Acacia: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE. The gums and tanning agents obtained from Acacia are called GUM ARABIC. The common name of catechu is more often used for Areca catechu (ARECA).Cuminum: A plant genus of the family APIACEAE. The seed is used in SPICES.Foeniculum: A plant genus of the family APIACEAE used in SPICES.Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Bignoniaceae: A plant family of the order Lamiales. The family is characterized by oppositely paired, usually compound leaves and bell- or funnel-shaped, bisexual flowers having a five-lobed calyx and corolla.Gum Arabic: Powdered exudate from various Acacia species, especially A. senegal (Leguminosae). It forms mucilage or syrup in water. Gum arabic is used as a suspending agent, excipient, and emulsifier in foods and pharmaceuticals.Tamaricaceae: A plant family of the order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida.Oceanic Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the islands of the central and South Pacific, including Micronesia, Melanesia, Polynesia, and traditionally Australasia.Health Services, Indigenous: Health care provided to specific cultural or tribal peoples which incorporates local customs, beliefs, and taboos.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Northern Territory: Territory in north central Australia, between the states of Queensland and Western Australia. Its capital is Darwin.Plant Weeds: A plant growing in a location where it is not wanted, often competing with cultivated plants.Queensland: A state in northeastern Australia. Its capital is Brisbane. Its coast was first visited by Captain Cook in 1770 and its first settlement (penal) was located on Moreton Bay in 1824. The name Cooksland was first proposed but honor to Queen Victoria prevailed. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p996 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p441)Western Australia: A state in western Australia. Its capital is Perth. It was first visited by the Dutch in 1616 but the English took possession in 1791 and permanent colonization began in 1829. It was a penal settlement 1850-1888, became part of the colonial government in 1886, and was granted self government in 1890. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1329)Heat Stroke: A condition caused by the failure of body to dissipate heat in an excessively hot environment or during PHYSICAL EXERTION in a hot environment. Contrast to HEAT EXHAUSTION, the body temperature in heat stroke patient is dangerously high with red, hot skin accompanied by DELUSIONS; CONVULSIONS; or COMA. It can be a life-threatening emergency and is most common in infants and the elderly.Plants, Medicinal: Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.Toothache: Pain in the adjacent areas of the teeth.Blister: Visible accumulations of fluid within or beneath the epidermis.Flowers: The reproductive organs of plants.Ethnobotany: The study of plant lore and agricultural customs of a people. In the fields of ETHNOMEDICINE and ETHNOPHARMACOLOGY, the emphasis is on traditional medicine and the existence and medicinal uses of PLANTS and PLANT EXTRACTS and their constituents, both historically and in modern times.Plant Pathology: The study of infectious diseases associated with plants.Congresses as Topic: Conferences, conventions or formal meetings usually attended by delegates representing a special field of interest.Cryptococcus neoformans: A species of the fungus CRYPTOCOCCUS. Its teleomorph is Filobasidiella neoformans.Mycology: The study of the structure, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of fungi, and MYCOSES.War Crimes: Criminal acts committed during, or in connection with, war, e.g., maltreatment of prisoners, willful killing of civilians, etc.Australasia: Australia, New Zealand and neighboring islands in the South Pacific Ocean. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed.)Ceremonial Behavior: A series of actions, sometimes symbolic actions which may be associated with a behavior pattern, and are often indispensable to its performance.Medicine, Ayurvedic: The traditional Hindu system of medicine which is based on customs, beliefs, and practices of the Hindu culture. Ayurveda means "the science of Life": veda - science, ayur - life.Ambulatory Care Facilities: Those facilities which administer health services to individuals who do not require hospitalization or institutionalization.Outpatient Clinics, Hospital: Organized services in a hospital which provide medical care on an outpatient basis.Quebec: A province of eastern Canada. Its capital is Quebec. The region belonged to France from 1627 to 1763 when it was lost to the British. The name is from the Algonquian quilibek meaning the place where waters narrow, referring to the gradually narrowing channel of the St. Lawrence or to the narrows of the river at Cape Diamond. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p993 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p440)Materia Medica: Materials or substances used in the composition of traditional medical remedies. The use of this term in MeSH was formerly restricted to historical articles or those concerned with traditional medicine, but it can also refer to homeopathic remedies. Nosodes are specific types of homeopathic remedies prepared from causal agents or disease products.Withania: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain withanolides. Withania somnifera is the source of ashwagandha and aswal.Withanolides: Ergostane derivatives of 28 carbons with oxygens at C1, C22, and C26 positions and the side chain cyclized. They are found in WITHANIA plant genus and have cytotoxic and other effects.Dominican Republic: A republic in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is Santo Domingo. With Haiti, it forms the island of Hispaniola - the Dominican Republic occupying the eastern two thirds, and Haiti, the western third. It was created in 1844 after a revolt against the rule of President Boyer over the entire island of Hispaniola, itself visited by Columbus in 1492 and settled the next year. Except for a brief period of annexation to Spain (1861-65), it has been independent, though closely associated with the United States. Its name comes from the Spanish Santo Domingo, Holy Sunday, with reference to its discovery on a Sunday. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p338, 506 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p151)Mimosa: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that contains kukulkanin, a CHALCONE.Expeditions: Usually refers to planned scientific data-gathering excursions.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Central AmericaMedical Illustration: The field which deals with illustrative clarification of biomedical concepts, as in the use of diagrams and drawings. The illustration may be produced by hand, photography, computer, or other electronic or mechanical methods.Erythrina: A genus of leguminous shrubs or trees, mainly tropical, yielding useful compounds such as ALKALOIDS and PLANT LECTINS.Drugs, Chinese Herbal: Chinese herbal or plant extracts which are used as drugs to treat diseases or promote general well-being. The concept does not include synthesized compounds manufactured in China.Artemisia: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE with strong-smelling foliage. It is a source of SANTONIN and other cytotoxic TERPENES.Herbal Medicine: The study of medicines derived from botanical sources.Medicine, Chinese Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the Chinese culture.Phytotherapy: Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.Comb and Wattles: Fleshy and reddish outgrowth of skin tissue found on top of the head, attached to the sides of the head, and hanging from the mandible of birds such as turkeys and chickens.Ephemerovirus: A genus of the family RHABDOVIRIDAE which primarily infect cattle. EPHEMERAL FEVER VIRUS, BOVINE is the type species.Dahlia: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE that contains antifungal plant defensin.Ants: Insects of the family Formicidae, very common and widespread, probably the most successful of all the insect groups. All ants are social insects, and most colonies contain three castes, queens, males, and workers. Their habits are often very elaborate and a great many studies have been made of ant behavior. Ants produce a number of secretions that function in offense, defense, and communication. (From Borror, et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p676)Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Soil: The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.
Amongst the woody plant species are serious environmental weeds such as Prickly Acacia (Acacia nilotica), Rubbervine ( ... cattle and horses are implicated in the spread of the seeds of weed species such as Prickly Acacia (Acacia nilotica) and Stylo ... Cryptostegia grandiflora), Mesquite (Prosopis spp.), Lantana (Lantana camara and L. montevidensis) and Prickly Pear (Opuntia ...
... a synonym for Acacia nilotica, the gum arabic tree, babul, Egyptian thorn or prickly acacia, a plant species native to Africa ... a moth species found in Saudi Arabia Acacia arabica, ...
... a synonym for Acacia nilotica, the gum arabic tree, babul, Egyptian thorn or prickly acacia, a plant species native to Africa ...
... (commonly known as Egyptian thorn, prickly acacia, scented thorn or scented-pod acacia) is a ... ILDIS LegumeWeb "Acacia nilotica subsp nilotica". AgroForestryTree Database. Archived from the original on 31 December 2013. ... The seed pods of V. nilotica subsp. nilotica have a tannin content of about 25-33.8%. The pods without seeds have a tannin ... "Phylogenetic position and revised classification of Acacia s.l. (Fabaceae: Mimosoideae) in Africa, including new combinations ...
Common names for it include babul, kikar and prickly acacia. Its uses include chemical products, environmental management, ... Vachellia nilotica subsp. indica is a perennial tree native to Bangladesh, India, Myanmar, Nepal and Pakistan. It is also ... The bark of V. nilotica subsp. indica has a tannin content of greater than 20%. The pods without seeds have a tannin content of ... "Phylogenetic position and revised classification of Acacia s.l. (Fabaceae: Mimosoideae) in Africa, including new combinations ...
... , a subspecies of honey bee and one of the important pollinating agents for coconut Palms Acacia nilotica subsp. indica, ... the prickly pear, the Indian fig opuntia or barbary fig, a cactus species and a long-domesticated crop plant important in ...
"Prickly acacia - Acacia nilotica" (PDF). Weed Management Guide. Weeds of National Significance. 2003. ISBN 1-920932-14-3. Zabré ... Vachellia nilotica (as Acacia nilotica) (www.frienvis.nic.in) Acacia nilotica in West African plants - A Photo Guide.. ... p. 7. "Vachellia nilotica (as Acacia nilotica)". Tropical Forages. Carter, J.O. (1998). "7.2 Acacia nilotica: a Tree Legume out ... "Acacia nilotica". LegumeWeb. International Legume Database & Information Service. "Vachellia nilotica (as Acacia nilotica)". ...
Prickly acacia subsp. kraussiana (Benth.) P.J.H.Hurter & Mabb. subsp. leiocarpa (Brenan) P.J.H.Hurter & Mabb. subsp. nilotica ( ... Acacia callicoma Meisn. Acacia harala Thulin & Gifri Acacia hunteri Oliv. Acacia johnwoodii Boulos Acacia planifrons Koenig ex ... Ebinger-Whitethorn Acacia, Mescat Acacia Vachellia cookii (Saff.) Seigler & Ebinger-Cook Acacia, Cockspur Acacia Vachellia ... Acacia pseudo-eburnea J.R. Drumm. ex Dunn Acacia tanjorensis Ragup., Thoth. & Mahad. Acacia yemenensis Boulos Vachellia × ...
Acacia truculenta Acacia trudgeniana Acacia truncata Acacia tuberculata Acacia tysonii-Tyson's Wattle Acacia ulicifolia-Prickly ... The genus was previously typified with the African species Acacia scorpioides (L.) W.F.Wright, a synonym of Acacia nilotica (L ... tenuis Acacia aprepta Acacia aprica Acacia aptaneura Acacia arcuatilis Acacia areolata Acacia argyraea Acacia arida Acacia ... Acacia abrupta Acacia acellerata Acacia adenogonia Acacia adnata Acacia amanda Acacia ammophila Acacia amyctica Acacia ...
sponge wattle , prickly mimosa bush, prickly Moses, needle bush, north-west curara, sheep's briar,, thorny acacia, thorny ... Acacia nilotica. This first (European) illustration of the plant was later designated as the (lecto-)type.[20][21] In 1753 ... Native Plants of South Texas: Sweet Acacia (Acacia farnesiana). *Acacia smallii: University of Arizona Pima County Cooperative ... Acacia pinetorum, the pineland acacia or pineland wattle,[12] is also disputed: ILDIS continues to recognise A. pinetorum,[4] ...
Acacia nilotica - Gum Arabic tree [378] Acacia auriculiformis - Northern black wattle [379] Acacia crassicarpa - Northern ... Prickly pear Stone pine Cluster pine Pampas grass Guava St John's wort Weeping willow Water hyacinth Acacia cyclops Acacia ... wattle [380] Acacia saligna - Port Jackson wattle [381] Acacia melanoxylon - Australian blackwood [382] Schefflera actinophylla ... mearnsii Acacia saligna Centranthus ruber Eucalyptus Hakea Lantana Tipuana tipu Bos taurus (cattle) Bubalus bubalis (water ...
Acacia blue (Amblypodia vivarna) Ancema anysis Ancema ctesia Arnold's ciliate blue (Anthene arnoldi) Red forewing (Anthene ... Prickly cave crayfish (Cambarus hamulatus) Hiwassee crayfish (Cambarus hiwasseensis) Rocky river crayfish (Cambarus hobbsorum) ... mertoni Caridina moeri Caridina multidentata Caridina natalensis Caridina natarajani Caridina neglecta Caridina nilotica ... Acacia katydid (Terpnistria lobulata) Zebra katydid (Terpnistria zebrata) Striped grass katydid (Tylopsis bilineolata) Common ...
... ear-leaf acacia Acacia basedowii, Basedow's wattle Acacia bussei Acacia caesia Acacia chiapensis Acacia crassiuscula Acacia ... border prickly-pear Opuntia aurantiaca, tiger-pear Opuntia aurea, golden prickly-pear Opuntia aureispina, golden-spined prickly ... Azolla microphylla Azolla nilotica Azolla pinnata, ferny azolla Marsilea aegyptiaca, Egyptian water-clover Marsilea apposita ... hairy acacia Acacia petraea, lancewood Acacia piauhiensis Acacia pluricapitata Acacia richii Acacia riparia Acacia semirigida, ...
... (known as silver wattle, blue wattle or mimosa) is a species of Acacia, native to southeastern Australia in New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania, and the Australian Capital Territory and widely introduced in Mediterranean, warm temperate, and highland tropical landscapes. Along with other bipinnate wattles, Acacia dealbata is classified in the section Botrycephalae within the subgenus Phyllodineae in the genus Acacia. An analysis of genomic and chloroplast DNA along with morphological characters found that the section is polyphyletic, though the close relationships of many species were unable to be resolved. Acacia dealbata appears to be most closely related to A. mearnsii, A. nanodealbata and A. baileyana. It is a fast-growing evergreen tree or shrub growing up to 30 m tall, typically a pioneer species after fire. The leaves are bipinnate, glaucous blue-green to silvery ...
It was first described by Europeans under the name Acacia Indica Farnesiana in 1625 by Tobias Aldini from plants grown in Rome in the Farnese Gardens from seed collected in Santo Domingo, in what is now the Dominican Republic, which germinated in 1611. Tobias Aldini included an illustration of the plant, which he contrasted with an illustration of the first known Acacia; Acacia nilotica. This first (European) illustration of the plant was later designated as the (lecto-)type.[20][21] In 1753 Linnaeus used Aldini's work as basis for his taxon Mimosa farnesiana. In 1806 Carl Ludwig Willdenow moved this taxon to the genus Acacia.[1]. Partly due to its wide distributional range the taxon has attracted many synonyms. Especially in the United States the taxonomy has been confused. In 1809 Willdenow described Acacia acicularis from ...
... , the highland tamarind,[2] is a tree (or shrub in its higher places) endemic to Réunion island where it is commonly named tamarin des hauts[1] The tree has a juvenile stage where its leaves have a pinnate arrangement, but in the adult stage the leaves diminish and the phyllode becomes the dominant photosynthetic structure. It has been introduced into Madagascar[3] where it grows in a subhumid climate at an altitude of about 500-1000 m above sea level.[3] Genetic sequence analysis has shown its closest relative is Acacia koa of Hawaii; the estimated time of divergence is about 1.4 million years ago.[4][5] A. heterophylla sequences nest within those of the more diverse A. koa, making the latter species paraphyletic.[5] Both species are descended from an ancestral species in Australia, presumably their sister species, Acacia melanoxylon; the means of dispersal to Hawaii and then to Réunion (the latter trip a distance of 18,000 km) is ...
Èn acacia al gome u acacia do Nil, c' est on bouxhon d' Afrike, do Moyén-Levant disk' a l' Inde ki crexhe sol boird do dezert, tot-z alårdjixhant s' coxhlaedje al copete.. I sopoite bén l' setchresse.. No e sincieus latén : Acacia nilotica. ...
... , also known as Acacia farnesiana, and previously Mimosa farnesiana, commonly known as sweet acacia, huisache or needle bush, is so named because of the numerous thorns distributed along its branches. The native range of V. farnesiana is uncertain. While the point of origin is Mexico and Central America, the species has a pantropical distribution incorporating northern Australia and southern Asia. It remains unclear whether the extra-American distribution is primarily natural or anthropogenic. It is deciduous over part of its range, but evergreen in most locales. The species grows to a height of up to 8 m (26 ft) and has a lifespan of about 25-50 years. The plant has been recently[when?] spread to many new locations as a result of human activity and it is considered a serious weed in Fiji, where locals call it Ellington's curse. It thrives in dry, saline, or sodic soils. It is also a serious pest plant in parts of Australia, including ...
... (sweet wattle) is a shrub species endemic to Australia.[2] It grows to between 0.3 and 3.5 metres high and has smooth purplish-brown or light green bark and has straight or slightly curving blue-green phyllodes [3][4] The pale yellow to near white globular flower heads generally appear between April and September in its native range.[3] These are followed by flattened, bluish oblong pods which are up to 2 to 5 cm long and 8 to 19 mm wide.[3][4] The species was first formally described by English botanist James Edward Smith in 1791 in Transactions of the Linnean Society of London He described it with reference to a cultivated plant at Syon House which had been raised by Thomas Hoy from seed that originated from New South Wales.[1] The species was transferred into the genus Acacia by Carl Ludwig Willdenow in 1806.[1] The species occurs naturally on sandy soils in heathland and dry sclerophyll forest in South Australia and Victoria, Tasmania, New South Wales and ...
Aboriginal Australians have traditionally harvested the seeds of some species, to be ground into flour and eaten as a paste or baked into a cake. The seeds contain as much as 25% more protein than common cereals, and they store well for long periods due to the hard seed coats.[21] In addition to utilizing the edible seed and gum, the people employed the timber for implements, weapons, fuel and musical instruments.[6] In ancient Egypt, an ointment made from the ground leaves of the plant was used to treat hemorrhoids.[23] A number of species, most notably A. mangium (hickory wattle), A. mearnsii (black wattle) and A. saligna (coojong), are economically important and are widely planted globally for wood products, tannin, firewood and fodder.[8] A. melanoxylon (blackwood) and A. aneura (mulga) supply some of the most attractive timbers in the genus.[6] Black wattle bark supported the tanning industries of several countries, and may supply tannins for production of waterproof adhesives.[6]. ...
... , commonly known as ironwood or southern ironwood, is a tree native to Central Australia. It is a graceful, pendulous shade tree, which grows from about 4-16 m tall and has a trunk with a diameter of up to about 0.45 m. Young plants are spiky leaved. It has pale yellow flowers after winter rains. It is usually found in areas with about 220-350 mm/year of average rainfall. Traditionally, Australian Aborigines would use the gum from the tree as a sweet bushtucker treat. Its name in the Arrernte language of Central Australia is Ngkwarle athenge arlperle. It is still sometimes eaten today. The gum is snapped off the branches, either clear or red. It is then ground and mixed with a little water, then left to set again to a chewable gum, and eaten with a small stick. The tree makes good forage for livestock. The seeds are edible and are 28.9% protein. Parts of the tree are used topically to treat skin problems such as burns, cuts, scabies, sores and it is also used for treating ...
22 Acacia Avenue é uma canção da banda de heavy metal britânica Iron Maiden, presente no álbum The Number of the Beast.[1] A canção dá sequencia à saga da prostituta Charlotte, iniciada no primeiro álbum com "Charlotte the Harlot".. ...
Strict service-service interactions are very rare, for reasons that are far from clear.[6] One example is the relationship between sea anemones and anemone fish in the family Pomacentridae: the anemones provide the fish with protection from predators (which cannot tolerate the stings of the anemone's tentacles) and the fish defend the anemones against butterflyfish (family Chaetodontidae), which eat anemones. However, in common with many mutualisms, there is more than one aspect to it: in the anemonefish-anemone mutualism, waste ammonia from the fish feed the symbiotic algae that are found in the anemone's tentacles.[9][10] Therefore, what appears to be a service-service mutualism in fact has a service-resource component. A second example is that of the relationship between some ants in the genus Pseudomyrmex and trees in the genus Acacia, such as the whistling thorn and bullhorn acacia. The ants nest inside the plant's thorns. In exchange ...
... is a moth of the family Geometridae. It is found in northern India, Sri Lanka, south-eastern Asia and probably throughout Sundaland. Wingspan is about 42mm. Fore wings with outer margin slightly angled at vein 4. Male with dilated hind tibia. Very similar to Semiothisa eleonora, differs from black suffusion especially beyond the medial band of both wings. Fore wings with a black speck at end of cell. Hind wings with black patches beyond the band more numerous. A white patch found on the outer area below vein 4. Larva greenish, with light, dull yellow longitudinal bands. Larvae have been reared on Acacia species. Males are known to feed from mammalian body fluids. "Godonela nora Walker". jpmoth. Retrieved 8 September 2016. Hampson G. F. (1892). "The Fauna Of British India Including Ceylon And Burma Moths Vol-iii". Digital Library of India. p. 558. Retrieved 4 July 2016. [permanent dead link] "Godonela nora Walker comb. n". The Moths of Borneo. Retrieved 8 September 2016. ...
... (DMDA) is an organic compound belonging to the phenethylamine family. It is related structurally to the alkaloid epinine (N-methyldopamine) and to the major neurotransmitter dopamine (of which it is the N,N-dimethylated analog). Because of its structural relationship to dopamine, DMDA has been the subject of a number of pharmacological investigations. DMDA has been detected in Acacia rigidula. DMDA has been reported from the plant Acacia rigidula Benth. (Fabaceae), in which it has been detected at levels of ~ 11-45 ppm. Since N,N-dimethyldopamine is chemically an amine, it is basic (a weak base, technically), but it is also a catechol (a 1,2-dihydroxybenzene), which gives it weakly acidic properties, so that the compound is amphoteric. Several different methods have been reported for the preparation of DMDA. An early synthesis by Buck and co-workers began with 3,4-dimethoxybenzaldehyde (veratraldehyde), which was condensed with hippuric ...
2.0 2.1 Roskov Y., Kunze T., Orrell T., Abucay L., Paglinawan L., Culham A., Bailly N., Kirk P., Bourgoin T., Baillargeon G., Decock W., De Wever A., Didžiulis V. (ed) (2014). Species 2000 & ITIS Catalogue of Life: 2014 Annual Checklist.. Species 2000: Reading, UK.. Retrieved on 26 May 2014. ...
Discover Nature at JCU Plants NQ Weeds by common name Vachellia nilotica (syn. Acacia nilotica) ... Vachellia nilotica (syn. Acacia nilotica). Common name(s). Prickly Acacia. Flower colour, life form ...
prickly acacia (babul), Acacia nilotica * rhatany, Krameria spp., including K argentea and K triandra ... prickly acacia, rhatany, rosemary, saffron, sage, sandalwood, spearmint, spilanthes, star anise, thyme, tomar, tulsi, turmeric ...
Amongst the woody plant species are serious environmental weeds such as Prickly Acacia (Acacia nilotica), Rubbervine ( ... cattle and horses are implicated in the spread of the seeds of weed species such as Prickly Acacia (Acacia nilotica) and Stylo ... Cryptostegia grandiflora), Mesquite (Prosopis spp.), Lantana (Lantana camara and L. montevidensis) and Prickly Pear (Opuntia ...
While most species of acacia trees and shrubs are found in Australia, others thrive in Africa, Europe, Asia, and North and ... Scientific name: Acacia nilotica. *Other common names: Thorn mimosa, gum arabic, scented thorn, Egyptian thorn, prickly acacia ... Other common names: Star-leaved acacia, prickly mo, star acacia, whorl-leaved acacia, prickly-leaved acacia, prickly mimosa ... Scientific name: Acacia abyssinica. *Other common names: Flat top acacia, feathery acacia, Ethiopian acacia, Invanaa flat-top ...
Woodland of Chinee apple, Zizyphus mauritiana with a large pocket of prickly acacia (Acacia nilotica), near Home Hill, ... From a potential problem now to a recognized disaster: The Prickly Acacia (Acacia nilotica). This spiny tree originates from ... Another prickly Acacia species found around these parts is the plant known as Mimosa Bush (Acacia farnesiana). Although some ... Acacia nilotica, Mesquite (declared in Queensland), our native Acacia A.auriculiformis (topping the list on weeds of Florida) ...
... a synonym for Acacia nilotica, the gum arabic tree, babul, Egyptian thorn or prickly acacia, a plant species native to Africa ... a moth species found in Saudi Arabia Acacia arabica, ...
Synonym: Acacia nilotica (L.) Willd. Ex Delile. Common names: scented thorn, prickly acacia. ... Vachellia nilotica (L.) P.J.H.Hurter & Mabb. Family: Fabaceae - Mimosaceae. Declared Pest, Prohibited - s12 (C2 Prohibited). ...
Acacia nilotica- known as thorn mimosa, scented thorn, Vachellia nilotica, or prickly acacia-splotches across the semiarid land ... Prickly acacia is a super plant. It can grow up to 65 feet tall, with a crown as wide. It thrives in poor, dry, and saline ... Of all the acacias, the nilotica has one of the deepest rooting systems, up to nine feet, which means it can tap into ... Prickly acacias may stand two dozen feet apart but underground they clasp the soil together in a tight, resilient web. Along a ...
Prickly acacia (Vachellia nilotica subsp. indica, Family: Fabaceae) is an invasive woody weed in coastal and semi-arid ... 1. Assessing the potential of fungi isolated from dieback-affected trees as biological control agents for prickly acacia ( ... Acacia; Asphondylia; Botryosphaeria dothidea; Prosopis; biological control; biological control agents; conidia; eggs; flower ... Lasiodiplodia; Parkinsonia aculeata; Vachellia nilotica; biological control; biological control agents; dieback; field ...
Acacia nilotica (gum arabic tree, Babul/Kikar, Egyptian thorn, Sant tree, Al-sant or prickly acacia), Agauria salicifolia and ...
Prickly acacia; Acacia nilotica; weed; biological control; biocontrol; exploration; native-range survey; India. ... Dhileepan, K. (2010) Australia takes prickly acacia biocontrol search to India. Biocontrol News and Information, 30 (4). 73N- ... Livestock Australia and the Queensland Government is putting new life into the search for biocontrol agents for prickly acacia ...
Acacia nilotica. Family: Mimosaceae. Name of black babool in different languages:. English: Prickly acacia, Rusty Acacia, Thorn ...
Prickly acacia (Vachellia nilotica subsp. indica, Family: Fabaceae) is an invasive woody weed in coastal and semi-arid ... Assessing the potential of fungi isolated from dieback-affected trees as biological control agents for prickly acacia ( ... field experimentation, etc ; Lasiodiplodia; Parkinsonia aculeata; Vachellia nilotica; biological control; biological control ...
Acacia. * Vachellia (syn. Acacia) nilotica* (Prickly Acacia) * Vachellia (syn. Acacia) farnesiana* (Mimosa Bush, Prickly Acacia ... Acaciella angustissima* (White Ball Acacia, Prairie Acacia, Wild Divi divi) African Tulip Tree. * Spathodea campanulata* ( ... Salsola australis* (S. kali is non-Australian) (Roly-poly, Prickly saltwort, Tumbleweed) ...
Assessment of the biological control impact of seed predators on the invasive shrub Acacia nilotica (Prickly acacia) in ... MOLLUSCICIDAL CERCARICIDAL AND MIRACIDICIDAL ACTIVITIES OF ACACIA-NILOTICA-SSP-NILOTICA AND ACACIA-NILOTICA-SSP-ADANSONII. ... augusta Abrus precatorius Abutilon hirtum Abutilon indicum Acacia catechu Acacia farnesiana Acacia horrida Acacia nilotica ... Prospects for the biological control of prickly acacia, Acacia nilotica (L.) Willd. ex Del. (Mimosaceae) in Australia. Marohasy ...
... prickly acacia, black piquant, egyptian acacia, indian gum arabic tree, gum arabic tree, thorn mimosa, thorny acacia, kikar, ... Acacia karroo, Acacia tortilis, Acacia sieberiana, Acacia rhemniana), young dried leaves of Acacia nilotica were found to be ... Acacia nilotica subsp. adansonii (Guill. & Perr.) Brenan, Acacia scorpioides (L.) W. Wight, Acacia subalata Vatke, Acacia vera ... Acacia nilotica browse is very palatable to rabbits: young Acacia nilotica trees are so abundantly grazed by wild rabbits in ...
Nile acacia, prickly acacia, prickly mimosa, scented pod acacia, scented-thorn, thorny acacia, thorn-mimosa ... Acacia arabica (Lam.) Willd. var. indica Benth.. Acacia indica Benth.. Acacia nilotica (L.) Willd. ex Delile. Acacia nilotica ( ... the National Weeds Strategy Strategic Plan for prickly acacia (Acacia nilotica), which is available online at www.weeds.org.au/ ... the National Case Studies Manual for prickly acacia (Acacia nilotica), which is available online at www.weeds.org.au/docs/ ...
Constraints to the introduction of biocontrol agents for prickly acacia (Acacia nilotica) J. Marohasy pp. 33-38 View pdf · ...
A property level economic assessment of prickly acacia (Acacia nilotica) on the Mitchell grass downs of Queensland E.N. Miller ... Biological control of prickly acacia in Australia W.A. Palmer pp. 239-242 View pdf · Export citation The failure of management ... Environmental factors influencing the establishment and growth of Acacia nilotica and Prosopis pallida M.J. Barker, W.J. Dorney ...
... and Prickly Acacia (Acacia nilotica). Field trials using endophytic inoculum inserted into weed stems are currently underway. ...
However, when mixed with charcoal of say Kikar (Acacia nilotica) and with char of pine needles, good enough fuel briquettes can ... Lantana shrubs are dense and prickly, bruising hands and tearing clothes of those who try to cut them. Decades ago, when timber ...
Wings: Fever tree bark, Acacia xanthophloea, mussel shells, Acacia nilotica pods. Body: Baobab pod ,Adansonia digitata, Floss ... Wings: Pine tree bark, prickly pear leaves, Protea flower bracts,Abrus precatorius seeds ... Head: Acacia erioloba thorn, Cycad seed, crayfish feelers, acorn seed, Quercus sp. ... Legs: Rose twigs, Cycad leaves, Floss silk tree pod, Acacia thorns and twigs ...
Acacia nilotica ssp. Tomentosa. Tomentose Babool. கறுவேளை. Live. Mechanical barrier. 3. Acacia sinuata (Lour.) Merr.. Prickly ... Acacia Mellifera. -. -. -. Live. Mechanical barrier. 2b. Acacia nilotica subsp. indica Gum Arabic, Babool. கறுவேளை. Live. ... Acacia caesia (L.) Willd.. Climbing prickly shrub. Dried. Mechanical barrier. 2. Acacia chundra Willd.. Small tree. Dried / ... Acacia torta (Roxb.) Craib.. Prickly climbing shrub. Dried. Mechanical barrier. 4a. Acalypha lanceolata. Indian Copperleaf, ...
Acacia mellifera, Acacia nilotica, Senegalia senegal, Acacia seyal, Acacia tortilis, Balanites aegyptiaca, Grewia bicolor, ... in spite of their low DM yield and the difficulties in harvesting them by hand due to their prickly stem, was encouraged since ... Acacia nilotica) (Sawe et al., 1998).. Calves. In Ethiopia, leaves of Senegalia brevispica, babul (Acacia tortilis) pods, ... as it was demonstrated for other acacia foliages rich in tannins such as Acacia nilotica (Mashamaite et al., 2009). ...
Local shrub pods such as camel thorn pods (Acacia erioloba) (14%), arabic gum tree/ scented thorn (Acacia nilotica) (18%), ... prickly pear) for the microorganism to get energy to use these Nitrogen to produce their proteins! ...
  • Do not forget to add some readily available sugar source (molasses, prickly pear) for the microorganism to get energy to use these Nitrogen to produce their proteins! (farm4trade.com)