Reptiles: Cold-blooded, air-breathing VERTEBRATES belonging to the class Reptilia, usually covered with external scales or bony plates.Mites: Any arthropod of the subclass ACARI except the TICKS. They are minute animals related to the spiders, usually having transparent or semitransparent bodies. They may be parasitic on humans and domestic animals, producing various irritations of the skin (MITE INFESTATIONS). Many mite species are important to human and veterinary medicine as both parasite and vector. Mites also infest plants.Otolaryngology: A surgical specialty concerned with the study and treatment of disorders of the ear, nose, and throat.Ectoparasitic Infestations: Infestations by PARASITES which live on, or burrow into, the surface of their host's EPIDERMIS. Most ectoparasites are ARTHROPODS.Snakes: Limbless REPTILES of the suborder Serpentes.Mite Infestations: Infestations with arthropods of the subclass ACARI, superorder Acariformes.Veterinary Medicine: The medical science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in animals.Phthiraptera: An order of small, wingless parasitic insects, commonly known as lice. The suborders include ANOPLURA (sucking lice); AMBLYCERA; ISCHNOCERA; and Rhynchophthirina (elephant and warthog lice).Education, Veterinary: Use for general articles concerning veterinary medical education.Siphonaptera: An order of parasitic, blood-sucking, wingless INSECTS with the common name of fleas.Acaridae: Family of MITES, in the superfamily Acaroidea, order Astigmata. They are frequently found in cereal-based foodstuffs including GRAIN and FLOUR.Electronic Supplementary MaterialsAcari: A large, subclass of arachnids comprising the MITES and TICKS, including parasites of plants, animals, and humans, as well as several important disease vectors.Synchrotrons: Devices for accelerating protons or electrons in closed orbits where the accelerating voltage and magnetic field strength varies (the accelerating voltage is held constant for electrons) in order to keep the orbit radius constant.Leg: The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.ArizonaBrazilTourette Syndrome: A neuropsychological disorder related to alterations in DOPAMINE metabolism and neurotransmission involving frontal-subcortical neuronal circuits. Both multiple motor and one or more vocal tics need to be present with TICS occurring many times a day, nearly daily, over a period of more than one year. The onset is before age 18 and the disturbance is not due to direct physiological effects of a substance or a another medical condition. The disturbance causes marked distress or significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. (From DSM-IV, 1994; Neurol Clin 1997 May;15(2):357-79)MexicoBiota: The spectrum of different living organisms inhabiting a particular region, habitat, or biotope.Quercetin: A flavonol widely distributed in plants. It is an antioxidant, like many other phenolic heterocyclic compounds. Glycosylated forms include RUTIN and quercetrin.History, 15th Century: Time period from 1401 through 1500 of the common era.Ecotype: Geographic variety, population, or race, within a species, that is genetically adapted to a particular habitat. An ecotype typically exhibits phenotypic differences but is capable of interbreeding with other ecotypes.Los AngelesEl SalvadorCockroaches: Insects of the order Dictyoptera comprising several families including Blaberidae, BLATTELLIDAE, Blattidae (containing the American cockroach PERIPLANETA americana), Cryptocercidae, and Polyphagidae.Blattellidae: A family of insects in the order Dictyoptera (COCKROACHES), including genera Blattella, Parcoblatta, and Symploce.Xenopsylla: A genus of fleas in the family Pulicidae which includes the species that serves as the primary vector of BUBONIC PLAGUE, Xenopsylla cheopis.Ischnocera: A suborder of chewing lice, in the order PHTHIRAPTERA, that are parasites of birds and mammals.Cat's Claw: A vine (Uncaria tomentosa) indigenous to the Amazon rainforest whose name is derived from its hook-like thorns. It contains oxindole alkaloids and glycosides and has many medicinal uses.Hysteria: Historical term for a chronic, but fluctuating, disorder beginning in early life and characterized by recurrent and multiple somatic complaints not apparently due to physical illness. This diagnosis is not used in contemporary practice.Entomology: A discipline or occupation concerned with the study of INSECTS, including the biology and the control of insects.Vapor Pressure: The contribution to barometric PRESSURE of gaseous substance in equilibrium with its solid or liquid phase.Caprolactam: Cyclic amide of caproic acid used in manufacture of synthetic fibers of the polyamide type. Can cause local irritation.Construction Materials: Supplies used in building.Sanitary Engineering: A branch of engineering concerned with the design, construction, and maintenance of environmental facilities conducive to public health, such as water supply and waste disposal.Forensic Sciences: Disciplines that apply sciences to law. Forensic sciences include a wide range of disciplines, such as FORENSIC TOXICOLOGY; FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY; FORENSIC MEDICINE; FORENSIC DENTISTRY; and others.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Humidity: A measure of the amount of WATER VAPOR in the air.North AmericaIce: The solid substance formed by the FREEZING of water.Lettuce: Any of the various plants of the genus Lactuca, especially L. sativa, cultivated for its edible leaves. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Pest Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous plants, insects, or other animals. This includes control of plants that serve as habitats or food sources for animal pests.Minerals: Native, inorganic or fossilized organic substances having a definite chemical composition and formed by inorganic reactions. They may occur as individual crystals or may be disseminated in some other mineral or rock. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed; McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Child Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological maturing of an individual from birth up to but not including ADOLESCENCE.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Air Pollution: The presence of contaminants or pollutant substances in the air (AIR POLLUTANTS) that interfere with human health or welfare, or produce other harmful environmental effects. The substances may include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; or volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Pesticides: Chemicals used to destroy pests of any sort. The concept includes fungicides (FUNGICIDES, INDUSTRIAL); INSECTICIDES; RODENTICIDES; etc.Allelopathy: The process by which organisms release chemical compounds known as ALLELOCHEMICALS which influence the physiology, growth, survival, colonization, and reproductive activities of other species usually located nearby.Pest Control, Biological: Use of naturally-occuring or genetically-engineered organisms to reduce or eliminate populations of pests.MuseumsInsects: The class Insecta, in the phylum ARTHROPODA, whose members are characterized by division into three parts: head, thorax, and abdomen. They are the dominant group of animals on earth; several hundred thousand different kinds having been described. Three orders, HEMIPTERA; DIPTERA; and SIPHONAPTERA; are of medical interest in that they cause disease in humans and animals. (From Borror et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p1)Preservatives, Pharmaceutical: Substances added to pharmaceutical preparations to protect them from chemical change or microbial action. They include ANTI-BACTERIAL AGENTS and antioxidants.Food Preservatives: Substances capable of inhibiting, retarding or arresting the process of fermentation, acidification or other deterioration of foods.Fishes: A group of cold-blooded, aquatic vertebrates having gills, fins, a cartilaginous or bony endoskeleton, and elongated bodies covered with scales.Beetles: INSECTS of the order Coleoptera, containing over 350,000 species in 150 families. They possess hard bodies and their mouthparts are adapted for chewing.Specimen Handling: Procedures for collecting, preserving, and transporting of specimens sufficiently stable to provide accurate and precise results suitable for clinical interpretation.Guadeloupe: The name of two islands of the West Indies, separated by a narrow channel. Their capital is Basse-Terre. They were discovered by Columbus in 1493, occupied by the French in 1635, held by the British at various times between 1759 and 1813, transferred to Sweden in 1813, and restored to France in 1816. Its status was changed from colony to a French overseas department in 1946. Columbus named it in honor of the monastery of Santa Maria de Guadalupe in Spain. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p470 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p221)
(1/23) Acaroid mite, intestinal and urinary acariasis.

AIM: To investigate epidemiology and pathogenic mite species of intestinal and urinary acariasis in individuals with different occupations. METHODS: A total of 1994 individuals were tested in this study. History collection, skin prick test and pathogen identification were conducted. The mites were isolated from stool and urine samples by saturated saline flotation methods and sieving following centrifugation, respectively. RESULTS: Among the 1994 individuals examined, responses to the skin prick test of "+++", "++", "+","+/-" and "-" were observed at frequencies of 3.96 % (79), 3.21 % (64), 2.31 % (46), 1.25 % (25) and 89.27 % (1780), respectively. A total number of 161 (8.07 %) individuals were shown to carry mites, with 92 (4.61 %) positive only for stool samples, 37 (1.86 %) positive only for urine samples and 32 (1.60 %) for both. The positive rate of mites in stool samples was 6.22 % (124/1994), being 6.84 % (78/1140) for males and 5.39 % (46/854) for females. No gender difference was observed in this study (chi(2)=1.77, P>0.05). The mites from stool samples included Acarus siro, TyroPhagus putrescentiae, Dermatophagoides farinae, D. pteronyssinus, Glycyphagus domesticus, G. ornatus, Carpoglyphus lactis and Tarsonemus granaries. The positive rate of mites in urine samples was 3.46 % (69/1994). The positive rates for male and female subjects were found to be 3.95 % (45/1140) and 2.81 % (24/854) respectively, with no gender difference observed (chi(2)=1.89, P>0.05). Mites species in urine samples included Acarus siro, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, T. longior, Aleuroglyphus ovatus, Caloglyphus berlesei, C. mycophagus, Suidasia nesbitti, Lardoglyphus konoi, Glycyphagus domesticus, Carpoglyphus lactis, Lepidoglyphus destructor, Dermatophagoides farinae, D. pteronyssinus, Euroglyphus magnei, Caloglyphus hughesi, Tarsonemus granarus and T. hominis. The species of mites in stool and urine samples were consistent with those separated from working environment. A significant difference was found among the frequencies of mite infection in individuals with different occupations (chi(2)=82.55, P<0.001), with its frequencies in those working in medicinal herb storehouses, those in rice storehouse or mills, miners, railway workers, pupils and teachers being 15.89 % (68/428), 12.96 % (53/409), 3.28 % (18/549), 2.54 % (6/236), 5.10 % (13/255) and 2.56 % (3/117), respectively. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of human intestinal and urinary acariasis was not associated with gender, and these diseases are more frequently found in individuals working in medicinal herb, rice storehouses or mills and other sites with high density of mites. More attention should be paid to the mite prevention and labor protection for these high-risk groups.  (+info)

(2/23) (E)-2-(2-Hydroxyethylidene)-6-methyl-5-heptenal (alpha-acariolal) and (E)-2-(2-hydroxyethyl)-6-methyl-2,5-heptadienal (beta-acariolal), two new types of isomeric monoterpenes from Caloglyphus polyphyllae (Acari: Acaridae).

The opisthonotal gland secretion of the acarid mite, Caloglyphus polyphyllae, contained two new monoterpenes, (E)-2-(2-hydroxyethylidene)-6-methyl-5-heptenal (1) and (E)-2-(2-hydroxyethyl)-6-methyl-2,5-heptadienal (2), to which we have given the trivial names alpha- and beta-acariolal in relation to alpha- and beta-acaridial (3 and 4), respectively. Elucidation of the structure of 1 was established mainly from 1H-NMR and GC/MS spectral data after partial purification, together with the fact that 1 was recovered in the more-polar fraction from a silica gel column than alpha- and beta-acaridial (3 and 4) present in the secretion. Compound 2 was obtained in the same fraction as a mixture with 1. Based on the facts that 2 had the same molecular weight by GC/MS and the same polarity as that of 1, compound 2 was assumed to be a structural analog of 1. The structures of compounds 1 and 2 were confirmed by their synthesis in nine and ten respective steps starting from alpha-bromo-gamma-butyrolactone.  (+info)

(3/23) The efficacy of benzyl benzoate sprays in killing the storage mite Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Acari: Acaridae).

This study tested the effectiveness of benzyl benzoate (BB) in killing Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank) mites when using the method utilized by regular consumers. The efficacy of the BB sprays was determined in laboratory experiments and semi-field experiments with mattress and mattress pad pieces. The mites were counted and their living status determined at different time points microscopically. In the laboratory experiment, the sprays containing either 0.5 %/0.9 % BB with 70 % ethanol or 0.1 % BB with absolute ethanol were highly efficient, resulting in over 90 % mite mortality within 20-30 minutes. In the semi-field experiment, mimicking the home application, the sprays were applied to pieces of a mattress and a mattress pad, and allowed to affect the area for 30 minutes before thorough vacuuming. The recovery of mites was usually less than 10 %. The sprays containing BB were effective in killing the mites in the laboratory, but success was less prominent in the semi-field tests. This method could be used in testing other compounds for their efficacy in killing mites.  (+info)

(4/23) Age and size at maturity: sex, environmental variability and developmental thresholds.

In most organisms, transitions between different life-history stages occur later and at smaller sizes as growth conditions deteriorate. Day and Rowe recently proposed that this pattern could be explained by the existence of developmental thresholds (minimum sizes or levels of condition below which transitions are unable to proceed). The developmental-threshold model predicts that the reaction norm of age and size at maturity will rotate in an anticlockwise manner from positive to a shallow negative slope if: (i) initial body size or condition is reduced; and/or (ii) some individuals encounter poor growth conditions at increasingly early developmental stages. We tested these predictions by rearing replicated populations of soil mites Sancassania berlesei (Michael) under different growth conditions. High-food environments produced a vertical relationship between age and size at maturity. The slope became increasingly shallow as food was reduced. By contrast, high food in the maternal environment reduced the slope of the reaction norm of age and size at maturity, whereas low food increased it. Overall, the reaction norm of age and size at maturity in S. berlesei was significantly nonlinear and differed for males and females. We describe how growth conditions, mother's environment and sex determine age and size at maturity in S. berlesei.  (+info)

(5/23) Putting copper into action: copper-impregnated products with potent biocidal activities.

Copper ions, either alone or in copper complexes, have been used for centuries to disinfect liquids, solids, and human tissue. Today copper is used as a water purifier, algaecide, fungicide, nematocide, molluscicide, and antibacterial and antifouling agent. Copper also displays potent antiviral activity. We hypothesized that introducing copper into clothing, bedding, and other articles would provide them with biocidal properties. A durable platform technology has been developed that introduces copper into cotton fibers, latex, and other polymeric materials. This study demonstrates the broad-spectrum antimicrobial (antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal) and antimite activities of copper-impregnated fibers and polyester products. This technology enabled the production of antiviral gloves and filters (which deactivate HIV-1 and other viruses), antibacterial self-sterilizing fabrics (which kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci), antifungal socks (which alleviate symptoms of athlete's foot), and anti-dust mite mattress covers (which reduce mite-related allergies). These products did not have skin-sensitizing properties, as determined by guine pig maximization and rabbit skin irritation tests. Our study demonstrates the potential use of copper in new applications. These applications address medical issues of the greatest importance, such as viral transmissions; nosocomial, or healthcare-associated, infections; and the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.  (+info)

(6/23) Effect of inbreeding and heritability of sperm competition success in the bulb mite Rhizoglyphus robini.

Sperm competition is a potent evolutionary force shaping the reproductive biology of most animal species. Here, we estimated the heritability of sperm competition success in the promiscuous bulb mite Rhizoglyphus robini. Sperm competition success was measured with the sterile male technique as the proportion of eggs fertilised by the second of three males mated with a single female. Sperm competition success responded significantly to selection. The heritability estimated from the response to five generations of selection was 0.13. We also estimated the effect of inbreeding on sperm competition success. Males produced by sib-mating (F=0.25) had a significantly lower sperm competition success than outbred males. The estimated coefficient of inbreeding depression was 0.53. Such high inbreeding depression together with moderately low heritability is consistent with the view that sperm competitive ability is under strong directional selection and strongly influences the reproductive success of males.  (+info)

(7/23) Immunoglobulin E reactivity of recombinant allergen Tyr p 13 from Tyrophagus putrescentiae homologous to fatty acid binding protein.

The storage mite, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, is one of the important causes of allergic disorders. Fifteen allergenic components were demonstrated in storage mite by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting, but only the group 2 allergen Tyr p 2 has been cloned and characterized. In this study, we attempted to identify and characterize new allergens from T. putrescentiae, which is a dominant species of storage mite in Korea. Expressed sequence tags were analyzed to identify possible storage mite allergens, and the cDNA sequence encoding a protein homologous to fatty acid binding protein, a mite group 13 allergen, was identified and named Tyr p 13. Its deduced amino acid sequence showed 61.1 to 85.3% identity with other mite group 13 allergens. The recombinant protein was expressed in Escherichia coli using a pET 28b vector system, and its allergenicity was investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The recombinant allergen was detected in 5 of 78 (6.4%) T. putrescentiae-positive sera tested, and it inhibited 61.9% of immunoglobulin E binding to crude extract at an inhibitor concentration of 10 mug/ml by inhibition ELISA using serum from the patient who showed the strongest reaction by ELISA. In this study, a novel allergen was identified in T. putrescentiae. This allergen could be helpful for more-detailed characterizations of storage mite allergy.  (+info)

(8/23) Immunoglobulin E binding reactivity of a recombinant allergen homologous to alpha-Tubulin from Tyrophagus putrescentiae.

Storage mites may cause allergic respiratory diseases in urban areas as well as pose an occupational hazard in rural areas. Characterization of storage mite allergens is important for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic agents against mite-associated allergic disorders. Here we report on the cloning and expression of alpha-tubulin from the storage mite (Tyrophagus putrescentiae). The deduced amino acid sequence of the alpha-tubulin from the storage mite showed as much as 97.3% identity to the alpha-tubulin sequences from other organisms. The highly conserved amino acid sequences of alpha-tubulins across different species of mites may indicate that cross-reactivity for this potential allergen exists. The frequency of immunoglobulin E reactivity of this recombinant protein is 29.3% in sera from storage mite-allergic subjects.  (+info)

*  Acaridae
The Acaridae are a family of mites. Common forms include some mold mites, for example the grain mite. Genera in the family ... 2008). "Acaridae Species Listing". Biology Catalog. Texas A&M University. Archived from the original on 7 August 2010. ...
*  Psyllacarus
... is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Psyllacarus subellipticus Fain, F. Bartholomaeus, B. Cooke & J. C. ... 2008). "Acaridae Species Listing". Biology Catalog. Texas A&M University. Retrieved July 26, 2010. ...
*  Thectochloracarus
2008). "Acaridae Species Listing". Biology Catalog. Texas A&M University. Retrieved July 26, 2010. ... Thectochloracarus is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Thectochloracarus neotropicalis Fain, Engel, Flechtmann & OConnor ...
*  Diadasiopus
2008). "Acaridae Species Listing". Biology Catalog. Texas A&M University. Retrieved July 26, 2010. ... Diadasiopus is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Diadasiopus alexanderi O'Connor & Daneshvar, 1999 Diadasiopus eickworti ...
*  Apiacarus
... is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Apiacarus inflatus Volgin, 1974 Barry O'Connor, ed. (2008). "Acaridae ...
*  Thyreophagus
2008). "Acaridae Species Listing". Biology Catalog. Texas A&M University. Retrieved July 26, 2010. ... Thyreophagus is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Thyreophagus africanus Mahunka, 1974 Thyreophagus aleurophagus (Sicher ...
*  Sennertionyx
2008). "Acaridae Species Listing". Biology Catalog. Texas A&M University. Retrieved July 26, 2010. ... Sennertionyx is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Scientific name: Sennertionyx Rank: GENUS cellular organisms Eukaryota ... Protostomia Panarthropoda Arthropoda Chelicerata Arachnida Acari Acariformes Sarcoptiformes Astigmata Acaroidea Acaridae ...
*  Lowryacarus
... is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Lowryacarus longipes Fain, 1986 Barry O'Connor, ed. (2008). "Acaridae ...
*  Acarotalpa
2008). "Acaridae Species Listing". Biology Catalog. Texas A&M University. Archived from the original on 7 August 2010. ... Acarotalpa is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Acarotalpa duprei Fain, 1987 Acarotalpa fossor Volgin, 1966 Barry ...
*  Mauracarus
2008). "Acaridae Species Listing". Biology Catalog. Texas A&M University. Retrieved July 26, 2010. ... Mauracarus is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Mauracarus mauritii S. Mahunka, 1978 Barry O'Connor, ed. ( ...
*  Lemmaniella
... is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Lemmaniella reducta Mahunka, 1977 Barry O'Connor, ed. (2008). "Acaridae ...
*  Madaglyphus
2008). "Acaridae Species Listing". Biology Catalog. Texas A&M University. Retrieved July 26, 2010. ... Madaglyphus is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Madaglyphus chaetolamina (C. A. Ferguson, 1985) Madaglyphus javensis ...
*  Sinolardoglyphus
2008). "Acaridae Species Listing". Biology Catalog. Texas A&M University. Retrieved July 26, 2010. ... Sinolardoglyphus is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Sinolardoglyphus nanchangensis Z. T. Jiang, 1991 Barry O'Connor, ...
*  Mycetoglyphus
2008). "Acaridae Species Listing". Biology Catalog. Texas A&M University. Retrieved July 26, 2010. ... Mycetoglyphus is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Mycetoglyphus fungivorus Oudemans, 1932 Mycetoglyphus sevastianovi ...
*  Calvoliopsis
2008). "Acaridae Species Listing". Biology Catalog. Texas A&M University. Retrieved July 26, 2010. ... Calvoliopsis is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Calvoliopsis rugosus Mahunka, 1973 Barry O'Connor, ed. ( ...
*  Bromeliaglyphus
2008). "Acaridae Species Listing". Biology Catalog. Texas A&M University. Retrieved July 26, 2010. ... Bromeliaglyphus is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Bromeliaglyphus monteverdensis H.H.J. Nesbitt, 1985 Barry O'Connor ...
*  Trichopsyllopus
2008). "Acaridae Species Listing". Biology Catalog. Texas A&M University. Retrieved July 26, 2010. ... Trichopsyllopus is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Trichopsyllopus oregonensis Fain & G. T. Baker, 1983 Barry O'Connor ...
*  Tyrophagus
2008). "Acaridae Species Listing". Biology Catalog. Texas A&M University. Retrieved July 26, 2010. Cheese mite. ... Tyrophagus is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Tyrophagus curvipenis Fain & Fauvel, 1993 Tyrophagus debrivorus Chinniah ...
*  Ebertia
... is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Ebertia australis (Oudemans, 1917) Barry O'Connor, ed. (2008). "Acaridae ...
*  Sancassania
2008). "Acaridae Species Listing". Biology Catalog. Texas A&M University. Retrieved July 26, 2010. ... Sancassania is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Sancassania berlesei (Michael, 1903) Sancassania chelone Oudemans, 1916 ...
*  Irianopus
... is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Irianopus brevis Fain, 1986 Barry O'Connor, ed. (2008). "Acaridae Species ...
*  Horstiella
2008). "Acaridae Species Listing". Biology Catalog. Texas A&M University. Retrieved July 26, 2010. ... Horstiella is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Horstiella armata Türk, 1949 Horstiella concentrica Ochoa & O'Connor, ...
*  Psylloglyphus
2008). "Acaridae Species Listing". Biology Catalog. Texas A&M University. Retrieved July 26, 2010. ... Psylloglyphus is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Psylloglyphus australiensis Fain, Bartholomaeus, Cooke & Beaucournu, ...
*  Setoglyphus
2008). "Acaridae Species Listing". Biology Catalog. Texas A&M University. Retrieved July 26, 2010. ... Setoglyphus is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Setoglyphus hexaedra (Mahunka, 1973) Setoglyphus variosetosus S. ...
*  Ghanacarus
... is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Ghanacarus endroedii Mahunka, 1973 Barry O'Connor, ed. (2008). "Acaridae ...
Acaridae - Wikipedia  Acaridae - Wikipedia
The Acaridae are a family of mites. Common forms include some mold mites, for example the grain mite. Genera in the family ... 2008). "Acaridae Species Listing". Biology Catalog. Texas A&M University. Archived from the original on 7 August 2010. ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acaridae
Phoretic associations between hypopi of Acarus nidicolous (Acari, Astigmata, Acaridae) and fleas of British small mammals. -...  Phoretic associations between hypopi of Acarus nidicolous (Acari, Astigmata, Acaridae) and fleas of British small mammals. -...
Acaridae) and fleas of British small mammals.' by David Britt et al. ... Phoretic associations between hypopi of Acarus nidicolous (Acari, Astigmata, Acaridae) and fleas of British small mammals.. @ ... article{Britt1983PhoreticAB, title={Phoretic associations between hypopi of Acarus nidicolous (Acari, Astigmata, Acaridae) and ...
more infohttps://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Phoretic-associations-between-hypopi-of-Acarus-and-Britt-Molyneux/09ba44986978ad3bcfbd58da04e27efa6869b7ca
Kaya HK[au] - PubMed - NCBI  Kaya HK[au] - PubMed - NCBI
Life history of Sancassania polyphyllae (Acari: Acaridae) feeding on dissected tissues of its phoretic host, Polyphylla fullo ( ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?cmd=search&term=Kaya+HK%5Bau%5D&dispmax=50
acarology discussion list 2001.04  acarology discussion list 2001.04
Subject: FWD:astigmated mites Acaridae, Histiostomatidae From: [email protected] Date: Wed, 16 May 2001 12:17:14 EDT Subject: ... Can anybody tell me anything about Acaridae- or Histiostomatidae- copulations of males with tritonymphs (or protonymphs)? What ... astigmated mites Acaridae, Histiostomatidae To: [email protected] Hallo everybody. ...
more infohttp://www.nhm.ac.uk/hosted_sites/acarology/archive/2001/al0105.html
The Probert Encyclopaedia - Animals And Plants (A)  The Probert Encyclopaedia - Animals And Plants (A)
Acaridae. Acaridae is the mite family of insects. Acarina. Acarina is the mite and tick order of the arachnida. They have a ...
more infohttp://vets.com/questionmanager/encyclopaedia/ency1/B1.HTM
Dr. Paul J. Watson, University of New Mexico  Dr. Paul J. Watson, University of New Mexico
Acaridae). Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 80, 499-505. get PDF. ...
more infohttp://biology.unm.edu/pwatson/pjw_cv52.htm
Mites (Acari) Associated with the Desert Seed Harvester Ant, Messor pergandei (Mayr)  Mites (Acari) Associated with the Desert Seed Harvester Ant, Messor pergandei (Mayr)
Astigmatina: Acaridae), and Lemanniella sp. (Astigmatina: Lemanniellidae). The latter marked the first record of this family in ... Mites were identified using a published key to families of Astigmatina [22] and an unpublished key to the genera of Acaridae ( ... Acaridae).," American Midland Naturalist, vol. 95, pp. 337-346, 1976. View at Google Scholar ... Acaridae), Histiostoma (Atigmatina: Histiostomatidae), and Unguidispus (Heterostigmatina: Microdispidae). One mite specimen ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/psyche/2011/974646/
Tomography of astigmatid mite in amber | Biology Letters  Tomography of astigmatid mite in amber | Biology Letters
Tyroglyphidae' (i.e. Acaridae) has been reported as subfossils from Japanese Mizunami copal. The Neogene of Sicily has an ... We should note that the short legs III and IV also resemble the habitus of certain Acaridae, particularly the genus Schwiebea. ... We cannot completely exclude our specimen from Acaridae, but given the preserved shape of legs III and IV, we favour an ... Modern histiostomatids-and species of Schwiebea (Acaridae)-are usually phoretically associated with insects or myriapods [2,3 ...
more infohttp://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/8/3/457
Proyecto para compatibilizar el inventario de biota edáfica BGBD con el Sistema Nacional de Información sobre Biodiversidad  Proyecto para compatibilizar el inventario de biota edáfica BGBD con el Sistema Nacional de Información sobre Biodiversidad
The morpho-species and its relationship to the biological species in the genus Tyrophagus (Acaridae, Acarina). Recent advances ... Life history and life tables of Rhizoglyphus robini Claparède (Acari: Astigmata: Acaridae). Acarologia. Bertrand, M. (Ed.). 4[ ... Phylogeny, historical ecology and systematics of some mushroom-associated mites of the genus Sancassania (Acari: Acaridae), ... Acaridae, Hemicycliophoridae, Dampfiellidae, Monhysteridae, Sternoppiidae, Nanorchestidae, Kalotermitidae, Cerambycidae, ...
more infohttps://www.gbif.org/dataset/b3f5c276-6416-473a-956f-902ae62cd760
Urban Entomology [Ebeling Chap. 10] Pests in Excessively Damp Locations...  Urban Entomology [Ebeling Chap. 10] Pests in Excessively Damp Locations...
Grocer's Itch Mite, Glycyphagus domesticus (De Geer) (Acaridae). This is a small, white mite found in pantries, feeding on ... Grocer's Itch Mite, Glycyphagus domesticus (De Geer) (Acaridae) *Silverfish *Fungus Gnats (Mycetophilidae) *Fungus Gnats in ...
more infohttp://www.entomology.ucr.edu/ebeling/ebel10.html
ISSN 0111-5383 - Wikispecies  ISSN 0111-5383 - Wikispecies
Fan, Q.-H.; Zhang, Z.-Q. 2007: Tyrophagus (Acari: Astigmata: Acaridae). Fauna of New Zealand, (56) Extract and PDF reference ...
more infohttps://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/ISSN_0111-5383
Ciidae  Ciidae
Review of mites of the genus Boletoglyphus (Acariformes, Acaridae). Entomological Review, 78(9): 1094-1101. ... Acaridae), are commonly found on adult ciids (Klimov 1998). ...
more infohttp://www.tolweb.org/Ciidae
Ciidae  Ciidae
Review of mites of the genus Boletoglyphus (Acariformes, Acaridae). Entomological Review, 78(9): 1094-1101. ... Acaridae), are commonly found on adult ciids (Klimov 1998). ...
more infohttp://www.tolweb.org/Ciidae/10303
Ciidae  Ciidae
Review of mites of the genus Boletoglyphus (Acariformes, Acaridae). Entomological Review, 78(9): 1094-1101. ... Acaridae), are commonly found on adult ciids (Klimov 1998). ...
more infohttp://tolweb.org/Ciidae/10303
Acarus | definition of Acarus by Medical dictionary  Acarus | definition of Acarus by Medical dictionary
A genus of mites of the family Acaridae.. [G. akari, mite] Acarus. /Ac·a·rus/ (ak´ah-rus) a genus of small mites, frequent ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Acarus
Psyllacarus - Wikipedia  Psyllacarus - Wikipedia
Psyllacarus is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Psyllacarus subellipticus Fain, F. Bartholomaeus, B. Cooke & J. C. ... 2008). "Acaridae Species Listing". Biology Catalog. Texas A&M University. Retrieved July 26, 2010. ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psyllacarus
Product Detail - Compendium of Lettuce Diseases and Pests, Second Edition  Product Detail - Compendium of Lettuce Diseases and Pests, Second Edition
Family: Acaridae. Bulb Mites. Spider Mites. Class: Malacostraca. Order: Isopoda. Sowbugs and Pillbugs. Part III. Injuries and ...
more infohttps://my.apsnet.org/ItemDetail?iProductCode=45775&WebsiteKey=2661527a-8d44-496c-a730-8cfeb6239be7
Product Detail - Compendium of Lettuce Diseases and Pests, Second Edition  Product Detail - Compendium of Lettuce Diseases and Pests, Second Edition
Family: Acaridae. Bulb Mites. Spider Mites. Class: Malacostraca. Order: Isopoda. Sowbugs and Pillbugs. Part III. Injuries and ...
more infohttps://my.apsnet.org/ItemDetail?iProductCode=45775
Biological Control  Biological Control
Entomopathogenic nematodes as natural enemies for control of Rhizoglyphus robini (Acari: Acaridae)? Jiří Nermuť , Rostislav ... Entomopathogenic nematodes as natural enemies for control of Rhizoglyphus robini (Acari: Acaridae)? Jiří Nermuť , Rostislav ...
more infohttps://www.journals.elsevier.com/biological-control
  • The former was collected in association with Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank) (Acaridae) on a commercial dog food, in Charqueada, while the latter was collected from flowers of Heliconia angusta Vellozo, in Registro, both in the State of Sao Paulo. (academicoo.com)