Academic Medical Centers: Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.Hospitalists: Physicians who are employed to work exclusively in hospital settings, primarily for managed care organizations. They are the attending or primary responsible physician for the patient during hospitalization.United StatesRetrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Career Mobility: The upward or downward mobility in an occupation or the change from one occupation to another.Conflict of Interest: A situation in which an individual might benefit personally from official or professional actions. It includes a conflict between a person's private interests and official responsibilities in a position of trust. The term is not restricted to government officials. The concept refers both to actual conflict of interest and the appearance or perception of conflict.TennesseeInternal Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.Hospitals, University: Hospitals maintained by a university for the teaching of medical students, postgraduate training programs, and clinical research.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.MuseumsResearch Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.Hospitals, Group Practice: Hospitals organized and controlled by a group of physicians who practice together and provide each other with mutual support.Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and overEducation, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Hospitals, Teaching: Hospitals engaged in educational and research programs, as well as providing medical care to the patients.Medication Systems, Hospital: Overall systems, traditional or automated, to provide medication to patients in hospitals. Elements of the system are: handling the physician's order, transcription of the order by nurse and/or pharmacist, filling the medication order, transfer to the nursing unit, and administration to the patient.Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Clinical Medicine: The study and practice of medicine by direct examination of the patient.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Hospitals, Urban: Hospitals located in metropolitan areas.Fellowships and Scholarships: Stipends or grants-in-aid granted by foundations or institutions to individuals for study.Patient Acuity: An assessment of a patient's illness, its chronicity, severity, and other qualitative aspects.BostonTreatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Achievement: Success in bringing an effort to the desired end; the degree or level of success attained in some specified area (esp. scholastic) or in general.OregonFinancial Support: The provision of monetary resources including money or capital and credit; obtaining or furnishing money or capital for a purchase or enterprise and the funds so obtained. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed.)Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Hospital Rapid Response Team: Multidisciplinary team most frequently consisting of INTENSIVE CARE UNIT trained personnel who are available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week for evaluation of patients who develop signs or symptoms of severe clinical deterioration.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Medical Order Entry Systems: Information systems, usually computer-assisted, that enable providers to initiate medical procedures, prescribe medications, etc. These systems support medical decision-making and error-reduction during patient care.PennsylvaniaGift Giving: The bestowing of tangible or intangible benefits, voluntarily and usually without expectation of anything in return. However, gift giving may be motivated by feelings of ALTRUISM or gratitude, by a sense of obligation, or by the hope of receiving something in return.Hospitals, Veterans: Hospitals providing medical care to veterans of wars.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Patient Discharge: The administrative process of discharging the patient, alive or dead, from hospitals or other health facilities.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Intensive Care Units: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.Documentation: Systematic organization, storage, retrieval, and dissemination of specialized information, especially of a scientific or technical nature (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983). It often involves authenticating or validating information.Hospital Information Systems: Integrated, computer-assisted systems designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information concerned with the administrative and clinical aspects of providing medical services within the hospital.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.Inpatients: Persons admitted to health facilities which provide board and room, for the purpose of observation, care, diagnosis or treatment.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.VirginiaQuality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Efficiency, Organizational: The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Personnel Staffing and Scheduling: The selection, appointing, and scheduling of personnel.Personnel, Hospital: The individuals employed by the hospital.Ethics Committees, Research: Hospital or other institutional committees established to protect the welfare of research subjects. Federal regulations (the "Common Rule" (45 CFR 46)) mandate the use of these committees to monitor federally-funded biomedical and behavioral research involving human subjects.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Pharmacy Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the receiving, storing, and distribution of pharmaceutical supplies.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.MichiganPhiladelphiaOutpatient Clinics, Hospital: Organized services in a hospital which provide medical care on an outpatient basis.Medication Errors: Errors in prescribing, dispensing, or administering medication with the result that the patient fails to receive the correct drug or the indicated proper drug dosage.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Medical Staff, Hospital: Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).New York CityMedical Errors: Errors or mistakes committed by health professionals which result in harm to the patient. They include errors in diagnosis (DIAGNOSTIC ERRORS), errors in the administration of drugs and other medications (MEDICATION ERRORS), errors in the performance of surgical procedures, in the use of other types of therapy, in the use of equipment, and in the interpretation of laboratory findings. Medical errors are differentiated from MALPRACTICE in that the former are regarded as honest mistakes or accidents while the latter is the result of negligence, reprehensible ignorance, or criminal intent.Interdisciplinary Communication: Communication, in the sense of cross-fertilization of ideas, involving two or more academic disciplines (such as the disciplines that comprise the cross-disciplinary field of bioethics, including the health and biological sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences and law). Also includes problems in communication stemming from differences in patterns of language usage in different academic or medical disciplines.Neurology: A medical specialty concerned with the study of the structures, functions, and diseases of the nervous system.MassachusettsFollow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.General Surgery: A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.Computer Communication Networks: A system containing any combination of computers, computer terminals, printers, audio or visual display devices, or telephones interconnected by telecommunications equipment or cables: used to transmit or receive information. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Interinstitutional Relations: The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Drug Utilization Review: Formal programs for assessing drug prescription against some standard. Drug utilization review may consider clinical appropriateness, cost effectiveness, and, in some cases, outcomes. Review is usually retrospective, but some analysis may be done before drugs are dispensed (as in computer systems which advise physicians when prescriptions are entered). Drug utilization review is mandated for Medicaid programs beginning in 1993.Clinical Pharmacy Information Systems: Information systems, usually computer-assisted, designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information for planning, organizing, directing, and controlling administrative activities associated with the provision and utilization of clinical pharmacy services.Organizational Innovation: Introduction of changes which are new to the organization and are created by management.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Decision Support Systems, Clinical: Computer-based information systems used to integrate clinical and patient information and provide support for decision-making in patient care.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Leadership: The function of directing or controlling the actions or attitudes of an individual or group with more or less willing acquiescence of the followers.IllinoisData Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Time and Motion Studies: The observation and analysis of movements in a task with an emphasis on the amount of time required to perform the task.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Quality Improvement: The attainment or process of attaining a new level of performance or quality.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.North CarolinaNational Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Hospital Mortality: A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Drug Therapy, Computer-Assisted: Adjunctive computer programs in providing drug treatment to patients.Tertiary Care Centers: A medical facility which provides a high degree of subspecialty expertise for patients from centers where they received SECONDARY CARE.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Libraries, MedicalCost Savings: Reductions in all or any portion of the costs of providing goods or services. Savings may be incurred by the provider or the consumer.Critical Care: Health care provided to a critically ill patient during a medical emergency or crisis.Translational Medical Research: The application of discoveries generated by laboratory research and preclinical studies to the development of clinical trials and studies in humans. A second area of translational research concerns enhancing the adoption of best practices.Patient Care: The services rendered by members of the health profession and non-professionals under their supervision.Medical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Point-of-Care Systems: Laboratory and other services provided to patients at the bedside. These include diagnostic and laboratory testing using automated information entry.Germinal Center: The activated center of a lymphoid follicle in secondary lymphoid tissue where B-LYMPHOCYTES are stimulated by antigens and helper T cells (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER) are stimulated to generate memory cells.Patients: Individuals participating in the health care system for the purpose of receiving therapeutic, diagnostic, or preventive procedures.Hospital Costs: The expenses incurred by a hospital in providing care. The hospital costs attributed to a particular patient care episode include the direct costs plus an appropriate proportion of the overhead for administration, personnel, building maintenance, equipment, etc. Hospital costs are one of the factors which determine HOSPITAL CHARGES (the price the hospital sets for its services).Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Process Assessment (Health Care): An evaluation procedure that focuses on how care is delivered, based on the premise that there are standards of performance for activities undertaken in delivering patient care, in which the specific actions taken, events occurring, and human interactions are compared with accepted standards.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Workload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A complex disorder characterized by infertility, HIRSUTISM; OBESITY; and various menstrual disturbances such as OLIGOMENORRHEA; AMENORRHEA; ANOVULATION. Polycystic ovary syndrome is usually associated with bilateral enlarged ovaries studded with atretic follicles, not with cysts. The term, polycystic ovary, is misleading.Continuity of Patient Care: Health care provided on a continuing basis from the initial contact, following the patient through all phases of medical care.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.IsraelIntegrated Advanced Information Management Systems: A concept, developed in 1983 under the aegis of and supported by the National Library of Medicine under the name of Integrated Academic Information Management Systems, to provide professionals in academic health sciences centers and health sciences institutions with convenient access to an integrated and comprehensive network of knowledge. It addresses a wide cross-section of users from administrators and faculty to students and clinicians and has applications to planning, clinical and managerial decision-making, teaching, and research. It provides access to various types of clinical, management, educational, etc., databases, as well as to research and bibliographic databases. In August 1992 the name was changed from Integrated Academic Information Management Systems to Integrated Advanced Information Management Systems to reflect use beyond the academic milieu.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Safety Management: The development of systems to prevent accidents, injuries, and other adverse occurrences in an institutional setting. The concept includes prevention or reduction of adverse events or incidents involving employees, patients, or facilities. Examples include plans to reduce injuries from falls or plans for fire safety to promote a safe institutional environment.Patient Admission: The process of accepting patients. The concept includes patients accepted for medical and nursing care in a hospital or other health care institution.Patient Readmission: Subsequent admissions of a patient to a hospital or other health care institution for treatment.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Critical Illness: A disease or state in which death is possible or imminent.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Child Day Care Centers: Facilities which provide care for pre-school and school-age children.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Mentors: Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Hospitals, Military: Hospitals which provide care for the military personnel and usually for their dependents.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.United States Department of Veterans Affairs: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to VETERANS. It was established March 15, 1989 as a Cabinet-level position.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Trauma Centers: Specialized hospital facilities which provide diagnostic and therapeutic services for trauma patients.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.Drug Utilization: The utilization of drugs as reported in individual hospital studies, FDA studies, marketing, or consumption, etc. This includes drug stockpiling, and patient drug profiles.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Malaysia: A parliamentary democracy with a constitutional monarch in southeast Asia, consisting of 11 states (West Malaysia) on the Malay Peninsula and two states (East Malaysia) on the island of BORNEO. It is also called the Federation of Malaysia. Its capital is Kuala Lumpur. Before 1963 it was the Union of Malaya. It reorganized in 1948 as the Federation of Malaya, becoming independent from British Malaya in 1957 and becoming Malaysia in 1963 as a federation of Malaya, Sabah, Sarawak, and Singapore (which seceded in 1965). The form Malay- probably derives from the Tamil malay, mountain, with reference to its geography. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p715 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p329)Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.NebraskaEuropean Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Veterans: Former members of the armed services.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.TaiwanUnderachievement: Performance, usually in school work, poorer than that predicted from aptitude and/or intelligence testing.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Faculty: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.Academies and Institutes: Organizations representing specialized fields which are accepted as authoritative; may be non-governmental, university or an independent research organization, e.g., National Academy of Sciences, Brookings Institution, etc.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.
(1/1470) Camelot or common sense? The logic behind the UCSF/Stanford merger.

Many academic medical centers (AMCs) throughout the United States have established their own community-based integrated delivery systems by purchasing physician groups and hospitals. Other AMCs have merged with existing nonprofit community-based delivery systems. Still other AMCs have been sold to for-profit firms. The AMCs at Stanford and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), chose a different strategy: to merge with each other to respond to the unique characteristics of the Bay Area marketplace.  (+info)

(2/1470) Referrals by general internists and internal medicine trainees in an academic medicine practice.

Patient referral from generalists to specialists is a critical clinic care process that has received relatively little scrutiny, especially in academic settings. This study describes the frequency with which patients enrolled in a prepaid health plan were referred to specialists by general internal medicine faculty members, general internal medicine track residents, and other internal medicine residents; the types of clinicians they were referred to; and the types of diagnoses with which they presented to their primary care physicians. Requested referrals for all 2,113 enrolled prepaid health plan patients during a 1-year period (1992-1993) were identified by computer search of the practice's administrative database. The plan was a full-risk contract without carve-out benefits. We assessed the referral request rate for the practice and the mean referral rate per physician. We also determined the percentage of patients with diagnoses based on the International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, who were referred to specialists. The practice's referral request rate per 100 patient office visits for all referral types was 19.8. Primary care track residents referred at a higher rate than did nonprimary care track residents (mean 23.7 vs. 12.1; P < .001). The highest referral rate (2.0/100 visits) was to dermatology. Almost as many (1.7/100 visits) referrals were to other "expert" generalists within the practice. The condition most frequently associated with referral to a specialist was depression (42%). Most referrals were associated with common ambulatory care diagnoses that are often considered to be within the scope of generalist practice. To improve medical education about referrals, a better understanding of when and why faculty and trainees refer and don't refer is needed, so that better models for appropriate referral can be developed.  (+info)

(3/1470) Physicians in training as quality managers: survival strategy for academic health centers.

Being responsible for medical education places academic health centers at a disadvantage in competing for managed care contracts. Although many suggestions have been made for changing medical education to produce physicians who are better prepared for the managed care environment, few studies have shown how physicians in training can actually contribute to the competitiveness of an academic health center. We present three examples of engaging trainees in projects with a population-based perspective that demonstrate how quality improvement for the academic health center can be operationalized and even led by physicians in training. In addition to gaining experience in a managed care skill that is increasingly important for future employment, physicians in training can simultaneously improve the quality of care delivered through the academic health center.  (+info)

(4/1470) Subspecialist referrals in an academic, pediatric setting: rationale, rates, and compliance.

Appropriate referrals reduce healthcare costs and enhance patient satisfaction. We evaluated the subspecialty referral pattern of a managed care general pediatric office over a 4-month period. Three-hundred-forty-six referrals (267 meeting inclusion criteria) to 24 subspecialties were generated during 4,219 office visits, with five subspecialties receiving 59% of the referrals. The main objective of each referral was management (100), diagnostic assistance (75), special procedure (63), or a combination (29). Patients kept less than half of the referral appointments, with the highest (80%) and lowest (28%) compliance rates observed in cardiology and ophthalmology, respectively. Appointments made within four weeks of the referral were more likely to be kept than those with greater lag time (P = 0.001). The subspecialists prepared written, post-consultation responses to the referring physician in 73% of cases. Presumptive and post-consultation diagnoses were congruent in 78% of those cases in which both diagnoses were noted. Overall, the managed care format enabled our practice to track referral outcomes. The subspecialists' written responses also allowed for an educational exchange between physicians. Compliance with referral appointments is a substantial problem that needs to be addressed.  (+info)

(5/1470) Predictors of acute hospital costs for treatment of ischemic stroke in an academic center.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We sought to determine predictors of acute hospital costs in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke to an academic center using a stroke management team to coordinate care. METHODS: Demographic and clinical data were prospectively collected on 191 patients consecutively admitted with acute ischemic stroke. Patients were classified by insurance status, premorbid modified Rankin scale, stroke location, stroke severity (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score), and presence of comorbidities. Detailed hospital charge data were converted to cost by application of department-specific cost-to-charge ratios. Physician's fees were not included. A stepwise multiple regression analysis was computed to determine the predictors of total hospital cost. RESULTS: Median length of stay was 6 days (range, 1 to 63 days), and mortality was 3%. Median hospital cost per discharge was $4408 (range, $1199 to $59 799). Fifty percent of costs were for room charges, 19% for stroke evaluation, 21% for medical management, and 7% for acute rehabilitation therapies. Sixteen percent were admitted to an intensive care unit. Length of stay accounted for 43% of the variance in total cost. Other independent predictors of cost included stroke severity, heparin treatment, atrial fibrillation, male sex, ischemic cardiac disease, and premorbid functional status. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the major predictors of acute hospital costs of stroke in this environment are length of stay, stroke severity, cardiac disease, male sex, and use of heparin. Room charges accounted for the majority of costs, and attempts to reduce the cost of stroke evaluation would be of marginal value. Efforts to reduce acute costs should be monitored for potential cost shifting or a negative impact on quality of care.  (+info)

(6/1470) Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in an academic hospital: evaluation of changes in perioperative outcomes.

OBJECTIVE: Evaluate changes in perioperative outcomes over an 82-month period in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy by a single attending surgeon in an academic hospital. METHODS: A retrospective review of 1025 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy from September 1992 to February 1997 was compared to the initial 600 patients from May 1990 to August 1992. Statistical analysis included Chi square with Yates correction and Fischer's exact test. RESULTS: Over the 82-month period there were no significant differences in the overall conversion rate to open cholecystectomy (p=0.26), intraoperative complications (p = 0.81), postoperative complications (p = 0.054) or mortality rates (p=0.66). There were 3 (0.5%) bile duct injuries in the initial 600 patients and only 1 (0.1%) in the group of 1025 patients (p=0.065). There was an increase (p<0.001) in laparoscopic cholecystectomies performed for acute cholecystitis and biliary dyskinesia and an increase (p<0.001) in the percentage of cases performed overall and for acute cholecystitis by the surgery residents over the last 54 months. Despite this, the conversion rates to open cholecystectomy in patients with acute cholecystitis decreased (p < 0.001) over the last 54 months. Additionally, more patients (p < 0.001) were discharged on the day of surgery in the most recent group. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy can be performed safely by surgery residents under the direct supervision of an experienced laparoscopist without significant changes in perioperative outcomes. Despite an increased percentage of cases being performed for acute cholecystitis over the last 54 months, conversion rates to open cholecystectomy and biliary tract injury rates have decreased, and the perioperative morbidity has remained the same.  (+info)

(7/1470) Development and evaluation of a pharmacist-directed pharmacotherapy center.

This article is designed for ambulatory pharmacy specialists, pharmacy administrators, and managed care pharmacy and/or medical directors interested in developing systems for improved drug therapy outcomes. GOAL: To describe an alternative method for the effective delivery of pharmaceutical care. OBJECTIVES: 1. Identify the barriers to delivery of pharmaceutical care in current systems. 2. Describe the steps to take to implement a referral-based pharmaceutical care service. 3. Describe the financial and patient satisfaction outcomes of a referral-based pharmacy. 4. Describe the services that can be offered by a referral-based pharmacy.  (+info)

(8/1470) Hypertension and managed care. Based on a presentation by Robert P. Jacobs, MD, MBA.

A shift in principles has accompanied the evolution of healthcare delivery from a fee-for-service system to managed care. Managed care organizations have to make decisions on the allocation of healthcare resources that will enhance the care of the entire population. Cost reduction has been a major driver for managed care, but this is increasingly being supplanted by other goals such as increasing the quality of care and the value of health services and providing accountability. As the population ages, management of chronic lifelong illness will pose an increasing challenge. Hypertension is a common chronic illness that, if left untreated, imposes an enormous economic burden on society. These and other aspects of the disease and its management make it eminently suitable for intervention in a managed care setting. Challenges and opportunities exist for disease management initiatives for hypertension in the managed care environment. As health plans enhance their data systems and begin to focus on the long-term benefits of chronic disease management, hypertension will certainly be an early target for intervention and control.  (+info)

*  University of Tennessee
... and the center promotes itself as the area's only academic, or "teaching hospital." The University Medical Center is the ... The university is a direct partner of the University of Tennessee Medical Center, which is one of two Level I trauma centers in ... The new UT Medical Center Heart Hospital received its first patient on April 27, 2010. In Fall 2016, the university enrolled ... The University of Tennessee Medical Center, administered by University Health Systems and affiliated with the University of ...
*  Academic Medical Center
The Academic Medical Center (Dutch: Academisch Medisch Centrum), or AMC, is the university hospital affiliated with the ... The AMC has an intensive cooperation with the other university hospital of Amsterdam, the VU University Medical Center (VUmc), ... AMC consistently ranks among the top 50 medical schools in the world. ... Neurosurgery Cardiothoracic surgery Neonatal and pediatric surgery and intensive care Pediatric oncology Level I trauma center ...
*  Alliance of Independent Academic Medical Centers
... the Alliance of Independent Academic Medical Centers (AIAMC) launched Improving Patient Care through Graduate Medical Education ... The Alliance of Independent Academic Medical Centers (AIAMC) is an American national membership organization of approximately ... 70 major academic medical centers and health systems committed to quality patient care, medical education and research. AIAMC ... A National Initiative of Independent Academic Medical Centers. Nineteen AIAMC-member institutions participated in this charter ...
*  The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice
Wennberg, JE et al., ''Unwarranted variations in healthcare delivery: implications for academic medical centres'', BMJ. 2002 ... The institute is located at One Medical Center Drive, WTRB, Level 5 on the Dartmouth Hitchcock Hospital campus, Lebanon, NH. ... Fisher, E.S. et al., ''Variations in the Longitudinal Efficiency of AcademicMedical Centers,'' Health Affairs, 7 October 2004. ... It was founded in 1988 by John Wennberg as the Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences (CECS); a reorganization in 2007 led ...
*  David Silbersweig
academic medical center article. higher education article.. ... He is an academic dean at Harvard Medical School, and Stanley ... Silbersweig has presented medical scientific information to the general public. He gave a presentation on post traumatic stress ... David Silbersweig is chairman of psychiatry at Brigham & Women's Hospital in Boston, where he also co-directs the center for ... Until 2008, Silbersweig was vice chair for research within the department of psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College, where ...
*  Michael M. Meguid
"Boston Medical Center , Boston Hospital, Academic Medical Center , Exceptional Care without Exception". Bmc.org. Retrieved 2011 ... UCLA Medical School; and the West Los Angeles VA Medical Center. He was founder and director of the Department of Nutrition, in ... He was also the director of the Institutional Review Board at Syracuse VA Medical Center. He started in 1983 "Nutrition: The ... It was at Boston University Hospital (now Boston Medical Center) that he began his surgical career in Surgical Oncology and ...
*  Translational research
Obstacles facing translational research in academic medical centres. Retrieved 12 June 2015. "What is basic research?" (PDF). ... American Medical Association. pp. 211-13. Retrieved 3 June 2015. "Obstacles facing translational research in academic medical ... Maine Medical Center in Portland, Maine, United States has a dedicated translational research institute. Scripps Research ... "Maine Medical Center Research Institute attracts top scientists, licenses discoveries". www.mainebiz.biz. Mainebiz. Retrieved ...
*  Comparison of research networking tools and research profiling systems
Pober JS, Neuhauser CS, Pober JM (November 2001). "Obstacles facing translational research in academic medical centers". FASEB ... Academic and Professional Networking-most succinctly described as "social networking for academics," these services focus on ... Portland, OR Oregon Health & Science University). Wieder B (2011). "Academic-reference firm offers $10,001 for best new ...
*  Joseph Zohar
"Sheba Academic Medical Center Hospital: Psychiatric Clinics". eng.sheba.co.il/. Retrieved 28 September 2015. Zohar, Joseph; ... Zohar heads the Anxiety Clinic at Sheba Medical Center, which specializes in anxiety disorders such as obsessive-compulsive ... "European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP)" "Sheba Medical Center". ... is the director of Psychiatry and the Anxiety and Obsessive Compulsive Clinic at the Sheba Medical Center in Tel HaShomer and ...
*  Amsterdam Holendrecht station
The station is near the Academic Medical Center. The following train services currently call at Amsterdam Holendrecht: 2x per ...
*  Institute for Family Health
... and the segregation of health care in academic medical centers. In 2007, the Institute was named a Center of Excellence in the ... "Beth Israel Medical Center". Programs by Sponsor. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Retrieved 2013-12-20. " ... "Patient Centered Medical Home Resource Center". Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Retrieved 2013-12-20. "Meaningful ... In 1994, the Institute developed a relationship with Beth Israel Medical Center, and began the Beth Israel Residency in Urban ...
*  CareMore
"One Path to Value-Based Care for Academic Medical Centers". 2016-04-28. Retrieved 2016-07-08. CareMore Health System Website ... Each Center provides a range of primary care medical services as well as podiatry, mental health services, diabetes management ... Emory Health System have remained optimistic about their partnership and the opportunities for other Academic medical centers ... The goal of the Care Center is to provide a one-stop shop for care services, reducing travel time, likelihood of missing an ...
*  University of Pennsylvania Health System
"What It Means to Be an Academic Medical Center". Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania. Retrieved January 13, 2018. " ... As such, Penn Medicine brands itself as an "academic medical center." Phoenixville Hospital in Phoenixville, Pennsylvania, was ... Three hospitals, two regional medical centers, and a multitude of clinical care providers in the greater Philadelphia area ...
*  Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome
The Netherlands: Academic Medical Center, Department of Medical Informatics. 2011. Klevens, RM; Edwards, JR; Andrus, ML; ... In recent years, some transplant centers have begun to administer eculizumab to patients with TMA who receive a kidney ...
*  Pascal J. Goldschmidt
"Failure by Deans of Academic Medical Centers to Disclose Outside Income". Archives of Internal Medicine. 171 (6): 586-587. doi: ... Goldschmidt joined University of Miami in April 2006, and oversaw the purchase of Cedars Medical Center in November 2007, which ... Goldschmidt was previously chairman of the Department of Medicine at Duke University Medical Center. Before taking the ... On August 2012, the University of Miami Faculty Senate Ad Hoc committee on medical issues presented its report to UM president ...
*  Epic Systems
Epic's market focus is large healthcare organizations and academic medical centers. The company offers an integrated suite of ... "Electronic Medical Records at The Mount Sinai Medical Center Shown to Greatly Improve Quality of Care". Retrieved April 9, 2015 ... Among many others, Epic provides electronic record systems for Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, the Cleveland Clinic ... UC Davis Medical Center in Sacramento, and Yale-New Haven Hospital. Partners HealthCare adopted Epic systems in 2016 for $1.2 ...
*  Funding of science
2005). "Academic Medical Centers' Standards for Clinical-Trial Agreements with Industry". New England Journal of Medicine. 352 ... In academic contexts, hard money may refer to funding received from a government or other entity at regular intervals, thus ... "Research administration is all about service-service to our faculty, to our academic units, to the institution, and to our ... "RANNIS (Icelandic Centre for Research)". "National Research Foundation, Singapore". "The Uganda National Council for Science ...
*  Bimaristan
Miller, Andrew C (December 2006). "Jundi-Shapur, bimaristans, and the rise of academic medical centres". Journal of the Royal ... The hospital was not just a place to treat patients, it also served as a medical school to educate and train students. Basic ... Islamic hospitals were the first to keep written records of patients and their medical treatment. Students were responsible in ... Muhammad came across wounded soldiers and he ordered a tent be assembled to provide medical care. Over time, Caliphs and rulers ...
*  Madrasa
... and the rise of academic medical centres". Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 99 (12). pp. 615-617. doi:10.1258/jrsm. ... wearing academic robes, obtaining doctorates by defending a thesis, and even the idea of academic freedom are also modelled on ... The Yale Center for the Study of Globalization examined bias in United States newspaper coverage of Pakistan since the ... Toby Huff argues that no medical degrees were granted to students, as there was no faculty that could issue them, and that, ...
*  Sengkang Health
... is part of the SingHealth Academic Medical Centre. Sengkang General and Community Hospitals was first announced ... national specialty centres and polyclinics. The Sengkang Health hospitals will also partner primary care physicians, ...
*  Broomfield Hospital
A former concert hall was converted and became a new Medical Academic Centre in 1988. In 1983 The Princess Anne opened the CAT ... A new medical academic library was built in 1991 and the following year Mid Essex Hospital Services NHS Trust was formed and ... Andrew's Centre - a specialist unit for cleft lip and palate, burns and plastic surgery - is also located at Broomfield ... A Medical Assessment Unit opened in 1998. In November 2010 a £148 Million major re-development of Broomfield Hospital was ...
*  Unwarranted variation
Wennberg, JE et al., Unwarranted variations in healthcare delivery: implications for academic medical centres, BMJ. 2002 ... 2003 Care Varies Widely At Top Medical Centers: Study Finds NYU, UCLA Used More Services Vs. Mayo, UC-San Francisco for Similar ... Variations in the Longitudinal Efficiency of AcademicMedical Centers, Health Affairs, 7 October 2004 Modifying Unwarranted ... In Miami, where medical services are abundant, Medicare pays more than twice as much per person per year as it does in ...
*  Parotidectomy
Maddox, PT, Paydarfar JA, Davies L (Feb 2012). "Parotidectomy: A 17-Year Institutional at a Rural Academic Medical Center". ... Painless, noticeably felt growths are the most common presentations described in medical literature. Benign parotid gland ...
*  Antimicrobial stewardship
As of 2014, thirteen internet-based institutional ASP resources in US academic medical centers had been published. An AMS ... "Internet-Based Institutional Antimicrobial Stewardship Program Resources in Leading US Academic Medical Centers". Clinical ... which may be in person or in the medical record. Further tasks are: Automatic review of the medical record after 72h empiric ... MA Protect Antibiotics Toolkit Health Care Without Harm Global Resource Action Center for the Environment (GRACE) Center for ...
*  Cannabis in Maryland
The legislation restricts cannabis distribution to academic medical centers, which will monitor patients. By September 2016, ... In 2016, the Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission awarded 15 preliminary licenses to grow medical marijuana (out of a pool of ... and 8,500 patients were certified by the Commission to buy medical marijuana.. By statute, defendants who can prove medical ... In 2012, a state law was enacted to establish a state-regulated medical marijuana program. The program became operational on ...
*  Nursing in Japan
Nurse Centers were created in each prefecture by the Act on Assurance of Work Forces of Nurses and Other Medical Experts. These ... Requirements of nursing education in Japan are that candidates have completed twelve years of basic academic study and then ... One of the older unions that relates to nursing is the Japanese Federation of Medical Workers Union, which was created in 1957 ... They may then perform specific medical interventions based upon those described in procedure manuals prepared by physicians. ...
*  Barrier nursing
"Terms used for isolation practices by nurses at an academic medical center". Journal of advanced nursing. 66 (10): 2309-2319. ... "Terms used for isolation practices by nurses at an academic medical center". Journal of advanced nursing. 66 (10): 2309-2319. ... "Barrier Nursing." British Medical Journal 1.5492 (1966): 876. Print. Gammon, J. (March 26 - April 8, 1998). "A review of the ... Barrier nursing started off as a term used by the Centre for Disease Control (CDC) to describe early infection control methods ...
Academic Medical Center - Wikipedia  Academic Medical Center - Wikipedia
The Academic Medical Center (Dutch: Academisch Medisch Centrum), or AMC, is the university hospital affiliated with the ... The AMC has an intensive cooperation with the other university hospital of Amsterdam, the VU University Medical Center (VUmc), ... Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Academic_Medical_Center&oldid=813344186" ... AMC consistently ranks among the top 50 medical schools in the world.[2] ...
more infohttps://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academic_Medical_Center
Academic Medical Center - Wikipedia  Academic Medical Center - Wikipedia
The Academic Medical Center (Dutch: Academisch Medisch Centrum), or AMC, is the university hospital affiliated with the ... The AMC has an intensive cooperation with the other university hospital of Amsterdam, the VU University Medical Center (VUmc), ... AMC consistently ranks among the top 50 medical schools in the world. ... Neurosurgery Cardiothoracic surgery Neonatal and pediatric surgery and intensive care Pediatric oncology Level I trauma center ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academic_Medical_Center
Medicares support of academic medical centers. | Circulation  Medicare's support of academic medical centers. | Circulation
Thank you for your interest in spreading the word on Circulation.. NOTE: We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it, and that it is not junk mail. We do not capture any email address. ...
more infohttp://circ.ahajournals.org/content/90/5/2554
Academic Medical Centers | Higher Education | Industries  Academic Medical Centers | Higher Education | Industries
As academic medical centers continue to evolve and address new challenges, Baker Tilly positions these organizations for ... Home → Industries → Higher Education → Academic Medical Centers. Academic Medical Centers. Academic medical centers face the ... Learn more about our Academic Medical Center services ,  Contact a Academic Medical Centers Advisor. ... "Academic medical centers face a perpetually innovative environment to integrate the finest quality of care available while ...
more infohttp://www.bakertilly.com/industries/higher-education/academic-medical-centers/
Alliance of Independent Academic Medical Centers - Wikipedia  Alliance of Independent Academic Medical Centers - Wikipedia
... the Alliance of Independent Academic Medical Centers (AIAMC) launched Improving Patient Care through Graduate Medical Education ... The Alliance of Independent Academic Medical Centers (AIAMC) is an American national membership organization of approximately ... 70 major academic medical centers and health systems committed to quality patient care, medical education and research. AIAMC ... A National Initiative of Independent Academic Medical Centers. Nineteen AIAMC-member institutions participated in this charter ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alliance_of_Independent_Academic_Medical_Centers
Boston Medical Center | Academic Medical Center | South End  Boston Medical Center | Academic Medical Center | South End
... is a 487-bed academic medical center located in Boston's historic South End, providing medical care for infants, children, ... Boston Medical Center (BMC) is a 487-bed academic medical center located in Boston's historic South End, providing medical care ... Boston Magazine has released its annual "Top Docs" list for 2017, and as in years past, Boston Medical Center (BMC) is strongly ... Boston Magazine has released its annual "Top Docs" list for 2017, and as in years past, Boston Medical Center (BMC) is strongly ...
more infohttps://www.bmc.org/
Morehead Wins in Academic Medical Center Market - CertMag  Morehead Wins in Academic Medical Center Market - CertMag
Morehead added six academic medical centers to its client roster: Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Brigham & Women's Hospital (a ... Academic medical centers are unique in that they combine health care services with medical research and the education of ... "Academic medical centers demand an exceptionally high level of service, accuracy and innovation," said David Rowlee, Ph.D., ... Morehead is moving quickly to dominate in employee survey research within the exclusive academic medical center market.,br /,, ...
more infohttp://certmag.com/morehead-wins-in-academic-medical-center-market/
Academic Medical Center Amsterdam | Protocols and Video Articles  Academic Medical Center Amsterdam | Protocols and Video Articles
... medical, chemical and physical research. Watch our scientific video articles. ... Brain Imaging Center, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, 2Biological Imaging Centre, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial ... Academic Medical Center Amsterdam. View Institution's Website 3 articles published in JoVE. * Biochemistry. ... Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Lymphoma and Myeloma Center Amsterdam (LYMMCARE) Here, it is demonstrated how ...
more infohttps://www.jove.com/institutions/EU-europe/NL-netherlands/25315-academic-medical-center-amsterdam
The Regions Academic Medical Center - UT Medical Center  The Region's Academic Medical Center - UT Medical Center
Why does an academic medical center have such high standards? An academic medical center must meet all of the standards ... What kind of medical research is being conducted?. As an academic medical center, UT Medical Center is actively involved in ... How is an academic medical center different from a regular hospital?. Academic medical centers differ from other healthcare ... What kind of new technology is available at an academic medical center such as The University of Tennessee Medical Center?. ...
more infohttps://www.utmedicalcenter.org/about-us/news-publications-media/the-regions-only-academic-medical-center/
Downstream Effect of a Proton Treatment Center on an Academic Medical Center.  - PubMed - NCBI  Downstream Effect of a Proton Treatment Center on an Academic Medical Center. - PubMed - NCBI
Downstream Effect of a Proton Treatment Center on an Academic Medical Center.. Remick JS1, Bentzen SM2, Simone CB 2nd2, Nichols ... To quantify the effects of opening a proton center (PC) on an academic medical center (AMC)/radiation oncology department. ... Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland.. 2. Department of Radiation ... National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda MD, 20894 USA ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30885776
CellepathicRx Partners with Leading Academic Medical Center on mHealth Mobile Platform with Research-Backed Behavioral Content  CellepathicRx Partners with Leading Academic Medical Center on mHealth Mobile Platform with Research-Backed Behavioral Content
This academic and industry partnership delivers proven behavioral coaching content to patients, and it does so wherever they ... can also help payers and health plans improve their Centers for Medicare & Medicare Services' Five-Star Quality Ratings by ... Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham VAMC. ...
more infohttps://www.cnbc.com/id/100135087
Elena Rampanelli | Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands | Nephrology-2015 | 27286  Elena Rampanelli | Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands | Nephrology-2015 | 27286
Elena Rampanelli from Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands is a speaker at Nephrology-2015 ... Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Title: Renal dysfunction and metabolic syndrome: the chicken ... she worked as a PhD student at the Academic Medical Hospital of Amsterdam (The Netherlands). She then carried out her first ... She is currently conducting postdoctoral research at the Academic Medical Hospital in Amsterdam (The Netherlands). ...
more infohttps://www.omicsonline.org/speaker/elena-rampanelli-academic-medical-center-university-of-amsterdam-the-netherlands/
Fewer ER, hospital visits for employer health center patients, per major academic medical center study | SAS  Fewer ER, hospital visits for employer health center patients, per major academic medical center study | SAS
Fewer ER, hospital visits for employer health center patients, per major academic medical center study. Reduced costs, improved ... Fewer ER, hospital visits for employer health center patients, per major academic medical center study ... A Phase III study of the effect of Health Care Center use on employee health is underway. This study is also being conducted by ... "It's clear our Health Care Center makes a big difference to not only the health of SAS employees and families, but the ...
more infohttps://www.sas.com/el_gr/news/press-releases/2016/february/sas-duke-study-employer-health-care-centers.html
Saving the Future of the Academic Medical Center - American College of Cardiology  Saving the Future of the Academic Medical Center - American College of Cardiology
Keywords: Cardiology Magazine, ACC Publications, Academic Medical Centers, Biomedical Research, Delivery of Health Care, Health ... Saving the Future of the Academic Medical Center. Sep 30, 2015 Cardiology Magazine. Share via: ... YOU ARE HERE: Home , Latest in Cardiology , Saving the Future of the Academic Medical Center ... the need for greater efficiency in patient care and new reimbursement models have driven academic medical centers (AMCs) to the ...
more infohttp://www.acc.org/latest-in-cardiology/articles/2015/09/24/17/25/saving-the-future-of-the-academic-medical-center
Abstract 3235: Application of the Appropriateness Criteria for Echocardiography in an Academic Medical Center | Circulation  Abstract 3235: Application of the Appropriateness Criteria for Echocardiography in an Academic Medical Center | Circulation
Abstract 3235: Application of the Appropriateness Criteria for Echocardiography in an Academic Medical Center. Niti R Aggarwal ... Abstract 3235: Application of the Appropriateness Criteria for Echocardiography in an Academic Medical Center ... Abstract 3235: Application of the Appropriateness Criteria for Echocardiography in an Academic Medical Center ... Abstract 3235: Application of the Appropriateness Criteria for Echocardiography in an Academic Medical Center ...
more infohttp://circ.ahajournals.org/content/118/Suppl_18/S_1118.4
Legal Issues Affecting Academic Medical Centers and Other Teaching Hospitals: Honigman Business Law Firm  Legal Issues Affecting Academic Medical Centers and Other Teaching Hospitals: Honigman Business Law Firm
Legal Issues Affecting Academic Medical Centers and Other Teaching Hospitals. Graduate Medical Education: Hospitals and ...
more infohttps://www.honigman.com/firm-newsroom-events-789.html
Duodenal Aspirates for Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth: Yield, PPIs, and Outcomes after Treatment at a Tertiary Academic...  Duodenal Aspirates for Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth: Yield, PPIs, and Outcomes after Treatment at a Tertiary Academic...
... and Outcomes after Treatment at a Tertiary Academic Medical Center. Diana L. Franco, Molly B. Disbrow, Allon Kahn, Laura M. ... Academic Editor: Daiming Fan. Copyright © 2015 Diana L. Franco et al. This is an open access article distributed under the ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/grp/2015/971582/ref/
Academic medical center | definition of academic medical center by Medical dictionary  Academic medical center | definition of academic medical center by Medical dictionary
What is academic medical center? Meaning of academic medical center medical term. What does academic medical center mean? ... Looking for online definition of academic medical center in the Medical Dictionary? academic medical center explanation free. ... Academic medical center , definition of academic medical center by Medical dictionary https://medical-dictionary. ... medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/academic+medical+center',academic medical center,/a,. *Facebook ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/academic+medical+center
Careers.org | University of Mississippi Medical Center -  Academic Programs, Courses, and Degrees  Careers.org | University of Mississippi Medical Center - Academic Programs, Courses, and Degrees
University of Mississippi Medical Center, located in Jackson, Mississippi is a Public, 4-year or above college of 1,000 - 4,999 ... University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMC) is the health sciences campus of the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss) and is ... On the Medical Center campus, the University Hospitals and Health System includes the University Hospital, Winfred L. Wiser ... The university is the only hospital in the state designated as a level 1 trauma center. Specialized hospital services include: ...
more infohttp://www.careers.org/education/colleges/176026?city=jackson&