Magnesium Oxide: Magnesium oxide (MgO). An inorganic compound that occurs in nature as the mineral periclase. In aqueous media combines quickly with water to form magnesium hydroxide. It is used as an antacid and mild laxative and has many nonmedicinal uses.Mycology: The study of the structure, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of fungi, and MYCOSES.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Plant Mucilage: A type of viscous polysaccharide that is secreted from PLANTS. It has natural properties that are useful in the formulation of ADHESIVES.Dictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Scattering, Radiation: The diversion of RADIATION (thermal, electromagnetic, or nuclear) from its original path as a result of interactions or collisions with atoms, molecules, or larger particles in the atmosphere or other media. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Fruiting Bodies, Fungal: The fruiting 'heads' or 'caps' of FUNGI, which as a food item are familiarly known as MUSHROOMS, that contain the FUNGAL SPORES.Agaricales: An extensive order of basidiomycetous fungi whose fruiting bodies are commonly called mushrooms.Social Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the interrelationships of individuals in a social environment including social organizations and institutions. Includes Sociology and Anthropology.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Anemia, Hemolytic: A condition of inadequate circulating red blood cells (ANEMIA) or insufficient HEMOGLOBIN due to premature destruction of red blood cells (ERYTHROCYTES).Hematology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with morphology, physiology, and pathology of the blood and blood-forming tissues.Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune: Acquired hemolytic anemia due to the presence of AUTOANTIBODIES which agglutinate or lyse the patient's own RED BLOOD CELLS.Anemia: A reduction in the number of circulating ERYTHROCYTES or in the quantity of HEMOGLOBIN.Hemolysis: The destruction of ERYTHROCYTES by many different causal agents such as antibodies, bacteria, chemicals, temperature, and changes in tonicity.Anemia, Hemolytic, Congenital: Hemolytic anemia due to various intrinsic defects of the erythrocyte.Anemia, Hemolytic, Congenital Nonspherocytic: Any one of a group of congenital hemolytic anemias in which there is no abnormal hemoglobin or spherocytosis and in which there is a defect of glycolysis in the erythrocyte. Common causes include deficiencies in GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE ISOMERASE; PYRUVATE KINASE; and GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE.Coombs Test: A test to detect non-agglutinating ANTIBODIES against ERYTHROCYTES by use of anti-antibodies (the Coombs' reagent.) The direct test is applied to freshly drawn blood to detect antibody bound to circulating red cells. The indirect test is applied to serum to detect the presence of antibodies that can bind to red blood cells.Anemia, Aplastic: A form of anemia in which the bone marrow fails to produce adequate numbers of peripheral blood elements.Medical Oncology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of neoplasms.Credentialing: The recognition of professional or technical competence through registration, certification, licensure, admission to association membership, the award of a diploma or degree, etc.Teaching Materials: Instructional materials used in teaching.Pamphlets: Printed publications usually having a format with no binding and no cover and having fewer than some set number of pages. They are often devoted to a single subject.Erythrocytes: Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.Certification: Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.Tularemia: A plague-like disease of rodents, transmissible to man. It is caused by FRANCISELLA TULARENSIS and is characterized by fever, chills, headache, backache, and weakness.MassachusettsPatient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Public Health Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with promoting and protecting the health of populations, using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences to develop local, regional, state, and national health policy and research. It is population-focused and community-oriented, aimed at health promotion and disease prevention through educational, diagnostic, and preventive programs.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Newspapers: Publications printed and distributed daily, weekly, or at some other regular and usually short interval, containing news, articles of opinion (as editorials and letters), features, advertising, and announcements of current interest. (Webster's 3d ed)BooksEsophageal Sphincter, Lower: The physiologic or functional barrier to GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX at the esophagogastric junction. Sphincteric muscles remain tonically contracted during the resting state and form the high-pressure zone separating the lumen of the ESOPHAGUS from that of the STOMACH. (Haubrich et al, Bockus Gastroenterology, 5th ed., pp399, 415)Catalogs, LibraryEsophagogastric Junction: The area covering the terminal portion of ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of STOMACH at the cardiac orifice.Catalogs as Topic: Ordered compilations of item descriptions and sufficient information to afford access to them.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Mass Media: Instruments or technological means of communication that reach large numbers of people with a common message: press, radio, television, etc.Advertising as Topic: The act or practice of calling public attention to a product, service, need, etc., especially by paid announcements in newspapers, magazines, on radio, or on television. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Publications: Copies of a work or document distributed to the public by sale, rental, lease, or lending. (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p181)Neurosciences: The scientific disciplines concerned with the embryology, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology, etc., of the nervous system.Attentional Blink: Temporary visual deficit or impaired visual processing occurring in a rapid serial visual presentation task. After a person identifies the first of two visual targets, the ability to detect the second target is impaired for the next few hundred milliseconds. This phenomenon is called attentional blink.Bromeliaceae: A plant family of the order Bromeliales, subclass Zingiberidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons).Quackery: The fraudulent misrepresentation of the diagnosis and treatment of disease.Hospices: Facilities or services which are especially devoted to providing palliative and supportive care to the patient with a terminal illness and to the patient's family.Natural History: A former branch of knowledge embracing the study, description, and classification of natural objects (as animals, plants, and minerals) and thus including the modern sciences of zoology, botany, and mineralogy insofar as they existed at that time. In the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries it was much used for the generalized pursuit of certain areas of science. (Webster, 3d ed; from Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Factor XIa: Activated form of factor XI. In the intrinsic pathway, Factor XI is activated to XIa by factor XIIa in the presence of cofactor HMWK; (HIGH MOLECULAR WEIGHT KININOGEN). Factor XIa then activates factor IX to factor IXa in the presence of calcium.Psychoanalysis: The separation or resolution of the psyche into its constituent elements. The term has two separate meanings: 1. a procedure devised by Sigmund Freud, for investigating mental processes by means of free association, dream interpretation and interpretation of resistance and transference manifestations; and 2. a theory of psychology developed by Freud from his clinical experience with hysterical patients. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996).Neurosurgery: A surgical specialty concerned with the treatment of diseases and disorders of the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral and sympathetic nervous system.Psychoanalytic Theory: Conceptual system developed by Freud and his followers in which unconscious motivations are considered to shape normal and abnormal personality development and behavior.Neuroacanthocytosis: An inherited autosomal disorder that is characterized by neurodegeneration; orofacial and buccal DYSKINESIAS; CHOREA; and thorny-looking red cells (ACANTHOCYTES). This disorder is due to mutations of chorein which is important in protein trafficking and is encoded by Vps13a on chromosome 9q21.Acanthocytes: Erythrocytes with protoplasmic projections giving the cell a thorny appearance.Chorea: Involuntary, forcible, rapid, jerky movements that may be subtle or become confluent, markedly altering normal patterns of movement. Hypotonia and pendular reflexes are often associated. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent episodes of chorea as a primary manifestation of disease are referred to as CHOREATIC DISORDERS. Chorea is also a frequent manifestation of BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES.Essential Tremor: A relatively common disorder characterized by a fairly specific pattern of tremors which are most prominent in the upper extremities and neck, inducing titubations of the head. The tremor is usually mild, but when severe may be disabling. An autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance may occur in some families (i.e., familial tremor). (Mov Disord 1988;13(1):5-10)Dyskinesia, Drug-Induced: Abnormal movements, including HYPERKINESIS; HYPOKINESIA; TREMOR; and DYSTONIA, associated with the use of certain medications or drugs. Muscles of the face, trunk, neck, and extremities are most commonly affected. Tardive dyskinesia refers to abnormal hyperkinetic movements of the muscles of the face, tongue, and neck associated with the use of neuroleptic agents (see ANTIPSYCHOTIC AGENTS). (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1199)Kell Blood-Group System: Multiple erythrocytic antigens that comprise at least three pairs of alternates and amorphs, determined by one complex gene or possibly several genes at closely linked loci. The system is important in transfusion reactions. Its expression involves the X-chromosome.United StatesPantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration: A rare autosomal recessive degenerative disorder which usually presents in late childhood or adolescence. Clinical manifestations include progressive MUSCLE SPASTICITY; hyperreflexia; MUSCLE RIGIDITY; DYSTONIA; DYSARTHRIA; and intellectual deterioration which progresses to severe dementia over several years. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p972; Davis & Robertson, Textbook of Neuropathology, 2nd ed, pp972-929)Movement Disorders: Syndromes which feature DYSKINESIAS as a cardinal manifestation of the disease process. Included in this category are degenerative, hereditary, post-infectious, medication-induced, post-inflammatory, and post-traumatic conditions.Dyskinesias: Abnormal involuntary movements which primarily affect the extremities, trunk, or jaw that occur as a manifestation of an underlying disease process. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent episodes of dyskinesia as a primary manifestation of disease may be referred to as dyskinesia syndromes (see MOVEMENT DISORDERS). Dyskinesias are also a relatively common manifestation of BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES.Limbic Encephalitis: A paraneoplastic syndrome marked by degeneration of neurons in the LIMBIC SYSTEM. Clinical features include HALLUCINATIONS, loss of EPISODIC MEMORY; ANOSMIA; AGEUSIA; TEMPORAL LOBE EPILEPSY; DEMENTIA; and affective disturbance (depression). Circulating anti-neuronal antibodies (e.g., anti-Hu; anti-Yo; anti-Ri; and anti-Ma2) and small cell lung carcinomas or testicular carcinoma are frequently associated with this syndrome.Huntington Disease: A familial disorder inherited as an autosomal dominant trait and characterized by the onset of progressive CHOREA and DEMENTIA in the fourth or fifth decade of life. Common initial manifestations include paranoia; poor impulse control; DEPRESSION; HALLUCINATIONS; and DELUSIONS. Eventually intellectual impairment; loss of fine motor control; ATHETOSIS; and diffuse chorea involving axial and limb musculature develops, leading to a vegetative state within 10-15 years of disease onset. The juvenile variant has a more fulminant course including SEIZURES; ATAXIA; dementia; and chorea. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1060-4)Dementia: An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social or occupational functioning. The dysfunction is multifaceted and involves memory, behavior, personality, judgment, attention, spatial relations, language, abstract thought, and other executive functions. The intellectual decline is usually progressive, and initially spares the level of consciousness.Paraneoplastic Syndromes, Nervous System: Degenerative or inflammatory conditions affecting the central or peripheral nervous system that develop in association with a systemic neoplasm without direct invasion by tumor. They may be associated with circulating antibodies that react with the affected neural tissue. (Intern Med 1996 Dec;35(12):925-9)Neurology: A medical specialty concerned with the study of the structures, functions, and diseases of the nervous system.Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system. This includes disorders of the brain, spinal cord, cranial nerves, peripheral nerves, nerve roots, autonomic nervous system, neuromuscular junction, and muscle.Alzheimer Disease: A degenerative disease of the BRAIN characterized by the insidious onset of DEMENTIA. Impairment of MEMORY, judgment, attention span, and problem solving skills are followed by severe APRAXIAS and a global loss of cognitive abilities. The condition primarily occurs after age 60, and is marked pathologically by severe cortical atrophy and the triad of SENILE PLAQUES; NEUROFIBRILLARY TANGLES; and NEUROPIL THREADS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1049-57)Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders.
(1/24) beta-Spectrin Sao PauloII, a novel frameshift mutation of the beta-spectrin gene associated with hereditary spherocytosis and instability of the mutant mRNA.

Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is a common inherited anemia characterized by the presence of spherocytic red cells. Defects in several membrane protein genes have been involved in the pathogenesis of HS. beta-Spectrin-related HS seems to be common. We report here a new mutation in the beta-spectrin gene coding region in a patient with hereditary spherocytosis. The patient presented acanthocytosis and spectrin deficiency and, at the DNA level, a novel frameshift mutation leading to HS, i.e., a C deletion at codon 1392 (beta-spectrin Sao PauloII), exon 20. The mRNA encoding beta-spectrin Sao PauloII was very unstable and the mutant protein was not detected in the membrane or in other cellular compartments. It is interesting to note that frameshift mutations of the beta-spectrin gene at the 3' end allow the insertion of the mutant protein in the red cell membrane, leading to a defect in the auto-association of the spectrin dimers and consequent elliptocytosis. On the other hand, beta-spectrin Sao PauloII protein was absent in the red cell membrane, leading to spectrin deficiency, HS and the presence of acanthocytes.  (+info)

(2/24) Acanthocytes of Stropharia rugosoannulata function as a nematode-attacking device.

Efficient killing of nematodes by Stropharia rugosoannulata Farlow ex Murrill cultures was observed. This fungus showed the ability to immobilize the free-living nematode Panagrellus redivivus Goodey within minutes and to immobilize the pine wilt nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Steiner & Buhrer) Nickle within hours on agar plates. Moreover, P. redivivus worms were completely degraded by the fungus within 24 to 48 h. The cultures of S. rugosoannulata studied shared the characteristic of abundantly producing cells with finger-like projections called acanthocytes. We showed that the nematode-attacking activity of this fungus is carried out by these spiny acanthocytes and that mechanical force is an important factor in the process. Furthermore, the growth and nematode-attacking activity of the fungus in soil were also determined, and our results suggest that acanthocytes are functional in soil.  (+info)

(3/24) Autopsy case of Dubin-Johnson syndrome with pneumonia and abetalipoproteinemia-like lipid profile.

We report the autopsy of a 79-year-old Japanese woman with Dubin-Johnson syndrome accompanied by pneumonia, an abetalipoproteinemia-like lipid profile and acanthocytosis. On admission, physical examination of the patient revealed malnutrition. Blood tests revealed marked inflammatory changes and mild liver dysfunction. Chest X-ray indicated bilateral pneumonia. Total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglyceride levels were 89 mg/dL, 5 mg/dL and 6 mg/dL, respectively. Peripheral blood smears revealed numerous acanthocytes. Despite the administration of antibiotics and nutritional support, the patient died. Autopsy revealed a black liver, atrophy of fat tissue on the mesentery, and pneumonia with bilateral pleural effusion. We believe that the abetalipoproteinemia-like lipid profiles in this case were caused by malnutrition and the inflammatory changes rather than the direct effects of Dubin-Johnson syndrome. We base this conclusion on the following three findings: 1) the patient's lipid profile before hospitalization was in the normal range, 2) her serum LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels gradually increased after nutritional support began, and 3) blood tests revealed marked inflammatory changes (C-reactive protein 9.0 mg/dL; interleukin-6 16.4 pg/mL). This case provides important information that enhances our understanding of lipid metabolism under conditions of malnutrition and inflammation.  (+info)

(4/24) Insights into extensive deletions around the XK locus associated with McLeod phenotype and characterization of two novel cases.

The McLeod phenotype is derived from various forms of XK gene defects that result in the absence of XK protein, and is defined hematologically by the absence of Kx antigen, weakening of Kell system antigens, and red cell acanthocytosis. Individuals with the McLeod phenotype usually develop late-onset neuromuscular abnormalities known as the McLeod syndrome (MLS). MLS is an X-linked multi-system disorder caused by absence of XK alone, or when the disorder is caused by large deletions, it may be accompanied with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), chronic granulomatous disease (CYBB), retinitis pigmentosa (RPGR), and ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTC). XK defects derived from a large deletion at the XK locus (Xp21.1) have not been characterized at the molecular level. In this study, the deletion breakpoints of two novel cases of McLeod phenotype with extensive deletions are reported. Case 1 has greater than 1.12 million base-pairs (mb) deletion around the XK locus with 7 genes affected. Case 2 has greater than 5.65 mb deletion from TCTE1L to DMD encompassing 20 genes. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that DMD, XK and CYBB have close paralogs, some of which may partially substitute for the functions of their counterparts. The loci around XK are highly conserved from fish to human; however, the disorders are probably specific to mammals, and may coincide with the translocation of the loci to the X chromosome after the speciation in birds. The non-synonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitution rate ratio (omega=dN/dS) in these genes was examined. CYBB and RPGR show evidence of positive selection, whereas DMD, XK and OTC are subject to selective constraint.  (+info)

(5/24) Beta-spectrinBari: a truncated beta-chain responsible for dominant hereditary spherocytosis.

 (+info)

(6/24) The acanthocyte-echinocyte differential: The example of chorea-acanthocytosis.

 (+info)

(7/24) Drug-induced hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia associated with alterations of cell membrane lipids and acanthocyte formation.

 (+info)

(8/24) Erythrocyte membrane changes of chorea-acanthocytosis are the result of altered Lyn kinase activity.

 (+info)

*  Acanthocyte
... -like cells may be found in hypothyroidism, after splenectomy, and in myelodysplasia. Acanthocytes should be ... Spur cells may refer synonymously to acanthocytes, or may refer in some sources to a specific subset of 'extreme acanthocytes' ... ISBN 978-1-4377-2928-3. Acanthocyte: Presented by the University of Virginia Acanthocytes at the US National Library of ... Acanthocyte (from the Greek word ἄκανθα acantha, meaning 'thorn'), in biology and medicine, refers to a form of red blood cell ...
*  Acanthocyte (mycology)
In mycology, acanthocyte refers to stellate cells found on the hyphae of fungi of the genus Stropharia. Recent work, published ... Hong Luo; Xuan Li; Guohong Li; Yanbo Pan; Keqin Zhang (2006). "Acanthocytes of Stropharia rugosoannulata Function as a Nematode ...
*  Acanthocyte (disambiguation)
Acanthocyte is a form of red blood cell that has a spiked cell membrane, due to abnormal thorny projections. Acanthocyte may ... neurological conditions in which the blood contains acanthocytes Acanthosis, thickening of the skin not connected to ... also refer to: Acanthocyte (mycology), stellate cells found on the hyphae of fungi of the genus Stropharia Neuroacanthocytosis ...
*  Abetalipoproteinemia
Acanthocytes are seen on blood smear. Since there is no or little assimilation of chylomicrons, their levels in plasma remains ...
*  Pholiota
None form acanthocytes on their mycelia. P. aurivella P. communis P. flammans P. iterata P. nameko P. nubigena P. squarrosa P. ...
*  Echinocyte
... s, like acanthocytes, may be found in hyperlipidemia caused by liver dysfunction, but the lipids themselves do not ... Echinocytes can be distinguished from acanthocytes by the shape of the projections, which are smaller and more numerous than in ... Spiculated cells (echinocytes and acanthocytes) and target cells. UpToDate (release: 20.12- C21.4) [1] Hoffman, R; Benz, EJ; ... Echinocytes are frequently confused with acanthocytes, but the mechanism of cell membrane alteration is different. ...
*  Stropharia rugosoannulata
ISBN 0-671-42849-7. Hong Luo; Xuan Li; Guohong Li; Yanbo Pan & Keqin Zhang (2006). "Acanthocytes of Stropharia rugosoannulata ... the fungus produces unique spiny cells called acanthocytes which are able to immobilise and digest the nematodes. See ...
*  Hemangiosarcoma
... and acanthocytes in the blood smear; and leukocytosis with neutrophilia, left shift, and monocytosis. A definitive diagnosis ...
*  McLeod syndrome
... is one of only a few disorders in which acanthocytes may be found on the peripheral blood smear. Blood ... McLeod females have only occasional acanthocytes and very mild hemolysis; the lesser severity is thought to be due to X ...
*  Stropharia
Members of the core clade of Stropharia are characterized by crystalline acanthocytes among the hyphae of the mycelium and that ... Phylogenetically, separated genera now recognized by some authors for species lacking acanthocytes. replacing these informal ( ...
*  Stropharia caerulea
The fungus produces acanthocytes, which are spiny cells produced on short branches on the mycelium. There are a few greenish ... ISBN 978-0-19-957112-3. Farr DA (1980). "The acanthocyte, a unique cell type in Stropharia (Agaricales)". Mycotaxon. 11 (1): ...
*  Spur cell hemolytic anemia
This condition also creates rough or thorny projections on the erythrocyte named acanthocytes. List of hematologic conditions " ...
*  Neuroacanthocytosis
... spiculated red blood cells called acanthocytes. The 'core' neuroacanthocytosis syndromes, in which acanthocytes are a typical ... Acanthocytes are spiculated red blood cells and can be caused by altered distribution of membrane lipids or membrane protein/ ... Acanthocytes are nearly always present in these conditions and they share common clinical features. Some of these features are ... Acanthocytes are seen less frequently in other conditions including Huntington's disease-like syndrome 2 (HDL2) and ...
*  Crenation
Acanthocytes and echinocytes may arise from abnormalities of the cell membrane lipids or proteins, or from other disease ... The crenations may be either large, irregular spicules of acanthocytes, or smaller, more numerous, regularly irregular ...
*  Protostropharia
Stercophila). It is differentiated from Stropharia by production of astrocystidia on its mycelium rather than by acanthocytes ... The name Protostropharia refers to the less anatomically complex astrocystidia (Greek proto-) as compared to the acanthocytes ...
*  Protostropharia alcis
... a genus circumscribed to contain Stropharia species characterized by the formation of astrocystidia rather than acanthocytes on ...
*  Zieve's syndrome
It is defined by hemolytic anemia (with spur cells and acanthocytes), hyperlipoproteinaemia (excessive blood lipoprotein), ...
*  Strophariaceae
Members of the core clade of Stropharia are characterized by crystalline acanthocytes among the hyphae that make up the ...
*  Frank Bassen
Treatment includes vitamin E. Characteristics of the syndrome include the presence of acanthocytes (burr-cell malformation of ...
*  Abraham Kornzweig
Treatment includes vitamin E. Characteristics of the syndrome include the presence of acanthocytes (burr-cell malformation of ...
*  Normocytic anemia
E.g. Bite cells and/or blistor cells for oxidative hemolysis, Acanthocytes for pyruvate kinase deficiency or McLeod phenotype, ...
*  List of MeSH codes (A11)
... acanthocytes MeSH A11.118.290.330.315 - erythrocyte inclusions MeSH A11.118.290.330.315.335 - heinz bodies MeSH A11.118.290.330 ... acanthocytes MeSH A11.443.240.330.531 - megaloblasts MeSH A11.443.240.330.802 - spherocytes MeSH A11.443.250.200 - ...
*  List of MeSH codes (A15)
... acanthocytes MeSH A15.145.229.334.330.340 --- erythrocyte inclusions MeSH A15.145.229.334.330.340.335 --- heinz bodies MeSH ...
*  Na
... spiculated red blood cells called acanthocytes Nomina Anatomica, a former international standard for human anatomical ...
Acanthocyte - Wikipedia  Acanthocyte - Wikipedia
Acanthocyte-like cells may be found in hypothyroidism, after splenectomy, and in myelodysplasia. Acanthocytes should be ... Spur cells may refer synonymously to acanthocytes, or may refer in some sources to a specific subset of 'extreme acanthocytes' ... ISBN 978-1-4377-2928-3. Acanthocyte: Presented by the University of Virginia Acanthocytes at the US National Library of ... Acanthocyte (from the Greek word ἄκανθα acantha, meaning 'thorn'), in biology and medicine, refers to a form of red blood cell ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acanthocyte
Acanthocyte (mycology) - Wikipedia  Acanthocyte (mycology) - Wikipedia
In mycology, acanthocyte refers to stellate cells found on the hyphae of fungi of the genus Stropharia. Recent work, published ... Hong Luo; Xuan Li; Guohong Li; Yanbo Pan; Keqin Zhang (2006). "Acanthocytes of Stropharia rugosoannulata Function as a Nematode ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acanthocyte_(mycology)
The Significance of the Acanthocyte in Cirrhosis with Hemolytic Anemia. | Annals of Internal Medicine | American College of...  The Significance of the Acanthocyte in Cirrhosis with Hemolytic Anemia. | Annals of Internal Medicine | American College of...
The Acanthocyte in Cirrhosis with Hemolytic Anemia Annals of Internal Medicine; 68 (2): 390-397 ... The Significance of the Acanthocyte in Cirrhosis with Hemolytic Anemia. Charles C. Douglass, M.D.; Rolland C. Reynolds, M.D.; ... Three patients with cirrhosis and a hemolytic anemia characterized by acanthocytes or "spur cells" have been studied. Data on ... The Significance of the Acanthocyte in Cirrhosis with Hemolytic Anemia.. Ann Intern Med. 1968;68:1167. doi: 10.7326/0003-4819- ...
more infohttps://annals.org/aim/article-abstract/682330/significance-acanthocyte-cirrhosis-hemolytic-anemia
BIOETYMOLOGY : ORIGIN IN BIOMEDICAL TERMS: acanthocyte  BIOETYMOLOGY : ORIGIN IN BIOMEDICAL TERMS: acanthocyte
Acanthocyte is a type of red blood cell that is characterised by its thorny appearance caused by proplasmic projections. ... Acantocytes are seen in abetalipoproteinemia cirrhosis and other conditions.Up to 3% acanthocytes in the peripheral blood smear ...
more infohttp://bioetymology.blogspot.com/2012/02/acantocyte.html
Abnormalities in erythrocyte morphology - wikidoc  Abnormalities in erythrocyte morphology - wikidoc
Acanthocytes (spur cells). *Abetalipoproteinemia. *Acanthocytosis. *Cirrhosis. *Hemolytic anemia. *Hepatic necrosis. *Infantile ...
more infohttp://www.wikidoc.org/index.php/Abnormalities_in_erythrocyte_morphology
Haematology Flashcards by Languages 247365 | Brainscape  Haematology Flashcards by Languages 247365 | Brainscape
Acanthocytes. Target cells. Leucocytosis.. Auer's bodies are inclusions in leukaemic white cells and are pathogonomic of ...
more infohttps://www.brainscape.com/flashcards/haematology-5315792/packs/7936498
8/4- Red Cell Physiology Flashcards by Kathryn Kudlaty | Brainscape  8/4- Red Cell Physiology Flashcards by Kathryn Kudlaty | Brainscape
Acanthocytes: smaller number of spicules which are larger. Note the acanthocyte here and the Howell Jolly Body-their presence ... Increased number of acanthocytes and Howell Jolly bodies are seen. - Also there are intracellular vacuoles in normal red blood ...
more infohttps://www.brainscape.com/flashcards/8-4-red-cell-physiology-4052438/packs/6029493
The Shroomery Mycology Glossary  The Shroomery Mycology Glossary
acanthocytes. needle-like crystalline deposits on the mycelium of certain muchrooms acrid. intensely sharp and burning (peppery ...
more infohttp://www.shroomery.org/glossary2.php
Anemia Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Transfusion, Iron Supplementation  Anemia Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Transfusion, Iron Supplementation
Acanthocyte. Five to 10 spicules of various lengths and at irregular intervals on surface of RBCs ...
more infohttps://emedicine.medscape.com/article/198475-treatment
Anemia: Practice Essentials, Pathophysiology, Etiology  Anemia: Practice Essentials, Pathophysiology, Etiology
Acanthocyte. Five to 10 spicules of various lengths and at irregular intervals on surface of RBCs ...
more infohttps://emedicine.medscape.com/article/198475-overview
Hematology: Principles and Practice  Hematology: Principles and Practice
b. Acanthocytes.. c. Spherocytes.. d. Schistocytes.. 15. Sideroblastic anemia is commonly:. a. Macrocytic.. b. Normocytic.. c. ... Acanthocytes are predominantly seen in patients with:. a. Severe liver disease.. b. Vitamin B12 deficiency.. c. Chronic ... a. Acanthocytes, normal to increased reticulocytes.. b. Spherocytes, polychromasia, and reticulocytes.. c. Dimorphic population ...
more infohttp://www.free-ed.net/free-ed/Courses/06%20MedHealth/MD%20Series/MD0853/Hematology.asp?iNum=0990
Neurosecretory cell | definition of neurosecretory cell by Medical dictionary  Neurosecretory cell | definition of neurosecretory cell by Medical dictionary
See: acanthocyte. spider cell. Astrocyte.. squamous cell. A flat epithelial cell.. Synonym: squamous epithelial cell. squamous ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/neurosecretory+cell
Exam 2 Flashcards  Exam 2 Flashcards
acanthocytes (spur cells). Definition. RBCs with multiple irregular projections that are randomly spaced around the external ...
more infohttps://www.flashcardmachine.com/exam-2733.html
Homerton: Glossary of Morphological terms  Homerton: Glossary of Morphological terms
see acanthocytes. Stomatocyte. an oval or rectangular area of central pallor, sometimes referred to as a "mouth" arises as a ... Acanthocytes. are spiculated (spikey) red cells that are found in some cases of α-β-lipoproteinaemia, chronic liver disease and ... macrocytosis and acanthocytes. There may also be evidence of infectious mononucleosis, any viral infection, toxoplasmosis and ...
more infohttp://www.homerton.nhs.uk/our-services/services-a-z/p/pathology/haematology/glossary-of-morphological-terms/
Red Blood Cell (RBC) Morphology  Red Blood Cell (RBC) Morphology
... nucleus polychromasia guideline sickle abnormalities wright laboratory poikilocyte blood bone marrow spherocyte acanthocyte ...
more infohttps://www.labce.com/red-cell-morphology.aspx
Md0853 les04 by Taw Alzu - issuu  Md0853 les04 by Taw Alzu - issuu
Acanthocytes 2 leukocytes. (7) Acanthocytes (spur cells). Acanthocytes are irregularity-shaped erythrocytes with long spiny ...
more infohttps://issuu.com/alzutaw/docs/md0853_les04
Blood - Humpath.com - Human pathology  Blood - Humpath.com - Human pathology
acanthocytes 1 October 2016 acanthocyte Etiology / examples lathosterolosis abetalipoproteinemia Images Acanthocytes in the ...
more infohttps://humpath.com/spip.php?rubrique218
Severe congenital hemolytic anemia caused by a novel compoun... : Chinese Medical Journal  Severe congenital hemolytic anemia caused by a novel compoun... : Chinese Medical Journal
Acanthocytes, target cells and stomatocytes could be seen. But there was no spherocytes and elliptocyte, which was typical for ... Macrocytes and acanthocytes have been reported to be seen in PKD patients' blood smear after splenectomy. Stomatocytes are ...
more infohttps://journals.lww.com/cmj/Fulltext/2019/01050/Severe_congenital_hemolytic_anemia_caused_by_a.14.aspx
Manual Differential  Manual Differential
Acanthocytes. Resultable. N. 7789-1. 2000603. Sickle Cell. Resultable. N. 801-1. ...
more infohttp://ltd.aruplab.com/Tests/Pub/0040005
Neuroacanthocytosis Syndromes II | Ruth H. Walker | Springer  Neuroacanthocytosis Syndromes II | Ruth H. Walker | Springer
One defining feature is the presence of thorny red blood cells (acanthocytes); however, neither the role of the genetic ... One defining feature is the presence of thorny red blood cells (acanthocytes); however, neither the role of the genetic ... Work on erythrocyte membranes suggests mechanisms for the generation of acanthocytes. Animal models are being generated which ...
more infohttps://www.springer.com/us/book/9783540716921
Neuroacanthocytosis - NORD (National Organization for Rare Disorders)  Neuroacanthocytosis - NORD (National Organization for Rare Disorders)
Acanthocytes are abnormal red blood cells that have thorny or spiny projections of varying lengths protruding from the surface ... Neurologic Syndromes with Acanthocytes. In: Merritt's Textbook of Neurology, 12th Ed, Pedley TA, Rowland LP. 2010 Lippincott ... Blood tests can reveal the presence of acanthocytes in the blood, although their absence does not exclude a diagnosis of ... When individuals have abnormally high levels of acanthocytes, it often indicates the presence of an underlying disorder. ...
more infohttps://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/neuroacanthocytosis/
  • Treatment includes vitamin E. Characteristics of the syndrome include the presence of acanthocytes (burr-cell malformation of the erythrocytes), and the reduction or even absence of B-lipoproteins. (wikipedia.org)