Premature separation of the normally implanted PLACENTA from the UTERUS. Signs of varying degree of severity include UTERINE BLEEDING, uterine MUSCLE HYPERTONIA, and FETAL DISTRESS or FETAL DEATH.
Diseases of Old World and New World monkeys. This term includes diseases of baboons but not of chimpanzees or gorillas (= APE DISEASES).
Death of the developing young in utero. BIRTH of a dead FETUS is STILLBIRTH.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
Pathological processes or abnormal functions of the PLACENTA.
A highly vascularized mammalian fetal-maternal organ and major site of transport of oxygen, nutrients, and fetal waste products. It includes a fetal portion (CHORIONIC VILLI) derived from TROPHOBLASTS and a maternal portion (DECIDUA) derived from the uterine ENDOMETRIUM. The placenta produces an array of steroid, protein and peptide hormones (PLACENTAL HORMONES).
Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.
Cells lining the outside of the BLASTOCYST. After binding to the ENDOMETRIUM, trophoblasts develop into two distinct layers, an inner layer of mononuclear cytotrophoblasts and an outer layer of continuous multinuclear cytoplasm, the syncytiotrophoblasts, which form the early fetal-maternal interface (PLACENTA).

Plasma total homocysteine, pregnancy complications, and adverse pregnancy outcomes: the Hordaland Homocysteine study. (1/87)

BACKGROUND: Total homocysteine (tHcy) measured in serum or plasma is a marker of folate status and a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to investigate associations between tHcy and complications and adverse outcomes of pregnancy. DESIGN: Plasma tHcy values measured in 1992-1993 in 5883 women aged 40-42 y were compared with outcomes and complications of 14492 pregnancies in the same women that were reported to the Medical Birth Registry of Norway from 1967 to 1996. RESULTS: When we compared the upper with the lower quartile of plasma tHcy, the adjusted risk for preeclampsia was 32% higher [odds ratio (OR): 1. 32; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.77; P for trend = 0.02], that for prematurity was 38% higher (OR: 1.38; 95% CI: 1.09, 1.75; P for trend = 0.005), and that for very low birth weight was 101% higher (OR: 2.01; 95% CI: 1.23, 3.27; P for trend = 0.003). These associations were stronger during the years closest to the tHcy determination (1980-1996), when there was also a significant relation between tHcy concentration and stillbirth (OR: 2.03; 95% CI: 0.98, 4.21; P for trend = 0.02). Neural tube defects and clubfoot had significant associations with plasma tHcy. Placental abruption had no relation with tHcy quartile, but the adjusted OR when tHcy concentrations >15 micromol/L were compared with lower values was 3.13 (95% CI: 1.63, 6. 03; P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: Elevated tHcy concentration is associated with common pregnancy complications and adverse pregnancy outcomes.  (+info)

Primary aldosteronism in pregnancy. (2/87)

Aldosteronism is a rare complication of pregnancy. We report a case of a 26-year-old woman who became pregnant soon after a diagnosis of primary aldosteronism due to left adrenal adenoma was made. Only oral potassium supplementation was required in addition to routine prenatal care until 36 weeks' gestation. Subsequently, antihypertensive medication was needed to control elevated blood pressure. A healthy male infant was delivered by cesarean section because of abruptio placentae. The postoperative course was uneventful. Left adrenalectomy was conducted eight months after delivery under laparoscopic visualization. In this case report, we discuss management of aldosteronism in pregnancy and review the literature.  (+info)

Placental abruption and perinatal mortality in the United States. (3/87)

Placental abruption is an uncommon obstetric complication associated with high perinatal mortality rates. The authors explored the associations of abruption with fetal growth restriction, preterm delivery, and perinatal survival. The study was based on 7,508,655 singleton births delivered in 1995 and 1996 in the United States. Abruption was recorded in 6.5 per 1,000 births. Perinatal mortality was 119 per 1,000 births with abruption compared with 8.2 per 1,000 among all other births. The high mortality with abruption was due, in part, to its strong association with preterm delivery; 55% of the excess perinatal deaths with abruption were due to early delivery. Furthermore, babies in the lowest centile of weight (<1% adjusted for gestational age) were almost nine times as likely to be born with abruption than those in the heaviest (> or =90%) birth weight centiles. This relative risk progressively declined with higher birth weight centiles. After controlling for fetal growth restriction and early delivery, the high risk of perinatal death associated with abruption persisted. Even babies born at 40 weeks of gestation and birth weight of 3,500-3,999 g (where mortality was lowest) had a 25-fold higher mortality with abruption. The link between fetal growth restriction and abruption suggests that the origins of abruption lie at least in midpregnancy and perhaps even earlier.  (+info)

Social deprivation and the causes of stillbirth and infant mortality. (4/87)

AIMS: To investigate the relation between social deprivation and causes of stillbirth and infant mortality. METHODS: Stillbirths and infant deaths in 6347 enumeration districts in Wales were linked with the Townsend score of social deprivation. In 1993-98 there were 211 072 live births, 1147 stillbirths, and 1223 infant deaths. Poisson regression analysis was used to estimate the magnitude of effect for associations between the Townsend score and categories of death by age and the causes of death. The relative risk of death between most and least deprived enumeration districts was derived. RESULTS: Relative risk of combined stillbirth and infant death was 1.53 (95% CI 1.35 to 1.74) in the most deprived compared with the least deprived enumeration districts. The early neonatal mortality rate was not significantly associated with deprivation. Sudden infant death syndrome showed a 307% (95% CI 197% to 456%) increase in mortality across the range of deprivation. Deaths caused by specific conditions and infection were also associated with deprivation, but there was no evidence of a significant association with deaths caused by placental abruption, intrapartum asphyxia, and prematurity. CONCLUSIONS: Collaborative public health action at national and local level to target resources in deprived communities and reduce these inequalities in child health is required. Early neonatal mortality rates and deaths from intrapartum asphyxia and prematurity are not significantly associated with deprivation and may be more appropriate quality of clinical care indicators than stillbirth, perinatal, and neonatal mortality rates.  (+info)

Placental abruption among singleton and twin births in the United States: risk factor profiles. (5/87)

The authors performed a population-based epidemiologic study to evaluate and contrast risk factor profiles for placental abruption among singleton and twin gestations. Data were derived from linked US birth/infant death files for 1995 and 1996, comprising 7,465,858 singleton births and 193,266 twin births. The authors also evaluated effect modification between smoking and hypertension and the effect of a dose-response relation with number of cigarettes smoked daily on abruption risk. Abruption was recorded in 5.9 per 1,000 singleton births and 12.2 per 1,000 twin births. Risk factors for abruption among singleton and twin births, respectively, included preterm premature rupture of membranes (adjusted relative risks (RRs) = 4.89 and 2.01), eclampsia (RRs = 3.58 and 1.67), anemia (RRs = 2.23 and 2.33), hydramnios (RRs = 2.04 and 1.66), renal disorders (RRs = 1.54 and 2.56), and intrapartum fever (>100 degrees F) (RRs = 1.17 and 1.69). Chronic hypertension (RR = 2.38) and pregnancy-induced hypertension (RR = 2.34) were risk factors for abruption in singleton births but not in twin births. Number of cigarettes smoked daily demonstrated a dose-response trend for abruption risk in singletons and twins. Abruption was more likely to occur among smokers with chronic hypertension (RRs = 4.66 and 3.15) and eclampsia (RRs = 6.28 and 5.08). The authors conclude that abruption is twice as likely to occur in twins as in singletons with differing risk factor profiles. This suggests that abruption in twins may result from different pathophysiologic processes.  (+info)

Quantitative digital analysis of regional placental perfusion using power Doppler in placental abruption. (6/87)

PURPOSE: To apply digital imaging techniques to the quantification of placental vascularity using power Doppler. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Regional placental blood flow was measured in a case of large placental abruption, shortly after presentation and 1 week later. Images were stored digitally and analysed using purpose-designed software (CQ Analysis) to extract and measure vascular energy information. The integrated color energy (ICE) was determined in the main body of placental tissue and in a cotyledon isolated by the retroplacental clot. RESULTS: Initial assessment at 25 weeks showed only a small difference in integrated energy between normal placenta and the isolated cotyledon (ICE ratio 1.44, P < 0.04). One week later, perfusion in the isolated cotyledon had fallen both on qualitative and quantitative assessment (ICE ratio 3.98, P < 0.0001). This area subsequently became devascularized. CONCLUSION: Placental perfusion may be quantified using digital power Doppler analysis. Further studies are indicated to evaluate its role in assessing regional and/or global placental perfusion as well as fetal organ perfusion.  (+info)

Uterine artery Doppler velocimetry and the outcome of pregnancies resulting from ICSI. (7/87)

BACKGROUND: An increased incidence of pregnancy complications following assisted reproduction has been reported. The use of uterine artery Doppler ultrasound may aid the prediction of such complications. METHODS: Doppler was performed at 18-24 weeks gestation in 114 singleton and 32 twin pregnancies after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and compared with a control group matched for age, parity and plurality. Outcome variables included gestational age at delivery, prematurity, preterm premature rupture of membrane (PPROM), birth weight, birth weight discordance of >20% in twins, small for gestational age (SGA), mode of delivery, development of pre-eclampsia and placental abruption. RESULTS: Compared with the controls, there were no significant differences concerning uterine Doppler parameters, pregnancy complications and the neonatal outcome, either in singleton or in twin pregnancies. According to Doppler results and/or risk factors by medical history, 42% of singleton ICSI and 39% of spontaneous singleton pregnancies were considered as high risk. In singletons, abnormal Doppler findings were associated with pre-eclampsia in 22% and SGA in 26% of ICSI patients, compared with 33 and 21% in controls; in contrast, 0 and 10% in ICSI and 3 and 6% in controls showed these complications but no risk factors respectively. No correlation was found between PPROM, prematurity, the rate of Caesarean section and pathological Doppler results. CONCLUSIONS: Uterine Doppler examination holds the potential to identify patients with an increased risk for developing pregnancy complications. According to our results, this risk is not elevated after ICSI treatment, therefore the decision of offering an intensified antenatal care should be based on the results of Doppler examination or risks by medical history rather than the mode of conception.  (+info)

Review of unexplained infertility and obstetric outcome: a 10 year review. (8/87)

BACKGROUND: Increased maternal and fetal risks have been reported in pregnancies following unexplained infertility. Our aims were to examine the obstetric and perinatal outcome of singleton pregnancies in couples with unexplained infertility and explore the impact of fertility treatment. METHODS: Women with unexplained infertility were identified from the Aberdeen Fertility Clinic Database. Their unit numbers were matched against the Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal Databank (AMND) in order to extract obstetric records of those women with subsequent pregnancy outcomes. The general obstetric population served as a control group. RESULTS: Women with unexplained infertility were older [30.8 versus 27.9 years, 95% confidence interval (CI) for difference = +2.4 to +3.4] and more likely to be primiparous (59 versus 40%, 95% CI = +1.3 to +1.9). After adjusting for age and parity they had a higher incidence of pre-eclampsia, abruptio placentae, preterm labour, emergency Caesarean section and induction of labour in comparison with the general population (P < 0.05). Perinatal outcome did not differ between women with unexplained infertility and those of the general population. The multiple pregnancy rate was 5.4% higher following fertility treatment than in women who conceived spontaneously (95% CI = +2.8 to +9.7). CONCLUSIONS: Women with unexplained infertility are at higher risk of obstetric complications which persist even after adjusting for age, parity and fertility treatment. The reasons are however unclear and merit further study.  (+info)

Abruptio placentae, also known as placental abruption, is a medical condition that occurs when the placenta separates from the uterus before the baby is born. The placenta is an organ that develops in the uterus during pregnancy to provide oxygen and nutrients to the growing fetus.

In abruptio placentae, the separation of the placenta from the uterus can cause bleeding, which can be serious or life-threatening for both the mother and the baby. The severity of the condition depends on how much of the placenta has separated from the uterus and how much bleeding has occurred.

Abruptio placentae can cause a range of symptoms, including vaginal bleeding, abdominal pain, contractions, and fetal distress. In severe cases, it can lead to preterm labor, low birth weight, and even stillbirth. The exact cause of abruptio placentae is not always known, but risk factors include high blood pressure, smoking, cocaine use, trauma to the abdomen, and advanced maternal age. Treatment may involve hospitalization, bed rest, medication to prevent contractions, or delivery of the baby if the pregnancy is at term.

There is no single medical definition for "Monkey Diseases." However, monkeys can carry and be infected with various diseases that are zoonotic, meaning they can be transmitted from animals to humans. Some examples include:

1. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV): A virus similar to Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) that causes AIDS in monkeys. It is not typically harmful to monkeys but can cause AIDS in humans if transmitted, which is rare.
2. Herpes B Virus: Also known as Macacine herpesvirus 1 or Cercopithecine herpesvirus 1, it is a virus that commonly infects macaque monkeys. It can be transmitted to humans through direct contact with an infected monkey's saliva, eye fluid, or cerebrospinal fluid, causing a severe and potentially fatal illness called B encephalitis.
3. Tuberculosis (TB): Monkeys can contract and transmit tuberculosis to humans, although it is not common.
4. Simian Retrovirus (SRV): A virus that can infect both monkeys and great apes, causing immunodeficiency similar to HIV/AIDS in humans. It is not known to infect or cause disease in humans.
5. Various parasitic diseases: Monkeys can carry and transmit several parasites, including malaria-causing Plasmodium species, intestinal worms, and other parasites that can affect human health.

It's important to note that while monkeys can carry and transmit these diseases, the risk of transmission is generally low, and most cases occur in individuals who have close contact with monkeys, such as primatologists, zookeepers, or laboratory workers. Always follow safety guidelines when interacting with animals, including monkeys, to minimize the risk of disease transmission.

Fetal death, also known as stillbirth or intrauterine fetal demise, is defined as the death of a fetus at 20 weeks of gestation or later. The criteria for defining fetal death may vary slightly by country and jurisdiction, but in general, it refers to the loss of a pregnancy after the point at which the fetus is considered viable outside the womb.

Fetal death can occur for a variety of reasons, including chromosomal abnormalities, placental problems, maternal health conditions, infections, and umbilical cord accidents. In some cases, the cause of fetal death may remain unknown.

The diagnosis of fetal death is typically made through ultrasound or other imaging tests, which can confirm the absence of a heartbeat or movement in the fetus. Once fetal death has been diagnosed, medical professionals will work with the parents to determine the best course of action for managing the pregnancy and delivering the fetus. This may involve waiting for labor to begin naturally, inducing labor, or performing a cesarean delivery.

Experiencing a fetal death can be a very difficult and emotional experience for parents, and it is important for them to receive supportive care from their healthcare providers, family members, and friends. Grief counseling and support groups may also be helpful in coping with the loss.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

Placental diseases, also known as placental pathologies, refer to a group of conditions that affect the development and function of the placenta during pregnancy. The placenta is an organ that develops in the uterus during pregnancy and provides oxygen and nutrients to the developing fetus while removing waste products.

Placental diseases can have serious consequences for both the mother and the fetus, including preterm labor, growth restriction, stillbirth, and long-term health problems for the child. Some common placental diseases include:

1. Placental abruption: This occurs when the placenta separates from the uterine wall before delivery, causing bleeding and potentially harming the fetus.
2. Placental previa: This is a condition where the placenta implants in the lower part of the uterus, covering the cervix. It can cause bleeding and may require cesarean delivery.
3. Preeclampsia: This is a pregnancy-related disorder characterized by high blood pressure and damage to organs such as the liver and kidneys. Placental dysfunction is thought to play a role in its development.
4. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR): This occurs when the fetus does not grow properly due to poor placental function, leading to low birth weight and potential health problems.
5. Chorioamnionitis: This is an infection of the membranes surrounding the fetus, which can lead to preterm labor and other complications.
6. Placental infarction: This occurs when a portion of the placenta dies due to a lack of blood flow, which can lead to growth restriction or stillbirth.

Prompt diagnosis and treatment of placental diseases are essential for ensuring the best possible outcomes for both the mother and the fetus.

The placenta is an organ that develops in the uterus during pregnancy and provides oxygen and nutrients to the growing baby through the umbilical cord. It also removes waste products from the baby's blood. The placenta attaches to the wall of the uterus, and the baby's side of the placenta contains many tiny blood vessels that connect to the baby's circulatory system. This allows for the exchange of oxygen, nutrients, and waste between the mother's and baby's blood. After the baby is born, the placenta is usually expelled from the uterus in a process called afterbirth.

A Cesarean section, often referred to as a C-section, is a surgical procedure used to deliver a baby. It involves making an incision through the mother's abdomen and uterus to remove the baby. This procedure may be necessary when a vaginal delivery would put the mother or the baby at risk.

There are several reasons why a C-section might be recommended, including:

* The baby is in a breech position (feet first) or a transverse position (sideways) and cannot be turned to a normal head-down position.
* The baby is too large to safely pass through the mother's birth canal.
* The mother has a medical condition, such as heart disease or high blood pressure, that could make vaginal delivery risky.
* The mother has an infection, such as HIV or herpes, that could be passed to the baby during a vaginal delivery.
* The labor is not progressing and there are concerns about the health of the mother or the baby.

C-sections are generally safe for both the mother and the baby, but like any surgery, they do carry some risks. These can include infection, bleeding, blood clots, and injury to nearby organs. In addition, women who have a C-section are more likely to experience complications in future pregnancies, such as placenta previa or uterine rupture.

If you have questions about whether a C-section is necessary for your delivery, it's important to discuss your options with your healthcare provider.

Trophoblasts are specialized cells that make up the outer layer of a blastocyst, which is a hollow ball of cells that forms in the earliest stages of embryonic development. In humans, this process occurs about 5-6 days after fertilization. The blastocyst consists of an inner cell mass (which will eventually become the embryo) and an outer layer of trophoblasts.

Trophoblasts play a crucial role in implantation, which is the process by which the blastocyst attaches to and invades the lining of the uterus. Once implanted, the trophoblasts differentiate into two main layers: the cytotrophoblasts (which are closer to the inner cell mass) and the syncytiotrophoblasts (which form a multinucleated layer that is in direct contact with the maternal tissues).

The cytotrophoblasts proliferate and fuse to form the syncytiotrophoblasts, which have several important functions. They secrete enzymes that help to degrade and remodel the extracellular matrix of the uterine lining, allowing the blastocyst to implant more deeply. They also form a barrier between the maternal and fetal tissues, helping to protect the developing embryo from the mother's immune system.

Additionally, trophoblasts are responsible for the formation of the placenta, which provides nutrients and oxygen to the developing fetus and removes waste products. The syncytiotrophoblasts in particular play a key role in this process by secreting hormones such as human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), which helps to maintain pregnancy, and by forming blood vessels that allow for the exchange of nutrients and waste between the mother and fetus.

Abnormalities in trophoblast development or function can lead to a variety of pregnancy-related complications, including preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, and gestational trophoblastic diseases such as hydatidiform moles and choriocarcinomas.

He was able to relate the above observation to abruptio placentae, as women with low ascorbate (Vitamin C) and high histamine ... Pre-eclampsia - Demonstrated a disturbance of ascorbic acid metabolism in pre-eclampsia and in abruptio placentae. Methodist ... "Abruptio placentae". International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics. 19 (6): 453-60. doi:10.1016/0020-7292(81)90004-7. ... levels are prone to develop premature separation of the placenta. Tulane University School of Medicine 1981-1990 Wrote three- ...
... abruptio placentae, and placenta previa 641.0 Placenta previa, w/o bleeding, unspec. 641.1 Placenta previa, w/ bleeding, unspec ... 641.2 Abruptio placentae, unspec. 641.9 Hemorrhage in pregnancy., unspec. 642 Hypertension complicating pregnancy, childbirth, ... other immediate postpartum 667 Retained placenta or membranes, without hemorrhage 668 Complication (medicine) of the ...
... is a rare but not a life-threatening condition in which loosening of the placenta (abruptio placentae) causes bleeding that ... This may occur after abruptio placentae. The hemorrhage that gets into the decidua basalis ultimately splits the decidua, and ... Signs can also be due to abruptio placentae including uterine hypertonus, fetal distress, fetal death, and rarely, hypovolemic ... The occurrence of Couvelaire uterus can be prevented by prevention of abruptio placentae. This includes proper management of ...
Studies have shown that cocaine usage during pregnancy triggers premature labor and may lead to abruptio placentae. In cases of ... Flowers, D.; Clark, J. F.; Westney, L. S. (1991-03-01). "Cocaine intoxication associated with abruptio placentae". Journal of ...
Pediatrics, Gastrointestinal Bleeding Heath, K. Abruptio Placentae. in 5-Minute Clinical Consult, 15th ed. Domino, FJ editor. ...
"Placenta abruptio: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia". medlineplus.gov. Retrieved 2018-11-07. Clarke MA, Long BJ, Del Mar ... In the second or third trimester a placenta previa (a placenta partially or completely overlying the cervix) may bleed quite ... There are a number of causes including complications to the placenta, such as placental abruption and placenta previa. Other ... or abnormal growth of the placenta, even if the woman is not aware of the pregnancy. This possibility must be kept in mind with ...
Placenta Previa, Placenta Accreta, Abruptio Placentae, and Vasa Previa". Creasy and Resnik's maternal-fetal medicine : ... The placenta may bleed (hemorrhage) or begin to separate early from the wall of the uterus. It is normal for the placenta to ... The presence of a placenta is required, and eclampsia resolves if it is removed. Reduced blood flow to the placenta (placental ... Having a placenta that is enlarged by multiple gestation or hydatidiform mole also increases risk of eclampsia. In addition, ...
Klatsky, P.C., Cronbach EJ; Cronbach, E.J. (2008). "Abruptio placentae in the setting of an atypical presentation of acute ...
February 2005). "MTHFD1 R653Q polymorphism is a maternal genetic risk factor for severe abruptio placentae". American Journal ...
Severe symptoms include congestive heart failure, placenta previa, abruptio placenta, and operative delivery. In the simplest ...
Preeclampsia, placenta abruptio, placenta previa, and postpartum hemorrhage were among them (Howell, 2018). The Healthy People ...
... and abruptio placenta. Placental alpha macroglobulin-1 (PAMG-1) has been the subject of over 20 clinical investigations, the ... PAMG-1 was originally referred to as specific alpha-1 globulin of placenta. PAMG-1 is present in blood and the amniotic fluid ...
He informs her that she suffered from abruptio placentae-a separation of the placenta from the uterus-but that the baby is fine ...
... abruptio placenta and postpartum haemorrhage can occur in pregnant women with overt hypothyroidism. Also, the offspring of ...
There is also an increased risk of abruptio placentae and uterine rupture in subsequent pregnancies for women who underwent ... Placenta problems (placenta praevia, placental abruption or placenta accreta) Failed labor induction Failed instrumental ... The risk of placenta accreta, a potentially life-threatening condition which is more likely to develop where a woman has had a ... This may be done in cases of intractable bleeding or when the placenta cannot be separated from the uterus. The EXIT procedure ...
... severe pre-eclampsia and abruptio placentae. Protein C deficiency may cause purpura fulminans, a severe clotting disorder in ...
... placenta-previa, abruptio placentae. Like Ward 1, Ward 2 is divided into several areas. There is the Kangaroo Mother care area ...
Per these guidelines, indications for induction may include: Abruptio placentae Chorioamnionitis Fetal compromise such as ... The placenta, which supplies the baby with oxygen and nutrients, begins to age and will eventually fail after the 42nd week of ... In some cultures the placenta may be consumed as a nutritional boost, but it may also be seen as a special part of birth and ... The period from just after the fetus is expelled until just after the placenta is expelled is called the third stage of labour ...
... or abruptio placentae. If the women tested positive, they were referred to substance abuse counseling and threatened with ...
... abruptio placentae MeSH C13.703.590.268 - chorioamnionitis MeSH C13.703.590.609 - placenta accreta MeSH C13.703.590.734 - ... abruptio placentae MeSH C13.703.420.183 - breech presentation MeSH C13.703.420.235 - cephalopelvic disproportion MeSH C13.703. ... placenta accreta MeSH C13.703.420.714 - placenta previa MeSH C13.703.420.725 - postpartum hemorrhage MeSH C13.703.420.814 - ... placenta previa MeSH C13.703.590.767 - placenta, retained MeSH C13.703.590.800 - placental insufficiency MeSH C13.703.634.404 ...
Abruptio placentae Placenta accreta Placenta increta Placenta percreta Placentitis Villitis of unknown etiology TORCH ... A placental disease is any disease, disorder, or pathology of the placenta. Ischemic placental disease leads to the attachment ... Suspicions may be confirmed by postpartum examination of the placenta. The following factors can be linked with reducing the ... infections Circumvallate placenta Placental villous immaturity Placenta previa Vasa previa Fetal thrombotic vasculopathy ...
... abruptio placentae, placenta previa, and postpartum hemorrhage than white women. African American women reportedly have ...
... abruptio placentae, pre-eclampsia or eclampsia, amniotic fluid embolism, retained intrauterine fetal demise, septic abortion, ... TF is also abundant in tissues of the lungs, brain, and placenta. This helps to explain why DIC readily develops in patients ...
It is frequently associated with obstetric catastrophes such as abruptio placentae and septic shock, and is three times more ...
... abruptio placenta, prematurity, low birth weight, and small size compared to babies of the same gestational time. PCE newborns ... Cocaine, a small molecule, is able to cross the placenta into the bloodstream of the fetus. In fact, it may be present in a ... Animal Model Studies have shown that cocaine has the ability to cross the placenta and the blood brain barrier in the body. ... Increased contractility of the uterus may also be behind the increased likelihood of placental abruption (the placenta tearing ...
The placenta connects the fetus (unborn baby) to the mothers uterus. It allows the baby to get nutrients, blood, and oxygen ... The placenta connects the fetus (unborn baby) to the mothers uterus. It allows the baby to get nutrients, blood, and oxygen ... Placenta abruptio (also called placental abruption) is when the placenta separates from the inner wall of the uterus before the ... Placenta previa and accreta, vasa previa, subchorionic hemorrhage, and abruptio placentae. In: Lockwood CJ, Copel JA, Dugoff L ...
Patients with abruptio placentae, also called placental abruption, typically present with bleeding, uterine contractions, and ... Abruptio placentae is defined as the premature separation of the placenta from the uterus. ... Abruptio placentae is defined as the premature separation of the placenta from the uterus. Patients with abruptio placentae, ... encoded search term (Abruptio Placentae) and Abruptio Placentae What to Read Next on Medscape ...
Patients with abruptio placentae, also called placental abruption, typically present with bleeding, uterine contractions, and ... Abruptio placentae is defined as the premature separation of the placenta from the uterus. ... Abruptio placentae is defined as the premature separation of the placenta from the uterus. Patients with abruptio placentae, ... encoded search term (Abruptio Placentae) and Abruptio Placentae What to Read Next on Medscape ...
... Ragusa Antonio;Garsia Salvatore;Rinaldo Denise. ;Maurizio Ciceri;Silvana Penco;Mauro Masatti; ... With the objective to evaluate this hypothesis, we havedesigned this prospective double blind study.Methods:Placentas from 12 ... With the objective to evaluate this hypothesis, we havedesigned this prospective double blind study.Methods:Placentas from 12 ... The innate immune system plays an important rolein the genesis of the detachment of the placenta. (ii) The TLRS 3receptors are ...
Abruptio Placentae) - Etiology, pathophysiology, symptoms, signs, diagnosis & prognosis from the MSD Manuals - Medical ... placenta previa Placenta Previa Placenta previa is implantation of the placenta over or near the internal os of the cervix. It ... Placental abruption (abruptio placentae) is premature separation of the placenta from the uterus, usually after 20 weeks ... abruptio placentae) is premature separation of the placenta from the uterus, usually after 20 weeks gestation. It can be an ...
Placenta abruptio is a maternity issue in which the placenta divides also early from the wall surface of the womb. ... Abruptio Placenta. What is placenta abruptio?. Placenta abruptio is a maternity issue in which the placenta divides also early ... Can you stop placenta abruptio?. There is no certain means to protect against placenta abruptio, however you could do points to ... Placenta abruptio could be really damaging.. Placenta abruptio generally takes place in the 3rd trimester. It should take place ...
Placental abruption, also called abruptio placenta, is a condition where the placenta prematurely separates from the uterus. It ... A placental abruption or abruptio placenta is considered a dire obstetrical emergency, potentially placing both the life of the ... As a placenta abrupts, or tears away or separates from the uterus, it not only can result in potentially massive maternal ... as a result of medical malpractice associated with the management of a patient with placental abruption or abruptio placenta. ...
He was able to relate the above observation to abruptio placentae, as women with low ascorbate (Vitamin C) and high histamine ... Pre-eclampsia - Demonstrated a disturbance of ascorbic acid metabolism in pre-eclampsia and in abruptio placentae. Methodist ... "Abruptio placentae". International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics. 19 (6): 453-60. doi:10.1016/0020-7292(81)90004-7. ... levels are prone to develop premature separation of the placenta. Tulane University School of Medicine 1981-1990 Wrote three- ...
Background: Abruptio placentae defined as the preterm partial or complete separation of normally situated placenta from the ... The incidence of abruption placentae in our study is 0.9%. Overall global incidence of abruptio placentae ranges between 0.5 to ... Conclusions: Abruptio placentae is one of the gravest hemorrhagic complications of pregnancy. Incidence in alarmingly high in ... 1a,6a,17a). Fetal adverse outcomes of abruptio placentae observed during study period were perinatal mortality 75.9%, ...
Abruptio placentae. *Active labor. *Incompetent cervix. *Premature labor. *Premature rupture of membranes ... are foodborne illnesses of particular concern during pregnancy because the infection can cross the placenta and cause ...
Placental infarcts, abruptio placentae, intrauterine growth retardation, and fetal hypoxia also contribute to fetal demise. [2 ... Ultrasound may also be used to assess for abruptio placentae, which can complicate eclampsia. However, the sensitivity of ... Poor outcome of previous pregnancy, including intrauterine growth retardation, abruptio placentae, or fetal death ...
Abruptio placenta--Premature separation of a normally implanted placenta from the uterus. Placenta previa--Implantation of the ... Other excessive bleeding--The loss of a significant amount of blood from conditions other than abruptio placenta or placenta ... Abruptio placenta, Placenta previa, Other excessive bleeding, Seizures during labor, Precipitous labor, Prolonged labor, ... Abruptio placenta ........................... NTABRUPT 1101 Placenta previa ............................. NTREPLAC 1102 Other ...
Abruptio Placentae / epidemiology * Abruptio Placentae / etiology * Abruptio Placentae / physiopathology * Academic Medical ...
Abruptio placentae following insertion of laminaria for maternal elective abortion. *Attempted elective abortion (mother ...
Abruptio Placentae * Advanced Maternal Age * Amniocentesis * Cancer During Pregnancy * Cervical Cerclage * Cervical Funneling ...
Abruptio Placentae * Advanced Maternal Age * Amniocentesis * Cancer During Pregnancy * Cervical Cerclage * Cervical Funneling ...
Hall, M. H. Folic acid deficiency and abruptio placentae. J Obstet.Gynaecol.Br Commonw. 1972;79(3):222-225. View abstract. ...
The exact cause of abruptio placenta is obscure or unknown. -Advancing age of mother. -High birth order pregnancy. -Poor socio ... Sick placenta. Clinical Features :-. -Depend upon degree of separation of placenta. -Small to moderate amount of bright or dark ... 3) Mixed:- In this type of placenta some part of blood collect inside & a part is expelled out . ... 1) Revealed:- Following separation of placenta in blood insiuates downward between membrane & deciduas ultimately blood comes ...
... placenta previa is the abnormal positioning of the placenta, and abruptio placentae is the premature separation of the placenta ... Placenta previa occurs when the placenta partially or completely covers the cervix, leading to bleeding during pregnancy. This ... A. Placenta previa Explanation. A patient who is pregnant and complaining of painless vaginal bleeding is likely experiencing ... The body produces more blood to meet the demands of the developing placenta and to compensate for the increased workload on the ...
Abruptio Placenta *De Quervains Tenosynovitis *Lateral Epicondylitis *Guillain-Barré Syndrome *Myasthenia Gravis Remember, ...
Hall, D.R. (2009) Abruptio placentae and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. Seminars in Perinatology, 33, 189-195. http ... 2011) The "Great Obstetrical Syndromes" are associated with disorders of deep placenta- tion. American Journal of Obstetrics ... Placenta, 27, 939-958. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.placenta.2005.12.006 ... Placenta, 27, 783-793. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.placenta.2005.08.006 ...
abruptio placentae 641.2. *. acromion presentation 652.8. *. affecting fetus or newborn 763.4. *. anteversion, cervix or uterus ... membranes, retained - see Delivery, complicated, placenta, retained. *. mentum presentation 652.4. *. causing obstructed labor ...
... acute and life-threatening abruptio placentae; hepatic cirrhosis; and neoplastic disease such as carcinoma of the prostate, ...
... abruptio placentae, and placenta previa (1,2). The receipt of late or inadequate prenatal care is associated with increased ... placenta previa, abruptio placenta, and preterm premature rupture of the membranes (9,29--31). In utero exposure to tobacco ...
... placenta previa) or has separated from the wall of the uterus (abruptio placenta). ... Abruptio placenta, rupture of the uterus, or damage to the umbilical cord. These problems are possible, but they are very rare. ... This can happen when the placenta partially or completely covers the cervix ( ...
A further matter of concern is the higher incidence of abruptio placentae found in the aspirin-treated patients in one study. ... It is frequently seen in Caucasian patients with delay in diagnosis or delivery and in patients with abruptio placentae. The ... With rapidly worsening preeclampsia, fetal monitoring should be continuous because of the risk of abruptio placentae and ... Low fibrinogen levels in preeclampsia-eclampsia are usually associated with abruptio placentae or fetal demise. Elevated fibrin ...
... abruptio placentae), and pregnancy loss. ...
  • Ultrasound is not required for diagnosis (usually made by the clinical presentation) however it is useful in ruling out placenta previa. (stepwards.com)
  • A quick review of the patient's prenatal course, such as a known history of placenta previa, may help lead to the correct diagnosis. (medscape.com)
  • Before a pelvic examination can be safely performed, an ultrasonographic examination should be performed to exclude placenta previa. (medscape.com)
  • [ 17 ] If placenta previa is present, a pelvic examination, either with a speculum or with bimanual examination, may initiate profuse bleeding. (medscape.com)
  • Placenta Previa Placenta previa is implantation of the placenta over or near the internal os of the cervix. (msdmanuals.com)
  • This can happen when the placenta partially or completely covers the cervix ( placenta previa ) or has separated from the wall of the uterus ( abruptio placenta ). (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • Effect of site of placentation on pregnancy outcomes in patients with placenta previa [3] "This retrospective study included 678 cases of placenta previa. (edu.au)
  • Differences between the different placenta previa positions and pregnancy outcomes were compared using the chi-square and independent t tests. (edu.au)
  • Placental attachment at the incision site of a previous cesarean section significantly increased the incidence of complete placenta previa and PAS disorders compared with placental attachment at a site without incision, but did not significantly influence pregnancy outcomes. (edu.au)
  • Placental attachment to the anterior wall was an independent risk factor for postpartum hemorrhage in patients with placenta previa. (edu.au)
  • CONCLUSION: The site of placental attachment in patients with placenta previa has an important influence on the pregnancy outcome. (edu.au)
  • Complete placenta previa ultrasound biometry and surgical outcomes [4] "To evaluate the relationship between surgical outcomes and ultrasound measurement of placental extension beyond the cervical os in women with placenta previa. (edu.au)
  • Detect problems with the placenta, such as placenta previa (the placenta being positioned too low or over the cervix) and abruptio placentae (the placenta is separating prematurely, causing bleeding). (askdrsears.com)
  • Placenta previa - Usually painless vaginal bleeding. (logicalimages.com)
  • Perinatal outcome and near-miss morbidity between placenta previa versus abruptio placentae. (bvsalud.org)
  • Patients with abruptio placentae , also called placental abruption, typically present with bleeding, uterine contractions, and fetal distress. (medscape.com)
  • Placenta abruptio (also called placental abruption) is when the placenta separates from the inner wall of the uterus before the baby is born. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Abruptio placentae (placental abruption) is the premature separation (can be either partial or complete) of the placenta from the the uterine wall before the delivery of the infant. (stepwards.com)
  • Placental abruption (abruptio placentae) is premature separation of the placenta from the uterus, usually after 20 weeks gestation. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Placental abruption, also called abruptio placenta, is a condition where the placenta prematurely separates from the uterus. (medicalneg.com)
  • A placental abruption or abruptio placenta is considered a dire obstetrical emergency, potentially placing both the life of the mother and her baby at risk. (medicalneg.com)
  • The Law Firm of Dugan, Babij, Tolley & Kohler, LLC has extensive experience in representing families whose loved ones have died or been injured as a result of medical malpractice associated with the management of a patient with placental abruption or abruptio placenta. (medicalneg.com)
  • They are hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, preterm delivery, gestational diabetes , small-for-gestational-age (SGA) delivery, placental abruption (abruptio placentae), and pregnancy loss . (medscape.com)
  • Placental abruption (abruptio placentae) is the premature separation of a normally implanted placenta from the uterus after the 20th week of gestation prior to fetal delivery. (logicalimages.com)
  • Abruptio placentae is defined as the premature separation of the placenta from the uterus. (medscape.com)
  • Hemorrhage into the decidua basalis occurs as the placenta separates from the uterus. (medscape.com)
  • The placenta connects the fetus (unborn baby) to the mother's uterus. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In a small number of pregnancies, the placenta detaches (pulls itself from the wall of the uterus) too early. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In such cases, the blood remains "concealed" and is retained between the detached placenta and the uterus. (medicalneg.com)
  • As a placenta abrupts, or tears away or separates from the uterus, it not only can result in potentially massive maternal bleeding, but it also results in the loss of perfusion of oxygenated blood to the baby through the umbilical cord. (medicalneg.com)
  • Possible causes of preterm labour include being pregnant with more than one baby, an infection, and problems with the placenta, uterus, or cervix. (alberta.ca)
  • The placenta separating early from the uterus. (alberta.ca)
  • The placenta attaches to the inside of the uterus during pregnancy and connects to the foetus via the umbilical cord, delivering blood, oxygen and nutrients from the mother to the baby. (kiindred.co)
  • This occurs when the placenta peels away from the uterus before birth and can stop oxygen and nutrients from getting to your baby, as well as major bleeding. (kiindred.co)
  • This occurs when the placenta remains attached to the uterus after birth (either partially or completely) and can be life-threatening if not treated. (kiindred.co)
  • Placenta Praevia occurs when the placenta either partially or wholly covers the cervix and can cause bleeding throughout the pregnancy and birth, and can hinder a vaginal birth. (kiindred.co)
  • Vaginal bleeding usually follows, although the presence of a concealed hemorrhage in which the blood pools behind the placenta is possible. (medscape.com)
  • Remember that 20% of abruptions are associated with a concealed hemorrhage, and the absence of vaginal bleeding does not exclude a diagnosis of abruptio placentae. (medscape.com)
  • Blood may also remain behind the placenta (concealed hemorrhage). (msdmanuals.com)
  • Placental attachment to the anterior wall was associated with shorter gestational age, low birth weight, lower Apgar score, higher prenatal bleeding rate, increased postpartum hemorrhage, longer duration of hospitalization, and higher blood transfusion and hysterectomy rates compared to cases with lateral/posterior wall placenta. (edu.au)
  • When the placenta is located on the anterior wall, clinicians should pay attention to the adverse pregnancy outcomes and the possibility of massive postpartum hemorrhage. (edu.au)
  • Hematoma formation further separates the placenta from the uterine wall, causing compression of these structures and compromise of blood supply to the fetus. (medscape.com)
  • In most pregnancies, the placenta stays attached to the upper part of the uterine wall. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Sometimes the blood that collects when the placenta detaches stays between the placenta and uterine wall, so you may not have bleeding from your vagina. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Background: Abruptio placentae defined as the preterm partial or complete separation of normally situated placenta from the uterine wall, complicating 1 in every 200 pregnancies (0.5-1%) in western nations, with rates as high as 4% in developing nations. (journalcra.com)
  • Morbidly adherent placenta (MAP) is the general clinical term used to describe the different forms of abnormal placental implantation ( Accreta , Increta and Percreta ). (edu.au)
  • 50% of placenta is involved, fetal death is likely, representing the distinction between a "total" abruption and a "partial" abruption. (logicalimages.com)
  • Thrombophilia is claimed in many adverse pregnancy outcomes such as recurrent pregnancy loss, intrauterine growth retardation, abruptio placenta, intrauterine fetal death, and pre-eclampsia with onset before 34 wk. (contemporaryobgyn.net)
  • At this point in time there has not been a significant improvement in several clinical series, but there is an increased risk of placenta separation ("abruptio placentae"), which is associated with fetal death (Ref. 18, p. 950). (nethealthbook.com)
  • Do not perform a digital examination on a pregnant patient with vaginal bleeding without first ascertaining the location of the placenta. (medscape.com)
  • You can not actually inform just how severe placenta abruptio is by the quantity of vaginal blood loss. (valleyfamilymedicineurgentcarecenter.com)
  • In this form of APH where bleeding due to premature separation of normally situated placenta. (gurukpo.com)
  • Separation results in bleeding into the decidua basalis behind the placenta (retroplacentally). (msdmanuals.com)
  • Abu-Heija A, al-Chalabi H, el-Iloubani N. Abruptio placentae: risk factors and perinatal outcome. (medscape.com)
  • Review - Defense and infection of the human placenta [2] "The placenta functions as a shield against infection of the fetus. (edu.au)
  • The placenta is the lifeline of a fetus. (medlineplus.gov)
  • This ultrasound study shows the fetus (F), the placenta (P) and a retroplacental abruption (P, source ). (stepwards.com)
  • the inner side of the placenta facing the fetus is smooth, being covered with amnion, a thin avascular layer that continues past the edges of the placenta to line the entire hollow sphere of chorion except where it is reflected to cover the umbilical cord , which joins fetus and placenta. (pe.kr)
  • The placenta is a mateno-fetal organ which begins developing at implantation of the blastocyst and is delivered with the fetus at birth. (edu.au)
  • As the fetus relies on the placenta for not only nutrition, but many other developmentally essential functions, the correct development of the placenta is important to correct embryonic and fetal development. (edu.au)
  • Alcohol and illicit drugs are toxic to the placenta and developing fetus and can cause congenital syndromes and withdrawal symptoms. (merckmanuals.com)
  • it crosses the placenta and causes vasoconstriction and hypertension in the fetus. (merckmanuals.com)
  • It is possible that the TLRs 3 areactivated by the degradation products of blood, while TLR 2 and4 are not activated.Conclusion:From our study is not possible to understand whetherthe activation of TLRs 3 determines the detachment of theplacenta, or if it is the detachment of the placenta that, throughgreater contact between decidual tissue and degradation productsof blood (both maternal and fetal) determines activation of TLRs3. (unicampus.it)
  • Conclusions: Abruptio placentae is one of the gravest hemorrhagic complications of pregnancy. (journalcra.com)
  • Your midwife or doctor will need to inspect the placenta closely to ensure the whole lot has been removed, and if any has been left it will need to be removed to prevent complications. (kiindred.co)
  • A problem with the placenta or umbilical cord puts the baby at risk. (stlukesonline.org)
  • The placenta is a round, standard body organ that creates throughout maternity. (valleyfamilymedicineurgentcarecenter.com)
  • placenta : an organ characteristic of true mammals during pregnancy, joining mother and offspring, providing endocrine secretion and selective exchange of soluble, but not particulate, blood-borne substances through an apposition of uterine and trophoblastic vascularized parts. (pe.kr)
  • The placenta is an organ that develops and functions purely to nurture your baby, and once your baby is born the placenta is no longer needed. (kiindred.co)
  • Results: A total of 83 cases of abruption placentae were present out of 9102 deliveries at department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at GMC Srinagar, India between January 2016 to April 2017. (journalcra.com)
  • Overall global incidence of abruptio placentae ranges between 0.5 to 2 % with more in developing countries as compared to the developed nations. (journalcra.com)
  • After you have given birth to your baby, your body will continue to experience contractions and this is to allow you to "birth" the placenta. (kiindred.co)
  • Extensive infarction, necrosis, and thrombosis have been identified in the placentas from failed pregnancies in women with APS. (contemporaryobgyn.net)
  • Risks of PROM at term are related to serious neonatal consequences such as pre-term delivery, fetal distress, prolapsed cord, abruptio placentae and infection (2). (qiagen.com)
  • If any or all of the placenta is left after giving birth there is a risk of infection and/or haemorrhage. (kiindred.co)
  • With the objective to evaluate this hypothesis, we havedesigned this prospective double blind study.Methods:Placentas from 12 pregnant patients, came to ouremergency room for suspicion detachment of the placenta, werecollected from the delivery unit of Niguarda Hospital in Milan,Italy (first group). (unicampus.it)
  • A 2009 longitudinal Norwegian study suggests an association between large placenta relative to fetal size "disproportionately large placenta relative to birth weight was associated with increased risk of (adult) cardiovascular disease death. (edu.au)
  • The cord usually joins the placenta near the centre but may insert at the edge, on the nonplacental chorion, or on an accessory placenta. (pe.kr)
  • A diagnosis of class 0 is made retrospectively by finding an organized blood clot or a depressed area on a delivered placenta. (medscape.com)
  • Occasionally the blood obtains caught in between the placenta as well as the wall surface of the womb. (valleyfamilymedicineurgentcarecenter.com)
  • The body produces more blood to meet the demands of the developing placenta and to compensate for the increased workload on the heart. (proprofs.com)
  • Abruptio placentae can present in a few different ways (with either internal or external bleeding, source ). (stepwards.com)