A large, subclass of arachnids comprising the MITES and TICKS, including parasites of plants, animals, and humans, as well as several important disease vectors.
A family of hardbacked TICKS, in the subclass ACARI. Genera include DERMACENTOR and IXODES among others.
Any arthropod of the subclass ACARI except the TICKS. They are minute animals related to the spiders, usually having transparent or semitransparent bodies. They may be parasitic on humans and domestic animals, producing various irritations of the skin (MITE INFESTATIONS). Many mite species are important to human and veterinary medicine as both parasite and vector. Mites also infest plants.
Family of spider MITES, in the superfamily Tetranychoidea, suborder Trombidiformes.
Family of MITES, in the superfamily Acaroidea, order Astigmata. They are frequently found in cereal-based foodstuffs including GRAIN and FLOUR.
Infestations with arthropods of the subclass ACARI, superorder Acariformes.
The immature stage in the life cycle of those orders of insects characterized by gradual metamorphosis, in which the young resemble the imago in general form of body, including compound eyes and external wings; also the 8-legged stage of mites and ticks that follows the first moult.
Infestations with soft-bodied (Argasidae) or hard-bodied (Ixodidae) ticks.
A species of tick (TICKS) in the family IXODIDAE, distributed throughout the world but abundant in southern Europe. It will feed on a wide variety of MAMMALS, but DOGS are its preferred host. It transmits a large number of diseases including BABESIOSIS; THEILERIASIS; EHRLICHIOSIS; and MEDITERRANEAN SPOTTED FEVER.
A widely distributed genus of TICKS, in the family IXODIDAE, including a number that infest humans and other mammals. Several are vectors of diseases such as TULAREMIA; ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER; COLORADO TICK FEVER; and ANAPLASMOSIS.
A genus of TICKS, in the family IXODIDAE, widespread in Africa. Members of the genus include many important vectors of animal and human pathogens.
Family of MITES, in the superfamily Sarcoptoidea, order Astigmata. They are slow moving, obligate PARASITES that infect MAMMALS and BIRDS. The species SARCOPTES SCABIEI causes SCABIES.
A family of softbacked TICKS, in the subclass ACARI. Genera include ARGAS and ORNITHODOROS among others.
A pesticide or chemical agent that kills mites and ticks. This is a large class that includes carbamates, formamides, organochlorines, organophosphates, etc, that act as antibiotics or growth regulators.
The largest genus of TICKS in the family IXODIDAE, containing over 200 species. Many infest humans and other mammals and several are vectors of diseases such as LYME DISEASE, tick-borne encephalitis (ENCEPHALITIS, TICK-BORNE), and KYASANUR FOREST DISEASE.
A genus of softbacked TICKS, in the family ARGASIDAE, serving as the vector of BORRELIA, causing RELAPSING FEVER, and of the AFRICAN SWINE FEVER VIRUS.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Poland" is not a medical term or concept; it is a country located in Central Europe. If you have any questions about medical topics or definitions, I would be happy to help answer those!
The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous plants, insects, or other animals. This includes control of plants that serve as habitats or food sources for animal pests.
A plant genus of the family ARECACEAE. It is a tropical palm tree that yields a large, edible hard-shelled fruit from which oil and fiber are also obtained.
The capability of producing eggs (OVA) from which young are hatched outside the body. While mostly referring to nonmammalian species, this does include MAMMALS of the order MONOTREMATA.
The relationship between an invertebrate and another organism (the host), one of which lives at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.
Use of naturally-occuring or genetically-engineered organisms to reduce or eliminate populations of pests.
Species of European house dust mite, in the family PYROGLYPHIDAE. It is the most commonly found house dust mite.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Brazil" is not a medical term or concept, it is a country located in South America, known officially as the Federative Republic of Brazil. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or science, I'd be happy to help answer those!
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria often surrounded by a protein microcapsular layer and slime layer. The natural cycle of its organisms generally involves a vertebrate and an invertebrate host. Species of the genus are the etiological agents of human diseases, such as typhus.
A species of mite that causes SCABIES in humans and sarcoptic mange in other animals. Specific variants of S. scabiei exist for humans and animals, but many have the ability to cross species and cause disease.
Members of the class Arachnida, especially SPIDERS; SCORPIONS; MITES; and TICKS; which transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.
Infestations by PARASITES which live on, or burrow into, the surface of their host's EPIDERMIS. Most ectoparasites are ARTHROPODS.
Blood-sucking acarid parasites of the order Ixodida comprising two families: the softbacked ticks (ARGASIDAE) and hardbacked ticks (IXODIDAE). Ticks are larger than their relatives, the MITES. They penetrate the skin of their host by means of highly specialized, hooked mouth parts and feed on its blood. Ticks attack all groups of terrestrial vertebrates. In humans they are responsible for many TICK-BORNE DISEASES, including the transmission of ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER; TULAREMIA; BABESIOSIS; AFRICAN SWINE FEVER; and RELAPSING FEVER. (From Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology, 5th ed, pp543-44)
The narrow passage way that conducts the sound collected by the EAR AURICLE to the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE.
Members of the phylum Arthropoda, composed of organisms having a hard, jointed exoskeleton and paired jointed legs. It includes the class INSECTS and the subclass ARACHNIDA, many species of which are important medically as parasites or as vectors of organisms capable of causing disease in man.
A plant genus of the family RUTACEAE. They bear the familiar citrus fruits including oranges, grapefruit, lemons, and limes. There are many hybrids which makes the nomenclature confusing.

Nitrophorins and related antihemostatic lipocalins from Rhodnius prolixus and other blood-sucking arthropods. (1/47)

Recent gene sequence and crystal structure determinations of salivary proteins from several blood-sucking arthropods have revealed an unusual evolutionary relationship: many such proteins derive their functions from lipocalin protein folds. Many blood-sucking arthropods have independently evolved the ability to overcome a host organism's means of preventing blood loss (called hemostasis). Most blood feeders have proteins that induce vasodilation, inhibit blood coagulation, and reduce inflammation, but do so by distinctly different mechanisms. Despite this diversity, in many cases the antihemostatic activities in such organisms reside in proteins with lipocalin folds. Thirteen such lipocalins are described in this review, with a particular focus on the heme-containing nitrophorins from Rhodnius prolixus, which transport nitric oxide, sequester histamine, and disrupt blood coagulation. Also described are the antiplatelet compounds RPAI, moubatin, and pallidipin from R. prolixus, Ornithodoros moubata, and Triatoma pallidipennis; the antithrombin protein triabin from T. pallidipennis; and the tick histamine binding proteins from Rhipicephalus appendiculatus.  (+info)

Aggregation pheromone activity of the female sex pheromone, beta-acaridial, in Caloglyphus polyphyllae (Acari: Acaridae). (2/47)

Caloglyphus (= Sancasania) polyphyllae discharges from a pair of opisthonotal glands a characteristic set of volatiles, i.e. three monoterpenes and seven hydrocarbons. Among them, beta-acaridial, which is known as the female sex pheromone of the species and has antifungal activity, was newly identified as the aggregation pheromone for unfeeding and unmating mites. Feeding mites, however, exhibited sexually aroused behavior instead of the tendency to cluster when exposed to beta-acaridial. This is the first example of the compound demonstrating two pheromone functions depending upon the circumstances faced by the mites.  (+info)

Evaluation of the acarofauna of the domiciliary ecosystem in Juiz de Fora, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. (3/47)

From August 1999 to January 2000, samples of house dust were collected from 160 domiciles in the city of Juiz de Fora, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. In 36 of these domiciles kitchen samples were obtained. Prevalence rate was 77.5%, varying according to the geographical sector. There were found 2,278 specimens of mites, with 1,530 (67.2%) in the adult stage and 748 (32.8%) in immature forms. The main species found were Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, D. farinae, Euroglyphus maynei, Blomia tropicalis and Tyrophagus putrescentiae. In a minor incidence we found Lepidoglyphus destructor, Suidasia pontificiae, Chortoglyphus arcuatus, Cheyletus malaccensis, C. fortis, Ker bakeri, Cheletonella vespertilionis, C. caucasica and others. C. vespertilionis and C. caucasica were identified for the first time in the domiciliary ecosystem and in Brazil. The abundance rate and the infestation intensity were analyzed. There was a varied correlation between climatic conditions and positive domiciles and number of mites. The difference between the number of positive domiciles in the urban area and in the expanding urban area was significant and so was the difference between samples from the domiciles compared to those from the kitchens.  (+info)

Exogenous ACC enhances volatiles production mediated by jasmonic acid in lima bean leaves. (4/47)

We report the synergistic effects of exogenous 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and jasmonic acid (JA) on production of induced volatiles by excised lima bean leaves. Application of ACC alone to leaves induced trace amounts of volatiles. ACC positively affected three JA-induced volatiles, (E)- and (Z)-beta-ocimene, and (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate. The ethylene inhibitor, silver thiosulfate, inhibited the production of these compounds. The results suggest synergistic effects of JA and ACC on inducible volatile production by lima bean leaves. Furthermore, lima bean leaves treated with JA plus ACC became more attractive to predatory mites, Phytoseiulus persimilis, than those treated with JA alone.  (+info)

(4E)-dehydrocitrals [(2E,4E)- and (2Z,4E )-3,7-dimethyl-2,4,6-octatrienals] from acarid mite Histiogaster sp. A096 (Acari: Acaridae). (5/47)

A mixture of two monoterpenes was obtained as the opisthonotal gland secretion from unidentified Histiogaster sp. A096 (Acari: Acaridae), and their structures were elucidated to be (4E)-dehydrocitrals [(2E,4E)- and (2Z,4E)-3,7-dimethyl-2,4,6-octatrienals] by GC/MS, GC/FT-IR, UV and 1H-NMR spectra. Both isomers of (4E)-dehydrocitral prepared by syntheses in 4 steps from 3-methyl-2-butenal with 34.2% yields (based on the ylide) were separated by column chromatography into the (2E,4E)- and (2Z,4E)-3,7-dimethyl-2,4,6-octatrienal. Mass spectra together with GC retention times of the purified natural (4E)-dehydrocitrals were identical with those of synthetic (2E,4E)-3,7-dimethyl-2,4,6-octatrienal and (2Z,4E)-3,7-dimethyl-2,4,6-octatrienal. The geometry at the 2-C position of both synthetic (4E)-dehydrocitrals was confirmed by NOESY analyses. This is the first identification of (4E)-dehydrocitrals from the animal kingdom.  (+info)

Androlaelaps marmosops (Acari: Laelapidae), a new species associated with the mouse opossum, Marmosops incanus (Lund, 1840) in the Atlantic forest of Rio De Janeiro State, Brazil. (6/47)

Androlaelaps marmosops, a new species of laelapid mite, is described from the pelage of the mouse opossum, Marmosops incanus (Lund, 1840) (Mammalia: Didelphidae), in two areas of Atlantic Forest of Rio de Janeiro State. Measurements and illustrations are included for females only.  (+info)

Diarrhea and acaroid mites: a clinical study. (7/47)

AIM: To explore the characteristics of diarrhea caused by acaroid mites. METHODS: Acaroid mites in fresh stools of 241 patients with diarrhea were separated by flotation in saturated saline. Meanwhile, skin prick test, total IgE and mite-specific IgE were detected in all patients. RESULTS: The total positive rate of mites in stool samples of the patients was 17.01 % (41/241), the positive rates of mites in male and female patients were 15.86 % (23/145) and 18.75 % (18/96), respectively, without significant difference (P>0.05). The percentage of skin prick test as "+++", "++", "+", "+/-" and "-" was 9.13 % (22/241), 7.47 % (18/241), 5.81 % (14/241), 4.98 % (12/241) and 72.61 % (175/241), respectively. The serum levels of total IgE, mite-specific IgE in patients with and without mites in stool samples were (165.72+/-78.55) IU/ml, (132.44+/-26.80) IU/ml and (145.22+/-82.47) IU/ml, (67.35+/-45.28) IU/ml, respectively, with significant difference (P<0.01). The positive rate of mites in stool samples in staffs working in traditional Chinese medicine storehouses or rice storehouses (experimental group) was 26.74 % (23/86), which was significantly higher than that (11.61 %, 18/155) in people engaged in other professions (chi(2)=8.97, P<0.01). CONCLUSION: Acaroid mites cause diarrhea and increase serum levels of total IgE and mite-specific IgE of patients, and the prevalence of diarrhea caused by acaroid mites is associated with occupations rather than the gender of patients.  (+info)

Simple synthesis of mite pheromone beta-acaridial and its analogs in the secretion of Caloglyphus polyphyllae (Acari: Acaridae). (8/47)

A simple synthesis of beta-acaridial [(E)-1], the active principle of the sex, alarm and aggregation pheromone among astigmatid mites, was achieved in 5 steps from 1,2,4-butanetriol 2 in a 19% overall yield. Its analog, beta-acariolal 8, was also prepared in a 63% yield by oxidation of the intermediate, beta-acaridiol [(E)-7], with pyridinium dichromate (PDC). This synthetic route also gave beta-(Z)-acaridiol [(Z)-7] by using a Z-selective base in the Wittig reaction. (Z)-7 was oxidized to give a new monoterpene, beta-(Z)-acaridial [(Z)-1], which was detected as a trace component in the secretion of Caloglyphus polyphyllae, together with 8.  (+info)

'Acari' is the scientific name for a group of small arthropods that includes ticks and mites. These tiny creatures are characterized by having eight legs, lack antennae or wings, and have a hard exoskeleton. They belong to the class Arachnida, which also includes spiders and scorpions.

Ticks are external parasites that feed on the blood of mammals, birds, and reptiles, and can transmit various diseases such as Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and tick-borne encephalitis. Mites, on the other hand, have diverse habits and lifestyles, with some being parasitic, predacious, or free-living. Some mites are pests that can cause skin irritation and allergies in humans and animals.

Overall, Acari is a significant group of organisms with medical and veterinary importance due to their ability to transmit diseases and cause other health problems.

Ixodidae is a family of arachnids commonly known as hard ticks. Here's a more detailed medical definition:

Ixodidae is a family of tick species, also known as hard ticks, which are obligate ectoparasites of many different terrestrial vertebrates, including mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians. They have a hard, shield-like structure on their dorsal surface called the scutum, and a prominent mouthpart called the hypostome, which helps them anchor themselves onto their host's skin during feeding.

Hard ticks are vectors of various bacterial, viral, and protozoan diseases that can affect both humans and animals. Some of the diseases transmitted by Ixodidae include Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis, babesiosis, and tularemia.

Ixodidae species have a complex life cycle that involves three developmental stages: larva, nymph, and adult. Each stage requires a blood meal from a host to progress to the next stage or to reproduce. The length of the life cycle varies depending on the species and environmental conditions but can take up to several years to complete.

Proper identification and control of Ixodidae populations are essential for preventing tick-borne diseases and protecting public health.

Mites are tiny arthropods belonging to the class Arachnida, which also includes spiders and ticks. They are characterized by their small size, usually measuring less than 1 mm in length, and their lack of obvious segmentation on their bodies. Many mites are parasitic, feeding on the skin cells, blood, or fluids of plants and animals, including humans. Some common mite infestations in humans include scabies, caused by the itch mite (Sarcoptes scabiei), and dust mites (e.g., Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and D. farinae), which are commonly found in household dust and can cause allergic reactions in some people. It's worth noting that the majority of mites are not harmful to humans and play important roles in ecosystems as decomposers and predators.

Tetranychidae is a family of mites, also known as spider mites. These are small arachnids that are characterized by the presence of four pairs of legs in their adult stage. They are often found on the undersides of leaves and can feed on plant material, causing damage to crops and ornamental plants. Some species of Tetranychidae are significant agricultural pests.

The term "Tetranychidae" is not typically used in a medical context, as these mites do not pose a direct threat to human health. However, they can cause allergic reactions in some people and may indirectly affect human health by damaging food crops.

Acaridae is a family of mites, also known as "grain mites" or "flour mites." These mites are tiny arthropods that are commonly found in stored food products such as grains, cereals, and dried fruits. Some species of Acaridae can cause allergic reactions in humans, and they have been known to contaminate food and cause spoilage. They are also capable of carrying and transmitting various diseases.

Here is a medical definition for Acaridae:

"A family of mites that includes several species commonly found in stored food products such as grains, cereals, and dried fruits. These mites can cause allergic reactions in humans and contaminate food, leading to spoilage. Some species are capable of carrying and transmitting diseases."

Mite infestations refer to the presence and multiplication of mites, which are tiny arthropods belonging to the class Arachnida, on or inside a host's body. This can occur in various sites such as the skin, lungs, or gastrointestinal tract, depending on the specific mite species.

Skin infestations by mites, also known as dermatophilosis or mange, are common and may cause conditions like scabies (caused by Sarcoptes scabiei) or demodecosis (caused by Demodex spp.). These conditions can lead to symptoms such as itching, rash, and skin lesions.

Lung infestations by mites, although rare, can occur in people who work in close contact with mites, such as farmers or laboratory workers. This condition is called "mite lung" or "farmer's lung," which is often caused by exposure to high levels of dust containing mite feces and dead mites.

Gastrointestinal infestations by mites can occur in animals but are extremely rare in humans. The most common example is the intestinal roundworm, which belongs to the phylum Nematoda rather than Arachnida.

It's important to note that mite infestations can be treated with appropriate medical interventions and prevention measures.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Nymph" does not have a medical definition. In general, nymph is a term used in mythology to refer to a minor nature deity typically represented as an attractive maiden or beautiful young woman who animates nature and is often associated with various natural phenomena.

If you have any medical concerns or questions, I would be happy to help if you could provide more information.

A "tick infestation" is not a formal medical term, but it generally refers to a situation where an individual has a large number of ticks (Ixodida: Acarina) on their body or in their living environment. Ticks are external parasites that feed on the blood of mammals, birds, and reptiles.

An infestation can occur in various settings, including homes, gardens, parks, and forests. People who spend time in these areas, especially those with pets or who engage in outdoor activities like camping, hiking, or hunting, are at a higher risk of tick encounters.

Tick infestations can lead to several health concerns, as ticks can transmit various diseases, such as Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis, and babesiosis, among others. It is essential to take preventive measures to avoid tick bites and promptly remove any attached ticks to reduce the risk of infection.

If you suspect a tick infestation in your living environment or on your body, consult a healthcare professional or a pest control expert for proper assessment and guidance on how to proceed.

"Rhipicephalus sanguineus" is the medical term for the brown dog tick. It is a species of tick that is widely distributed around the world and is known to feed on a variety of hosts, including dogs, cats, and humans. The brown dog tick is a vector for several diseases, including canine babesiosis and Rocky Mountain spotted fever. It can survive and reproduce in indoor environments, making it a common pest in homes and kennels. The tick undergoes a four-stage life cycle: egg, larva, nymph, and adult. Each stage requires a blood meal before molting to the next stage or reproducing.

Dermacentor is a genus of ticks that includes several species known to transmit diseases to humans and animals. Some of the notable species in this genus are:

1. Dermacentor andersoni (Rocky Mountain wood tick): This species is widely distributed across western North America and can transmit Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Colorado tick fever, and tularemia.
2. Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick): Found throughout the United States, this tick can transmit Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tularemia, and human ehrlichiosis.
3. Dermacentor reticulatus (Ornate cow tick or Marsh tick): This species is distributed in Europe and parts of Asia and can transmit diseases like tick-borne encephalitis, louping ill, and babesiosis.
4. Dermacentor marginatus (Marginated tick): Found primarily in Europe, this tick transmits various pathogens causing diseases such as Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, tick-borne encephalitis, and rickettsialpox.
5. Dermacentor nitens (Brazilian pampas tick): This species is native to South America and can transmit Rickettsia rickettsii, the bacterium that causes Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

Dermacentor ticks are known for their hard, shield-like structures called scutums on their backs and their long mouthparts called hypostomes, which they use to feed on the blood of their hosts. They typically prefer large mammals as hosts but will also feed on humans and other animals if necessary.

"Rhipicephalus" is a genus of ticks that are commonly found in many parts of the world, including Africa, Europe, and Asia. These ticks are known to parasitize various mammals, birds, and reptiles, and can transmit a variety of diseases to their hosts. Some species of Rhipicephalus ticks are capable of transmitting serious diseases to humans, such as Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever and African tick-bite fever. These ticks are usually found in grassy or wooded areas, and can be carried by animals such as cattle, sheep, and deer. They are typically reddish-brown in color and have a hard, shield-shaped body. Proper identification and prevention measures are important for avoiding tick bites and reducing the risk of tick-borne diseases.

Sarcoptidae is a family of mites that are parasitic to mammals and birds. The most well-known member of this family is Sarcoptes scabiei, the mite responsible for causing scabies in humans. These mites burrow into the skin and lay their eggs, causing an intensely itchy rash. Other members of this family can also cause similar skin reactions in various animals.

Argasidae is a family of ticks commonly known as soft ticks. These ticks differ from hard ticks (Ixodidae) in that they do not have a hard, shield-like plate on their backs and have a softer, leathery cuticle. Soft ticks are also characterized by their mouthparts being located at the end of a prolonged, flexible proboscis.

Soft ticks are primarily parasites of birds and bats but can occasionally feed on humans and other mammals. They are known to transmit several diseases, including relapsing fever caused by various species of Borrelia bacteria. Unlike hard ticks, soft ticks may feed for a short period (minutes) or over extended periods (hours to days), depending on the species.

It is important to note that Argasidae is a medical term used in taxonomy and should not be confused with medical conditions or treatments.

Acaricides are a type of pesticide that are specifically used to kill acarines, which are mites and ticks. These agents work by targeting the nervous system of the acarines, leading to paralysis and eventually death. Acaricides are commonly used in agricultural settings to protect crops from mite infestations, and in medical and veterinary settings to control ticks and mites that can transmit diseases to humans and animals. It is important to use acaricides according to the manufacturer's instructions and to take appropriate safety precautions to minimize exposure to non-target organisms, including humans.

"Ixodes" is a genus of tick that includes several species known to transmit various diseases to humans and animals. These ticks are often referred to as "hard ticks" because of their hard, shield-like plate on their backs. Ixodes ticks have a complex life cycle involving three stages: larva, nymph, and adult. They feed on the blood of hosts during each stage, and can transmit diseases such as Lyme disease, Anaplasmosis, Babesiosis, and Powassan virus disease.

The most common Ixodes species in North America is Ixodes scapularis, also known as the black-legged tick or deer tick, which is the primary vector of Lyme disease in this region. In Europe, Ixodes ricinus, or the castor bean tick, is a widespread and important vector of diseases such as Lyme borreliosis, tick-borne encephalitis, and several other tick-borne pathogens.

Ixodes ticks are typically found in wooded or grassy areas with high humidity and moderate temperatures. They can be carried by various hosts, including mammals, birds, and reptiles, and can survive for long periods without feeding, making them efficient disease vectors.

Ornithodoros is a genus of hard-bodied ticks that belong to the family Argasidae, also known as soft ticks. These ticks are characterized by their lack of a distinct rear end or capitulum, and they have a leathery cuticle that appears smooth and shiny when they are engorged with blood.

Ornithodoros ticks are known to be vectors of various diseases, including relapsing fever caused by Borrelia spp. They can transmit these pathogens through their saliva during feeding, which typically occurs at night. Ornithodoros ticks are also capable of surviving for long periods without food, making them efficient carriers and transmitters of disease-causing agents.

These ticks are often found in the nests or burrows of animals such as birds, reptiles, and mammals, where they feed on the host's blood. Some species of Ornithodoros ticks can also bite humans, causing skin irritation and other symptoms. It is important to take precautions when entering areas where these ticks may be present, such as wearing protective clothing and using insect repellent.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Poland" is not a medical term. It is a country in Central Europe. If you have any questions about medical conditions or terminology, I would be happy to help answer those!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "pest control" is not a term typically used in medical definitions. Pest control refers to the regulation or management of species considered to be pests, which can include insects, rodents, and other organisms that can cause damage to crops, transmit diseases, or otherwise negatively impact human activities.

In a medical context, you might be looking for information on "pesticide exposure" or "insect-borne diseases." Pesticide exposure refers to the contact with pesticides, which are substances used to control pests. These exposures can occur through inhalation, ingestion, or skin contact and may lead to a variety of health effects depending on the type and amount of pesticide involved. Insect-borne diseases are illnesses transmitted to humans through the bite of infected insects, such as mosquitoes, ticks, or fleas. Examples include malaria, Lyme disease, and Zika virus infection.

I could not find a medical definition specifically for "Cocos." However, Cocos is a geographical name that may refer to:

* The Cocos (Keeling) Islands, an Australian territory in the Indian Ocean.
* Cocos nucifera, the scientific name for the coconut palm tree.

There are some medical conditions related to the consumption of coconuts or exposure to the coconut palm tree, such as allergies to coconut products, but there is no specific medical term "Cocos."

Oviparity is a form of reproduction in which an animal lays eggs with externally developing embryos. The eggs are usually equipped with a protective shell and all the nutrients necessary for the development of the embryo, which allows the female to lay and abandon them, without any further care. This method of reproduction is common in many species of fish, reptiles, insects, and birds.

In oviparous animals, the fertilization of the egg may occur either internally or externally. In internal fertilization, the male deposits sperm directly into the female's reproductive tract, which then travel to the ova and fertilize them. The fertilized eggs are subsequently laid by the female. In external fertilization, the male and female release their gametes (sperm and eggs) into the surrounding environment, where fertilization takes place.

Oviparity is distinct from viviparity, a reproductive strategy in which the embryo develops inside the mother's body and receives nutrients through a placenta. In viviparous animals, such as mammals (excluding monotremes), the young are born live instead of hatching from eggs.

Host-parasite interactions refer to the relationship between a parasitic organism (the parasite) and its host, which can be an animal, plant, or human body. The parasite lives on or inside the host and derives nutrients from it, often causing harm in the process. This interaction can range from relatively benign to severe, depending on various factors such as the species of the parasite, the immune response of the host, and the duration of infection.

The host-parasite relationship is often categorized based on the degree of harm caused to the host. Parasites that cause little to no harm are called commensals, while those that cause significant damage or disease are called parasitic pathogens. Some parasites can even manipulate their hosts' behavior and physiology to enhance their own survival and reproduction, leading to complex interactions between the two organisms.

Understanding host-parasite interactions is crucial for developing effective strategies to prevent and treat parasitic infections, as well as for understanding the ecological relationships between different species in natural ecosystems.

Biological pest control, also known as biocontrol, is a method of managing or eliminating pests such as insects, mites, weeds, and plant diseases using natural enemies or other organisms. These biological control agents include predators, parasites, pathogens, and competitors that regulate pest populations and reduce the need for chemical pesticides. Biological pest control is a key component of integrated pest management (IPM) programs and has minimal impact on the environment compared to traditional pest control methods.

'Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus' is a species of mite that belongs to the family Pyroglyphidae. These mites are commonly known as house dust mites, and they are found in various environments, particularly in households. They thrive in warm and humid conditions, and their primary food source consists of human skin scales.

House dust mites like 'Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus' are associated with allergic reactions in humans, such as asthma, rhinitis, and dermatitis. Their feces and body parts contain protease enzymes that can trigger an immune response in sensitive individuals, leading to the release of histamine and other inflammatory mediators. These allergens can become airborne and inhaled or come into contact with the skin, causing symptoms such as sneezing, runny nose, itchy eyes, and difficulty breathing.

It is essential to maintain a clean living environment, particularly in bedding and upholstered furniture, to reduce the population of house dust mites and minimize allergen exposure. Measures such as using allergen-impermeable covers for mattresses and pillows, washing bedding in hot water, and reducing humidity levels can help control dust mite populations and alleviate allergic symptoms.

I apologize, but "Brazil" is not a medical term or condition. It is the largest country in both South America and Latin America by land area and population. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health concerns, please provide more information and I will do my best to help.

Rickettsia is a genus of Gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that are obligate intracellular parasites. They are the etiologic agents of several important human diseases, including Rocky Mountain spotted fever, typhus fever, and scrub typhus. Rickettsia are transmitted to humans through the bites of infected arthropods, such as ticks, fleas, and lice. Once inside a host cell, Rickettsia manipulate the host cell's cytoskeleton and membrane-trafficking machinery to gain entry and replicate within the host cell's cytoplasm. They can cause significant damage to the endothelial cells that line blood vessels, leading to vasculitis, tissue necrosis, and potentially fatal outcomes if not promptly diagnosed and treated with appropriate antibiotics.

"Sarcoptes scabiei" is a medical term that refers to a species of mite known as the human itch mite or simply scabies mite. This tiny arthropod burrows into the upper layer of human skin, where it lives and lays its eggs, causing an intensely itchy skin condition called scabies. The female mite measures about 0.3-0.5 mm in length and has eight legs. It is barely visible to the naked eye.

The mite's burrowing and feeding activities trigger an immune response in the host, leading to a characteristic rash and intense itching, particularly at night. The rash typically appears as small red bumps or blisters and can occur anywhere on the body, but is most commonly found in skin folds such as the wrists, elbows, armpits, waistline, and buttocks.

Scabies is highly contagious and can spread rapidly through close physical contact with an infected person, shared bedding or towels, or prolonged skin-to-skin contact. It is important to seek medical treatment promptly if scabies is suspected, as the condition can cause significant discomfort and lead to secondary bacterial infections if left untreated. Treatment typically involves topical medications that kill the mites and their eggs, as well as thorough cleaning of bedding, clothing, and other items that may have come into contact with the infected person.

Arachnid vectors are arthropods belonging to the class Arachnida that are capable of transmitting infectious diseases to humans and other animals. Arachnids include spiders, scorpions, mites, and ticks. Among these, ticks and some mites are the most significant as disease vectors.

Ticks can transmit a variety of bacterial, viral, and protozoan pathogens, causing diseases such as Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis, babesiosis, tularemia, and several types of encephalitis. They attach to the host's skin and feed on their blood, during which they can transmit pathogens from their saliva.

Mites, particularly chiggers and some species of birds and rodents mites, can also act as vectors for certain diseases, such as scrub typhus and rickettsialpox. Mites are tiny arachnids that live on the skin or in the nests of their hosts and feed on their skin cells, fluids, or blood.

It is important to note that not all arachnids are disease vectors, and only a small percentage of them can transmit infectious diseases. However, those that do pose a significant public health risk and require proper prevention measures, such as using insect repellents, wearing protective clothing, and checking for and promptly removing attached ticks.

Ectoparasitic infestations refer to the invasion and multiplication of parasites, such as lice, fleas, ticks, or mites, on the outer surface of a host organism, typically causing irritation, itching, and other skin disorders. These parasites survive by feeding on the host's blood, skin cells, or other bodily substances, leading to various health issues if left untreated.

Ectoparasitic infestations can occur in humans as well as animals and may require medical intervention for proper diagnosis and treatment. Common symptoms include redness, rash, inflammation, and secondary bacterial or viral infections due to excessive scratching. Preventive measures such as personal hygiene, regular inspections, and avoiding contact with infested individuals or environments can help reduce the risk of ectoparasitic infestations.

A medical definition of "ticks" would be:

Ticks are small, blood-sucking parasites that belong to the arachnid family, which also includes spiders. They have eight legs and can vary in size from as small as a pinhead to about the size of a marble when fully engorged with blood. Ticks attach themselves to the skin of their hosts (which can include humans, dogs, cats, and wild animals) by inserting their mouthparts into the host's flesh.

Ticks can transmit a variety of diseases, including Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis, and babesiosis. It is important to remove ticks promptly and properly to reduce the risk of infection. To remove a tick, use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin's surface as possible and pull upward with steady, even pressure. Do not twist or jerk the tick, as this can cause the mouthparts to break off and remain in the skin. After removing the tick, clean the area with soap and water and disinfect the tweezers.

Preventing tick bites is an important part of protecting against tick-borne diseases. This can be done by wearing protective clothing (such as long sleeves and pants), using insect repellent containing DEET or permethrin, avoiding wooded and brushy areas with high grass, and checking for ticks after being outdoors.

The ear canal, also known as the external auditory canal, is the tubular passage that extends from the outer ear (pinna) to the eardrum (tympanic membrane). It is lined with skin and tiny hairs, and is responsible for conducting sound waves from the outside environment to the middle and inner ear. The ear canal is typically about 2.5 cm long in adults and has a self-cleaning mechanism that helps to keep it free of debris and wax.

Arthropods are a phylum of animals characterized by the presence of a segmented body, a pair of jointed appendages on each segment, and a tough exoskeleton made of chitin. This phylum includes insects, arachnids (spiders, scorpions, mites), crustaceans (crabs, lobsters, shrimp), and myriapods (centipedes, millipedes). They are the largest group of animals on Earth, making up more than 80% of all described species. Arthropods can be found in nearly every habitat, from the deep sea to mountaintops, and play important roles in ecosystems as decomposers, pollinators, and predators.

'Citrus' is a genus of flowering plants in the rue family, Rutaceae. It includes several species of shrubs and trees that produce fruits known as citrus fruits. Some common examples of citrus fruits are oranges, lemons, limes, grapefruits, and pomelos. These fruits are popular for their juicy pulp and fragrant zest, which are used in a wide variety of culinary applications around the world.

Citrus fruits are also known for their high vitamin C content and other health benefits. They contain various bioactive compounds such as flavonoids and carotenoids, which have antioxidant properties and may help protect against chronic diseases like cancer and cardiovascular disease. Additionally, citrus fruits are a good source of dietary fiber, which can aid in digestion and help regulate blood sugar levels.

In medical terms, citrus fruits may be recommended as part of a healthy diet to help prevent nutrient deficiencies and promote overall health. However, it's important to note that some people may have allergies or sensitivities to citrus fruits, which can cause symptoms like mouth irritation, hives, or anaphylaxis in severe cases. Additionally, citrus fruits can interact with certain medications, so it's always a good idea to consult with a healthcare provider before making any significant changes to your diet.

Look up acari or Acari in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Acari is a group of arachnids containing ticks and mites. Acari may ... Brazil Acari River (Rio de Janeiro), a river in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil This disambiguation page lists articles ... a fictional character in the animated series Kim Possible Acari, Rio Grande do Norte, a municipality in Rio Grande do Norte, ... associated with the title Acari. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the ...
... may refer to several rivers in Brazil: Acari River (Amazonas) Acari River (Minas Gerais) Acari River (Rio de ... Brazil This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Acari River. If an internal link led you here, you may ...
... (Portuguese: Parque Nacional do Acari) is a national park in the state of Amazonas, Brazil. The Acari ... PARNA do Acari - ISA. FLONA de Urupadi - ISA, Informações gerais (mapa). Parna do Acari - Chico Mendes. No apagar das luzes, ... The Acari National Park was created by federal decree on 11 May 2016. It is administered by the Chico Mendes Institute for ... These were the fully protected Manicoré Biological Reserve with 359,063 hectares (887,260 acres) and Acari National Park with ...
The Serra do Acari or Acari Mountains are a mountain range in the border of Brazil and Guyana. The range runs through the north ... The highest point of Pará is located there, at 906 meters (2,972 feet). Serra do Acari at Peakbagger.com 1°45′N 57°30′W /  ...
Acari River (Portuguese: Rio Acari) is a river of Amazonas state in north-western Brazil. The river flows through the 896,411 ... List of rivers of Amazonas PARNA do Acari - ISA. Viana 2010, p. 28. PARNA do Acari (in Portuguese), ISA: Instituto ... hectares (2,215,080 acres) Acari National Park created by president Dilma Rousseff in 2016 in the last week before her ...
Acari (Portuguese pronunciation: [ɐkɐˈɾi]) is a neighborhood in the North Zone of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. "Bairros Cariocas" ( ...
The Acari River is a river of Minas Gerais state in southeastern Brazil. List of rivers of Minas Gerais Map from Ministry of ...
... is a genus of mites in the family Acaridae. Acarus ananas (Tryon, 1898) Acarus beschkovi (Mitov, 1994) Acarus bomiensis ... Acarus rhombeus Koch & Berendt, 1854 Acarus sentus Ashfaq, Akhtar & Chaudhri, 1986 Acarus siro Linnaeus, 1758 Acarus umbonis ... Acarus chaetoxysilos Griffiths, 1970 Acarus ebrius Ashfaq, Akhtar & Chaudhri, 1986 Acarus farinae DeGeer, 1778 Acarus farris ( ... Krishna-Rao 1981 Acarus immobilis Griffiths, 1964 Acarus inaequalis (Banks, 1916) Acarus lushanensis Jiang, 1992 Acarus ...
Acari is a municipality in the state of Rio Grande do Norte in the Northeast region of Brazil. List of municipalities in Rio ...
It is not related to the Loricariidae Acari fish. The Acari River rises in the Serra do Gericinó with its mouth on the Rio ... The Acari River is located in Rio de Janeiro state in southeastern Brazil. It is one of the major watercourses of the city of ... The Acari flows through the city from the extreme west to the zona norte. It is navigable but as it traverses the territories ...
Ueckermann, E.A.; Van Harten, A. & Meyer (Smith) M.K.P. "The mites and ticks (Acari) of Yemen: an annotated check-list." in ... She was also senior author of the first checklist of Acari of the Ethiopian region and published articles on mite faunas of ... In 1959 Meyer established the National Collection of Acari, which is now one of the largest mite collections in the Southern ... Amongst other works, Meyer co-contributed to a chapter on Acari in the Biogeography and Ecology of Southern Africa series: ...
Fish include the pescada branca; tainha; sardinha; camurim, corvina; acari; bandeirado; caíca; dourada; peixe pedra; amoré; ...
Thomas Scott (1996). "Acari". Concise Encyclopedia: Biology. Walter de Gruyter. pp. 6-7. ISBN 3-11-010661-2. "Mites". www.the- ...
Acari: Ixodida) of the world: a list of valid species names" (PDF). Zootaxa. 2528: 1-28. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.2528.1.1. hdl: ... Acari; Parasitiformes; Ixodida; Ixodoidea D. H. Molyneux (1993). "Vectors". In Francis E. G. Cox (ed.). Modern parasitology: a ... Acari families, Taxa named by Carl Ludwig Koch, Extant Cretaceous first appearances). ...
Within the Arthropoda, they belong in the subclass Acari (or Acarina) and species belonging to the Acari are informally known ... The Acari are a subclass of the class Arachnida. Within the Acari are two superorders: the Acariformes and the Parasitiformes. ... Acari. The Mites, Tree of Life Project Parasitic Insects, Mites and Ticks: Genera of Medical and Veterinary Importance ( ... canis (Acari: Sarcoptidae)". Journal of Medical Entomology. 25: 64-68. doi:10.1093/jmedent/25.1.64. PMID 3128665. McOrist, S ( ...
Acari: Trombidiidae). Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society 50(1): 89-107. Abstract v t e (Articles with short ... Parasitic acari, All stub articles, Trombidiformes stubs). ...
The phylogeny of the Ixodida within the Acari is shown in the cladogram, based on a 2014 maximum parsimony study of amino acid ... Walker JB, Keirans JE, Horak IG (2005). The Genus Rhipicephalus (Acari, Ixodidae): A Guide to the Brown Ticks of the World. ... Klompen H, Grimaldi D (2001). "First Mesozoic Record of a Parasitiform Mite: a Larval Argasid Tick in Cretaceous Amber (Acari: ... Ticks, like mites, belong to the subclass Acari that lack their primary somatic segmentation of the abdomen (or opisthosoma), ...
Acari: Pygmephoridae)". Psyche: A Journal of Entomology. 2012: 1-5. doi:10.1155/2012/150958. Kinamu, Bare Kingkin; Permadi, ...
Acari: Erythraeidae) and Willungella rufusanus sp. nov. (Acari: Microtrombidiidae). Zootaxa, 2925: 19-32. Preview v t e ( ...
Acari: Tarsonemidae)". Environmental Entomology. 50 (3): 744-751. doi:10.1093/ee/nvab013. ISSN 0046-225X. PMID 33675654. Moser ... Magowski, Wojciech (January 1986). "Two new species of Tarsonemus (Acari: Prostigmata) associated with Xylocopa carpenter bees ... Acari: Tarsonemidae) from Bahia, Brazil". Systematic and Applied Acarology. 25 (6): 986-1012. doi:10.11158/saa.25.6.4. ISSN ... Acari: Heterostigmata) associated with orchard and ornamental plants in Europe, Australia and New Zealand". Systematic and ...
Acari: Phytoseiidae)". International Journal of Acarology. 38: 116-119. doi:10.1080/01647954.2011.595084. mapress.com Archived ...
Gary Mullen & Barry M. OConnor (2009). "Mites (Acari)". In Gary Mullen & Lance Durden (eds.). Medical and Veterinary Entomology ... Parasitic acari, Veterinary entomology, Monotypic arachnid genera). ...
Acari: Eriophyidae)". Experimental and Applied Acarology. 67 (3): 393-410. doi:10.1007/s10493-015-9953-9. ISSN 0168-8162. PMID ... Acari: Tetrapodili)". Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 13 (2): 129-151. doi:10.1080/14772019.2013.867373. ISSN 1477-2019. ... "Mitochondrial Metagenomics Reveals the Ancient Origin and Phylodiversity of Soil Mites and Provides a Phylogeny of the Acari". ...
Acari: Trombidiidae). Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society 50(1): 89-107. Abstract v t e (Articles with short ...
The six-legged larva is a feature they share with Acari (see Relationships). Despite the scarce number of studies about the ... doi:10.1111/j.1096-3642.2007.00284.x. E. E. Lindquist (1984). "Current theories on the evolution of major groups of Acari and ... Ricinulei - Acari , SpringerLink Joachim Adis, Benjamin Messner & Norman Platnick (1999). "Morphological structures and ... Morphological studies of arachnid relationships have largely concluded that ricinuleids are most closely related to Acari ( ...
Acari: Erythraeidae) and Willungella rufusanus sp. nov. (Acari: Microtrombidiidae)". Zootaxa. 2925 (1): 19-32. doi:10.11646/ ...
Acari. The Mites. Version 13 December 1996. in Tree of Life Web Project. v t e (Articles with short description, Short ... The gnathosoma (from Greek γνάθος, gnáthos = "jaw" and σώμα, sóma = "body") is the part of the body of the Acari (mites and ... description is different from Wikidata, Articles containing Greek-language text, Arachnid anatomy, Acari, All stub articles, ...
"House dust mites: Agents of allergy". acari.be. Archived from the original on 29 December 2010. Retrieved 24 January 2019. ... Acari and humans, Acariformes, Arthropod common names, Arthropod infestations, Building biology, Cosmopolitan arthropods, Dust) ...
"First report of Amblyomma clypeolatum Neumann (Acari : Ixodida : Ixodidae) from the Union of Myanmar, with two new records from ... "Mites belong to the class Arachnida". Acari.be. Archived from the original on 18 April 2017. Retrieved 5 February 2017. ...
ISBN 978-94-010-2709-0. Xie, Lixia; Yang, Maofa; Huang, Rong (15 July 2011). "A new species of the genus Epidamaeus (Acari, ... ISBN 978-1-4832-7554-3. Perez-Iñigo C. (1997). "Acari: Oribatei, Gymnonota. In: Ramos, M. A., (Ed.)". Fauna Iberica. Museo ... Jan Mourek (May 2010). "Systematics of oribatid mite families Damaeidae and Gymnodamaeidae (Acari: Oribatida), feeding ecology ... S. G. Ermilov (2010). "MORPHOLOGY OF JUVENILE INSTARS OF METABELBA PAPILLIPES (ACARI, ORIBATIDA, DAMAEIDAE" (PDF). Acarina. 18 ...
Look up acari or Acari in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Acari is a group of arachnids containing ticks and mites. Acari may ... Brazil Acari River (Rio de Janeiro), a river in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil This disambiguation page lists articles ... a fictional character in the animated series Kim Possible Acari, Rio Grande do Norte, a municipality in Rio Grande do Norte, ... associated with the title Acari. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the ...
... Dataset homepage ... Stalažs A, Turka I, plazi (2019). Eriophyoid mites (Acari: Prostigmata: Eriophyoidea) of Latvia: an annotated checklist. Plazi. ... Stalažs, Arturs, Turka, Ināra (2019): Eriophyoid mites (Acari: Prostigmata: Eriophyoidea) of Latvia: an annotated checklist. ... Acari: Prostigmata: Eriophyoidea) of Latvia: an annotated checklist. Zootaxa 4629 (2): 211-236, DOI: 10.11646/zootaxa.4629.2.4 ...
R. W. Barker, A. Alan Kocan, S. A. Ewing, R. P. Wettemann, and Mark E. Payton "Occurrence of the Gulf Coast Tick (Acari: ... R. W. Barker, A. Alan Kocan, S. A. Ewing, R. P. Wettemann, Mark E. Payton "Occurrence of the Gulf Coast Tick (Acari: Ixodidae) ... Occurrence of the Gulf Coast Tick (Acari: Ixodidae) on Wild and Domestic Mammals in North-Central Oklahoma. ...
Introduction to Acari Database. Search for specimens The specimen database includes the valid names of the species present in ...
Author summary Scrub typhus is a chigger-transmitted zoonotic infection caused by Orientia species, which is endemic to the tsutsugamushi triangle in Asia-Pacific region. Recently, a focus of scrub typhus in South America has been confirmed on Chiloé Island in southern Chile. However, the vectors of scrub typhus in this region remain unknown. We undertook a survey to study the presence of chiggers on different rodent species in areas identified as probable sites of exposure to scrub typhus on Chiloé Island. The study showed that 55% of rodents were infested by trombiculids. Three mite genera were identified, of which Herpetacarus was the most abundant. Chiggers showed low host specificity, but spatial differences. Using molecular techniques, the trombiculid mites were found to be infected with Orientia species. These findings suggest that chigger mites play a role in the life cycle and transmission of this emerging infectious disease in Chile.
Detection of Anaplasma phagocytophilum DNA in Ixodes Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) from Madeira Island and Setúbal District, Mainland ... Detection of Anaplasma phagocytophilum DNA in Ixodes Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) from Madeira Island and Setúbal District, Mainland ...
Acari: Eriophyidae), is a small cigar-shaped mite, normally measuring 0.1-0.2 mm long. The mite uses a ... Impact of Pecan Leafroll Mite (Acari: Eriophyidae) on Pecan Foliage1 Cristina Pisani; Cristina Pisani 2 ... Recipient(s) will receive an email with a link to Impact of Pecan Leafroll Mite (Acari: Eriophyidae) on Pecan Foliage1 and ... Cristina Pisani, Ted E. Cottrell; Impact of Pecan Leafroll Mite (Acari: Eriophyidae) on Pecan Foliage1. Journal of ...
Piksa K, Nowak-Chmura M, Siuda K (2013) First case of human infestation by the tick Ixodes vespertilionis (Acari: Ixodidae). ... Yamauchi T, Funakoshi K (2000) Ticks from Chiroptera (Mammalia) of the mainland Kyushu, Japan (Acari: Ixodoidea). Journal of ... Kuofan T, Zaijie J (1991) Acari: Ixodidae. Economic Insect Fauna of China. Science Press, Beijing, Fasc 39: 72-76. ... Among blood-sucking arthropod vectors, ticks (Acari: Ixodidae, Argasidae) are considered as the epidemiologically and ...
Mesa, N.C., Ochoa, R., Welbourn, W.C., Evans, G.A. & de Moraes, G.J. (2009) A catalog of the Tenuipalpidae (Acari) of the World ... Seeman, O.D. & Beard, J.J. (2011) A new species of Aegyptobia (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) from Myrtaceae in Australia. Systematic ... Xu, Y., Fan, Q-H., Zhang, F.-P. & Huang, J. (2017a) Morphological ontogeny in Aegyptobia exarata Livchitz & Mitrofanov (Acari: ... Xu, Y., Huang, J. & Zhang, Z.-Q. (2017b) Two new species of Prolixus (Acari: Trombidiformes: Tenuipalpidae) on Gahnia ( ...
A large mouse mat featuring ultra low friction, textured hard surface, and thin form factor gaming mouse mat.
sp., eine neue Milbenart der Gattung Saprolaelaps Leitner, 1946 (Acari: Gamasida: Halolaelapidae). ...
Acari base - index of all author names beginning with A ...
Alegre Em Acari. Artist / Composer. Doug De Vries. Year. 2000-2010. Style. Choro. Difficulty. Hard. Tempo. Fast. Type. ...
ACARI K-12 Schools. The first Asia - Middle East - Africa Conference on Academic and Research Integrity (ACARI 2023) is taking ... ACARI 2023 aims to bring together leaders, educators, practitioners, and researchers from the AMEA region and beyond to discuss ...
Catalogue of Eriophyid Mites (Acari: Eriophyoidea). Davis, Robert; Flechtmann, Carlos H.W.; Boczek, Jan H.; Barké, Harvey E. ( ... Catalogue of Eriophyid Mites (Acari: Eriophyoidea). Books are from the collection of Combined Scientific founder Terry Taylor ...
O ácaro-hindustânico-dos-citros, Schizotetranychus hindustanicus (Hirst) (Acari:Tetranychidae).. Authors: MORAIS, E. G. F.. ...
Weeds as alternative substrates to phytoseiids (Acari, Phytoseiidae) in rubber tree Hevea brasilienis, Muell. Arg. ( ... Plantas de ocorrência espontânea como substratos alternativos para fitoseídeos (Acari, Phytoseiidae) em cultivos de seringueira ...
Comparison of Vector Efficiency of Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) From the Northeast and Upper Midwest of the United ... Comparison of Vector Efficiency of Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) From the Northeast and Upper Midwest of the United ... Title : Comparison of Vector Efficiency of Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) From the Northeast and Upper Midwest of the ... "Comparison of Vector Efficiency of Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) From the Northeast and Upper Midwest of the United ...
Acari • Superordo: Acariformes • Ordo: Trombidiformes ...
Subclass: Acari. Order: Parasitiformes Family: Varroidae. (S. Bauer, ARS/USDA) (BBC). Identification: The adult female varroa ...
Acari Sans Medium font;. *Inconsolata Bold font;. *Brisa Sans font;. *Aneliza font; ...
Higgins, Harold G. and Woolley, Tyler A. (1972) "A new species of soil mite from western Colorado (Acari: Cryptostigmata, ... A new species of soil mite from western Colorado (Acari: Cryptostigmata, Pelopidae) ...
Neoseiulus californicus McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae): a predatory mite species for controlling two-spotted spider mite in ... Neoseiulus californicus McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae): a predatory mite species for controlling two-spotted spider mite in ... Neoseiulus californicus McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae): a predatory mite species for controlling two-spotted spider mite in ...
Acari: Ixodidae). Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 5, 734-743. 10.1016/j.ttbdis.2014.05.003. 13. ESTRADA-PEÑA, A., A. D. MİHALCA and T. N ... First record of Ixodes ricinus (Acari; Ixodidae) in European glass lizard (Pseudopus apodus; Anguidae) and a review of ... First record of Ixodes ricinus (Acari; Ixodidae) in European glass lizard (Pseudopus apodus; Anguidae) and a review of ... USLU, U., M. S. SAJİD, O. CEYLAN and A. D EJAZ (2019): Prevalence of hard ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) in spur-thighed tortoise ( ...
FIGURE 28 in Feather mites of the subfamily Proctophyllodinae (Acari: Proctophyllodidae) from passerines (Aves: Passeriformes) ...
Acari: Cheyletidae). J Med Entomol. 1985 Jan 18. 22(1):115-7. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. ...
Contamination of public facilities with Dermatophagoides mites (Acari: Pyroglyphidae) in Japan.. Submitted by admin on Sat, 07/ ... Read more about Contamination of public facilities with Dermatophagoides mites (Acari: Pyroglyphidae) in Japan. ...
The aim of this study was to explore densovirus diversity in a small arthropod pest belonging to Acari, the two-spotted spider ... A New Prevalent Densovirus Discovered in Acari. Insight from Metagenomics in Viral Communities Associated with Two-Spotted Mite ...
Plant inhabiting mites (Acari) of the "Estação Ecológica de Paulo de Faria", State of São Paulo, Brazil Renato Buosi, Reinaldo ... Review about mites (Acari) of rubber trees (Hevea spp., Euphorbiaceae) in Brazil Reinaldo José Fazzio Feres ...
Identifizierung schwer bestimmbarer Arten der Acari und Collembola mittels eines DNA-Microarray. ...
  • Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae and Argasidae) transmit multiple and diverse pathogens (including bacteria, protozoa, and viruses), which cause a wide range of human and animal diseases, including rickettsial diseases, caused by bacteria in the order Rickettsiales. (cdc.gov)
  • Geographical distribution and prevalence of selected Borrelia, Ehrlichia, and Rickettsia infections in Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae) in New Jersey. (medscape.com)
  • Acari is a group of arachnids containing ticks and mites. (wikipedia.org)
  • This dataset contains the digitized treatments in Plazi based on the original journal article Stalažs, Arturs, Turka, Ināra (2019): Eriophyoid mites (Acari: Prostigmata: Eriophyoidea) of Latvia: an annotated checklist. (gbif.org)
  • Saito, Y., Kotaro, M. & Chittenden, A.R. (1999) Body characters reflecting the body size of spider mites in flattened specimens (Acari: Tetranychidae). (mapress.com)
  • Contamination of public facilities with Dermatophagoides mites (Acari: Pyroglyphidae) in Japan. (aivc.org)
  • Review about mites (Acari) of rubber trees (Hevea spp. (biotaneotropica.org.br)
  • The pecan leafroll mite, Aceria caryae (Keifer) (Acari: Eriophyidae), is a small cigar-shaped mite, normally measuring 0.1-0.2 mm long. (allenpress.com)
  • Beard, J.J. & Ochoa, R. (2011) New flat mite genera (Acari: Trombidiformes: Tenuipalpidae) associated with Australian sedges (Cyperaceae). (mapress.com)
  • The aim of this study was to explore densovirus diversity in a small arthropod pest belonging to Acari , the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae, while using viral metagenomics based on virus -enrichment. (bvsalud.org)
  • Acervo Digital: Plantas de ocorrência espontânea como substratos alternativos para fitoseídeos (Acari, Phytoseiidae) em cultivos de seringueira Hevea brasiliensis Muell. (unesp.br)
  • Weeds as alternative substrates to phytoseiids (Acari, Phytoseiidae) in rubber tree Hevea brasilienis, Muell. (unesp.br)
  • Xu, Y. & Zhang, Z.-Q. (2013) New Zealand Tenuipalpidae (Acari: Trombidiformes): A new species of Acaricis from Cyperaceae and its ontogenetic patterns in chaetotaxy. (mapress.com)
  • Xu, Y. & Zhang, Z.-Q. (2014) Prolixus (Acari: Trombidiformes: Tenuipalpidae) newly recorded from New Zealand: A new species from Cyperaceae and its ontogenetic patterns in chaetotaxy. (mapress.com)
  • Acari: Trombidiformes: Tenuipalpidae). (mapress.com)
  • Xu, Y., Huang, J. & Zhang, Z.-Q. (2017b) Two new species of Prolixus (Acari: Trombidiformes: Tenuipalpidae) on Gahnia (Cyperaceae) from New Zealand. (mapress.com)
  • Seeman, O.D. & Beard, J.J. (2011) A new species of Aegyptobia (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) from Myrtaceae in Australia. (mapress.com)
  • Acari may also refer to: Acarí District, a district in Peru Acarí, the capital of Acarí District Professor Acari, a fictional character in the animated series Kim Possible Acari, Rio Grande do Norte, a municipality in Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil Acari River (Rio de Janeiro), a river in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Acari. (wikipedia.org)
  • Look up acari or Acari in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. (wikipedia.org)
  • Salivary gland changes and host antibody responses associated with feeding of male lone star ticks (Acari:Ixodidae). (nih.gov)
  • Article: A new genus and species of Nematalycidae (Acari: Endeostigmata). (osu.edu)
  • Four species of the family Cunaxidae (Acari: Acariformes), i.e. (psu.edu)
  • The corticolous fauna of plane trees: I. Arachnids (Arachnida: Araneae, Pseudoscorpiones, Acari) From February until September 2000 an inventory was made of the bark-dwelling arthropod fauna of more than 400 plane trees (Platanus hybrida), all over the Netherlands. (naturalis.nl)
  • The extant Acari occurring on the inland mountain ranges and nunataks of Continental Antarctica comprise only pre-Pleistocene endemic Prostigmata and Cryptostigmata of which the Prostigmata are the probable earlier colonists. (bas.ac.uk)
  • Skvarla, MJ & Dowling, APG 2012, ' Some new armascirine cunaxids (Acari: Prostigmata: Cunaxidae) from the Eastern United States ', Zootaxa , no. 3194, pp. 1-34. (psu.edu)
  • Mites (Acari) of the Shores of Forest Lakes and Ponds in Northern Poland, With Species Analysis of Oribatida. (artsdatabanken.no)
  • Comments on controversial tick (Acari: Ixodida) species names and species described or resurrected from 2003 to 2008. (nih.gov)
  • Bayartogtokh, B. & Schatz, H. (2008) Trichoribates and Jugatala (Acari: Oribatida: Ceratozetidae) from the Central and Southern Alps, with notes on their distribution. (mapress.com)
  • Acari, Oribatida, Pterochthoniidae) / M. A. Minor, S. G. Ermilov // Acarina : Russian journal of acaralogy / editor A. V. Tolstikov. (utmn.ru)
  • The oribatid mite superfamily Atopochthonioidea (Acari, Oribatida) is recorded in New Zealand for the first time. (utmn.ru)
  • Berlese, A. (1916) Centuria terza di Acari nuovi. (mapress.com)
  • Acari: Stigmaeidae), were collected from soil under oak trees. (bioone.org)
  • The form takes lead from the magnificent beak of the Acari Toucan. (phioro.com)