Academies and Institutes: Organizations representing specialized fields which are accepted as authoritative; may be non-governmental, university or an independent research organization, e.g., National Academy of Sciences, Brookings Institution, etc.National Academy of Sciences (U.S.): A United States organization of distinguished scientists and engineers established for the purpose of investigating and reporting upon any subject of art or science as requested by any department of government. The National Research Council organized by NAS serves as the principal operating agency to stimulate and support research.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Institute of Medicine (U.S.): Identifies, for study and analysis, important issues and problems that relate to health and medicine. The Institute initiates and conducts studies of national policy and planning for health care and health-related education and research; it also responds to requests from the federal government and other agencies for studies and advice.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.National Cancer Institute (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. Through basic and clinical biomedical research and training, it conducts and supports research with the objective of cancer prevention, early stage identification and elimination. This Institute was established in 1937.United StatesNational Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It conducts and supports research program related to diseases of the heart, blood vessels, lung, and blood; blood resources; and SLEEP WAKE DISORDERS. From 1948 until October 10, 1969, it was known as the National Heart Institute. From June 25, 1976, it was the National Heart and Lung Institute. Since October 1997, the NHLBI has also had administrative responsibility for the NIH Woman's Health Initiative.Neurology: A medical specialty concerned with the study of the structures, functions, and diseases of the nervous system.National Institute of Mental Health (U.S.): A component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH concerned with research, overall planning, promoting, and administering mental health programs and research. It was established in 1949.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (U.S.): An institute of the CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION which is responsible for assuring safe and healthful working conditions and for developing standards of safety and health. Research activities are carried out pertinent to these goals.Exhibits as Topic: Discussions, descriptions or catalogs of public displays or items representative of a given subject.National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It conducts and supports basic and applied research to better understand, treat, and ultimately prevent infectious, immunologic, and allergic diseases. It was established in 1948.Sleep Medicine Specialty: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of SLEEP WAKE DISORDERS and their causes.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It supports and conducts research, both basic and clinical, on the normal and diseases nervous system. It was established in 1950.National Institute on Aging (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. Through basic and clinical biomedical research and training, it conducts and supports research into the nature of the aging process and diseases associated with the later stages of life. The Institute was established in 1974.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Awards and PrizesEvidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Neuropsychology: A branch of psychology which investigates the correlation between experience or behavior and the basic neurophysiological processes. The term neuropsychology stresses the dominant role of the nervous system. It is a more narrowly defined field than physiological psychology or psychophysiology.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Congresses as Topic: Conferences, conventions or formal meetings usually attended by delegates representing a special field of interest.Research Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.Societies, Scientific: Societies whose membership is limited to scientists.Credentialing: The recognition of professional or technical competence through registration, certification, licensure, admission to association membership, the award of a diploma or degree, etc.Neonatology: A subspecialty of Pediatrics concerned with the newborn infant.Child Advocacy: Promotion and protection of the rights of children; frequently through a legal process.Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Child Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the child.Phototherapy: Treatment of disease by exposure to light, especially by variously concentrated light rays or specific wavelengths.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Persons: Persons as individuals (e.g., ABORTION APPLICANTS) or as members of a group (e.g., HISPANIC AMERICANS). It is not used for members of the various professions (e.g., PHYSICIANS) or occupations (e.g., LIBRARIANS) for which OCCUPATIONAL GROUPS is available.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Organizational Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It conducts and supports basic and applied research for a national program in diabetes, endocrinology, and metabolic diseases; digestive diseases and nutrition; and kidney, urologic, and hematologic diseases. It was established in 1948.Immunization Schedule: Schedule giving optimum times usually for primary and/or secondary immunization.National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It was initially established to investigate the broad aspects of human development as a means of understanding developmental disabilities, including mental retardation, and the events that occur during pregnancy. It now conducts and supports research on all stages of human development. It was established in 1962.Research Report: Detailed account or statement or formal record of data resulting from empirical inquiry.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Pacifiers: Devices that babies can suck on when they are not feeding. The extra sucking can be comforting to the babies and pacify them. Pacifiers usually are used as a substitute for the thumb in babies who suck on their thumb or fingers almost constantly.Research Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.Ethics, Professional: The principles of proper conduct concerning the rights and duties of the professional, relations with patients or consumers and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the professional and interpersonal relations with patient or consumer families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Advisory Committees: Groups set up to advise governmental bodies, societies, or other institutions on policy. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Wedge Argument: An assertion that an action apparently unobjectionable in itself would set in motion a train of events leading ultimately to an undesirable outcome. (From Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, 1995)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)IndiaMilitary Medicine: The practice of medicine as applied to special circumstances associated with military operations.National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It conducts and supports basic and applied research to reduce the burden of human illness and dysfunction from environmental causes by, defining how environmental exposures, genetic susceptibility, and age interact to affect an individual's health. It was established in 1969.National Institute on Drug Abuse (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It supports a comprehensive research portfolio that focuses on the biological, social, behavioral and neuroscientific bases of drug abuse on the body and brain as well as its causes, prevention, and treatment. NIDA, NIAAA, and NIMH were created as coequal institutes within the Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Administration in 1974. It was established within the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH in 1992.Anecdotes as Topic: Brief accounts or narratives of an incident or event.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Infant Care: Care of infants in the home or institution.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Library AssociationsSeverity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Societies, Nursing: Societies whose membership is limited to nurses.Sleep Bruxism: A sleep disorder characterized by grinding and clenching of the teeth and forceful lateral or protrusive jaw movements. Sleep bruxism may be associated with TOOTH INJURIES; TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DISORDERS; sleep disturbances; and other conditions.Mumps Vaccine: Vaccines used to prevent infection by MUMPS VIRUS. Best known is the live attenuated virus vaccine of chick embryo origin, used for routine immunization of children and for immunization of adolescents and adults who have not had mumps or been immunized with live mumps vaccine. Children are usually immunized with measles-mumps-rubella combination vaccine.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Perinatology: The branch of medicine dealing with the fetus and infant during the perinatal period. The perinatal period begins with the twenty-eighth week of gestation and ends twenty-eight days after birth. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Dermatology: A medical specialty concerned with the skin, its structure, functions, diseases, and treatment.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Nursing, Private Duty: The practice of nursing by a registered or licensed nurse to care for a specific patient in a health facility or in the home.Police: Agents of the law charged with the responsibility of maintaining and enforcing law and order among the citizenry.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Interdisciplinary Communication: Communication, in the sense of cross-fertilization of ideas, involving two or more academic disciplines (such as the disciplines that comprise the cross-disciplinary field of bioethics, including the health and biological sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences and law). Also includes problems in communication stemming from differences in patterns of language usage in different academic or medical disciplines.Orthopedics: A surgical specialty which utilizes medical, surgical, and physical methods to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the skeletal system, its articulations, and associated structures.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Allergy and Immunology: A medical specialty concerned with the hypersensitivity of the individual to foreign substances and protection from the resultant infection or disorder.Ankylosis: Fixation and immobility of a joint.Neonatal Screening: The identification of selected parameters in newborn infants by various tests, examinations, or other procedures. Screening may be performed by clinical or laboratory measures. A screening test is designed to sort out healthy neonates (INFANT, NEWBORN) from those not well, but the screening test is not intended as a diagnostic device, rather instead as epidemiologic.Vaccines, Combined: Two or more vaccines in a single dosage form.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Thimerosal: An ethylmercury-sulfidobenzoate that has been used as a preservative in VACCINES; ANTIVENINS; and OINTMENTS. It was formerly used as a topical antiseptic. It degrades to ethylmercury and thiosalicylate.Expert Testimony: Presentation of pertinent data by one with special skill or knowledge representing mastery of a particular subject.New YorkFollow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Leadership: The function of directing or controlling the actions or attitudes of an individual or group with more or less willing acquiescence of the followers.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Faculty: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.National Eye Institute (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It conducts and supports research on the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases of the eye and visual system. It was originally part of the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness. The National Eye Institute was established in 1968.Korea: Former kingdom, located on Korea Peninsula between Sea of Japan and Yellow Sea on east coast of Asia. In 1948, the kingdom ceased and two independent countries were formed, divided by the 38th parallel.Hyperbilirubinemia, Neonatal: Accumulation of BILIRUBIN, a breakdown product of HEME PROTEINS, in the BLOOD during the first weeks of life. This may lead to NEONATAL JAUNDICE. The excess bilirubin may exist in the unconjugated (indirect) or the conjugated (direct) form. The condition may be self-limiting (PHYSIOLOGICAL NEONATAL JAUNDICE) or pathological with toxic levels of bilirubin.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Military Personnel: Persons including soldiers involved with the armed forces.Breast Feeding: The nursing of an infant at the breast.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Periodontics: A dental specialty concerned with the histology, physiology, and pathology of the tissues that support, attach, and surround the teeth, and of the treatment and prevention of disease affecting these tissues.Vaccines: Suspensions of killed or attenuated microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa), antigenic proteins, synthetic constructs, or other bio-molecular derivatives, administered for the prevention, amelioration, or treatment of infectious and other diseases.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Academic Medical Centers: Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Brain Ischemia: Localized reduction of blood flow to brain tissue due to arterial obstruction or systemic hypoperfusion. This frequently occurs in conjunction with brain hypoxia (HYPOXIA, BRAIN). Prolonged ischemia is associated with BRAIN INFARCTION.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Sudden Infant Death: The abrupt and unexplained death of an apparently healthy infant under one year of age, remaining unexplained after a thorough case investigation, including performance of a complete autopsy, examination of the death scene, and review of the clinical history. (Pediatr Pathol 1991 Sep-Oct;11(5):677-84)Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Education: Acquisition of knowledge as a result of instruction in a formal course of study.TexasClinical Laboratory Techniques: Techniques used to carry out clinical investigative procedures in the diagnosis and therapy of disease.Leg Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the leg.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.IllinoisPreservatives, Pharmaceutical: Substances added to pharmaceutical preparations to protect them from chemical change or microbial action. They include ANTI-BACTERIAL AGENTS and antioxidants.MarylandDatabases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Ophthalmology: A surgical specialty concerned with the structure and function of the eye and the medical and surgical treatment of its defects and diseases.WisconsinWest VirginiaForecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Safety: Freedom from exposure to danger and protection from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. It suggests optimal precautions in the workplace, on the street, in the home, etc., and includes personal safety as well as the safety of property.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Meniere Disease: A disease of the inner ear (LABYRINTH) that is characterized by fluctuating SENSORINEURAL HEARING LOSS; TINNITUS; episodic VERTIGO; and aural fullness. It is the most common form of endolymphatic hydrops.National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It seeks to improve oral, dental and craniofacial health through research, research training, and the dissemination of health information by conducting and supporting basic and clinical research. It was established in 1948 as the National Institute of Dental Research and re-named in 1998 as the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Inservice Training: On the job training programs for personnel carried out within an institution or agency. It includes orientation programs.Licensure: The legal authority or formal permission from authorities to carry on certain activities which by law or regulation require such permission. It may be applied to licensure of institutions as well as individuals.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Child Restraint Systems: Devices used to protect and restrain infant and child automotive passengers.Mass Media: Instruments or technological means of communication that reach large numbers of people with a common message: press, radio, television, etc.Library Science: Study of the principles and practices of library administration and services.Societies, Pharmaceutical: Societies whose membership is limited to pharmacists.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It conducts research focused on improving the treatment and prevention of alcoholism and alcohol-related problems to reduce the health, social, and economic consequences of this disease. NIAAA, NIMH, and NIDA were created as coequal institutes within the Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Administration in 1974. It was established within the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH in 1992.Vaccination: Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.Pediatric Dentistry: The practice of dentistry concerned with the dental problems of children, proper maintenance, and treatment. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Nutrition Policy: Guidelines and objectives pertaining to food supply and nutrition including recommendations for healthy diet.Infant Equipment: Equipment and furniture used by infants and babies in the home, car, and play area.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.EuropePatient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.): An agency of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that conducts and supports programs for the prevention and control of disease and provides consultation and assistance to health departments and other countries.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Polysomnography: Simultaneous and continuous monitoring of several parameters during sleep to study normal and abnormal sleep. The study includes monitoring of brain waves, to assess sleep stages, and other physiological variables such as breathing, eye movements, and blood oxygen levels which exhibit a disrupted pattern with sleep disturbances.Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine: A combined vaccine used to prevent MEASLES; MUMPS; and RUBELLA.BrazilEducation, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Government Agencies: Administrative units of government responsible for policy making and management of governmental activities.Quality Control: A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of children from birth to 2 years of age.Adoption: Voluntary acceptance of a child of other parents to be as one's own child, usually with legal confirmation.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Seizures, Febrile: Seizures that occur during a febrile episode. It is a common condition, affecting 2-5% of children aged 3 months to five years. An autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance has been identified in some families. The majority are simple febrile seizures (generally defined as generalized onset, single seizures with a duration of less than 30 minutes). Complex febrile seizures are characterized by focal onset, duration greater than 30 minutes, and/or more than one seizure in a 24 hour period. The likelihood of developing epilepsy (i.e., a nonfebrile seizure disorder) following simple febrile seizures is low. Complex febrile seizures are associated with a moderately increased incidence of epilepsy. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p784)Tissue Plasminogen Activator: A proteolytic enzyme in the serine protease family found in many tissues which converts PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN. It has fibrin-binding activity and is immunologically different from UROKINASE-TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR. The primary sequence, composed of 527 amino acids, is identical in both the naturally occurring and synthetic proteases.Teaching Materials: Instructional materials used in teaching.Soccer: A game in which a round inflated ball is advanced by kicking or propelling with any part of the body except the hands or arms. The object of the game is to place the ball in opposite goals.Developmental Disabilities: Disorders in which there is a delay in development based on that expected for a given age level or stage of development. These impairments or disabilities originate before age 18, may be expected to continue indefinitely, and constitute a substantial impairment. Biological and nonbiological factors are involved in these disorders. (From American Psychiatric Glossary, 6th ed)Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Child Day Care Centers: Facilities which provide care for pre-school and school-age children.Formularies as Topic: Works about lists of drugs or collections of recipes, formulas, and prescriptions for the compounding of medicinal preparations. Formularies differ from PHARMACOPOEIAS in that they are less complete, lacking full descriptions of the drugs, their formulations, analytic composition, chemical properties, etc. In hospitals, formularies list all drugs commonly stocked in the hospital pharmacy.Child Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological maturing of an individual from birth up to but not including ADOLESCENCE.Prone Position: The posture of an individual lying face down.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Drug Monitoring: The process of observing, recording, or detecting the effects of a chemical substance administered to an individual therapeutically or diagnostically.Emergency Medical Services: Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Translational Medical Research: The application of discoveries generated by laboratory research and preclinical studies to the development of clinical trials and studies in humans. A second area of translational research concerns enhancing the adoption of best practices.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Jaundice, Neonatal: Yellow discoloration of the SKIN; MUCOUS MEMBRANE; and SCLERA in the NEWBORN. It is a sign of NEONATAL HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA. Most cases are transient self-limiting (PHYSIOLOGICAL NEONATAL JAUNDICE) occurring in the first week of life, but some can be a sign of pathological disorders, particularly LIVER DISEASES.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Contusions: Injuries resulting in hemorrhage, usually manifested in the skin.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Schools, Pharmacy: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of pharmacy.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Infant Formula: Liquid formulations for the nutrition of infants that can substitute for BREAST MILK.
(1/422) Burnet Oration: living in the Burnet lineage.

Scientific discoveries are not made in isolation. Innovation depends on resources, both intellectual and physical. A primary requirement is the development and maintenance of appropriate institutions. Such structures do not emerge by chance, but arise from opportunity, political will and the continued efforts and commitment of many people over long periods. Suitable buildings, laboratories and state-of-the-art equipment are obviously necessary, but hardware alone is of little value in the absence of a vibrant research culture. The key characteristics of the latter are intellectual foment, open debate and a body of wisdom and knowledge about the particular subject area. Rolf Zinkernagel and 1 played a part in triggering a paradigm shift in the understanding of T cell recognition, a contribution recognized by the 1996 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine. In our Nobel lectures, we both discussed briefly why it was that the John Curtin School of Medical Research (JCSMR) of 1973-75 provided a milieu that facilitated the emergence of the underlying experiments and ideas. My intention here is to discuss in more detail the scientific lineages that put this physical and intellectual environment in place, focusing particularly on the influence of Sir Frank Macfarlane (Sir Mac) Burnet as we celebrate his centenary year.  (+info)

(2/422) Informatics at the National Institutes of Health: a call to action.

Biomedical informatics, imaging, and engineering are major forces driving the knowledge revolutions that are shaping the agendas for biomedical research and clinical medicine in the 21st century. These disciplines produce the tools and techniques to advance biomedical research, and continually feed new technologies and procedures into clinical medicine. To sustain this force, an increased investment is needed in the physics, biomedical science, engineering, mathematics, information science, and computer science undergirding biomedical informatics, engineering, and imaging. This investment should be made primarily through the National Institutes of Health (NIH). However, the NIH is not structured to support such disciplines as biomedical informatics, engineering, and imaging that cross boundaries between disease- and organ-oriented institutes. The solution to this dilemma is the creation of a new institute or center at the NIH devoted to biomedical imaging, engineering, and informatics. Bills are being introduced into the 106th Congress to authorize such an entity. The pathway is long and arduous, from the introduction of bills in the House and Senate to the realization of new opportunities for biomedical informatics, engineering, and imaging at the NIH. There are many opportunities for medical informaticians to contribute to this realization.  (+info)

(3/422) Health related research in Bangladesh: MEDLINE based analysis.

BACKGROUND: Health research is not a priority sector in Bangladesh. By and large, physicians and academicians are neither interested nor are they properly trained to conduct quality research. The objective of this study is to quantify the volume of researches related to health in Bangladesh with a view to propose remedial measures. METHODS: Data regarding health research, originating from Bangladesh during the period of 1990-1996, were extracted from MEDLINE database using certain inclusion criteria. Data on name of the institution, main author (Bangladeshi or foreigner), country of publication, and research topics were abstracted and analyzed using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: A total of 580 (on average 83 per year) articles met the inclusion criteria. About two-third (64.0%) of the researches were from International Center for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh, followed by Institute of Post Graduate Medicine & Research with 5.7%. Seven medical colleges and one dental college collectively contributed 5.8%. Infectious diseases was the single largest (54.8%) topic dealt with, followed by non-infectious diseases (7.7%), and nutrition and nutrition-related diseases (6.9%). CONCLUSION: The number of research articles from Bangladesh is very small possibly owing to the lack of proper training and funding shortage. Incorporating research methodology in both graduate and postgraduate medical education, appointing researchers in clinical and academic departments and allocating more funding towards research activities are necessary to boost health related research activities in Bangladesh.  (+info)

(4/422) A treasure house of comparative embryology.

The Embryo Collection of the Hubrecht Laboratory is a treasure house of comparative embryology. It is the largest and most important collection of its kind in the world, and consists of thousands of vertebrate embryos stored in alcohol, or prepared as histological sections. Many elusive species are included in the collection, some represented by complete developmental series. The accompanying archives offer a remarkable insight into the methods used to collect embryos form wild animals, as well as the motives behind the founders of the collection. Carefully maintained, documented and catalogued, the collection is available for study by all interested scientists. We argue that this collection is one of the greatest biodiversity resources in existence.  (+info)

(5/422) The EFQM excellence model: European and Dutch experiences with the EFQM approach in health care. European Foundation for Quality Management.

One way to meet the challenges in creating a high performance organization in health care is the approach of the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM). The Foundation is in the tradition of the American Malcolm Baldrige Award and was initiated by the European Commission and 14 European multi-national organizations in 1988. The essence of the approach is the EFQM Model, which can be used as a self-assessment instrument on all levels of a health care organization and as an auditing instrument for the Quality Award. In 1999 the EFQM Model was revised but its principles remained the same. In The Netherlands many health care organizations apply the EFQM Model. In addition to improvement projects, peer review of professional practices, accreditation and certification, the EFQM Approach is used mainly as a framework for quality management and as a conceptualization for organizational excellence. The Dutch National Institute for Quality, the Instituut Nederlandse Kwaliteit, delivers training and supports self-assessment and runs the Dutch quality award programme. Two specific guidelines for health care organizations, 'Positioning and Improving' and 'Self-Assessment', have been developed and are used frequently. To illustrate the EFQM approach in The Netherlands, the improvement project of the Jellinek Centre is described. The Jellinek Centre conducted internal and external assessments and received in 1996, as the first health care organization, the Dutch Quality Prize.  (+info)

(6/422) A national survey of policies on disclosure of conflicts of interest in biomedical research.

BACKGROUND: Conflicts of interest pose a threat to the integrity of scientific research. The current regulations of the U.S. Public Health Service and the National Science Foundation require that medical schools and other research institutions report the existence of conflicts of interest to the funding agency but allow the institutions to manage conflicts internally. The regulations do not specify how to do so. METHODS: We surveyed all medical schools (127) and other research institutions (170) that received more than $5 million in total grants annually from the National Institutes of Health or the National Science Foundation; 48 journals in basic science and clinical medicine; and 17 federal agencies in order to analyze their policies on conflicts of interest. RESULTS: Of the 297 institutions, 250 (84 percent) responded by March 2000, as did 47 of the 48 journals and 16 of the 17 federal agencies. Fifteen of the 250 institutions (6 percent)--5 medical schools and 10 other research institutions--reported that they had no policy on conflicts of interest. Among the institutions that had policies, there was marked variation in the definition and management of conflicts. Ninety-one percent had policies that adhered to the federal threshold for disclosure ($10,000 in annual income or equity in a relevant company or 5 percent ownership), and 9 percent had policies that exceeded the federal guidelines. Only 8 percent had policies requiring disclosure to funding agencies, only 7 percent had such policies regarding journals, and only 1 percent had policies requiring the disclosure of information to the relevant institutional review boards or to research subjects. Twenty journals (43 percent) reported that they had policies requiring disclosure of conflicts of interest. Only four federal agencies had policies that explicitly addressed conflicts of interest in extramural research, and all but one of the agencies relied primarily on institutional discretion. CONCLUSIONS: There is substantial variation among policies on conflicts of interest at medical schools and other research institutions. This variation, combined with the fact that many scientific journals and funding agencies do not require disclosure of conflicts of interest, suggests that the current standards may not be adequate to maintain a high level of scientific integrity.  (+info)

(7/422) Community outreach at biomedical research facilities.

For biomedical researchers to fulfill their responsibility for protecting the environment, they must do more than meet the scientific challenge of reducing the number and volume of hazardous materials used in their laboratories and the engineering challenge of reducing pollution and shifting to cleaner energy sources. They must also meet the public relations challenge of informing and involving their neighbors in these efforts. The experience of the Office of Community Liaison of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in meeting the latter challenge offers a model and several valuable lessons for other biomedical research facilities to follow. This paper is based on presentations by an expert panel during the Leadership Conference on Biomedical Research and the Environment held 1--2 November 1999 at NIH, Bethesda, Maryland. The risks perceived by community members are often quite different from those identified by officials at the biomedical research facility. The best antidote for misconceptions is more and better information. If community organizations are to be informed participants in the decision-making process, they need a simple but robust mechanism for identifying and evaluating the environmental hazards in their community. Local government can and should be an active and fully informed partner in planning and emergency preparedness. In some cases this can reduce the regulatory burden on the biomedical research facility. In other cases it might simplify and expedite the permitting process or help the facility disseminate reliable information to the community. When a particular risk, real or perceived, is of special concern to the community, community members should be involved in the design, implementation, and evaluation of targeted risk assessment activities. Only by doing so will the community have confidence in the results of those activities. NIH has involved community members in joint efforts to deal with topics as varied as recycling and soil testing. These ad hoc efforts are more likely to succeed if community members and groups have also been included in larger and longer term advisory committees. These committees institutionalize the outreach process. This can provide the facility with vocal and influential allies who create an independent line of communication with the larger community.  (+info)

(8/422) Diet quality, nutrient intake, weight status, and feeding environments of girls meeting or exceeding recommendations for total dietary fat of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

OBJECTIVES: To compare the diet quality and weight status of girls consuming diets meeting the recommendation of the American Academy of Pediatrics for dietary fat with those of girls consuming >30% of energy from fat and to examine relationships between girls' dietary fat intake, mothers' nutrient intakes, and mothers' child-feeding practices. DESIGN: Participants were 192 white girls and their mothers, who were divided into 2 groups: >30% of energy from fat (high fat [HF]) or +info)

*  U. C. Chaturvedi
Indian Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Sciences, India and the Indian National Science Academy as well as the Royal ... 216-. ISBN 978-1-4020-6795-2. "Intramural CME on Encephalitis". Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences. 2003 ... "Fellow profile". Indian Academy of Sciences. 2016. "NASI fellows". National Academy of Sciences, India. 2016. "Indian fellow". ... The year 1987 brought him two elected fellowships; that of the Indian National Science Academy and the National Academy of ...
*  Reelin
Bordo neuroscience institute. Sinagra M, Verrier D, Frankova D, Korwek KM, Blahos J, Weeber EJ, Manzoni OJ, Chavis P (Jun 2005 ... Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 95 (6): 3221-6. doi:10.1073/pnas.95.6.3221. ... Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 96 (6): 3217-22. doi:10.1073/pnas.96.6.3217. ... Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 97 (3): 1281-6. doi:10.1073/pnas.97.3.1281. ...
*  Amitabha Mukhopadhyay
National Institute of Immunology, India. 2017-11-25. Retrieved 2017-11-25. "Fellow profile". Indian Academy of Sciences. 2017- ... He is known for his studies on host-pathogens interaction and drug discovery and is an elected fellow of the Indian Academy of ... "NASI fellows". National Academy of Sciences, India. 2017-11-12. Retrieved 2017-11-12. "Brief Profile of the Awardee". Shanti ... Subsequently, he joined the National Institute of Immunology, India where he holds the position of a professor. He also serves ...
*  Sleep medicine
American Academy of Sleep Medicine, 2005. National Academy of Sciences: Institute of Medicine (US) Committee on Sleep Medicine ... The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM), founded in 1978, administered the certification process and sleep medicine ... 2004 American Academy of Sleep Medicine. The International Classification of Sleep Disorders: Diagnostic and Coding Manual. 2nd ... Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 2006. Chapter 5 (full text): Improving Awareness, Diagnosis, and Treatment of ...
*  Kirpal Singh Chugh
A member of the Advisory Board of World Kidney Forum and an elected Fellow of the National Academy of Medical Sciences, he was ... at the Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh . Born on 12 December 1932, Chugh won many awards ... "List of Fellows - NAMS" (PDF). National Academy of Medical Sciences. 2016. Retrieved March 19, 2016. "Padma Awards" (PDF). ...
*  Naval Academy Research Institute
The Naval Academy Research Institute (in French : Institut de recherche de l'École navale), also known as IRENav, is a French ... The institute is part of the Carnot Institute ARTS and currently employs more than 70 persons. It is also involved in the ... the institute has been developing new marine turbines since 2011. The IRENav teams also study ways of improvement for the sails ... Energy and fluid dynamics Acoustics and submarine transmissions The institute is divided in two research teams, which have ...
*  Paleontological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences
The Paleontological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences (PIN; Russian: Палеонтологический институт РАН) in Moscow is among ... An affiliate of the Russian Academy of Sciences, it includes collections from all over the former Soviet Union, as well as from ... The Museum of Paleontology named after Yuri Alexandrovich Orlov is run by the Institute, and contains public exhibits ... Paleontological Institute pages at the University of California Museum of Paleontology website Coordinates: 55°37.4333′N 37° ...
*  Astronomical Institute of Czech Academy of Sciences
The Astronomical Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences was founded in 1954. Currently, it has its headquarters in Ondřejov ... Astronomical Institute of Slovak Academy of Sciences Department of theoretical physics and astrophysics of Masaryk University ... The Astronomical Institute is a direct descendant of an observatory founded at the beginning of 18th century by Jesuits in the ... The institute is focused on stellar, solar and galactic astronomy, research of meteors and motion of cosmic bodies. It has ...
*  Astronomical Institute of Slovak Academy of Sciences
Astronomical Institute of Czech Academy of Sciences Ondřejov Observatory Institute of physics of the University of Pavol Jozef ... Bečvář) got a status of astronomical institute and became one of the founding institutes of the newly born Slovakian Academy of ... The Astronomical Institute of Slovak Academy of Sciences was founded in 1953, when the state observatory on Skalnaté Pleso ( ... The institute has mountain observatories at Skalnaté Pleso, Lomnický štít and a theoretical department in Bratislava (founded ...
*  Energy Research Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences
Founded in July 1985, the Energy Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (ERIRAS) was originally an outgrowth of ... At present, Academician Aleksei Aleksandrovich Makarov is the director of the Institute. The Institute employs approximately 80 ... The Institute's mission is to find solutions to a wide range of contemporary challenges including: efficient energy production ... The first director of ERIRAS was Lev Aleksandrovich Milentyev, an Academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences. ...
*  Modern Art Research Institute of Ukrainian Academy of Arts
... (Ukrainian: Інститут Проблем Cучасного Mистецтва України) is a ... Ukrainian Academy of Arts The Messenger of Ukrainian Academy of Arts (Вісник Академії мистецтв України.) -- К., 2007. Enactment ... Official Modern Art Research Institute of Ukrainian Academy of Arts website. ... Ukrainian Academy of Arts (Kiev), Национальная академия изобразительного искусства и архитектуры (Киев), Stichting Cultural Aid ...
*  Partnership for Peace Consortium of Defense Academies and Security Studies Institutes
According to the PfPC Annual Report of 2012, in 2012 eight hundred defense academies and security studies institutes in 59 ... The Partnership for Peace Consortium is a network of over 800 defense academies and security studies institutes across 60 ... throughout the Euro-Atlantic region to include not only governmental defense academies and security studies institutes, but ... also other governmental, non-governmental, and private organizations whether they are institutes, agencies or universities ...
*  FIA Institute Young Driver Excellence Academy
The FIA Institute Young Driver Excellence Academy is a programme founded by the FIA Institute for Motor Sport Safety and ... FIA Institute for Motor Sport Safety and Sustainability FIA Institute Young Driver Excellence Academy on Twitter. ... "Drivers Chosen for 2012 FIA Institute Academy". fiainstitute.com. FIA Institute. 2011-11-18. Archived from the original on 2011 ... Missing or empty ,title= (help) "FIA Institute selects 30 young drivers for academy shootout". formula1.com. Formula One ...
*  Institute for Spectroscopy Russian Academy of Sciences
Institute for Spectroscopy is co-founder of EU Virtual Institute of Nano-Films Institute for Spectroscopy of Russian Academy of ... The Institute for Spectroscopy Russian Academy of Sciences (ISAN) (in some sources the abbreviation used is ISAS, IS RAS) is a ... Web-page of seminar[permanent dead link] Web-page of Personov seminar Institute for Spectroscopy Russian Academy of Sciences ... Institute for Spectroscopy of Soviet Union Academy of Sciences) was founded in 1968 on the basis of laboratory of Spectroscopy ...
*  Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences
Institute of Botany, the Chinese Academy of Sciences (IB-CAS; Chinese: 中国科学院植物研究所; pinyin: Zhōngguó Kēxuéyuàn Zhíwù Yánjiūsuǒ) ... Institute of Botany. "Introduction to the Institute of Botany". ... The institute has received three first-level National Natural ... Since 2011, the institute has launched a new international project, Flora of the Pan-Himalaya, which is expected to address ... The institute has postdoctoral research programs in both biology and ecology. So far, over 1,500 students have graduated from ...
*  Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences
The Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CASIA, Chinese: 自动化研究所; pinyin: Zìdònghuà Yánjiūsuǒ) is a research ... lab belonging to the Chinese Academy of Sciences which researches robotics, pattern recognition and control theory. Meinü robot ...
*  Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences
The Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), focuses on biophysically oriented basic research in the life ... The main research focus of the Institute is on the fields of protein science and brain & cognitive sciences. The Institute has ... The achievements of the Institute in terms of awards, publications, patents and applied research maintain the Institute at the ... The Institute has a research team, with about 400 staff members, 500 graduate students and 60 visiting scholars and post-docs. ...
*  Institute of Software, Chinese Academy of Sciences
... (IOS, or ISCAS, simplified Chinese: 中国科学院软件研究所; pinyin: Zhōngguó Kēxuéyuàn ... is one of institutes that Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) established. It was established on March 1, 1985. It's on the 4th ...
*  Institute of Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences
The research activities of the Institute of Chemistry of the Slovak Academy of Sciences are aimed at the chemistry and ...
*  Institute of Philosophy, Russian Academy of Sciences
The Institute of Philosophy was founded as the Institute of Scientific Philosophy in 1921 by Gustav Shpet, who was its first ... however philosophers such as Semyon Frank and Ivan Ilyin attempted to set up temporary courses at the new institute. However, ...
*  Nuclear Physics Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences
The second largest part the Nuclear Physics Institute of the CAS remains under the Academy of Sciences. Former Institute of ... In 1955 the Nuclear Research Institute CSAS (originally called the Nuclear Physics Institute of the Czechoslovak Academy of ... The Nuclear Physics Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences (Czech: Ústav Jaderné Fyziky Akademie věd ČR) is a public ... The Czech Academy of Sciences official website, Retrieved November 28, 2015 Nuclear Physics Institute of the CAS official ...
*  Mammal Research Institute of the Polish Academy of Sciences
The Mammal Research Institute of the Polish Academy of Sciences (MRI) (Polish: Zakład Badania Ssaków Polskiej Akademii Nauk) is ... Since 2003 the Institute has attained status as a European Union Centre of Excellence and in 2006 was assessed as one of the ... The Mammal Research Institute was founded in 1952 and is an independent research institution of the Biology Department of the ... The Institute pursues its mission by conducting research on all aspects of mammalian biology, publishing in renowned scientific ...
*  Academy of Our Lady/Spalding Institute
... in 1973. AOL/SI (also known as Academy/Spalding) was merged with Bergan High School to ... Academy of Our Lady and Spalding Institute were Catholic high schools across the street from each other in downtown Peoria, ... The Academy (AOL), a girls' school, traced its lineage back to 1863. The Spalding Institute (SI), the boys' school, was founded ...
*  Academy of Sciences of the Institute of Bologna
The Academy of Sciences of the Institute of Bologna (Accademia delle Scienze dell'Istituto di Bologna) is an academic society ... The institute helped pull Bologna out of its provincial isolation, reengaging with centers such as the French Academy of ... In 1704 the academy acquired a more formal structure with the appointment of a president and a secretary. In 1705 the academy ... In 1907, the academy admitted legal scholars for the first time. Under the Fascist regime, the academy played a leading role in ...
*  Institute of Archaeology, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences
The Institute of Archaeology (IA; Chinese: 中国社会科学院考古研究所) is a constituent institute of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences ( ... "Introduction of the Institute of Archaeology, CASS". Institute of Archaeology, CASS. 2005-04-28. "About IA CASS". Institute of ... Its original 20 or so researchers came from the Beiping Research Academy and the Institute of History and Philology, Academia ... The institute is also responsible for the Department of Archaeology of the Graduate School of CASS. The institute publishes ...
*  David F. Swensen
... the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Courtauld Institute of Art, the Yale-New Haven Hospital, The Investment Fund for ... he was awarded the American Academy of Arts & Sciences Fellowship and the year prior, the Mory's Cup for "conspicuous service ...
*  Institute of Mathematics (National Academy of Sciences of Belarus)
The Institute of Mathematics of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus was founded in 1959. It is headquartered in Minsk, ...
Press Release: Institute of Medicine to Become National Academy of Medicine : Health and Medicine Division  Press Release: Institute of Medicine to Become National Academy of Medicine : Health and Medicine Division
... the membership of the National Academy of Sciences voted to change the name of the Institute of Medicine to the National ... The National Academy of Medicine will join the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering in advising the ... Institute of Medicine to Become National Academy of Medicine. WASHINGTON - Today, at its 152nd annual meeting, the membership ... Today's vote amends the NAS constitution to change the name of the Institute of Medicine to the National Academy of Medicine, ...
more infohttp://nationalacademies.org/hmd/Global/News%20Announcements/IOM-to-become-NAM-Press-Release.aspx
Academy Institutes Research Fund awards for third time - KNAW  Academy Institutes Research Fund awards for third time - KNAW
... the Academy Institutes Research Fund has awarded grants to three new research proposals. The three proposals are an historical ... The Young Academy Working for the Academy Talent development at the Academy History of the Academy The Trippenhuis Academy ... The Young Academy Working for the Academy Talent development at the Academy History of the Academy The Trippenhuis Academy ... Two Academy institutes, Huygens ING and the International Institute of Social History (IISH), are planning to join forces in a ...
more infohttps://www.knaw.nl/en/news/news/academy-institutes-research-fund-awards-for-third-time
Naval Academy Research Institute - Wikipedia  Naval Academy Research Institute - Wikipedia
The Naval Academy Research Institute (in French : Institut de recherche de l'École navale), also known as IRENav, is a French ... The institute is part of the Carnot Institute ARTS and currently employs more than 70 persons. It is also involved in the ... the institute has been developing new marine turbines since 2011. The IRENav teams also study ways of improvement for the sails ... Energy and fluid dynamics Acoustics and submarine transmissions The institute is divided in two research teams, which have ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naval_Academy_Research_Institute
Taiwan Academy - Walker Institute | University of South Carolina  Taiwan Academy - Walker Institute | University of South Carolina
Our institute signed a contract with Taiwan government for becoming one of the 200 Taiwan Academy contact points. ... Taiwan Academy includes three major missions:. *Promoting Mandarin Chinese instruction and traditional Chinese characters. You ... Taiwan Academy. We're a platform for the international community to learn about the comprehensive development and ... Taiwan Academy also plans to offer high quality cultural performances and learning activities in their resource centers, ...
more infohttps://sc.edu/study/colleges_schools/artsandsciences/walker_institute/area_studies/center_for_asian_studies/taiwan_academy/index.php
Leadership Institute | American Academy of Dermatology  Leadership Institute | American Academy of Dermatology
The Leadership Institute is an Academy initiative that provides training, mentoring, and networking opportunities to help ... Leadership Institute The Leadership Institute (LI) is an Academy initiative that provides training, mentoring, and networking ... Learn more about the Leadership Institute's stand-alone programs as well as sessions at Annual and Summer Academy Meetings.. ... Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Dermatology. All rights reserved.. Reproduction or republication strictly prohibited ...
more infohttps://www.aad.org/members/leadership-institute
Paleontological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences - Wikipedia  Paleontological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences - Wikipedia
The Paleontological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences (PIN; Russian: Палеонтологический институт РАН) in Moscow is among ... An affiliate of the Russian Academy of Sciences, it includes collections from all over the former Soviet Union, as well as from ... The Museum of Paleontology named after Yuri Alexandrovich Orlov is run by the Institute, and contains public exhibits ... Paleontological Institute pages at the University of California Museum of Paleontology website Coordinates: 55°37.4333′N 37° ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paleontological_Institute,_Russian_Academy_of_Sciences
Beef Cattle Institute director named Academy of Veterinary Consultants president  Beef Cattle Institute director named Academy of Veterinary Consultants president
... *Ten graduate students earn scholarships at ... Brad White, director of the Beef Cattle Institute at K-State, was named president of the Academy of Veterinary Consultants at ... Beef Cattle Institute director named Academy of Veterinary Consultants president. By Audrey Hambright ...
more infohttp://www.k-state.edu/today/announcement.php?id=33697
FACES 2018 Summer Medical Academy - Public Health Institute  FACES 2018 Summer Medical Academy - Public Health Institute
During the two-week academy, FSMA students are exposed to clinical skills training, gross anatomy and pathology workshops, ... This year's Academy took place in July, and it was a huge success! 45 high school students were able to take part in this one ... The summer academy gave students the opportunity to see where the rubber hits the road. "FSMA helped me realize that healthcare ... FACES 2018 Summer Medical Academy. August 15, 2018 , FACES for the Future Coalition , Adapted from the FACES for Future ...
more infohttp://phi.org/news-events/1481/faces-2018-summer-medical-academy
Sulzberger Institute grant | American Academy of Dermatology  Sulzberger Institute grant | American Academy of Dermatology
The Sulzberger Institute for Dermatologic Education provides grant support for innovative initiatives in education and ... Sulzberger Institute Grant The Sulzberger Institute for Dermatologic Education, part of the American Academy of Dermatology, ... the part of the value equal to the initial contribution of the Sulzberger Institute will be payable to the Sulzberger Institute ... The Sulzberger Institute is not interested in funding commercial, for-profit organizations. Note: Should any funded projects ...
more infohttps://www.aad.org/members/awards-grants-and-scholarships/sulzberger-institute-grant
The Dartmouth Institute | Microsystem Academy  The Dartmouth Institute | Microsystem Academy
The Jönköping Academy, Sweden. Qulturum, Jönköping, Sweden. QRC Coaching Academy, Stockholm, Sweden. Cystic Fibrosis, Canada. ... Sheffield Microsystem Coaching Academy, UK. St. James's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. ...
more infohttp://www.clinicalmicrosystem.org
The Dartmouth Institute | Microsystem Academy  The Dartmouth Institute | Microsystem Academy
Ashleigh is a Program Coordinator with The Dartmouth Institute Microsystem Academy (TDIMA). Her current program coordination ... Ashleigh is enrolled in the Master's in Public Health program at The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical ...
more infohttp://clinicalmicrosystem.org/about/people/ashleigh-king
The Dartmouth Institute | Microsystem Academy  The Dartmouth Institute | Microsystem Academy
Maria is a Program Coordinator with The Dartmouth Institute Microsystem Academy (TDIMA). Her current program coordination and ...
more infohttp://clinicalmicrosystem.org/about/people/maria-scopeletti
Frank Rijkaard Appointed Advisor of Player Development for New Soccer Institute at Montverde Academy  Frank Rijkaard Appointed Advisor of Player Development for New Soccer Institute at Montverde Academy
Montverde Academy officially announces that former F.C. Barcelona and Dutch National Team Manager, Frank Rijkaard, has ... I feel as though The Soccer Institute at Montverde Academy will offer a superior life experience for talented youth, and I ... "After visiting the campus in July, I feel as though The Soccer Institute at Montverde Academy will offer a superior life ... For further information about the Soccer Institute at Montverde Academy, please contact Mike Potempa, at mike.potempa(at) ...
more infohttp://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/8/prweb11011827.htm
Gallery Talk: Female Painters and the French Academy | The Art Institute of Chicago  Gallery Talk: Female Painters and the French Academy | The Art Institute of Chicago
The French Academy orchestrated artistic production from the 17th to the late 19th century, an era of great political and ... Van Gogh's Bedrooms at the Art Institute of Chicago - Duration: 111 seconds. ...
more infohttp://www.artic.edu/event/gallery-talk-female-painters-and-french-academy
AXON REGISTRY Trademark of AMERICAN ACADEMY OF NEUROLOGY INSTITUTE Serial Number: 86516805 :: Trademarkia Trademarks  AXON REGISTRY Trademark of AMERICAN ACADEMY OF NEUROLOGY INSTITUTE Serial Number: 86516805 :: Trademarkia Trademarks
AXON REGISTRY is a trademark and brand of AMERICAN ACADEMY OF NEUROLOGY INSTITUTE. Filed to USPTO On Wednesday, January 28, ... AMERICAN ACADEMY OF NEUROLOGY INSTITUTE. Continuing education services for physicians, namely, providing a database in the ... Or, contact the owner AMERICAN ACADEMY OF NEUROLOGY INSTITUTE of the AXON REGISTRY trademark by filing a request to communicate ... This is a brand page for the AXON REGISTRY trademark by AMERICAN ACADEMY OF NEUROLOGY INSTITUTE in MINNEAPOLIS, MN, 55415. ...
more infohttps://www.trademarkia.com/axon-registry-86516805.html
Polish Academy of Sciences - Institute of Physical Chemistry | Nanowerk  Polish Academy of Sciences - Institute of Physical Chemistry | Nanowerk
Here are details for Polish Academy of Sciences - Institute of Physical Chemistry ... Polish Academy of Sciences - Institute of Physical Chemistry The Department of Soft Condensed Matter deals with research topics ...
more infohttps://www.nanowerk.com/nanotechnology-labs.php?url2=Polish_Academy_of_Sciences_Institute_of_Physical_Chemistry.php
Astronomical Institute of Czech Academy of Sciences - Wikipedia  Astronomical Institute of Czech Academy of Sciences - Wikipedia
The Astronomical Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences was founded in 1954. Currently, it has its headquarters in Ondřejov ... Astronomical Institute of Slovak Academy of Sciences Department of theoretical physics and astrophysics of Masaryk University ... The Astronomical Institute is a direct descendant of an observatory founded at the beginning of 18th century by Jesuits in the ... The institute is focused on stellar, solar and galactic astronomy, research of meteors and motion of cosmic bodies. It has ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astronomical_Institute_of_Czech_Academy_of_Sciences
American Academy McAllister Institute of Funeral Service - Niche  American Academy McAllister Institute of Funeral Service - Niche
Explore American Academy McAllister Institute of Funeral Service reviews, rankings, and statistics. Is it the right college for ... Do You Work at American Academy McAllister Institute of Funeral Service? Claim Your College Today! ...
more infohttps://www.niche.com/colleges/american-academy-mcallister-institute-of-funeral-service/
SANS Institute Launches the SANS CyberTalent Immersion Academy for Women | SANS Institute: Press  SANS Institute Launches the SANS CyberTalent Immersion Academy for Women | SANS Institute: Press
SANS Institute. "The women's academy builds on the success of SANS' VetSuccess Immersion Academy for transitioning veterans. ... SANS Institute Launches the SANS CyberTalent Immersion Academy for Women. Accelerated Program Aims to Increase the Number of ... SANS Institute, the global leader in information security training today announced the SANS CyberTalent Immersion Academy for ... About SANS Institute. The SANS Institute was established in 1989 as a cooperative research and education organization. SANS is ...
more infohttps://www.sans.org/press/announcement/2015/10/08/1
  • During the two-week academy, FSMA students are exposed to clinical skills training, anatomy and pathology workshops, clinical simulation scenarios, problem-based learning, and workshops in patient centered care models. (phi.org)
  • Montverde Academy officially announces that former F.C. Barcelona and Dutch National Team Manager, Frank Rijkaard, has been appointed official ambassador and advisor of player development for The Soccer Institute at Montverde Academy (S.I.M.A.). A legendary player for AFC Ajax and A.C. Milan, Rijkaard brings a wealth of knowledge and international experience as both a player and manager to participants enrolled at Montverde Academy. (prweb.com)
  • Ashleigh is enrolled in the Master's in Public Health program at The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice the Fall of 2016 with an aim of linking health care systems and improvement to engineering to discover new innovation and designs. (clinicalmicrosystem.org)
  • The SANS Technology Institute, a regionally accredited independent subsidiary, offers master's degrees in cyber security . (sans.org)
  • Founded in 2005, the FACES Summer Medical Academy (FSMA) is a tuition-based, intensive summer day experience designed to expose high school students to the fields of medicine, nursing, and allied health professions. (phi.org)
  • These include not "publishing the content in any media," which could make it difficult to utilize the curriculum offerings (a principal point of the institute, or so it seems). (wordpress.com)
  • We are delighted to have a new voice from Weill Cornell join the ranks of the Institute of Medicine," says Dr. Laurie H. Glimcher, the Stephen and Suzanne Weiss Dean of Weill Cornell Medical College and Provost for Medical Affairs at Cornell University. (newswise.com)
  • The Museum of Paleontology named after Yuri Alexandrovich Orlov is run by the Institute, and contains public exhibits representing almost every type of fossil organism. (wikipedia.org)
  • The purpose of this research is to develop DIPPer Academy, a family-focused, mobile health (mHealth) behavioral intervention to promote glycemic control and type 1 diabetes (T1D) adherence. (bioportfolio.com)
  • On its institute page, SA states, "Our teaching and learning model, now tested and scaled across nearly 50 campuses, has proved extraordinarily effective. (wordpress.com)
  • The nation turns to the National Academy of Medicine on matters of biomedical science, medicine, and health. (washington.edu)
  • Newswise - NEW YORK (Oct. 16, 2012) -- Dr. Andrew I. Schafer, chairman of the Department of Medicine and The E. Hugh Luckey Distinguished Professor of Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College and physician-in-chief at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, has been elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies. (newswise.com)
  • Dr. Schafer's expertise and leadership will be a vital resource to the Institute of Medicine, helping ensure its future health care recommendations and research will continue to improve the lives of our patients and all Americans. (newswise.com)
  • Election to the Institute of Medicine is a true honor, and I feel tremendously privileged to be elected a new member," says Dr. Schafer. (newswise.com)
  • In addition, leading neuro-oncologist Dr. Lisa DeAngelis, chair of the Department of Neurology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and professor of Neurology at Weill Cornell Medical College, was also elected as a new member of the Institute of Medicine. (newswise.com)
  • The Niels Bohr International Academy has just received 2.5 million DKK from the Ib Henriksen Foundation. (ku.dk)
  • A tutorial on the 2013-14 $1 million spent on "talent recruitment" would surely also usefully inform the national SA ed institute audience about the broad architecture of the SA model. (wordpress.com)
  • In order to encourage students and scholars to acquire degrees, or engage in research and language study, Taiwan Academy lists several scholarship and grant applications. (sc.edu)
  • The Sulzberger Institute for Dermatologic Education, part of the American Academy of Dermatology, provides grant support for innovative initiatives in education and technology. (aad.org)
  • Five generations of Montverde Academy graduates have been guided by three fundamental principles of Knowledge, Character and Community with its international character adding an exciting dimension to the community and the overall educational experience. (prweb.com)
  • It offers short description about the main trends of scientific investigations of the institute: complex analysis, approximation theory, real analysis, probability theory. (mathguide.de)
  • The summer academy gave students the opportunity to see where the rubber hits the road. (phi.org)
  • The technical report published by the American Academy of Pediatrics fails to recognize significant changes being made in the way antibiotics are used in food animals. (ahi.org)
  • Learn more about the Leadership Institute's stand-alone programs as well as sessions at Annual and Summer Academy Meetings. (aad.org)
  • Taiwan Academy also plans to offer high quality cultural performances and learning activities in their resource centers, including painting appreciation, floral arrangement, film lectures, and artistic exhibitions. (sc.edu)
  • I feel as though The Soccer Institute at Montverde Academy will offer a superior life experience for talented youth, and I believe in the model they have developed, placing a focus on world class education in the classroom and on the field of competition. (prweb.com)
  • The main part of the research is focused on the following lines : Energy and fluid dynamics Acoustics and submarine transmissions The institute is divided in two research teams, which have their own field of research : M2EN (Mechanics and energy in marine environment) MoTIM (Maritime information modeling and processing) In association with DCNS, the institute has been developing new marine turbines since 2011. (wikipedia.org)
  • Training academy based in West Yorkshire, UK, with apprenticeships, short courses and unit accreditation. (dmoztools.net)
  • SANS Institute, the global leader in information security training today announced the SANS CyberTalent Immersion Academy for Women . (sans.org)
  • Abe Baker: Visionary and organizational leader of the American Academy of Neurology. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Designed for transitioning US veterans, the VetSuccess Immersion Academy is a faster, more reliable, and less expensive way to find, train and certify, and connect top cyber talent to employers. (sans.org)
  • SANS Institute is working with the National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT), a non-profit focused on increasing women's meaningful participation in computing, to increase awareness of the academy with thousands of technical women participating in the NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Community. (sans.org)
  • The Ministry of Culture, Republic of China (Taiwan) established the Taiwan Academy in 2011 In order to construct an integrated information platform for Chinese culture. (sc.edu)
  • The SANS CyberTalent Immersion Academy for Women shares the goal of introducing highly talented, yet untapped, individuals to the cyber security industry. (sans.org)