doctor about diagnosis, treatment and medication for ... There are only PVC and accelerated idioventricular rhythm, which are related to dilated heart and low cardiac function. I ... Suggest treatment for pvc and accelerated idioventricular rhythm. *Suggest treatment for face swelling following dental ... Follow-up: Suggest treatment for PVC and accelerated idioventricular rhythm 2 days later ...
American Roentgen Ray Society Images of Accelerated idioventricular rhythm All Images. X-rays. Echo & Ultrasound. CT Images. ... Differentiating Accelerated idioventricular rhythm from other Diseases. Epidemiology and Demographics. Diagnosis. ... The wide complex beats represent accelerated idioventricular rhythm which is usually seen following reperfusion in acute MI ... Differential Diagnosis of Tachycardia with a Wide QRS Complex • Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm • Ventricular Parasystole • ...
Rossdonaldson1 moved page Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm to Accelerated idioventricular rhythm). *(cur , prev). 04:04, 9 ... Revision history of "Accelerated idioventricular rhythm". View logs for this page. Search for revisions. From year (and earlier ...
Various Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythms Various Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythms. 1.. Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm ...
Accelerated idioventricular rhythm is ventricular rhythm with a rate of between 40 and 120 beats per minute Idioventricular ... Accelerated idioventricular rhythm is ventricular rhythm with a rate of between 40 and 120 beats per minute. Idioventricular ... The accelerated idioventricular rhythm occurs when depolarization rate of a normally suppressed focus increases to above that ... Accelerated idioventricular rhythm is also the most common reperfusion arrhythmia in humans. However, ventricular tachycardia ...
... accelerated ventricular rhythm (idioventricular rhythm), with emphasis on ECG, clinical features and management. ... ECG Example: Idioventricular rhythm (accelerated ventricular rhythm) - Accelerated ventricular rhythm at a rate of 56 for the ... Figure 1 exemplifies a ventricular rhythm.. Accelerated ventricular rhythm (idioventricular rhythm) is a rhythm with rate at 60 ... Accelerated ventricular rhythm, which is also called idioventricular rhythm.. The hallmark of all ventricular rhythms is the ...
Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm. - Ventricular Tachycardia. Irregular Tachycardias. - Multifocal Atrial Tachycardia. - ... An easy-to-read approach covers everything from airway management and rhythms and their management to electrical therapy, acute ... Consistent format of case studies includes Objective, Skills to Master, Rhythms to Master, Medications to Master, Related Text ...
Accelerated idioventricular rhythm is typically seen in infants and young children, accelerated idioventricular rhythm rates ... A benign accelerated idioventricular rhythm is an example of an autonomic mechanism. ... Automatic rhythms. Automatic rhythms are more common than reentrant rhythms in pediatric patients with apparently normal hearts ... accelerated idioventricular rhythm (AIVR). Although thorough noninvasive evaluation with monitoring and echocardiography is ...
The most important rhythm abnormality in athletes is ventricular tachycardia associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. If ... Accelerated idioventricular rhythm is defined as a ventricular rhythm with a rate of 60 to 125 beats per minute. This ... Accelerated idioventricular rhythm is also common after successful reperfusion with thrombolytics, but it is not considered a ... Accelerated idioventricular rhythm is present in up to 20 percent of patients after an acute myocardial infarction.25 It occurs ...
Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm: A Benign Arrhythmia in Childhood Susan G. MacLellan-Tobert, Co-burn J. Porter ...
Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm (AIVR). 138. (1). ECG Criteria. 138. (1). Causes and Clinical Significance. ...
Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm in a Child With Status Asthmaticus Cheyenne Beach, Elisa Marcuccio, Lee Beerman, Gaurav ...
Our mission is to create a smarter world by simplifying and accelerating the learning process. © 2019 Bold Learning Solutions. ...
1 result(s) search for keyword(s) Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm Add the result to your basket Refine your search ... Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm Hypertrophy, Right Ventricular Respiratory System Abnormalities Evaluation Studies as Topic ... Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm Hypertrophy, Right Ventricular Respiratory System Abnormalities Evaluation Studies as Topic ... Sixty percent (60.22) had normal rhythm; and forty percent had various rhythm abnormalities; 77.6 had normal axis while 22.4 ...
AIVR - accelerated idioventricular rhythm. - Both are wide QRS regular tachycardia with no P (but AIVR does not -, SCD) ... Our mission is to create a smarter world by simplifying and accelerating the learning process. © 2018 Bold Learning Solutions. ...
加速性心室自主節律Accelerated idioventricular rhythm ...
Accelerated idioventricular rhythm Full details Contributors. Authors VIEW ALL  Ramin Shadman, MD, FACC ... Regular versus irregular rhythm: * Whether a rhythm is regular or irregular is easy to determine clinically and can help guide ... endorsed by Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación ... endorsed by Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación ...
7596699 - Accelerated idioventricular rhythm: a benign arrhythmia in childhood.. 7659579 - Catheter ablation of idiopathic left ...
25378469 - Idiopathic accelerated idioventricular rhythm or ventricular tachycardia originating fr.... 22353149 - Measurement ...
D A single PVC during sinus rhythm (left) and accelerated idioventricular rhythm during reperfusion (right). Retrograde p waves ... One amiodarone-treated animal showed an accelerated idioventricular rhythm with 115 beats per minute starting 24 min after ... During reperfusion, all animals showed phases with accelerated idioventricular rhythm (Fig. 3D). ... The underlying rhythm in all animals was SR with spontaneous PVCs during occlusion. Amiodarone treatment decreased the mean ...
Toxicity To Various Agents, Feeling Hot, Body Temperature Decreased, Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm, Grand Mal Convulsion, ...
  • Prevalence and significance of accelerated idioventricular rhythm in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention. (medscape.com)
  • Post-operatively, the patient developed hemodynamically significant accelerated idioventricular rhythm which was not responsive to a combination of amiodarone, lidocaine, and procainamide leading to 2 cardiac arrest events and placement on ECMO. (springermedizin.de)
  • IV sotalol in the setting of ECMO and CRRT was safe and effective in controlling refractory hemodynamically compromising accelerated idioventricular rhythm unresponsive to amiodarone. (springermedizin.de)
  • His medications included amiodarone for rhythm control of his atrial fibrillation. (blogspot.ca)
  • The discharge rate of normal or abnormal pacemakers may be accelerated by drugs, various forms of cardiac disease, reduction in extracellular potassium, or alterations of autonomic nervous system tone. (uptodate.com)
  • This specialty organization represents medical, allied health, and science professionals from more than 70 countries who specialize in cardiac rhythm disorders. (guidelinecentral.com)