Inflammation of the GALLBLADDER wall in the absence of GALLSTONES.
Inflammation of the GALLBLADDER; generally caused by impairment of BILE flow, GALLSTONES in the BILIARY TRACT, infections, or other diseases.
Acute inflammation of the GALLBLADDER wall. It is characterized by the presence of ABDOMINAL PAIN; FEVER; and LEUKOCYTOSIS. Gallstone obstruction of the CYSTIC DUCT is present in approximately 90% of the cases.
A storage reservoir for BILE secretion. Gallbladder allows the delivery of bile acids at a high concentration and in a controlled manner, via the CYSTIC DUCT to the DUODENUM, for degradation of dietary lipid.
A radiopharmaceutical used extensively in cholescintigraphy for the evaluation of hepatobiliary diseases. (From Int Jrnl Rad Appl Inst 1992;43(9):1061-4)
Diseases of the GALLBLADDER. They generally involve the impairment of BILE flow, GALLSTONES in the BILIARY TRACT, infections, neoplasms, or other diseases.
Surgical removal of the GALLBLADDER.
Imino acids are organic compounds containing a nitrogen atom in their structure, classified as derivatives of amino acids, where the carbon atom adjacent to the carboxyl group is bonded to a nitrogen atom instead of a hydrogen atom, forming a characteristic imino functional group.
A motility disorder characterized by biliary COLIC, absence of GALLSTONES, and an abnormal GALLBLADDER ejection fraction. It is caused by gallbladder dyskinesia and/or SPHINCTER OF ODDI DYSFUNCTION.
Establishment of an opening into the gallbladder either for drainage or surgical communication with another part of the digestive tract, usually the duodenum or jejunum.
Disease having a short and relatively severe course.
Excision of the gallbladder through an abdominal incision using a laparoscope.
A variant of acute cholecystitis with inflammation of the GALLBLADDER that is characterized by the pockets of gas in the gallbladder wall. It is due to secondary infection caused by gas-forming organisms, and has a high risk of perforation.
A process whereby bile is delivered from the gallbladder into the duodenum. The emptying is caused by both contraction of the gallbladder and relaxation of the sphincter mechanism at the choledochal terminus.
Death and putrefaction of tissue usually due to a loss of blood supply.
Presence or formation of GALLSTONES in the BILIARY TRACT, usually in the gallbladder (CHOLECYSTOLITHIASIS) or the common bile duct (CHOLEDOCHOLITHIASIS).

Efficacy of laparoscopic cholecystectomy in acalculous gallbladder disease: long-term follow-up. (1/30)

OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to determine the efficacy of laparoscopic cholecystectomy in symptomatic patients with ultrasound negative and abnormal gallbladder ejection fractions; Patients with gallbladder ejection fractions less than 35% on hepatobiliary scan were offered laparoscopic cholecystectomy. METHODS: Between January 1995 and January 2001, 1564 patients underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy at our institution: 256 were confirmed to have acalculous gallbladder disease by pathology report and reconfirmation of abnormal hepatobiliary scan data. A 30-day postoperative follow-up was obtained by retrospective medical record review. For this study, we contacted all 256 patients by mail questionnaire and followed up on nonresponders with telephone interviews; we also reviewed hospital records to verify preoperative symptom patterns. The survey was completed by 154 patients (60%): 48 (31%) by mail and 106 (69%) by telephone interviews. The study included 115 (75%) female and 39 (25%) male patients, and the average age was 42 years (range, 13 to 95). All hepatobiliary laboratory parameters were normal pre- and postoperatively. The survey was completed in December 2001, 1 to 5 years postoperatively (mean 3 years). RESULTS: Preoperatively, 142 patients (92%) had right upper quadrant pain, 114 (74%) had nausea, 88 (57%) had vomiting, 120 (73%) had heartburn, and 118 (77%) had food intolerance. In a 30-day postoperative period, these numbers had reduced to 48 (37%), 14 (90%), 8 (5%), 22 (14%), and 34 (22%), respectively. had laparoscopic cholecystectomy, and 95% stated that they would recommend laparoscopic cholecystectomy to other patients. CONCLUSION: This study shows that patients with acalculous gallbladder disease benefit from laparoscopic cholecystectomy.  (+info)

Constancy and variability of gallbladder ejection fraction: impact on diagnosis and therapy. (2/30)

The main objective of this study was to test the constancy and variability of gallbladder (GB) ejection fraction (EF) in long-term studies to (a) determine whether EF ever becomes normal once it is low, (b) determine how long it takes for the EF to become abnormal once it is found to be normal, (c) explore the cause of low EF, and (d) define objective parameters for biliary and nonbiliary abdominal pain. METHODS: Fifty-two patients (42 women, 10 men) who underwent quantitative cholescintigraphy twice (total studies, 104), over a mean period of 38.54 mo between studies, were chosen for retrospective analysis. They were divided into the following groups: control (n = 13; nonbiliary abdominal pain), chronic acalculous cholecystitis (CAC) (n = 27; biliary abdominal pain), chronic calculous cholecystitis (CCC) (n = 6; biliary abdominal pain), and opioid (n = 6; nonbiliary abdominal pain). The last group had received an opioid before cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8) infusion in one study but not in the other study. A GBEF value of > or =35% was considered normal with a 3-min infusion and > or =50% as normal with a 10-min infusion of CCK-8. RESULTS: The mean GBEF value was reproducible between the 2 sequential studies in the control group (66.0% +/- 20.5% vs. 73.9% +/- 17.7%), CAC group (24.4% +/- 22.3% vs. 16.9% +/- 10.9%), and CCC group (20.8% +/- 20.9% vs. 27.5% +/- 34.5%) but not in the opioid group (14.8% +/- 14.6% vs. 56.5% +/- 31.7%). The severity of GBEF reduction in CAC increased with time: 7.2% +/- 8.1% within 12 mo, 16.1% +/- 14.9% in 13-47 mo, and 23.5% +/- 21.3% in 48-168 mo. None of the 27 patients with CAC developed a gallstone as detected by ultrasound during the study period. In 5 patients with CAC, a mean period of 52.6 +/- 28.9 mo was required for conversion from normal to a low EF. CCK-induced cystic duct spasm is the etiology for low EF in both CAC and CCC. CONCLUSION: Normal and low GBEF values are reproducible in long-term studies. Once the EF reaches a low value, it does not return to normal, and a normal value requires many years to become abnormal. CCK-induced cystic duct spasm is the cause of low GBEF in CAC and CCC, and the severity of EF reduction is similar for both. Exclusion of opioid intake immediately before the study is critical before attributing a low GBEF value to an irreversible GB motor dysfunction.  (+info)

Corn oil emulsion: a simple cholecystagogue for diagnosis of chronic acalculous cholecystitis. (3/30)

This study investigated the use of a corn oil emulsion as an inexpensive alternative to sincalide in the scintigraphic diagnosis of chronic acalculous cholecystitis (CAC). METHODS: Thirty patients with abdominal or right upper quadrant pain underwent (99m)Tc-disofenin hepatobiliary imaging for 60 min. After gallbladder filling, 30 mL of corn oil emulsion were administered orally to all patients followed by dynamic imaging for an additional 60 min in all patients and for 90 min in 26 patients. Gallbladder emptying kinetics were determined with gallbladder ejection fractions calculated at 30, 60, and 90 min. The results were compared with histopathologic or clinical follow-up data. RESULTS: Corn oil emulsion was found to be palatable and free of side effects in all patients. Seven of the 30 patients had histopathologic evidence of CAC, whereas the remaining 23 did not have evidence of gallbladder disease based on clinical follow-up. The 30-, 60-, and 90-min gallbladder ejection fractions were determined to be 25% +/- 22% (mean +/- SD), 47% +/- 28%, and 62% +/- 29%, respectively. Receiver-operating-characteristic analysis showed that the 60-min gallbladder ejection fraction best distinguished between CAC and non-gallbladder disease with an area under the curve of 0.963. A 60-min gallbladder ejection fraction of < or = 20% had 100% sensitivity, 96% specificity, 88% positive predictive value, 100% negative predictive value, and 97% overall accuracy for the diagnosis of CAC. CONCLUSION: Standardized corn oil emulsion appears to be an adequate and well-tolerated gallbladder stimulant. Based on receiver-operating-characteristic analysis, a 60-min gallbladder ejection fraction of < or = 20% using this simple cholecystagogue results in high diagnostic accuracy for CAC.  (+info)

Changes in guinea pig gallbladder smooth muscle Ca2+ homeostasis by acute acalculous cholecystitis. (4/30)

Impaired smooth muscle contractility is a hallmark of acute acalculous cholecystitis. Although free cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) is a critical step in smooth muscle contraction, possible alterations in Ca2+ homeostasis by cholecystitis have not been elucidated. Our aim was to elucidate changes in the Ca2+ signaling pathways induced by this gallbladder dysfunction. [Ca2+]i was determined by epifluorescence microscopy in fura 2-loaded isolated gallbladder smooth muscle cells, and isometric tension was recorded from gallbladder muscle strips. F-actin content was quantified by confocal microscopy. Ca2+ responses to the inositol trisphosphate (InsP3) mobilizing agonist CCK and to caffeine, an activator of the ryanodine receptors, were impaired in cholecystitic cells. This impairment was not the result of a decrease in the size of the releasable pool. Inflammation also inhibited Ca2+ influx through L-type Ca2+ channels and capacitative Ca2+ entry induced by depletion of intracellular Ca2+ pools. In addition, the pharmacological phenotype of these channels was altered in cholecystitic cells. Inflammation impaired contractility further than Ca2+ signal attenuation, which could be related to the decrease in F-actin that was detected in cholecystitic smooth muscle cells. These findings indicate that cholecystitis decreases both Ca2+ release and Ca2+ influx in gallbladder smooth muscle, but a loss in the sensitivity of the contractile machinery to Ca2+ may also be responsible for the impairment in gallbladder contractility.  (+info)

Acute acalculous cholecystitis: a rare complication of typhoid fever. (5/30)

Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a very rare complication of typhoid fever, and may be due to multi-drug resistant and virulent forms of Salmonella infection. It is particularly rare in adults. A 21-year-old woman, presenting with fever, vomiting, diarrhoea and abdominal pain, was found to have acute acalculous cholecystitis due to typhoid fever on basis of ultrasonographical findings and a positive Widal's test for Salmonella typhi. She was treated with antibiotics and made a full recovery.  (+info)

Unusual cases of acute cholecystitis and cholangitis: Tokyo Guidelines. (6/30)

Unusual cases of acute cholecystitis and cholangitis include (1) pediatric biliary tract infections, (2) geriatric biliary tract infections, (3) acalculous cholecystitis, (4) acute and intrahepatic cholangitis accompanying hepatolithiasis (5) acute biliary tract infection accompanying malignant pancreatic-biliary tumor, (6) postoperative biliary tract infection, (7) acute biliary tract infection accompanying congenital biliary dilatation and pancreaticobiliary maljunction, and (8) primary sclerosing cholangitis. Pediatric biliary tract infection is characterized by great differences in causes from those of adult acute biliary tract infection, and severe cases should be immediately referred to a specialist pediatric surgical unit. Because biliary tract infection in elderly patients, who often have serious systemic conditions and complications, is likely to progress to a serious form, early surgery or biliary drainage is necessary. Acalculous cholangitis, which often occurs in patients with serious concomitant conditions, such as those in intensive care units (ICUs) and those with disturbed cardiac, pulmonary, and nephric function, has a high mortality and poor prognosis. Cholangitis accompanying hepatolithiasis includes recurrent pyogenic cholangitis, an epidemic disease in Southeast Asia. Biliary tract infections, which often occur after a biliary tract operation and treatment of the biliary tract, may have a fatal outcome, and should be carefully observed. The causes of acute cholangitis associated with pancreaticobiliary maljunction differ before and after operation. Direct cholangiography is most useful in the diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis. If cholangiography visualizes a typical bile duct, differentiation from acute pyogenic cholangitis is easy. This article discusses the individual characteristics, diagnostic criteria, treatment guidelines, and prognosis of these unusual types of biliary tract infection.  (+info)

A case report of dengue virus infection and acalculous cholecystitis in a pregnant returning traveler. (7/30)

Dengue viral infections present a significant risk during pregnancy to both mother and fetus. A young woman at 13 weeks' gestation presented with fever and abdominal pain following a diarrheal illness after returning from Puerto Rico. Over the course of 5 days, she developed nausea, petechiae, severe thrombocytopenia, and acalculous cholecystitis. After a serologic diagnosis of acute infection with dengue virus, she was provided supportive care. An uncomplicated pregnancy led to delivery of a healthy infant at 40 weeks gestation. Travel during pregnancy to dengue-endemic areas poses a risk to both mother and fetus. Pregnancies complicated by dengue infection require close monitoring for potential maternal and fetal complications.  (+info)

Oerskovia turbata and Myroides species: rare isolates from a case of acalculus cholecystitis. (8/30)

Here we report a case of acalculus cholecystitis, which presented with features of obstructive jaundice of one-week duration. The patient underwent cholecystectomy and bile grew a mixed culture of Oerskovia turbata and Myroides spp. Being a rare isolate, characteristic features of the former are described in this report. The patient recovered without any complication.  (+info)

Acalculous cholecystitis is a form of inflammation of the gallbladder that occurs in the absence of gallstones, which are commonly associated with gallbladder inflammation. It mainly affects critically ill or debilitated patients and can be caused by various factors such as bacterial or viral infection, reduced blood flow to the gallbladder, and injury to the bile ducts.

The symptoms of acalculous cholecystitis may include abdominal pain, fever, nausea, vomiting, and jaundice. The diagnosis is often made through imaging tests such as ultrasound or CT scan, which may show gallbladder wall thickening, fluid accumulation around the gallbladder, and other signs of inflammation.

Treatment typically involves antibiotics to manage infection, intravenous fluids, and pain management. In severe cases, cholecystectomy (surgical removal of the gallbladder) may be necessary. If left untreated, acalculous cholecystitis can lead to serious complications such as gangrene, perforation of the gallbladder, and sepsis.

Cholecystitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the gallbladder, a small pear-shaped organ located under the liver that stores and concentrates bile produced by the liver. Bile is a digestive fluid that helps break down fats in the small intestine during digestion.

Acute cholecystitis is a sudden inflammation of the gallbladder, often caused by the presence of gallstones that block the cystic duct, the tube that carries bile from the gallbladder to the common bile duct. This blockage can cause bile to build up in the gallbladder, leading to inflammation, swelling, and pain.

Chronic cholecystitis is a long-term inflammation of the gallbladder, often caused by repeated attacks of acute cholecystitis or the presence of gallstones that cause ongoing irritation and damage to the gallbladder wall. Over time, chronic cholecystitis can lead to thickening and scarring of the gallbladder wall, which can reduce its ability to function properly.

Symptoms of cholecystitis may include sudden and severe abdominal pain, often in the upper right or center of the abdomen, that may worsen after eating fatty foods; fever; nausea and vomiting; bloating and gas; and clay-colored stools. Treatment for cholecystitis typically involves antibiotics to treat any infection present, pain relief, and surgery to remove the gallbladder (cholecystectomy). In some cases, a nonsurgical procedure called endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) may be used to remove gallstones from the bile duct.

Acute cholecystitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the gallbladder (cholecystitis) that develops suddenly (acute). The gallbladder is a small pear-shaped organ located in the upper right part of the abdomen, beneath the liver. It stores bile, a digestive juice produced by the liver, which helps break down fats in the food we eat.

Acute cholecystitis occurs when the gallbladder becomes inflamed and irritated, often due to the presence of gallstones that block the cystic duct, the tube that carries bile from the gallbladder into the small intestine. When the cystic duct is obstructed, bile builds up in the gallbladder, causing it to become swollen, inflamed, and infected.

Symptoms of acute cholecystitis may include sudden and severe abdominal pain, often located in the upper right or middle part of the abdomen, that may radiate to the back or shoulder blade area. Other symptoms may include fever, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, and abdominal tenderness or swelling.

Acute cholecystitis is typically diagnosed through a combination of medical history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and imaging studies such as ultrasound or CT scan. Treatment may involve hospitalization, antibiotics to treat infection, pain relief medications, and surgery to remove the gallbladder (cholecystectomy). In some cases, nonsurgical treatments such as endoscopic sphincterotomy or percutaneous cholecystostomy may be used to relieve obstruction and inflammation.

The gallbladder is a small, pear-shaped organ located just under the liver in the right upper quadrant of the abdomen. Its primary function is to store and concentrate bile, a digestive enzyme produced by the liver, which helps in the breakdown of fats during the digestion process. When food, particularly fatty foods, enter the stomach and small intestine, the gallbladder contracts and releases bile through the common bile duct into the duodenum, the first part of the small intestine, to aid in fat digestion.

The gallbladder is made up of three main parts: the fundus, body, and neck. It has a muscular wall that allows it to contract and release bile. Gallstones, an inflammation of the gallbladder (cholecystitis), or other gallbladder diseases can cause pain, discomfort, and potentially serious health complications if left untreated.

Technetium Tc 99m Disofenin is not a medical condition, but rather a radiopharmaceutical used in diagnostic imaging. It is a radioactive tracer used in nuclear medicine scans, specifically for liver and biliary system imaging. The compound consists of the radioisotope Technetium-99m (Tc-99m) bonded to the pharmaceutical Disofenin.

The Tc-99m is a gamma emitter with a half-life of 6 hours, making it ideal for diagnostic imaging. When administered to the patient, the compound is taken up by the liver and excreted into the bile ducts and gallbladder, allowing medical professionals to visualize these structures using a gamma camera. This can help detect various conditions such as tumors, gallstones, or obstructions in the biliary system.

It's important to note that Technetium Tc 99m Disofenin is used diagnostically and not for therapeutic purposes. The radiation exposure from this compound is generally low and considered safe for diagnostic use. However, as with any medical procedure involving radiation, the benefits and risks should be carefully weighed and discussed with a healthcare professional.

Gallbladder diseases refer to a range of conditions that affect the function and structure of the gallbladder, a small pear-shaped organ located beneath the liver. The primary role of the gallbladder is to store, concentrate, and release bile into the small intestine to aid in digesting fats. Gallbladder diseases can be chronic or acute and may cause various symptoms, discomfort, or complications if left untreated. Here are some common gallbladder diseases with brief definitions:

1. Cholelithiasis: The presence of gallstones within the gallbladder. Gallstones are small, hard deposits made of cholesterol, bilirubin, or a combination of both, which can vary in size from tiny grains to several centimeters.
2. Cholecystitis: Inflammation of the gallbladder, often caused by obstruction of the cystic duct (the tube connecting the gallbladder and the common bile duct) due to a gallstone. This condition can be acute or chronic and may cause abdominal pain, fever, and tenderness in the right upper quadrant of the abdomen.
3. Choledocholithiasis: The presence of gallstones within the common bile duct, which can lead to obstruction, jaundice, and potential infection of the biliary system (cholangitis).
4. Acalculous gallbladder disease: Gallbladder dysfunction or inflammation without the presence of gallstones. This condition is often seen in critically ill patients and can lead to similar symptoms as cholecystitis.
5. Gallbladder polyps: Small growths attached to the inner wall of the gallbladder. While most polyps are benign, some may have malignant potential, especially if they are larger than 1 cm in size or associated with certain risk factors.
6. Gallbladder cancer: A rare form of cancer that originates in the gallbladder tissue. It is often asymptomatic in its early stages and can be challenging to diagnose. Symptoms may include abdominal pain, jaundice, or a palpable mass in the right upper quadrant of the abdomen.

It is essential to consult with a healthcare professional if experiencing symptoms related to gallbladder disease for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Cholecystectomy is a medical procedure to remove the gallbladder, a small pear-shaped organ located on the right side of the abdomen, just beneath the liver. The primary function of the gallbladder is to store and concentrate bile, a digestive fluid produced by the liver. During a cholecystectomy, the surgeon removes the gallbladder, usually due to the presence of gallstones or inflammation that can cause pain, infection, or other complications.

There are two primary methods for performing a cholecystectomy:

1. Open Cholecystectomy: In this traditional surgical approach, the surgeon makes an incision in the abdomen to access and remove the gallbladder. This method is typically used when there are complications or unique circumstances that make laparoscopic surgery difficult or risky.
2. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: This is a minimally invasive surgical procedure where the surgeon makes several small incisions in the abdomen, through which a thin tube with a camera (laparoscope) and specialized surgical instruments are inserted. The surgeon then guides these tools to remove the gallbladder while viewing the internal structures on a video monitor.

After the gallbladder is removed, bile flows directly from the liver into the small intestine through the common bile duct, and the body continues to function normally without any significant issues.

Imino acids are organic compounds that contain a nitrogen atom as part of an amide-like structure. They are structurally similar to amino acids, which contain a carboxyl group and an amino group, but instead of the amino group, imino acids have a structural unit known as an imine or Schiff base, which is a carbon-nitrogen double bond with a hydrogen atom attached to the nitrogen atom.

One example of an imino acid is proline, which is a cyclic imino acid that plays important roles in protein structure and function. Proline is unique among the 20 standard amino acids because its side chain is linked to the nitrogen atom of the backbone, forming a ring-like structure. This structural feature gives proline unique properties, such as restricted rotation around the bond between the nitrogen and alpha carbon atoms, which can affect protein folding and stability.

Other imino acids may be formed through chemical reactions or enzymatic processes, and they can play important roles in various biological pathways, including the biosynthesis of amino acids, nucleotides, and other biomolecules. However, imino acids are not typically considered to be part of the standard set of 20 amino acids that make up proteins.

Biliary dyskinesia is a medical condition characterized by abnormal or impaired motility of the biliary system, which includes the gallbladder and the bile ducts. This can lead to symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, nausea, and vomiting, particularly after eating fatty foods.

In biliary dyskinesia, the gallbladder may not contract properly or may contract too much, leading to a backup of bile in the liver or bile ducts. This can cause inflammation and irritation of the biliary system and surrounding tissues.

The condition is often diagnosed through imaging tests such as ultrasound, nuclear medicine scans, or MRI, which can help assess gallbladder function and detect any abnormalities in the biliary system. Treatment for biliary dyskinesia may include medications to improve gallbladder motility, dietary modifications, or in some cases, surgery to remove the gallbladder.

Cholecystostomy is a medical procedure that involves the creation of an opening or fistula between the gallbladder and the stomach or the skin surface to drain bile from the gallbladder. This procedure is typically performed when there is an obstruction in the cystic duct or common bile duct, leading to inflammation or infection of the gallbladder (cholecystitis).

There are two types of cholecystostomy: percutaneous and open. Percutaneous cholecystostomy is a minimally invasive procedure that involves inserting a small tube through the skin and into the gallbladder under the guidance of imaging techniques such as ultrasound or CT scan. Open cholecystostomy, on the other hand, requires an open surgical incision to access the gallbladder and create the fistula.

Cholecystostomy is usually a temporary measure to manage acute cholecystitis in high-risk patients who are not suitable candidates for surgery or until they become stable enough to undergo a more definitive treatment, such as cholecystectomy (surgical removal of the gallbladder).

An acute disease is a medical condition that has a rapid onset, develops quickly, and tends to be short in duration. Acute diseases can range from minor illnesses such as a common cold or flu, to more severe conditions such as pneumonia, meningitis, or a heart attack. These types of diseases often have clear symptoms that are easy to identify, and they may require immediate medical attention or treatment.

Acute diseases are typically caused by an external agent or factor, such as a bacterial or viral infection, a toxin, or an injury. They can also be the result of a sudden worsening of an existing chronic condition. In general, acute diseases are distinct from chronic diseases, which are long-term medical conditions that develop slowly over time and may require ongoing management and treatment.

Examples of acute diseases include:

* Acute bronchitis: a sudden inflammation of the airways in the lungs, often caused by a viral infection.
* Appendicitis: an inflammation of the appendix that can cause severe pain and requires surgical removal.
* Gastroenteritis: an inflammation of the stomach and intestines, often caused by a viral or bacterial infection.
* Migraine headaches: intense headaches that can last for hours or days, and are often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light and sound.
* Myocardial infarction (heart attack): a sudden blockage of blood flow to the heart muscle, often caused by a buildup of plaque in the coronary arteries.
* Pneumonia: an infection of the lungs that can cause coughing, chest pain, and difficulty breathing.
* Sinusitis: an inflammation of the sinuses, often caused by a viral or bacterial infection.

It's important to note that while some acute diseases may resolve on their own with rest and supportive care, others may require medical intervention or treatment to prevent complications and promote recovery. If you are experiencing symptoms of an acute disease, it is always best to seek medical attention to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment.

Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a surgical procedure to remove the gallbladder using a laparoscope, a thin tube with a camera, which allows the surgeon to view the internal structures on a video monitor. The surgery is performed through several small incisions in the abdomen, rather than a single large incision used in open cholecystectomy. This approach results in less postoperative pain, fewer complications, and shorter recovery time compared to open cholecystectomy.

The procedure is typically indicated for symptomatic gallstones or chronic inflammation of the gallbladder (cholecystitis), which can cause severe abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and fever. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has become the standard of care for gallbladder removal due to its minimally invasive nature and excellent outcomes.

Emphysematous cholecystitis is a type of acute inflammation of the gallbladder, characterized by the presence of gas within the wall and/or lumen of the gallbladder. It is a severe and potentially life-threatening condition, which typically occurs in patients with diabetes or other underlying medical conditions that compromise their immune system.

The gas that accumulates in the gallbladder in emphysematous cholecystitis can come from several sources, including gas-forming bacteria such as Clostridium perfringens and Escherichia coli. These bacteria produce gas as a byproduct of their metabolism, which can lead to the formation of gas bubbles within the gallbladder.

The symptoms of emphysematous cholecystitis are similar to those of other forms of acute cholecystitis and may include abdominal pain, fever, nausea, vomiting, and decreased appetite. However, the presence of gas within the gallbladder can be detected on imaging studies such as X-rays or computed tomography (CT) scans, which can help to confirm the diagnosis.

Treatment of emphysematous cholecystitis typically involves surgical removal of the gallbladder (cholecystectomy), often through a laparoscopic approach. Antibiotic therapy is also administered to treat any underlying bacterial infection. In severe cases, where the patient's condition is too unstable for surgery, percutaneous drainage of the gallbladder may be performed as a temporary measure to help reduce the risk of complications such as gangrene or perforation.

Gallbladder emptying refers to the process by which the gallbladder releases bile into the small intestine through the bile duct. The gallbladder is a small pear-shaped organ that stores and concentrates bile, a digestive fluid produced by the liver. After eating, especially when fatty or greasy foods are consumed, the hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) is released into the bloodstream, which stimulates the contraction of the gallbladder and relaxation of the sphincter of Oddi, a muscle that controls the opening and closing of the bile duct. This allows the concentrated bile to flow from the gallbladder into the small intestine, where it helps break down fats for absorption.

Gallbladder emptying can be assessed through various diagnostic tests, such as ultrasound or cholescintigraphy (also known as a HIDA scan), which measures the rate and degree of gallbladder emptying in response to CCK stimulation. Abnormalities in gallbladder emptying can contribute to conditions such as gallstones, biliary dyskinesia, and other functional gallbladder disorders.

Gangrene is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition that occurs when there is a loss of blood flow to a specific area of the body, resulting in tissue death. It can be caused by various factors such as bacterial infections, trauma, diabetes, vascular diseases, and smoking. The affected tissues may become discolored, swollen, and emit a foul odor due to the accumulation of bacteria and toxins.

Gangrene can be classified into two main types: dry gangrene and wet (or moist) gangrene. Dry gangrene develops slowly and is often associated with peripheral arterial disease, which reduces blood flow to the extremities. The affected area turns black and shriveled as it dries out. Wet gangrene, on the other hand, progresses rapidly due to bacterial infections that cause tissue breakdown and pus formation. This type of gangrene can spread quickly throughout the body, leading to severe complications such as sepsis and organ failure if left untreated.

Treatment for gangrene typically involves surgical removal of the dead tissue (debridement), antibiotics to control infections, and sometimes revascularization procedures to restore blood flow to the affected area. In severe cases where the infection has spread or the damage is irreversible, amputation of the affected limb may be necessary to prevent further complications and save the patient's life.

Cholelithiasis is a medical term that refers to the presence of gallstones in the gallbladder. The gallbladder is a small pear-shaped organ located beneath the liver that stores bile, a digestive fluid produced by the liver. Gallstones are hardened deposits that can form in the gallbladder when substances in the bile, such as cholesterol or bilirubin, crystallize.

Gallstones can vary in size and may be as small as a grain of sand or as large as a golf ball. Some people with gallstones may not experience any symptoms, while others may have severe abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, and jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes) if the gallstones block the bile ducts.

Cholelithiasis is a common condition that affects millions of people worldwide, particularly women over the age of 40 and those with certain medical conditions such as obesity, diabetes, and rapid weight loss. If left untreated, gallstones can lead to serious complications such as inflammation of the gallbladder (cholecystitis), infection, or pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas). Treatment options for cholelithiasis include medication, shock wave lithotripsy (breaking up the gallstones with sound waves), and surgery to remove the gallbladder (cholecystectomy).

In acalculous cholecystitis, no stone is in the biliary ducts. It accounts for 5-10% of all cases of cholecystitis and is ... The presentation of acalculous cholecystitis is similar to calculous cholecystitis. Patients are more likely to have yellowing ... Acalculous cholecystitis is typically seen in people who are hospitalized and critically ill. Males are more likely to develop ... Acalculous and postoperative cholecystitis. In: Surgical intensive care, Barie PS, Shires GT. (Eds), Little Brown & Co, Boston ...
Owen CC, Bilhartz LE (2003). "Gallbladder polyps, cholesterolosis, adenomyomatosis, and acute acalculous cholecystitis". Semin ...
Tucker RA, Jenkins HL (November 1984). "Acalculous cholecystitis and fever related to total parenteral nutrition". Drug ... Total parenteral nutrition increases the risk of acute cholecystitis due to complete disuse of the gastrointestinal tract, ...
The abdominal pain can be due to acalculous cholecystitis or inflammation of the pancreas. Rarely, the lymph nodes, liver, and ...
... pancreatic and biliary infection can involve acalculous cholecystitis, sclerosing cholangitis, papillary stenosis, or ...
They also argued that his sepsis was actually caused by post-traumatic acute acalculous cholecystitis. Based on the autopsy ... Pappas, Theodore N.; Joharifard, Shahrzad (July 8, 2013). "Did James A. Garfield die of cholecystitis? Revisiting the autopsy ... state that they don't believe that Garfield's doctors could have saved him even if they had been aware of his cholecystitis, ...
They also argued that his sepsis was actually caused by post-traumatic acute acalculous cholecystitis. Based on the autopsy ... Pappas, Theodore N.; Joharifard, Shahrzad (July 8, 2013). "Did James A. Garfield die of cholecystitis? Revisiting the autopsy ...
They also argued that his sepsis was actually caused by post-traumatic acute acalculous cholecystitis (inflammation of the ... 312-313 Pappas, Theodore N.; Joharifard, Shahrzad (July 8, 2013). "Did James A. Garfield die of cholecystitis? Revisiting the ...
... but occasionally due to acalculous cholecystitis or granulomatous appendicitis. The most serious complication of the vasculitic ...
Five to ten percent of acute cholecystitis occurs in people without gallstones, and for this reason, is called acalculous ... People with repeat episodes of acute cholecystitis can develop chronic cholecystitis from changes in the normal anatomy of the ... such as acute cholecystitis, that requires urgent surgery. Acute cholecystitis is the second most common cause of acute abdomen ... Pain in cholecystitis is similar to that of biliary colic, but lasts longer than six hours and occurs together with signs of ...
... cholecystitis MeSH C06.130.564.263.249 - acalculous cholecystitis MeSH C06.130.564.263.500 - cholecystitis, acute MeSH C06.130. ... 564.263.500.500 - emphysematous cholecystitis MeSH C06.130.564.332 - cholecystolithiasis MeSH C06.130.564.401 - gallbladder ...
A palpable tender gallbladder (hence the law cannot be applied) may be seen in acute acalculous cholecystitis, which commonly ... acute cholecystitis) and right upper quadrant abdominal pain (i.e., not Courvoisier's sign). Fibrosis of the gallbladder is ... another chronic process that occurs due to repeated acute inflammation (i.e., chronic cholecystitis), resulting in a shrunken, ...
... acalculous cholecystitis), cornea and uveal tract (keratouveitis), thyroids (thyroiditis), liver (hepatitis), retina (retinitis ...
Patients usually have normal vital signs with biliary colic, whereas patients with cholecystitis are usually febrile and more ... Furthermore, biliary pain may be associated with functional disorders of the biliary tract, so-called acalculous biliary pain ( ... Shakespear, J. S.; Shaaban, A. M.; Rezvani, M. (2010). "CT findings of acute cholecystitis and its complications". American ... Presence of infection indicates cholecystitis. It is unclear whether those experiencing a gallstone attack should receive ...
Duncan first recognized it in 1844 when a fatal case of acalculous cholecystitis complicating an incarcerated hernia was ... Acalculous cholecystitis is a severe illness that is a complication of various other medical or surgical conditions. ... encoded search term (Acalculous Cholecystitis) and Acalculous Cholecystitis What to Read Next on Medscape ... Acalculous cholecystitis has a slight male predominance, unlike calculous cholecystitis, which has a female predominance. ...
Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) represents inflammation of the gallbladder in the absence of demonstrated calculi (see the ... encoded search term (Acalculous Cholecystitis Imaging) and Acalculous Cholecystitis Imaging What to Read Next on Medscape ... As a result, some authors propose the term necrotizing cholecystitis to reflect the fact that acalculous cholecystitis does not ... Plain film radiography is of limited use in the diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC). Emphysematous cholecystitis ...
In acalculous cholecystitis, no stone is in the biliary ducts. It accounts for 5-10% of all cases of cholecystitis and is ... The presentation of acalculous cholecystitis is similar to calculous cholecystitis. Patients are more likely to have yellowing ... Acalculous cholecystitis is typically seen in people who are hospitalized and critically ill. Males are more likely to develop ... Acalculous and postoperative cholecystitis. In: Surgical intensive care, Barie PS, Shires GT. (Eds), Little Brown & Co, Boston ...
... Patients with acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) often present with acute abdominal symptoms. However, recent clinical ... Is conservative management a safe approach for patients with acute acalculous cholecystiti ...
Gastrointestinal system disorders: Cholecystitis, including acalculous cholecystitis and acute acalculous cholecystitis. * ... May increase risk of acute acalculous cholecystitis; symptoms of acute acalculous cholecystitis include abdominal pain, ... Gastrointestinal: Acute acalculous cholecystitis. *Immune disorders: Goodpastures syndrome, Graves disease, aplastic anemia, ... if acute acalculous cholecystitis is suspected, evaluate and treat promptly. *In postmarketing setting, cases of ...
described a case of a 67 year-old gentleman with numerous medical co-morbidities who developed acalculous cholecystitis and was ... C. glycolicum as the sole cause of bacteremia in a patient with acute cholecystitis. Ann Clin Lab Sci. 2012;42(2):162-4. ...
According to Kim et al., patients diagnosed with acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) were divided into surgical and non-surgical ... 8 However, the Tokyo Guidelines suggest a mortality rate of approximately 2.7-10% for acute cholecystitis and cholangitis and ... Kimura, Y. et al. TG13 current terminology, etiology, and epidemiology of acute cholangitis and cholecystitis. Journal of ... 9 The mortality rate for biliary sepsis, including cholangitis and cholecystitis in our study, was approximately 3.7-11.0%, ...
Cholecystitis - Learn about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis & treatment from the MSD Manuals - Medical Consumer Version. ... Acalculous cholecystitis Cholecystitis without gallstones is called acalculous cholecystitis. Instead of gallstones, you have ... What causes cholecystitis? The most common cause of cholecystitis is gallstones Gallstones Gallstones are solid material that ... What is cholecystitis? Cholecystitis is inflammation of your gallbladder. Your gallbladder is the sac just under your liver ...
Acalculous Cholecystitis Acalculous Gallbladder Inflammation use Acalculous Cholecystitis Acalypha Acalypha alnifolia use ...
Chronic acalculous cholecystitis;. - cholangitis;. - cirrhosis of the liver;. - Encephalopathy, including that associated with ...
Biliary infection: Cholecystitis and cholangitis. Rege, R. V., Jan 1 2015, Clinical Infectious Disease, Second Edition. ... Biliary infection: Cholecystitis and cholangitis. Rege, R. V., Jan 1 2010, Clinical Infectious Disease. Cambridge University ...
Acalculous Cholecystitis Acalculous Gallbladder Inflammation use Acalculous Cholecystitis Acalypha Acalypha alnifolia use ...
Gastrointestinal system disorders: Cholecystitis, including acalculous cholecystitis and acute acalculous cholecystitis. * ... May increase risk of acute acalculous cholecystitis; symptoms of acute acalculous cholecystitis include abdominal pain, ... Gastrointestinal: Acute acalculous cholecystitis. *Immune disorders: Goodpastures syndrome, Graves disease, aplastic anemia, ... if acute acalculous cholecystitis is suspected, evaluate and treat promptly. *In postmarketing setting, cases of ...
Acalculous Cholecystitis Secondary to Epstein-Barr Virus Infection Pages : 374-375 - Toshimasa Yamaguchi DOI : 10.4274/ ...
Conclusion: Typhoid acalculous cholecystitis is a frequent complication in children. Late presentation and diagnosis is ... Results: Six children with typhoid acalculous cholecystitis were treated over a five-year period (4 males and 2 females). Their ... Child , Child, Preschool , Cholecystitis, Acute/diagnosis , Cholecystitis, Acute/etiology , Diagnosis, Differential , ... four patients had ultrasound evidence of acalculous cholecystitis. Open cholecystectomy was successful in the six cases. The ...
Acute acalculous cholecystitis in a child returning from the Ivory Coast.. Anthoine-Milhomme MC, Chappuy H, Chéron G. ...
Kim, S.B.; Gu, M.G.; Kim, K.H.; Kim, T.N. Long-term outcomes of acute acalculous cholecystitis treated by non-surgical ... Susceptibilities for acalculous cholecystitis include acute critical illness, male sex, advanced age over 50, presence of HIV, ... Fu, Y.; Pang, L.; Dai, W.; Wu, S.; Kong, J. Advances in the Study of Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis: A Comprehensive Review. ... Chawla, A.; Bosco, J.I.; Lim, T.C.; Srinivasan, S.; Teh, H.S.; Shenoy, J.N. Imaging of acute cholecystitis and cholecystitis- ...
Tara, Fatemeh Acalculous Cholecystitis Presenting as Intractable Hypere-mesis during Pregnancy: A Case Report [Volume 5, Issue ... Pourali, Leila Acalculous Cholecystitis Presenting as Intractable Hypere-mesis during Pregnancy: A Case Report [Volume 5, Issue ... Alamtian, Atefe Acalculous Cholecystitis Presenting as Intractable Hypere-mesis during Pregnancy: A Case Report [Volume 5, ... Mohammadzade Vatanchi, Atiyeh Acalculous Cholecystitis Presenting as Intractable Hypere-mesis during Pregnancy: A Case Report [ ...
Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis in a Patient With COVID-19 and a LVAD. Roy Justin, et al. Journal of cardiac failure 2020 0 0. ( ... Query Trace: Cholecystitis[original query] Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) or Severely Increased Chest Wall ... Acute cholecystitis during COVID-19 pandemic: a multisocietary position statement. Campanile Fabio Cesare, et al. World journal ... Diagnostic Delay During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Liver Abscess Secondary to Acute Lithiasic Cholecystitis. García Virosta Mariana ...
Calculous cholecystitis is caused by gallstones, while acalculous cholecystitis is not associated with gallstones and is often ... It is important to note that cholecystitis can sometimes occur without any apparent cause, known as acalculous cholecystitis. ... Acalculous cholecystitis can be caused by a variety of factors, including infections, trauma, and prolonged fasting. ... What is Cholecystitis?. Cholecystitis is a condition that occurs when the gallbladder becomes inflamed due to the buildup of ...
Retro-orbital inflammation and psychological support for acalculous cholecystitis, though the breast is interrupted by ...
Necrotizing Gallbladder Torsion Masking as Acalculous Cholecystitis: A Review of Two Cases Treated with Successful Laparoscopic ...
Three patients died due to transplant-related complications (sepsis, complications of acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute ... A third patient presented an acute episode of acalculous cholecystitis and required emergency laparotomy during transplantation ...
... and uncomplicated cholecystitis. Dr. Rahul Pannala (@RahulPannala) talks us through how to diagnose biliary colic, what imaging ... Pannala recommends this test for evaluating acalculous cholecystitis or bile leaks (for example, a patient post-cholecystectomy ... What I find most ironic is rarely does simple cholecystitis make it onto a medical service - as in the case they describe. The ... assistant , biliary colic , care , cholecystitis , cholelithiasis , Doctor , education , family , foam , FOAMed , FOAMim , ...
... cause only acute infections that Acute acalculous cholecystitis (ACC) is a rare complication of acute hepatitis B acalculous ... cholecystitis and associated with acute hepatitis B virus infection, and normal CBD (4.8 mm), and free fluid along subhepatic ...
Three separate papers published online in Neurology on March 30 describe eight cases of acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC), ... Acute A calculous Cholecystitis In the paper describing AAC, David Croteau, MD, and colleagues from the US Food and Drug ... and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography showed an acalculous gallbladder with thickened walls and pericholecystic fluid ...
Acalculous Cholecystopathy * Acute Cholecystitis and Biliary Colic Medscape Consult. News & Perspective. * Defining Difficult- ...
Acalculous Cholecystopathy * Acute Cholecystitis and Biliary Colic Medscape Consult. News & Perspective. * Defining Difficult- ...
  • Gallbladder wall ischemia that occurs because of a low-flow state due to fever, dehydration, or heart failure may also play a role in the pathogenesis of acalculous cholecystitis. (medscape.com)
  • The main cause of acalculous cholecystitis is gallbladder stasis with resulting stagnant bile. (medscape.com)
  • Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) represents inflammation of the gallbladder in the absence of demonstrated calculi (see the image below). (medscape.com)
  • Abdominal radiograph of acalculous emphysematous cholecystitis demonstrating curvilinear air pattern conforming to the shape of the gallbladder wall. (medscape.com)
  • Although it is unusual for acalculous cholecystitis to occur in patients with a normal gallbladder, on US and cholescintigraphy examinations, the gallbladder may be found to be normal early in the course of the disease. (medscape.com)
  • Cholecystitis is inflammation of the gallbladder. (wikipedia.org)
  • Often gallbladder attacks (biliary colic) precede acute cholecystitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • The pain lasts longer in cholecystitis than in a typical gallbladder attack. (wikipedia.org)
  • A gallbladder with cholecystitis is almost always tender to touch. (wikipedia.org)
  • Complications include the following: Gangrene Gallbladder rupture Empyema Fistula formation and gallstone ileus Rokitansky-Aschoff sinuses Cholecystitis causes the gallbladder to become distended and firm. (wikipedia.org)
  • Untreated cholecystitis can lead to worsened inflammation and infected bile that can lead to a collection of pus inside the gallbladder, also known as empyema. (wikipedia.org)
  • The inflammation of cholecystitis can lead to adhesions between the gallbladder and other parts of the gastrointestinal tract, most commonly the duodenum. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cholecystitis can also be caused by infection or tumors in the gallbladder, but these are rare. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Krishna, S.G. Endoscopic Transpapillary/Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Gallbladder Drainage of Acute Cholecystitis. (encyclopedia.pub)
  • Endoscopic Transpapillary/Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Gallbladder Drainage of Acute Cholecystitis" Encyclopedia , https://encyclopedia.pub/entry/55527 (accessed April 17, 2024). (encyclopedia.pub)
  • Acute cholecystitis-primarily caused by gallstone obstruction of the cystic duct-involves the inflammation of the gallbladder. (encyclopedia.pub)
  • If acute cholecystitis is left untreated without surgery or decompression, potential long-term sequelae may include complications such as perforation, gangrenous cholecystitis, and the formation of a fistula between the gallbladder and bowel [ 4 ] . (encyclopedia.pub)
  • Cholecystitis is a condition that affects the gallbladder, a small organ located under the liver. (tinykitchendivas.com)
  • Cholecystitis is a condition that occurs when the gallbladder becomes inflamed due to the buildup of bile in the organ. (tinykitchendivas.com)
  • When the bile is not able to flow properly, it can cause the gallbladder to become inflamed and infected, leading to cholecystitis. (tinykitchendivas.com)
  • Acute cholecystitis is a sudden onset of inflammation in the gallbladder that is usually caused by gallstones. (tinykitchendivas.com)
  • Chronic cholecystitis is a long-term inflammation of the gallbladder that can be caused by multiple episodes of acute cholecystitis. (tinykitchendivas.com)
  • Help your patients navigate gallbladder disease, including asymptomatic stones, incidental polyps, and uncomplicated cholecystitis. (thecurbsiders.com)
  • The condition causes approximately 5%-10% of all cases of acute cholecystitis and is usually associated with more serious morbidity and higher mortality rates than calculous cholecystitis. (medscape.com)
  • [ 4 ] ). In addition, acalculous cholecystitis is associated with a higher incidence of gangrene and perforation compared to calculous disease. (medscape.com)
  • Acalculous cholecystitis has a slight male predominance, unlike calculous cholecystitis, which has a female predominance. (medscape.com)
  • The reported mortality range is 10%-50% for acalculous cholecystitis as compared to 1% for calculous cholecystitis. (medscape.com)
  • It is important to note that cholecystitis can also be classified as either calculous or acalculous. (tinykitchendivas.com)
  • Calculous cholecystitis is caused by gallstones, while acalculous cholecystitis is not associated with gallstones and is often seen in critically ill patients. (tinykitchendivas.com)
  • Complications of acute cholecystitis include gallstone pancreatitis, common bile duct stones, or inflammation of the common bile duct. (wikipedia.org)
  • Classic symptoms of acute cholecystitis include nausea, vomiting, and right upper quadrant abdominal pain [ 1 ] [ 2 ] . (encyclopedia.pub)
  • Emphysematous cholecystitis, which can occur as a complication of acute cholecystitis, is seen in the images below. (medscape.com)
  • Because of the inflammation, its size can be felt from the outside of the body in 25-50% of people with cholecystitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Retro-orbital inflammation and psychological support for acalculous cholecystitis, though the breast is interrupted by exaggerated blinking. (sjsbrookfield.org)
  • People with cholecystitis most commonly have symptoms of biliary colic before developing cholecystitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nausea is common and vomiting occurs in 75% of people with cholecystitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition to the above symptoms, some people with cholecystitis may also experience shoulder pain or pain that radiates to the back. (tinykitchendivas.com)
  • The incidence of gangrenous cholecystitis was also greater in the AAC than in ACC (31.2% vs 5.6%, respectively). (medscape.com)
  • More than 90% of the time acute cholecystitis is caused from blockage of the cystic duct by a gallstone. (wikipedia.org)
  • You can get an attack of cholecystitis when a gallstone blocks your cystic duct. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Without treatment, chronic cholecystitis may occur. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rupture can also occur in cases of chronic cholecystitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cholecystitis can happen suddenly (acute) or repeatedly over time (chronic). (msdmanuals.com)
  • Cholecystitis can be classified into two different types: acute and chronic. (tinykitchendivas.com)
  • Symptoms of chronic cholecystitis include mild pain and discomfort in the upper right abdomen, and may not be as severe as acute cholecystitis. (tinykitchendivas.com)
  • four patients had ultrasound evidence of acalculous cholecystitis. (bvsalud.org)
  • If ultrasound and/or CT imaging is equivocal for acute cholecystitis, hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HIDA) may be utilized to corroborate the diagnosis. (encyclopedia.pub)
  • Cholecystitis without gallstones is called acalculous cholecystitis. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Plain film radiography is of limited use in the diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC). (medscape.com)
  • Symptoms of acute cholecystitis can include severe pain in the upper right abdomen, fever, nausea, and vomiting. (tinykitchendivas.com)
  • A much higher rate of complications is observed in patients with acalculous cholecystitis (eg, gangrene, perforation) because of the more fulminant course and coexistent disease. (medscape.com)
  • Treinen C, Lomelin D, Krause C, Goede M, Oleynikov D. Acute acalculous cholecystitis in the critically ill: risk factors and surgical strategies. (medscape.com)
  • This type of cholecystitis is more common in critically ill patients and those with weakened immune systems. (tinykitchendivas.com)
  • It is important to seek medical attention if you experience any of these symptoms, as cholecystitis can lead to serious complications if left untreated. (tinykitchendivas.com)
  • A number of complications may occur from cholecystitis if not detected early or properly treated. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cholecystitis is suspected based on symptoms and laboratory testing. (wikipedia.org)
  • The symptoms of empyema are similar to uncomplicated cholecystitis but greater severity: high fever, severe abdominal pain, more severely elevated white blood count. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients with acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) often present with acute abdominal symptoms. (bvsalud.org)
  • What are symptoms of cholecystitis? (msdmanuals.com)
  • Older people (over age 55) may have different symptoms for acute cholecystitis. (msdmanuals.com)
  • In this article, we will discuss the causes, symptoms, and treatment options for cholecystitis, as well as how to prevent future episodes from occurring. (tinykitchendivas.com)
  • Symptoms of cholecystitis can vary depending on the type and severity of the condition. (tinykitchendivas.com)
  • Acalculous cholecystitis can be observed in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, although it is a late manifestation of this disease. (medscape.com)
  • Acalculous cholecystitis can also be found in patients on total parenteral nutrition (TPN), typically those on TPN for more than three months. (medscape.com)
  • The prognosis of patients with acalculous cholecystitis is guarded. (medscape.com)
  • Acalculous cholecystitis in severely burned patients: incidence and predisposing factors. (medscape.com)
  • Acalculous cholecystitis typically occurs as a secondary event in patients who are hospitalized and are acutely ill with another disease. (medscape.com)
  • Early imaging evaluation is required for patients with acalculous cholecystitis, and frequently, multiple diagnostic tests are performed. (medscape.com)
  • This form of complicated cholecystitis typically is seen in older male patients with diabetes. (medscape.com)
  • Is conservative management a safe approach for patients with acute acalculous cholecystitis presenting with an acute abdomen? (bvsalud.org)
  • Les patients qui ont accepté de participer après apptéléphonique ont été inclus de janvier à mai 2021.Les variables d'étudeétaient: âge, sexe, acuité visuelle (AV), caractéristiques de la LCET selon Diallo, pronostic fonctionnel et anatomique en post puberté (plus de 15 ans). (bvsalud.org)
  • Diagnostic Delay During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Liver Abscess Secondary to Acute Lithiasic Cholecystitis. (cdc.gov)
  • more than one half of such cases occur in the setting of acalculous disease. (medscape.com)
  • It is important to note that cholecystitis can sometimes occur without any apparent cause, known as acalculous cholecystitis. (tinykitchendivas.com)
  • The pain becomes severe and constant in cholecystitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Occasionally, acute cholecystitis occurs as a result of vasculitis or chemotherapy, or during recovery from major trauma or burns. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acalculous cholecystitis can be caused by a variety of factors, including infections, trauma, and prolonged fasting. (tinykitchendivas.com)
  • One should be familiar with the CT scan signs that suggest acalculous cholecystitis in the appropriate clinical setting (see the image below). (medscape.com)
  • NorthernLebanon,wheresub-clinical tureswerepositiveonBACTEC9240® atedwithskininfections,cholecystitis, casesmayoccur.Anunknownnumber system(BectonDickinsonMicrobiol- meningitis and septicaemia. (who.int)
  • Susceptibilities for acalculous cholecystitis include acute critical illness, male sex, advanced age over 50, presence of HIV, and use of total parenteral nutrition. (encyclopedia.pub)
  • Without appropriate treatment, recurrent episodes of cholecystitis are common. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acalculous cholecystitis comprises approximately 5-10% of all cases of acute cholecystitis. (medscape.com)
  • Three separate papers published online in Neurology on March 30 describe eight cases of acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC), two cases of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), and one occurrence of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), all linked to the drug. (medscape.com)
  • In addition to these risk factors, there are other factors that may contribute to the development of cholecystitis. (tinykitchendivas.com)
  • Cholecystitis can be caused by a variety of factors, including a high-fat diet, obesity, and certain medical conditions such as diabetes and Crohn's disease. (tinykitchendivas.com)
  • Cholecystitis can also be caused by underlying health conditions such as diabetes, obesity, or Crohn's disease. (tinykitchendivas.com)
  • Tana M, Tana C, Cocco G, Iannetti G, Romano M, Schiavone C. Acute acalculous cholecystitis and cardiovascular disease: a land of confusion. (medscape.com)
  • Additionally, certain medical conditions such as Crohn's disease and sickle cell anemia may also increase the risk of developing cholecystitis. (tinykitchendivas.com)
  • Women are also more likely to develop cholecystitis than men, and it is more common in people over the age of 40. (tinykitchendivas.com)
  • There are several risk factors that can increase your likelihood of developing cholecystitis. (tinykitchendivas.com)
  • If untreated, about 20% of people with biliary colic develop acute cholecystitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Women are more likely to develop cholecystitis than men, and those over the age of 60 are also at a higher risk. (tinykitchendivas.com)
  • Background: To evaluate the particularities of typhoid cholecystitis in children. (bvsalud.org)