Intentional removal of a fetus from the uterus by any of a number of techniques. (POPLINE, 1978)
The medical science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in animals.
Use for general articles concerning veterinary medical education.
Drugs used by veterinarians in the treatment of animal diseases. The veterinarian's pharmacological armamentarium is the counterpart of drugs treating human diseases, with dosage and administration adjusted to the size, weight, disease, and idiosyncrasies of the species. In the United States most drugs are subject to federal regulations with special reference to the safety of drugs and residues in edible animal products.
Expulsion of the product of FERTILIZATION before completing the term of GESTATION and without deliberate interference.
Premature expulsion of the FETUS in animals.
Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of veterinary medicine.
Illegal termination of pregnancy.
The field of veterinary medicine concerned with the causes of and changes produced in the body by disease.
Abortion induced to save the life or health of a pregnant woman. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Individuals with a degree in veterinary medicine that provides them with training and qualifications to treat diseases and injuries of animals.
Individuals requesting induced abortions.
The retention in the UTERUS of a dead FETUS two months or more after its DEATH.
Any type of abortion, induced or spontaneous, that is associated with infection of the UTERUS and its appendages. It is characterized by FEVER, uterine tenderness, and foul discharge.
Three or more consecutive spontaneous abortions.
Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of veterinary medicine, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.
UTERINE BLEEDING from a GESTATION of less than 20 weeks without any CERVICAL DILATATION. It is characterized by vaginal bleeding, lower back discomfort, or midline pelvic cramping and a risk factor for MISCARRIAGE.
'Animal diseases' is a term that refers to any illness or infection that affects the health and well-being of non-human animals, caused by pathogens such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, or toxic substances, which can impact individual animals, herds, or entire species, and may have implications for human health through zoonotic transmission.
Chemical substances that interrupt pregnancy after implantation.
Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.
Premature loss of PREGNANCY in which not all the products of CONCEPTION have been expelled.
A mammalian fetus expelled by INDUCED ABORTION or SPONTANEOUS ABORTION.
Steroidal compounds with abortifacient activity.
Assistants to a veterinarian, biological or biomedical researcher, or other scientist who are engaged in the care and management of animals, and who are trained in basic principles of animal life processes and routine laboratory and animal health care procedures. (Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)
Abortion performed because of possible fetal defects.
Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.
Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.
Diseases of the domestic cat (Felis catus or F. domesticus). This term does not include diseases of the so-called big cats such as CHEETAHS; LIONS; tigers, cougars, panthers, leopards, and other Felidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.
A synthetic analog of natural prostaglandin E1. It produces a dose-related inhibition of gastric acid and pepsin secretion, and enhances mucosal resistance to injury. It is an effective anti-ulcer agent and also has oxytocic properties.
Non-steroidal chemical compounds with abortifacient activity.
Unintended accidental pregnancy, including pregnancy resulting from failed contraceptive measures.
Diseases of domestic and wild horses of the species Equus caballus.
Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals.
The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)
Pregnancy, usually accidental, that is not desired by the parent or parents.
Aspiration of the contents of the uterus with a vacuum curette.
Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.
The beginning third of a human PREGNANCY, from the first day of the last normal menstrual period (MENSTRUATION) through the completion of 14 weeks (98 days) of gestation.
A written account of a person's life and the branch of literature concerned with the lives of people. (Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed)
Drugs and their metabolites which are found in the edible tissues and milk of animals after their medication with specific drugs. This term can also apply to drugs found in adipose tissue of humans after drug treatment.
The study of the anatomical structures of animals.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
Human females who are pregnant, as cultural, psychological, or sociological entities.
Diseases of domestic and mountain sheep of the genus Ovis.
Prevention of CONCEPTION by blocking fertility temporarily, or permanently (STERILIZATION, REPRODUCTIVE). Common means of reversible contraception include NATURAL FAMILY PLANNING METHODS; CONTRACEPTIVE AGENTS; or CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES.
Animals kept by humans for companionship and enjoyment, as opposed to DOMESTIC ANIMALS such as livestock or farm animals, which are kept for economic reasons.
Procedures to block or remove all or part of the genital tract for the purpose of rendering individuals sterile, incapable of reproduction. Surgical sterilization procedures are the most commonly used. There are also sterilization procedures involving chemical or physical means.
The protection of animals in laboratories or other specific environments by promoting their health through better nutrition, housing, and care.
Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of medicine, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.
The emotional attachment of individuals to PETS.
A person who has not attained the age at which full civil rights are accorded.
Death of the developing young in utero. BIRTH of a dead FETUS is STILLBIRTH.
The rights of women to equal status pertaining to social, economic, and educational opportunities afforded by society.
The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.
A genus of protozoan parasites of the subclass COCCIDIA. Its species are parasitic in dogs, cattle, goats, and sheep, among others. N. caninum, a species that mainly infects dogs, is intracellular in neural and other cells of the body, multiplies by endodyogeny, has no parasitophorous vacuole, and has numerous rhoptries. It is known to cause lesions in many tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord as well as abortion in the expectant mother.
Health care programs or services designed to assist individuals in the planning of family size. Various methods of CONTRACEPTION can be used to control the number and timing of childbirths.
The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)
The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.
The state or condition of being a human individual accorded moral and/or legal rights. Criteria to be used to determine this status are subject to debate, and range from the requirement of simply being a human organism to such requirements as that the individual be self-aware and capable of rational thought and moral agency.
A progestational and glucocorticoid hormone antagonist. Its inhibition of progesterone induces bleeding during the luteal phase and in early pregnancy by releasing endogenous prostaglandins from the endometrium or decidua. As a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, the drug has been used to treat hypercortisolism in patients with nonpituitary CUSHING SYNDROME.
Behavior patterns of those practicing CONTRACEPTION.
Reproductive rights rest on the recognition of the basic right of all couples and individuals to decide freely and responsibly the number, spacing and timing of their children and to have the information and means to do so, and the right to attain the highest standard of sexual and reproductive health. They also include the right of all to make decisions concerning reproduction free of discrimination, coercion and violence.
The number of births in a given population per year or other unit of time.
Dilatation of the cervix uteri followed by a scraping of the endometrium with a curette.
Domesticated farm animals raised for home use or profit but excluding POULTRY. Typically livestock includes CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; SWINE; GOATS; and others.
Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.
The point at which religious ensoulment or PERSONHOOD is considered to begin.
An order of diurnal BIRDS of prey, including EAGLES; HAWKS; buzzards; vultures; and falcons.
The middle third of a human PREGNANCY, from the beginning of the 15th through the 28th completed week (99 to 196 days) of gestation.
Diseases of the domestic or wild goat of the genus Capra.
Protozoan infection found in animals and man. It is caused by several different genera of COCCIDIA.
'Laboratory animals' are non-human creatures that are intentionally used in scientific research, testing, and education settings to investigate physiological processes, evaluate the safety and efficacy of drugs or medical devices, and teach anatomy, surgical techniques, and other healthcare-related skills.
The three approximately equal periods of a normal human PREGNANCY. Each trimester is about three months or 13 to 14 weeks in duration depending on the designation of the first day of gestation.
Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.
Reporting to parents or guardians about care to be provided to a minor (MINORS).
Pregnancy in human adolescent females under the age of 19.
Devices that diminish the likelihood of or prevent conception. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Examination of foods to assure wholesome and clean products free from unsafe microbes or chemical contamination, natural or added deleterious substances, and decomposition during production, processing, packaging, etc.
Bleeding from blood vessels in the UTERUS, sometimes manifested as vaginal bleeding.
The study of plant lore and agricultural customs of a people. In the fields of ETHNOMEDICINE and ETHNOPHARMACOLOGY, the emphasis is on traditional medicine and the existence and medicinal uses of PLANTS and PLANT EXTRACTS and their constituents, both historically and in modern times.
The term "United States" in a medical context often refers to the country where a patient or study participant resides, and is not a medical term per se, but relevant for epidemiological studies, healthcare policies, and understanding differences in disease prevalence, treatment patterns, and health outcomes across various geographic locations.
The state that distinguishes organisms from inorganic matter, manifested by growth, metabolism, reproduction, and adaptation. It includes the course of existence, the sum of experiences, the mode of existing, or the fact of being. Over the centuries inquiries into the nature of life have crossed the boundaries from philosophy to biology, forensic medicine, anthropology, etc., in creative as well as scientific literature. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed; Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)
Any of numerous agile, hollow-horned RUMINANTS of the genus Capra, in the family Bovidae, closely related to the SHEEP.
Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.
Diseases of domestic swine and of the wild boar of the genus Sus.
A species of gram-positive bacteria in the family STAPHYLOCOCCACEAE. It is a zoonotic organism and common commensal in dogs, but can cause disease in dogs and other animals. It also can be associated with human disease.
The Christian faith, practice, or system of the Catholic Church, specifically the Roman Catholic, the Christian church that is characterized by a hierarchic structure of bishops and priests in which doctrinal and disciplinary authority are dependent upon apostolic succession, with the pope as head of the episcopal college. (From Webster, 3d ed; American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed)
The commitment in writing, as authentic evidence, of something having legal importance. The concept includes certificates of birth, death, etc., as well as hospital, medical, and other institutional records.
Infection caused by bacteria of the genus BRUCELLA mainly involving the MONONUCLEAR PHAGOCYTE SYSTEM. This condition is characterized by fever, weakness, malaise, and weight loss.
The number of offspring a female has borne. It is contrasted with GRAVIDITY, which refers to the number of pregnancies, regardless of outcome.
The science and technology dealing with the procurement, breeding, care, health, and selection of animals used in biomedical research and testing.
The state of birth outside of wedlock. It may refer to the offspring or the parents.
Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program in the health occupations.
Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.
The kind of action or activity proper to the judiciary, particularly its responsibility for decision making.
Infection with CHLAMYDOPHILA PSITTACI (formerly Chlamydia psittaci), transmitted to humans by inhalation of dust-borne contaminated nasal secretions or excreta of infected BIRDS. This infection results in a febrile illness characterized by PNEUMONITIS and systemic manifestations.
Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.
A potentially life-threatening condition in which EMBRYO IMPLANTATION occurs outside the cavity of the UTERUS. Most ectopic pregnancies (>96%) occur in the FALLOPIAN TUBES, known as TUBAL PREGNANCY. They can be in other locations, such as UTERINE CERVIX; OVARY; and abdominal cavity (PREGNANCY, ABDOMINAL).
The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.
'Dairying' is not a term used in medical definitions; it refers to the practice of keeping dairy animals for milk production and its related processes, which is an agricultural or farming concept.
An adrenergic alpha-2 agonist used as a sedative, analgesic and centrally acting muscle relaxant in VETERINARY MEDICINE.
The age of the mother in PREGNANCY.
Pathological processes or abnormal functions of the PLACENTA.
A medical-surgical specialty concerned with the physiology and disorders primarily of the female genital tract, as well as female endocrinology and reproductive physiology.
Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.
Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.
Infestation of animals with parasitic worms of the helminth class. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.
A series of actions, sometimes symbolic actions which may be associated with a behavior pattern, and are often indispensable to its performance.
A species of gram-negative bacteria that grows preferentially in the vacuoles of the host cell. It is the etiological agent of Q FEVER.
Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
A genus of CHLAMYDOPHILA infecting primarily birds. It contains eight known serovars, some of which infect more than one type of host, including humans.
An acute infectious disease caused by COXIELLA BURNETII. It is characterized by a sudden onset of FEVER; HEADACHE; malaise; and weakness. In humans, it is commonly contracted by inhalation of infected dusts derived from infected domestic animals (ANIMALS, DOMESTIC).
The interrelationship of medicine and religion.
A pyrazolodiazepinone with pharmacological actions similar to ANTI-ANXIETY AGENTS. It is commonly used in combination with TILETAMINE to obtain immobilization and anesthesia in animals.
The co-occurrence of pregnancy and an INFECTION. The infection may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.
Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.
Diseases of birds not considered poultry, therefore usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild. The concept is differentiated from POULTRY DISEASES which is for birds raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption, and usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc.
Inflammation of the ENDOMETRIUM, usually caused by intrauterine infections. Endometritis is the most common cause of postpartum fever.
A disease of the horny parts and of the adjacent soft structures of the feet of cattle, swine, and sheep. It is usually caused by Corynebacterium pyogenes or Bacteroides nodosus (see DICHELOBACTER NODOSUS). It is also known as interdigital necrobacillosis. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 18th ed)
Animals grouped according to ecological, morphological or genetic populations.
A demographic parameter indicating a person's status with respect to marriage, divorce, widowhood, singleness, etc.
An acute infection caused by the RIFT VALLEY FEVER VIRUS, an RNA arthropod-borne virus, affecting domestic animals and humans. In animals, symptoms include HEPATITIS; abortion (ABORTION, VETERINARY); and DEATH. In humans, symptoms range from those of a flu-like disease to hemorrhagic fever, ENCEPHALITIS, or BLINDNESS.
Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.
Drugs used to treat or prevent parasitic infections.
The science or philosophy of law. Also, the application of the principles of law and justice to health and medicine.
Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.
Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
A genus of the family CHLAMYDIACEAE comprising gram-negative non CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS-like species infecting vertebrates. Chlamydophila do not produce detectable quantities of glycogen. The type species is CHLAMYDOPHILA PSITTACI.
The enactment of laws and ordinances and their regulation by official organs of a nation, state, or other legislative organization. It refers also to health-related laws and regulations in general or for which there is no specific heading.
Malformations of organs or body parts during development in utero.
Proposed anesthetic with possible anticonvulsant and sedative properties.
Maternal deaths resulting from complications of pregnancy and childbirth in a given population.
The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)
The unborn young of a viviparous mammal, in the postembryonic period, after the major structures have been outlined. In humans, the unborn young from the end of the eighth week after CONCEPTION until BIRTH, as distinguished from the earlier EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.
Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.
Infections with unicellular organisms formerly members of the subkingdom Protozoa. The infections may be experimental or veterinary.
Decisions made by the United States Supreme Court.
Domesticated birds raised for food. It typically includes CHICKENS; TURKEYS, DUCKS; GEESE; and others.
Places where animals are slaughtered and dressed for market.
A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)
A genus of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, coccoid bacteria. Its organisms occur singly, in pairs, and in tetrads and characteristically divide in more than one plane to form irregular clusters. Natural populations of Staphylococcus are found on the skin and mucous membranes of warm-blooded animals. Some species are opportunistic pathogens of humans and animals.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
A departure from the normal gait in animals.
Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.
A subspecialty of pathology applied to the solution of clinical problems, especially the use of laboratory methods in clinical diagnosis. (Dorland, 28th ed.)
A medical-surgical specialty concerned with management and care of women during pregnancy, parturition, and the puerperium.
A highly vascularized mammalian fetal-maternal organ and major site of transport of oxygen, nutrients, and fetal waste products. It includes a fetal portion (CHORIONIC VILLI) derived from TROPHOBLASTS and a maternal portion (DECIDUA) derived from the uterine ENDOMETRIUM. The placenta produces an array of steroid, protein and peptide hormones (PLACENTAL HORMONES).
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Berlin" is not a medical term or concept to the best of my knowledge and searching through medical resources. It's actually the capital city of Germany, known for its rich history, diverse architecture, vibrant culture, and significant landmarks such as the Berlin Wall and Brandenburg Gate.
A sulfanilamide anti-infective agent. It has a spectrum of antimicrobial action similar to other sulfonamides.
Administration of a soluble dosage form by placement under the tongue.
A genus of facultatively anaerobic, gram-positive bacteria in the family ACTINOMYCETACEAE, order ACTINOMYCETALES. They are obligate parasites of the PHARYNX in humans and farm animals.
Facilities equipped to carry out investigative procedures.
The rights of the individual to cultural, social, economic, and educational opportunities as provided by society, e.g., right to work, right to education, and right to social security.
A mosquito-borne species of the PHLEBOVIRUS genus found in eastern, central, and southern Africa, producing massive hepatitis, abortion, and death in sheep, goats, cattle, and other animals. It also has caused disease in humans.
Ruminant mammals of South America. They are related to camels.
Contraceptive devices placed high in the uterine fundus.
A corps of the armed services concerned with animal medicine, the chief interest of which is the care of government-owned working dogs (as in the military police units), working horses (as in state funerals), and working military dolphins (as in undersea exploration and other activities). In the United States Army Veterinary Corps animal medicine overlaps and interconnects with biomedical research using laboratory research animals. A related activity is laboratory animal care. The Corps provides limited care for privately owned animals of military personnel through non-appropriated funds. Military service veterinarians in the United States Army must be graduates of accredited veterinary schools and must have a state license. (Telephone communication with Lt. Col. William Inskeep II, U.S. Army Veterinary Corps, October 4, 1994)
A board-certified specialty of VETERINARY MEDICINE, requiring at least four years of special education, training, and practice of veterinary surgery after graduation from veterinary school. In the written, oral, and practical examinations candidates may choose either large or small animal surgery. (From AVMA Directory, 43d ed, p278)
A TETRACYCLINE analog isolated from the actinomycete STREPTOMYCES rimosus and used in a wide variety of clinical conditions.
Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.
Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.
Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.
The fundamental dispositions and traits of humans. (Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)
Means of postcoital intervention to avoid pregnancy, such as the administration of POSTCOITAL CONTRACEPTIVES to prevent FERTILIZATION of an egg or implantation of a fertilized egg (OVUM IMPLANTATION).
A complex of antibiotic substances produced by Streptomyces tenebrarius.
A scientific or medical discipline concerning the study of male reproductive biology, diseases of the male genital organs, and male infertility. Major areas of interest include ENDOCRINOLOGY; SPERMATOGENESIS; semen analysis; FERTILIZATION; CONTRACEPTION; and CRYOPRESERVATION.
The cognitive and affective processes which constitute an internalized moral governor over an individual's moral conduct.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
The intrinsic moral worth ascribed to a living being. (Bioethics Thesaurus)
The field of veterinary medicine concerned with PHYSICAL FITNESS of animals in sports (horse racing, dog racing, etc.) and the diagnosis and treatment of sports injuries in animals.
The study of microorganisms living in a variety of environments (air, soil, water, etc.) and their pathogenic relationship to other organisms including man.
Books in the field of medicine intended primarily for consultation.
A mixture of mostly avermectin H2B1a (RN 71827-03-7) with some avermectin H2B1b (RN 70209-81-3), which are macrolides from STREPTOMYCES avermitilis. It binds glutamate-gated chloride channel to cause increased permeability and hyperpolarization of nerve and muscle cells. It also interacts with other CHLORIDE CHANNELS. It is a broad spectrum antiparasitic that is active against microfilariae of ONCHOCERCA VOLVULUS but not the adult form.
INFLAMMATION of the UDDER in cows.
Informed consent given by a parent on behalf of a minor or otherwise incompetent child.
Chemical, biological, or medical measures designed to prevent the spread of ticks or the concomitant infestations which result in tick-borne diseases. It includes the veterinary as well as the public health aspects of tick and mite control.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Denmark" is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. It is a country located in northern Europe. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I would be happy to try to help answer them.
A hole or break through the wall of the UTERUS, usually made by the placement of an instrument or INTRAUTERINE DEVICES.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.
Duties that are based in ETHICS, rather than in law.
The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.
A suborder of the order ARTIODACTYLA whose members have the distinguishing feature of a four-chambered stomach, including the capacious RUMEN. Horns or antlers are usually present, at least in males.
Inorganic compounds that contain magnesium as an integral part of the molecule.
Nurses of the male sex.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Accidentally acquired infection in laboratory workers.
The insertion of drugs into the vagina to treat local infections, neoplasms, or to induce labor. The dosage forms may include medicated pessaries, irrigation fluids, and suppositories.
Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.
A disease of cattle caused by bacteria of the genus BRUCELLA leading to abortion in late pregnancy. BRUCELLA ABORTUS is the primary infective agent.
The physical condition of human reproductive systems.
Macrolide antibiotic obtained from cultures of Streptomyces fradiae. The drug is effective against many microorganisms in animals but not in humans.
Dissertations embodying results of original research and especially substantiating a specific view, e.g., substantial papers written by candidates for an academic degree under the individual direction of a professor or papers written by undergraduates desirous of achieving honors or distinction.
Infestations with soft-bodied (Argasidae) or hard-bodied (Ixodidae) ticks.
Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).
Advanced programs of training to meet certain professional requirements in fields other than medicine or dentistry, e.g., pharmacology, nutrition, nursing, etc.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Italy" is not a medical term or concept, it's a country located in Southern Europe. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I'd be happy to help with those!
Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.
A hereditary disease of the hip joints in dogs. Signs of the disease may be evident any time after 4 weeks of age.
The disintegration and assimilation of the dead FETUS in the UTERUS at any stage after the completion of organogenesis which, in humans, is after the 9th week of GESTATION. It does not include embryo resorption (see EMBRYO LOSS).

Serum immunoglobulins in aborted and non-aborted bovine foetuses. (1/403)

The concentration of immunoglobulin classes G, M and A (IgG, IgM and IgA) in the sera of 233 aborted and 201 non-aborted foetuses was measured. IgM was first detected in a foetus at day 90 of gestation while IgG and IgA were first detected on day 111 of gestation. Immunoglobulins were detected in 81.5% of aborted foetuses and 32.8% of non-aborted foetuses. Total immunoglobulin concentrations of 20 mg/100 ml or greater were found in 35.2% of aborted foetuses but only in 4.5% of non-aborted foetuses. It is suggested that factors resulting in antigenic stimulation of the foetus may play an important part in bovine abortion.  (+info)

Role of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in a murine model of Chlamydia psittaci-induced abortion. (2/403)

To assess the role of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in Chlamydia psittaci infection in a pregnant mouse model, pregnant and nonpregnant Swiss OF1 mice were depleted of PMNs by treatment with the RB6-8C5 monoclonal antibody before intraperitoneal infection with C. psittaci serotype 1. Nondepleted mice served as infection controls. Depleted mice aborted earlier and had a much higher mortality rate than nondepleted mice. Bacteriological analysis showed that the number of chlamydiae isolated from the spleens of depleted mice at 5 and 7 days postinfection was 100 times greater than that isolated from nondepleted mice. Histopathological analysis of the placentas of depleted mice showed widespread necrosis of the uteroplacental units, with weak immunoreaction to chlamydial antigen, while the placentas of nondepleted mice showed substantial neutrophil infiltration but no large areas of necrosis, with moderate to strong immunoreaction to chlamydial antigen. The livers of depleted mice showed numerous chlamydial inclusions in the hepatocytes, delayed microgranuloma formation, and in the pregnant animals extensive coagulative periportal necrosis. The livers of nondepleted mice displayed multiple small foci of PMNs and mononuclear cells with microgranuloma formation. Among this group of mice, the pregnant animals always had more hepatic damage than nonpregnant animals. Our results suggest that PMNs play an essential role in the response to C. psittaci primary infection, preventing the uncontrolled multiplication of chlamydiae in the liver and spleen.  (+info)

Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene of micro-organism WSU 86-1044 from an aborted bovine foetus reveals that it is a member of the order Chlamydiales: proposal of Waddliaceae fam. nov., Waddlia chondrophila gen. nov., sp. nov. (3/403)

The structural gene encoding the 16S rRNA of the new obligate intracellular organism presently designated WSU 86-1044T was sequenced and analysed to establish its phylogenetic relationships. The 16S rDNA sequence was most closely related to those of chlamydial species, having 84.7-85.3% sequence similarity, while it had 72.4-73.2% similarity with rickettsia-like organisms. When the sequences of the four species of chlamydiae (Chlamydophila psittaci, Chlamydia trachomatis, Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Chlamydophila pecorum) were compared, they had > 93% sequence similarity indicating that WSU 86-1044T was not close enough to be in the same family as current Chlamydiaceae members. However, based on the 84.7-85.3% 16S rDNA sequence similarity of WSU 86-1044T and other previously described characteristics, WSU 86-1044T belongs to a novel family within the order Chlamydiales; hence, the proposal of Waddliaceae fam. nov., Waddlia chondrophila gen. nov., sp. nov.  (+info)

Experimental infection of pregnant cows with Bacillus licheniformis bacteria. (4/403)

To study the abortifacient potential and fetoplacental tropism of Bacillus licheniformis bacteria, eight cows in the sixth to eighth month of gestation were inoculated intravenously either once (n = 4) or on four successive days (n = 4) with B. licheniformis at doses ranging from 10(9) to 10(12) colony-forming units. Cows were euthanatized and necropsied prior to abortion (n = 2), at the time of abortion (n = 2), or at calving (n = 4). Live-born calves (n = 5) were euthanatized immediately after delivery and necropsied. B. licheniformis was reisolated from placentomes/endometrium in six of eight (75%) cows and from one fetus aborted 43 days after inoculation. Lesions associated with B. licheniformis were restricted to the pregnant uterus, with the exception of one cow, which developed pneumonia. Necrosis in the fetal compartment of the placenta were present in three of four (75%) cows of both inoculation groups. Lesions were mainly restricted to fetal membranes and especially to the fetal side of the placentomes. Necrosis and diffuse neutrophil infiltrations of both villi and intervillous areas occurred in the fetal part of the placenta, and the placentomal interface was distended by bacteria, neutrophils, erythrocytes, and debris. Within trophoblasts, bacteria were located both free in the cytoplasm and in cytoplasmatic vesicles. Inflammation was present in three of eight (38%) calves. Placental and fetal lesions were similar to those found in cases of spontaneous abortions associated with B. licheniformis. The abortifacient potential of B. licheniformis and the tropism for the bovine placenta is demonstrated here for the first time.  (+info)

Participation of embryonic genotype in the pregnancy block phenomenon in mice. (5/403)

Pregnancy block by male pheromones in mice differs in incidence depending on the combination of strains. Female mice of BALB/cA strain mated with BALB/cA males show a 100% pregnancy block when exposed to males of inbred strain DDK shortly after copulation (Chung et al., Biol Reprod 1997; 57:312-319). In the present study, BALB/cA females mated with the males of other strains--CBA/J, C3H/HeN, C57BL/6Cr, and IXBL--showed higher pregnancy rates (66.6-87. 5%) even when they were exposed to DDK males. In the pharmacological induction of pregnancy block with dopamine agonist (bromocriptine, 4 mg/kg BW), BALB/cA females mated with BALB/cA males showed a 100% pregnancy block. In contrast, BALB/cA females mated with CBA/J, C3H/HeN, and C57BL/6Cr males showed higher pregnancy rates (40-70%). These results suggest that the better pregnancy rate of BALB/cA females mated with alien males may be due to the stronger viability of F(1) embryos. This interpretation was confirmed by an embryo transfer experiment in which a higher implantation rate was observed when BALB/cA embryos grown in BALB/cA females exposed to BALB/cA males were transferred into recipient BALB/cA females exposed to DDK males. These results suggest that the embryonic genotype or viability of the embryo is one factor contributing to the occurrence of pregnancy block by male pheromones in mice.  (+info)

Abortifacient effects of a unique class of vasoactive lipids from Pinus ponderosa needles. (6/403)

Pinus ponderosa needle (PN) ingestion by late pregnant cows results in decreased uterine blood flow, premature parturition, and retained placentae. Further, plasma from PN-fed cows increases caruncular arterial tone (i.e., induces prolonged contraction) in an isolated perfused bovine placentome. A novel class of vasoactive lipids was isolated and identified using a bovine placentome assay-guided fractionation of CH2Cl2 extracts of PN. Placentome perfusion tests indicated that 1-12-dodecanedioyl-dimyristate (14-12-14) was the most potent of the PN lipids for increasing caruncular arterial tone. Late pregnant guinea pigs (GP) were used to evaluate the abortifacient activity of these vasoactive lipids. In Study 1, on d 50 of gestation, part of the control diet was replaced with chopped PN (Diet A) or chopped PN subjected to sequential extraction with diethyl ether (Et2O; Diet B); Et2O and CH2Cl2 (Diet C); and Et2O, CH2Cl2, and methanol (Diet D). The GP on Diets A and B exhibited shorter (P<.01) gestation lengths and reduced (P<.01) pig birth weights than GP on the control diet or Diets C and D. Further, only GP on Diets A and B exhibited retained placentae. In Study 2, on d 50 of gestation, part of the control diet was replaced with chopped PN that had been subjected to exhaustive CH2Cl2 extraction and then infiltrated with either CH2Cl2 alone (Diet E), CH2Cl2 containing 14-12-14 (Diet F), or CH2Cl2 containing isocupressic acid (Diet G); then solvents were evaporated. The GP consuming Diet F had shorter (P<.05) gestation lengths and reduced (P<.05) pig birth weights than did GP consuming Diets E or G. The GP consuming Diet F also exhibited a high incidence of retained placentae. These data provide evidence that a unique class of vasoactive lipids in PN exhibit abortifacient activity in guinea pigs.  (+info)

Identification and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of a variant of the Ibaraki virus from naturally infected cattle and aborted fetuses in Japan. (7/403)

One hundred fourteen field isolates of the Ibaraki virus (IBAV), a member of the epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus serotype 2 (EHDV-2), were isolated from blood samples of affected and apparently healthy cattle and Culicoides biting midges and from blood samples of dams and internal organs of aborted fetuses during an outbreak of Ibaraki disease in the southern part of Japan in 1997. In this outbreak, 242 cattle showed typical symptoms of the disease, and several hundred dams had miscarriages or stillbirths. The viruses that induced typical Ibaraki disease and reproductive problems among cattle were identical and were antigenically closely related to but distinct from previous isolates of IBAV and EHDV-2. The virus was considered to be a putative agent of this outbreak. Reverse transcription-PCR based on segment 3 of the RNA genome of EHDV-2 and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the PCR products were conducted to compare the genomes of the viruses. The results suggested that the virus isolated in 1997 was a variant of IBAV and might be exotic.  (+info)

Detection by PCR of Neospora caninum in fetal tissues from spontaneous bovine abortions. (8/403)

The routine diagnosis of Neospora caninum abortion is based upon histopathologic changes in fetal tissues and identification of tissue parasites by immunohistochemistry. Confirmation of N. caninum infection by immunohistochemistry has low sensitivity. In the present study, we examined the utility of PCR in detecting N. caninum infection in fetal tissues from spontaneous bovine abortion. DNA was obtained from fresh and formalin-fixed tissues from 61 bovine fetuses submitted for abortion diagnosis. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry determined the true status of N. caninum infection in each fetus. In formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues, PCR detected N. caninum DNA in 13 of 13 true-positive fetuses (100%) and in 1 of 16 true-negative fetuses (6%). In fresh or frozen tissues, PCR detected N. caninum DNA in 10 of 13 true-positive fetuses (77%) and 0 of 11 true-negative fetuses (0%). PCR also detected N. caninum DNA in 6 of 8 fetuses that had typical lesions of N. caninum but were immunohistochemistry negative, indicating a higher sensitivity of PCR in comparison to that of immunohistochemistry. N. caninum DNA was amplified most consistently from brain tissue. PCR detection of N. caninum DNA in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues was superior to that in fresh tissues, presumably because of the increased accuracy of sample selection inherent in histologic specimens.  (+info)

Induced abortion is a medical procedure that intentionally terminates a pregnancy before the fetus can survive outside the womb. It can be performed either surgically or medically through the use of medications. The timing of an induced abortion is typically based on the gestational age of the pregnancy, with different methods used at different stages.

The most common surgical procedure for induced abortion is vacuum aspiration, which is usually performed during the first trimester (up to 12-13 weeks of gestation). This procedure involves dilating the cervix and using a vacuum device to remove the pregnancy tissue from the uterus. Other surgical procedures, such as dilation and evacuation (D&E), may be used in later stages of pregnancy.

Medical abortion involves the use of medications to induce the termination of a pregnancy. The most common regimen involves the use of two drugs: mifepristone and misoprostol. Mifepristone works by blocking the action of progesterone, a hormone necessary for maintaining pregnancy. Misoprostol causes the uterus to contract and expel the pregnancy tissue. This method is typically used during the first 10 weeks of gestation.

Induced abortion is a safe and common medical procedure, with low rates of complications when performed by trained healthcare providers in appropriate settings. Access to induced abortion varies widely around the world, with some countries restricting or prohibiting the practice entirely.

Veterinary medicine is the branch of medical science that deals with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases, disorders, and injuries in non-human animals. The profession of veterinary medicine is dedicated to the care, health, and welfare of animals, as well as to the promotion of human health through animal research and public health advancements. Veterinarians employ a variety of diagnostic methods including clinical examination, radiography, laboratory testing, and ultrasound imaging. They use a range of treatments, including medication, surgery, and dietary management. In addition, veterinarians may also advise on preventative healthcare measures such as vaccination schedules and parasite control programs.

Veterinary education is a postsecondary educational process and training that prepares students to become licensed veterinarians. The curriculum typically includes courses in biochemistry, anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, pathology, microbiology, immunology, toxicology, animal nutrition, parasitology, and veterinary clinical practice.

In addition to classroom instruction, veterinary education also involves hands-on training through clinical rotations in veterinary hospitals, clinics, and research laboratories. Students learn how to diagnose and treat diseases and injuries in a variety of animals, including domestic pets, livestock, and wildlife.

Veterinary education typically takes four years to complete and is offered by colleges or schools of veterinary medicine that are accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Council on Education. After completing their education, graduates must pass a licensing exam in order to practice veterinary medicine. Continuing education is also required throughout their careers to maintain their license and stay up-to-date with advances in the field.

Veterinary drugs, also known as veterinary medicines, are substances or combinations of substances used to treat, prevent, or diagnose diseases in animals, including food-producing species and pets. These drugs can be administered to animals through various routes such as oral, topical, injectable, or inhalation. They contain active ingredients that interact with the animal's biological system to produce a therapeutic effect. Veterinary drugs are subject to regulatory control and must be prescribed or recommended by a licensed veterinarian in many countries to ensure their safe and effective use.

Spontaneous abortion, also known as miscarriage, is the unintentional expulsion of a nonviable fetus from the uterus before the 20th week of gestation. It is a common complication of early pregnancy, with most miscarriages occurring during the first trimester. Spontaneous abortion can have various causes, including chromosomal abnormalities, maternal health conditions, infections, hormonal imbalances, and structural issues of the uterus or cervix. In many cases, the exact cause may remain unknown.

The symptoms of spontaneous abortion can vary but often include vaginal bleeding, which may range from light spotting to heavy bleeding; abdominal pain or cramping; and the passing of tissue or clots from the vagina. While some miscarriages occur suddenly and are immediately noticeable, others may progress slowly over several days or even weeks.

In medical practice, healthcare providers often use specific terminology to describe different stages and types of spontaneous abortion. For example:

* Threatened abortion: Vaginal bleeding during early pregnancy, but the cervix remains closed, and there is no evidence of fetal demise or passing of tissue.
* Inevitable abortion: Vaginal bleeding with an open cervix, indicating that a miscarriage is imminent or already in progress.
* Incomplete abortion: The expulsion of some but not all products of conception from the uterus, requiring medical intervention to remove any remaining tissue.
* Complete abortion: The successful passage of all products of conception from the uterus, often confirmed through an ultrasound or pelvic examination.
* Missed abortion: The death of a fetus in the uterus without any expulsion of the products of conception, which may be discovered during routine prenatal care.
* Septic abortion: A rare and life-threatening complication of spontaneous abortion characterized by infection of the products of conception and the surrounding tissues, requiring prompt medical attention and antibiotic treatment.

Healthcare providers typically monitor patients who experience a spontaneous abortion to ensure that all products of conception have been expelled and that there are no complications, such as infection or excessive bleeding. In some cases, medication or surgical intervention may be necessary to remove any remaining tissue or address other issues related to the miscarriage. Counseling and support services are often available for individuals and couples who experience a spontaneous abortion, as they may face emotional challenges and concerns about future pregnancies.

I. Definition:

An abortion in a veterinary context refers to the intentional or unintentional termination of pregnancy in a non-human animal before the fetus is capable of surviving outside of the uterus. This can occur spontaneously (known as a miscarriage) or be induced through medical intervention (induced abortion).

II. Common Causes:

Spontaneous abortions may result from genetic defects, hormonal imbalances, infections, exposure to toxins, trauma, or other maternal health issues. Induced abortions are typically performed for population control, humane reasons (such as preventing the birth of a severely deformed or non-viable fetus), or when the pregnancy poses a risk to the mother's health.

III. Methods:

Veterinarians may use various methods to induce abortion depending on the species, stage of gestation, and reason for the procedure. These can include administering drugs that stimulate uterine contractions (such as prostaglandins), physically removing the fetus through surgery (dilation and curettage or hysterectomy), or using techniques specific to certain animal species (e.g., intrauterine infusion of hypertonic saline in equids).

IV. Ethical Considerations:

The ethics surrounding veterinary abortions are complex and multifaceted, often involving considerations related to animal welfare, conservation, population management, and human-animal relationships. Veterinarians must weigh these factors carefully when deciding whether to perform an abortion and which method to use. In some cases, legal regulations may also influence the decision-making process.

V. Conclusion:

Abortion in veterinary medicine is a medical intervention that can be used to address various clinical scenarios, ranging from unintentional pregnancy loss to deliberate termination of pregnancy for humane or population control reasons. Ethical considerations play a significant role in the decision-making process surrounding veterinary abortions, and veterinarians must carefully evaluate each situation on a case-by-case basis.

I'm not a medical professional, but I can try to help you with that. "Schools, veterinary" is not a medical condition or term related to human health. Instead, it refers to educational institutions that offer programs and training for individuals who wish to become veterinarians or work in animal care.

Veterinary schools provide advanced education and training in animal medicine, surgery, and healthcare. Students typically complete a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree program, which includes classroom instruction, laboratory work, and clinical experience. Upon graduation, they are eligible to take licensing exams and practice veterinary medicine.

Therefore, "schools, veterinary" is not a medical definition related to human health but rather a term used to describe educational institutions that specialize in training professionals in animal healthcare.

A criminal abortion is an illegal abortion, which is a procedure performed with the intent to induce the termination of a pregnancy, carried out in violation of the law. In many jurisdictions, criminal abortions are defined as those performed outside of the legal parameters set forth by the relevant regulations, such as those that require the procedure to be performed by a licensed medical professional, within certain timeframes, and/or for specific reasons.

Criminal abortions may be motivated by various factors, including financial constraints, social stigma, or fear of repercussions. Engaging in criminal abortion practices can result in severe legal consequences, including fines, imprisonment, and in some cases, loss of medical license. It's important to note that the legality and accessibility of abortion vary significantly across different countries and regions, with varying restrictions and requirements.

If you require assistance or advice related to pregnancy termination, it is crucial to consult a licensed healthcare professional or a trusted reproductive health organization in your area to ensure that you receive accurate information and safe care within the legal framework of your jurisdiction.

Veterinary pathology is a branch of veterinary medicine that deals with the diagnosis and investigation of diseases in animals through the examination of animal tissue, bodily fluids, and other specimens. It involves the study of causes, mechanisms, and effects of disease processes in animals, which can help to understand the nature of diseases and develop effective treatments and preventive measures.

Veterinary pathologists use various techniques such as histopathology (examination of tissue sections under a microscope), clinical pathology (analysis of blood, urine, and other bodily fluids), and necropsy (post-mortem examination) to diagnose diseases and identify any abnormalities in animals. They also conduct research on animal diseases, develop new diagnostic tests and techniques, and provide guidance to veterinarians and other animal health professionals on disease diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

Veterinary pathology is an essential field that contributes to the advancement of animal health and welfare, food safety, and public health. It plays a critical role in identifying and controlling zoonotic diseases (diseases transmissible from animals to humans) and ensuring the safety of the food supply chain.

A therapeutic abortion is the deliberate termination of a pregnancy before viability (the ability of the fetus to survive outside the womb), which is generally considered to be around 24 weeks of gestation. The term "therapeutic" is used to describe abortions that are performed for medical reasons, such as to protect the life or health of the pregnant individual, or in cases where the fetus has a severe abnormality and cannot survive outside the womb.

Therapeutic abortions may be recommended in situations where continuing the pregnancy poses a significant risk to the health or life of the pregnant individual. For example, if a pregnant person has a serious medical condition such as heart disease, cancer, or severe pre-eclampsia, continuing the pregnancy could worsen their condition and put them at risk of serious complications or even death. In these cases, a therapeutic abortion may be necessary to protect the health or life of the pregnant individual.

Therapeutic abortions may also be recommended in cases where the fetus has a severe abnormality that is not compatible with life outside the womb. For example, if the fetus has a condition such as anencephaly (a neural tube defect where the brain and skull do not form properly), or a chromosomal abnormality such as Trisomy 13 or 18, continuing the pregnancy may result in a stillbirth or a short, painful life for the infant after birth. In these cases, a therapeutic abortion may be considered a compassionate option to prevent unnecessary suffering.

It's important to note that the decision to undergo a therapeutic abortion is a deeply personal one, and should be made in consultation with medical professionals and trusted family members or support networks. Ultimately, the decision should be based on what is best for the physical and emotional health of the pregnant individual, taking into account their values, beliefs, and circumstances.

A veterinarian is a licensed medical professional who practices veterinary medicine. They are dedicated to the health and well-being of animals, ranging from pets and livestock to wild animals and exotic creatures. Veterinarians diagnose, treat, and prevent diseases and injuries in animals, and they also provide advice and guidance on animal care and nutrition.

Veterinarians may specialize in a particular area of veterinary medicine, such as surgery, internal medicine, dentistry, dermatology, or emergency care. They may work in private clinical practice, research institutions, government agencies, zoos, wildlife rehabilitation centers, or the animal health industry.

To become a veterinarian, one must complete a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree from an accredited veterinary school and pass a licensing exam. Veterinary schools typically require applicants to have a bachelor's degree with a strong background in science courses. Additionally, veterinarians must adhere to strict ethical standards and maintain their knowledge and skills through ongoing education and training.

"Abortion applicants" is not a standard medical term. However, in general, it may refer to individuals who are seeking to have an abortion procedure performed. This could include people of any gender, although the vast majority of those seeking abortions are women or pregnant individuals. The term "abortion applicant" may be used in legal or administrative contexts to describe someone who is applying for a legal abortion, particularly in places where there are restrictions or requirements that must be met before an abortion can be performed. It is important to note that access to safe and legal abortion is a fundamental human right recognized by many international organizations and medical associations.

A "missed abortion" is a medical term used to describe a pregnancy in which the fetus has died or failed to develop, but the products of conception (i.e., the placenta and gestational sac) remain in the uterus. This condition is also sometimes referred to as a "silent miscarriage" or "delayed miscarriage." In a missed abortion, there may be no symptoms or only very mild ones, such as vaginal bleeding or the passing of tissue. The diagnosis is typically made through an ultrasound exam that shows an empty gestational sac or a non-viable fetus. Treatment options include waiting for the body to expel the products of conception naturally, taking medication to induce expulsion, or undergoing a surgical procedure to remove the products of conception.

Septic abortion is a medical term used to describe a spontaneous abortion or miscarriage that is associated with infection. This occurs when the products of conception, such as the fetal tissue and placenta, are not completely expelled from the uterus, leading to an infection of the uterine lining and potentially the pelvic cavity.

The infection can cause fever, chills, severe abdominal pain, foul-smelling vaginal discharge, and heavy bleeding. If left untreated, septic abortion can lead to serious complications such as sepsis, infertility, and even death. It is important to seek medical attention immediately if you suspect a septic abortion. Treatment typically involves antibiotics to clear the infection and possibly surgical intervention to remove any remaining products of conception.

The medical definition of "Habitual Abortion" refers to a woman who has three or more consecutive pregnancies that end in spontaneous miscarriages before 20 weeks of gestation. The cause of habitual abortions can be difficult to determine and may involve genetic, anatomical, hormonal, or immune system factors. Treatment is often aimed at addressing any underlying issues that may be contributing to the recurrent miscarriages. It's important to note that the terminology has changed over time and the term "recurrent pregnancy loss" is now more commonly used in place of "habitual abortion".

Veterinary legislation refers to the laws, regulations, and policies that govern the practice of veterinary medicine, animal health and welfare, and related activities. These rules are designed to protect animals, humans, and the environment from harm, ensure the humane treatment of animals, and maintain a high standard of veterinary care.

Veterinary legislation covers various aspects, including:

1. Licensing and registration of veterinarians, veterinary technicians, and other animal health professionals.
2. Standards for veterinary education, training, and continuing education.
3. Regulation of veterinary drugs, devices, and biologicals, including their manufacture, distribution, and use.
4. Control and prevention of zoonotic diseases (diseases transmissible between animals and humans).
5. Animal welfare standards for housing, transportation, breeding, and slaughter.
6. Reporting and management of animal disease outbreaks and public health emergencies.
7. Importation and exportation of live animals and animal products.
8. Research involving animals.
9. Establishment of penalties for violations of veterinary legislation.

These laws and regulations are typically enacted and enforced by governmental bodies at the national, regional, or local level. Compliance with veterinary legislation is essential to maintain public trust in the veterinary profession, ensure animal health and welfare, and protect human health.

A "threatened abortion" is a medical term used to describe a situation in which there are symptoms that suggest an impending miscarriage, such as vaginal bleeding and/or cramping during early pregnancy, but the cervix remains closed and the fetal heartbeat is still present. This condition is estimated to occur in up to 20-30% of all pregnancies, and while it can be a source of anxiety for pregnant individuals, it does not necessarily mean that a miscarriage will definitely occur.

It's important to note that if you are experiencing any symptoms of a threatened abortion, you should contact your healthcare provider right away for evaluation and guidance on how to manage the situation. They may recommend bed rest, pelvic rest, or other treatments to help support the pregnancy and reduce the risk of miscarriage.

Animal diseases are health conditions that primarily affect animals, including but not limited to, livestock, poultry, wildlife, and pets. These diseases can be caused by various factors such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, genetic disorders, and environmental conditions. Some animal diseases can also pose a risk to human health, either directly or indirectly, through the consumption of contaminated food or water, contact with infected animals, or the spread of vectors like ticks and mosquitoes. Examples of animal diseases include rabies, avian influenza, foot-and-mouth disease, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), and heartworm disease. It is important to monitor, control, and prevent the spread of animal diseases to protect animal health, food security, and public health.

An abortifacient agent is a substance or drug that causes abortion by inducing the uterus to contract and expel a fetus. These agents can be chemical or herbal substances, and they work by interfering with the implantation of the fertilized egg in the uterine lining or by stimulating uterine contractions to expel the developing embryo or fetus.

Examples of abortifacient agents include misoprostol, mifepristone, and certain herbs such as pennyroyal, tansy, and black cohosh. It is important to note that the use of abortifacient agents can have serious health consequences, including infection, bleeding, and damage to the reproductive system. Therefore, it is essential to consult with a healthcare provider before using any abortifacient agent.

There is no medical definition for "dog diseases" as it is too broad a term. However, dogs can suffer from various health conditions and illnesses that are specific to their species or similar to those found in humans. Some common categories of dog diseases include:

1. Infectious Diseases: These are caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites. Examples include distemper, parvovirus, kennel cough, Lyme disease, and heartworms.
2. Hereditary/Genetic Disorders: Some dogs may inherit certain genetic disorders from their parents. Examples include hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), and degenerative myelopathy.
3. Age-Related Diseases: As dogs age, they become more susceptible to various health issues. Common age-related diseases in dogs include arthritis, dental disease, cancer, and cognitive dysfunction syndrome (CDS).
4. Nutritional Disorders: Malnutrition or improper feeding can lead to various health problems in dogs. Examples include obesity, malnutrition, and vitamin deficiencies.
5. Environmental Diseases: These are caused by exposure to environmental factors such as toxins, allergens, or extreme temperatures. Examples include heatstroke, frostbite, and toxicities from ingesting harmful substances.
6. Neurological Disorders: Dogs can suffer from various neurological conditions that affect their nervous system. Examples include epilepsy, intervertebral disc disease (IVDD), and vestibular disease.
7. Behavioral Disorders: Some dogs may develop behavioral issues due to various factors such as anxiety, fear, or aggression. Examples include separation anxiety, noise phobias, and resource guarding.

It's important to note that regular veterinary care, proper nutrition, exercise, and preventative measures can help reduce the risk of many dog diseases.

An incomplete abortion is a medical term used to describe a situation where a pregnancy is expelled or terminated spontaneously or induced, but only partially. This means that some of the products of conception (i.e., the fetus, placenta, and associated membranes) are retained within the uterus.

Incomplete abortions can be caused by various factors, including complications during a medical or surgical abortion, miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy, or infection. Symptoms of an incomplete abortion may include vaginal bleeding, abdominal pain, cramping, and the passage of tissue or clots.

Incomplete abortions are considered a medical emergency because they can lead to complications such as infection, hemorrhage, and infertility if left untreated. Treatment typically involves a surgical procedure called dilatation and curettage (D&C) to remove any remaining products of conception from the uterus. In some cases, medication may also be used to help complete the abortion and prevent infection.

An aborted fetus refers to a developing human organism that is expelled or removed from the uterus before it is viable, typically as a result of an induced abortion. An abortion is a medical procedure that intentionally ends a pregnancy and can be performed through various methods, depending on the stage of the pregnancy.

It's important to note that the term "abortion" is often used in different contexts and may carry different connotations depending on one's perspective. In medical terminology, an abortion refers specifically to the intentional ending of a pregnancy before viability. However, in other contexts, the term may be used more broadly to refer to any spontaneous or induced loss of a pregnancy, including miscarriages and stillbirths.

The definition of "viable" can vary, but it generally refers to the point at which a fetus can survive outside the uterus with medical assistance, typically around 24 weeks of gestation. Fetal viability is a complex issue that depends on many factors, including the availability and accessibility of medical technology and resources.

In summary, an aborted fetus is a developing human organism that is intentionally expelled or removed from the uterus before it is viable, typically as a result of a medical procedure called an abortion.

Abortifacient agents, steroidal, refer to a type of medication or substance that is capable of inducing abortion or causing the termination of pregnancy by interfering with the implantation and maintenance of the fertilized ovum (embryo) or the development of the placenta. Steroidal abortifacient agents are synthetic derivatives of steroids, which have a similar structure to naturally occurring hormones in the human body.

The most commonly used steroidal abortifacient agent is mifepristone, also known as RU-486. Mifepristone works by blocking the action of progesterone, a hormone that is essential for maintaining pregnancy. By blocking the action of progesterone, mifepristone causes the shedding of the uterine lining and the expulsion of the embryo or fetus from the uterus.

Steroidal abortifacient agents are typically used in the early stages of pregnancy, up to 10 weeks after the last menstrual period. They may be used alone or in combination with other medications, such as misoprostol, which helps to stimulate uterine contractions and expel the embryo or fetus from the uterus.

It is important to note that steroidal abortifacient agents are not the same as emergency contraceptives, which are used to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse. Steroidal abortifacient agents are intended for use in cases where pregnancy has already occurred and is unwanted or poses a risk to the health of the mother or fetus.

An Animal Technician, also known as a Laboratory Animal Technician, is a professional who cares for and handles animals in a research or testing facility. They are responsible for ensuring the welfare and well-being of the animals, which includes providing them with proper housing, feeding, and medical care. They also assist researchers and veterinarians with procedures and experiments involving animals, and help to maintain accurate records of animal health and behavior.

Animal Technicians must have a strong understanding of animal biology, husbandry, and ethology, as well as knowledge of relevant regulations and guidelines governing the use of animals in research. They may work with a variety of species, including rodents, dogs, cats, non-human primates, and farm animals.

In addition to their technical skills, Animal Technicians must also have excellent observational and communication skills, as they are often responsible for monitoring animal behavior and reporting any changes or concerns to researchers or veterinarians. They must be able to work independently and as part of a team, and may need to work flexible hours, including evenings and weekends, to meet the needs of the animals in their care.

An "eugenic abortion" is not a medical term, but rather a descriptive phrase that combines two concepts: eugenics and abortion.

Eugenics refers to the belief and practice of improving the human species by encouraging reproduction of individuals with desired traits and preventing reproduction of those with undesired traits. This concept has been widely criticized for its potential to be used as a tool for discrimination and oppression.

Abortion, on the other hand, is the medical procedure to end a pregnancy before the fetus can survive outside the womb.

A "eugenic abortion," therefore, generally refers to the practice of terminating a pregnancy based on the perceived genetic traits or characteristics of the fetus, such as disability, race, or sex. This phrase is often used in discussions about the ethics and morality of selective abortions, and it raises important questions about discrimination, reproductive rights, and medical ethics. It's worth noting that the vast majority of abortions are not performed for eugenic reasons, but rather due to a variety of personal, medical, and socioeconomic factors.

Domestic animals, also known as domestic animals or pets, are species that have been tamed and kept by humans for various purposes. These purposes can include companionship, work, protection, or food production. Some common examples of domestic animals include dogs, cats, cows, sheep, goats, pigs, horses, and chickens.

Domestic animals are distinguished from wild animals in that they are dependent on humans for their survival and are able to live in close proximity to people. They have often been selectively bred over generations to possess certain traits or characteristics that make them more suitable for their intended uses. For example, dogs may be bred for their size, strength, agility, or temperament, while cats may be bred for their coat patterns or behaviors.

It is important to note that the term "domestic animal" does not necessarily mean that an animal is tame or safe to handle. Some domestic animals, such as certain breeds of dogs, can be aggressive or dangerous if not properly trained and managed. It is always important to approach and handle any animal, domestic or wild, with caution and respect.

Cattle diseases are a range of health conditions that affect cattle, which include but are not limited to:

1. Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD): Also known as "shipping fever," BRD is a common respiratory illness in feedlot cattle that can be caused by several viruses and bacteria.
2. Bovine Viral Diarrhea (BVD): A viral disease that can cause a variety of symptoms, including diarrhea, fever, and reproductive issues.
3. Johne's Disease: A chronic wasting disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis. It primarily affects the intestines and can cause severe diarrhea and weight loss.
4. Digital Dermatitis: Also known as "hairy heel warts," this is a highly contagious skin disease that affects the feet of cattle, causing lameness and decreased productivity.
5. Infectious Bovine Keratoconjunctivitis (IBK): Also known as "pinkeye," IBK is a common and contagious eye infection in cattle that can cause blindness if left untreated.
6. Salmonella: A group of bacteria that can cause severe gastrointestinal illness in cattle, including diarrhea, dehydration, and septicemia.
7. Leptospirosis: A bacterial disease that can cause a wide range of symptoms in cattle, including abortion, stillbirths, and kidney damage.
8. Blackleg: A highly fatal bacterial disease that causes rapid death in young cattle. It is caused by Clostridium chauvoei and vaccination is recommended for prevention.
9. Anthrax: A serious infectious disease caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis. Cattle can become infected by ingesting spores found in contaminated soil, feed or water.
10. Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD): A highly contagious viral disease that affects cloven-hooved animals, including cattle. It is characterized by fever and blisters on the feet, mouth, and teats. FMD is not a threat to human health but can have serious economic consequences for the livestock industry.

It's important to note that many of these diseases can be prevented or controlled through good management practices, such as vaccination, biosecurity measures, and proper nutrition. Regular veterinary care and monitoring are also crucial for early detection and treatment of any potential health issues in your herd.

There are many diseases that can affect cats, and the specific medical definitions for these conditions can be quite detailed and complex. However, here are some common categories of feline diseases and examples of each:

1. Infectious diseases: These are caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites. Examples include:
* Feline panleukopenia virus (FPV), also known as feline parvovirus, which can cause severe gastrointestinal symptoms and death in kittens.
* Feline calicivirus (FCV), which can cause upper respiratory symptoms such as sneezing and nasal discharge.
* Feline leukemia virus (FeLV), which can suppress the immune system and lead to a variety of secondary infections and diseases.
* Bacterial infections, such as those caused by Pasteurella multocida or Bartonella henselae, which can cause abscesses or other symptoms.
2. Neoplastic diseases: These are cancerous conditions that can affect various organs and tissues in cats. Examples include:
* Lymphoma, which is a common type of cancer in cats that can affect the lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and other organs.
* Fibrosarcoma, which is a type of soft tissue cancer that can arise from fibrous connective tissue.
* Squamous cell carcinoma, which is a type of skin cancer that can be caused by exposure to sunlight or tobacco smoke.
3. Degenerative diseases: These are conditions that result from the normal wear and tear of aging or other factors. Examples include:
* Osteoarthritis, which is a degenerative joint disease that can cause pain and stiffness in older cats.
* Dental disease, which is a common condition in cats that can lead to tooth loss, gum inflammation, and other problems.
* Heart disease, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), which is a thickening of the heart muscle that can lead to congestive heart failure.
4. Hereditary diseases: These are conditions that are inherited from a cat's parents and are present at birth or develop early in life. Examples include:
* Polycystic kidney disease (PKD), which is a genetic disorder that causes cysts to form in the kidneys and can lead to kidney failure.
* Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), which can be inherited as an autosomal dominant trait in some cats.
* Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), which is a group of genetic disorders that cause degeneration of the retina and can lead to blindness.

Misoprostol is a synthetic prostaglandin E1 analog used in obstetrics and gynecology to prevent and treat ulcers caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), reduce the risk of gastric ulcers in patients taking NSAIDs long term, induce labor, manage postpartum hemorrhage, and cause abortion. It is also used off-label for cervical ripening before gynecologic surgery and to treat miscarriage.

In addition, Misoprostol has been found to be effective in reducing the risk of gastric ulcers and NSAID-induced dyspepsia (upper abdominal pain or discomfort) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory conditions who require long-term NSAID therapy.

It is important to note that Misoprostol should not be used during pregnancy unless under the supervision of a healthcare provider for specific medical indications, such as preventing or treating stomach ulcers in pregnant women taking NSAIDs or inducing labor. It can cause miscarriage and birth defects if taken during early pregnancy.

Non-steroidal abortifacient agents are medications or substances that can cause abortion by interfering with the normal functioning of the hormones in the reproductive system. These agents do not contain steroids and work primarily by preventing the implantation of a fertilized egg in the uterus or by causing the shedding of the uterine lining, leading to the termination of an early pregnancy.

Examples of non-steroidal abortifacient agents include:

1. Mifepristone (RU-486): This medication works by blocking the action of progesterone, a hormone necessary for maintaining pregnancy. When used in combination with another medication called misoprostol, it can cause an abortion during the early stages of pregnancy.
2. Misoprostol: This medication is primarily used to prevent and treat stomach ulcers but can also be used as an abortifacient agent. It causes uterine contractions and cervical dilation, leading to the expulsion of the contents of the uterus.
3. High-dose estrogen and progestin: These hormones can interfere with the normal functioning of the reproductive system and cause an early abortion when taken in high doses.
4. Herbal remedies: Certain herbs, such as pennyroyal, tansy, and savin, have been used traditionally as abortifacient agents. However, their effectiveness and safety are not well-established, and they can cause serious side effects or even death when taken in large quantities.

It is important to note that the use of non-steroidal abortifacient agents for the purpose of inducing an abortion should only be done under the supervision of a licensed healthcare provider, as there are potential risks and complications associated with their use. Additionally, some of these agents may be restricted or illegal in certain jurisdictions, so it is essential to comply with local laws and regulations regarding their use.

Unplanned pregnancy is a pregnancy that is not intended or expected by the woman or couple. It is also sometimes referred to as an "unintended" or "unwanted" pregnancy. This can occur when contraceptive methods fail or are not used, or when there is a lack of knowledge about or access to effective family planning resources. Unplanned pregnancies can present various physical, emotional, and social challenges for the individuals involved, and may also have implications for public health and societal well-being. It's important to note that unplanned pregnancies can still result in wanted and loved children, but the circumstances surrounding their conception may bring additional stressors and considerations.

I understand you are asking for a medical definition of "Horse Diseases." However, it's important to note that there isn't a specific medical field dedicated to horse diseases as we typically categorize medical fields by human diseases and conditions. Veterinary medicine is the field responsible for studying, diagnosing, and treating diseases in animals, including horses.

Here's a general definition of 'Horse Diseases':

Horse diseases are health issues or medical conditions that affect equine species, particularly horses. These diseases can be caused by various factors such as bacterial, viral, fungal, or parasitic infections; genetic predispositions; environmental factors; and metabolic disorders. Examples of horse diseases include Strangles (Streptococcus equi), Equine Influenza, Equine Herpesvirus, West Nile Virus, Rabies, Potomac Horse Fever, Lyme Disease, and internal or external parasites like worms and ticks. Additionally, horses can suffer from musculoskeletal disorders such as arthritis, laminitis, and various injuries. Regular veterinary care, preventative measures, and proper management are crucial for maintaining horse health and preventing diseases.

Zoonoses are infectious diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans. They are caused by pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, parasites, or fungi that naturally infect non-human animals and can sometimes infect and cause disease in humans through various transmission routes like direct contact with infected animals, consumption of contaminated food or water, or vectors like insects. Some well-known zoonotic diseases include rabies, Lyme disease, salmonellosis, and COVID-19 (which is believed to have originated from bats). Public health officials work to prevent and control zoonoses through various measures such as surveillance, education, vaccination, and management of animal populations.

I believe there might be a misunderstanding in your question. "Dogs" is not a medical term or condition. It is the common name for a domesticated carnivore of the family Canidae, specifically the genus Canis, which includes wolves, foxes, and other extant and extinct species of mammals. Dogs are often kept as pets and companions, and they have been bred in a wide variety of forms and sizes for different purposes, such as hunting, herding, guarding, assisting police and military forces, and providing companionship and emotional support.

If you meant to ask about a specific medical condition or term related to dogs, please provide more context so I can give you an accurate answer.

Unwanted pregnancy is a situation where a person becomes pregnant despite not planning or desiring to conceive at that time. This can occur due to various reasons such as lack of access to effective contraception, failure of contraceptive methods, sexual assault, or a change in circumstances that makes the pregnancy untimely or inconvenient. Unwanted pregnancies can have significant physical, emotional, and socioeconomic impacts on individuals and families. It is important to address unwanted pregnancies through comprehensive sexuality education, access to affordable and effective contraception, and supportive services for those who experience unintended pregnancies.

Vacuum curettage is a medical procedure that involves the use of suction to remove tissue from the uterus. It is often used as a method of first-trimester abortion, or to treat abnormal uterine conditions such as miscarriage or retained placental tissue after childbirth. The cervix is dilated and a vacuum aspirator is inserted into the uterus to remove the contents using suction. This procedure may also be referred to as vacuum aspiration or suction curettage.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "horses" is not a medical term. It is the common name given to the species *Equus ferus caballus*, which are large domesticated mammals used for transportation, work, and recreation. If you have any questions about horses or a related topic that you would like a medical perspective on, please let me know and I'd be happy to help!

The first trimester of pregnancy is defined as the period of gestational development that extends from conception (fertilization of the egg by sperm) to the end of the 13th week. This critical phase marks significant transformations in both the mother's body and the growing embryo/fetus.

During the first trimester, the fertilized egg implants into the uterine lining (implantation), initiating a series of complex interactions leading to the formation of the placenta - an organ essential for providing nutrients and oxygen to the developing fetus while removing waste products. Simultaneously, the embryo undergoes rapid cell division and differentiation, giving rise to various organs and systems. By the end of the first trimester, most major structures are present, although they continue to mature and grow throughout pregnancy.

The mother may experience several physiological changes during this time, including:
- Morning sickness (nausea and vomiting)
- Fatigue
- Breast tenderness
- Frequent urination
- Food aversions or cravings
- Mood swings

Additionally, hormonal shifts can cause various symptoms and prepare the body for potential changes in lactation, posture, and pelvic alignment as pregnancy progresses. Regular prenatal care is crucial during this period to monitor both maternal and fetal wellbeing, identify any potential complications early on, and provide appropriate guidance and support throughout the pregnancy.

A biography is a written or oral account of someone’s life. It can be written in either objective or subjective style, depending on the author’s approach and purpose. A biography typically includes information about the person’s birth, major life events, relationships, accomplishments, and death. It may also include an analysis of the person’s character and impact on society.

Biographies can be written about people from all walks of life, including politicians, artists, scientists, religious figures, and historical figures. They can be used for a variety of purposes, such as to educate readers about a particular person or period in history, to inspire or entertain, or to provide insight into the human experience.

Biographies can be classified into several types, including:

1. Autobiography: A biography written by the subject themselves.
2. Memoir: A type of autobiography that focuses on specific events or aspects of the author's life.
3. Authorized biography: A biography written with the cooperation and approval of the subject or their estate.
4. Unauthorized biography: A biography written without the subject's cooperation or approval.
5. Collective biography: A biography that covers multiple subjects who share a common theme, such as members of a particular family, group, or profession.
6. Fictionalized biography: A biography that includes fictional elements to enhance the narrative or fill in gaps in the historical record.

Regardless of the type, a well-written biography can provide valuable insights into the life and times of its subject, shedding light on their achievements, struggles, and contributions to society.

Drug residues refer to the remaining amount of a medication or drug that remains in an animal or its products after the treatment period has ended. This can occur when drugs are not properly metabolized and eliminated by the animal's body, or when withdrawal times (the recommended length of time to wait before consuming or selling the animal or its products) are not followed.

Drug residues in animals can pose a risk to human health if consumed through the consumption of animal products such as meat, milk, or eggs. For this reason, regulatory bodies set maximum residue limits (MRLs) for drug residues in animal products to ensure that they do not exceed safe levels for human consumption.

It is important for farmers and veterinarians to follow label instructions and recommended withdrawal times to prevent the accumulation of drug residues in animals and their products, and to protect public health.

Veterinary anatomy is the study of the physical structure and organization of the bodies of animals that are relevant to veterinary medicine. It involves the examination and understanding of the various organs, tissues, and systems in animals, including their form, function, and interrelationships.

The subject matter of veterinary anatomy includes:

1. Gross anatomy: This refers to the study of large structures that can be seen with the naked eye, such as bones, muscles, and organs.
2. Histology: This is the study of tissues at the microscopic level, including their structure, composition, and function.
3. Embryology: This involves the study of the development of animals from fertilization to birth, including the formation and differentiation of various structures and systems.
4. Neuroanatomy: This is the study of the nervous system, including the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves.
5. Comparative anatomy: This involves the comparison of the anatomy of different species to understand their evolutionary relationships and adaptations.

Veterinary anatomy is a fundamental subject in veterinary medicine, providing essential knowledge for understanding animal health and disease, as well as for performing surgical procedures and other medical interventions.

"Cattle" is a term used in the agricultural and veterinary fields to refer to domesticated animals of the genus *Bos*, primarily *Bos taurus* (European cattle) and *Bos indicus* (Zebu). These animals are often raised for meat, milk, leather, and labor. They are also known as bovines or cows (for females), bulls (intact males), and steers/bullocks (castrated males). However, in a strict medical definition, "cattle" does not apply to humans or other animals.

'Pregnant women' refers to female individuals who have conceived and are in the process of carrying a developing fetus inside their womb (uterus) until childbirth. This state is typically marked by various physiological changes, including hormonal fluctuations, weight gain, and growth of the uterus and breasts, among others. Pregnancy usually lasts for about 40 weeks, starting from the first day of the woman's last menstrual period (LMP) and is divided into three trimesters. Each trimester is characterized by different developmental milestones in the fetus. Regular prenatal care is essential to monitor the health and wellbeing of both the mother and the developing fetus, and to address any potential complications that may arise during pregnancy.

I'm happy to help, but I want to clarify that the term "sheep diseases" refers to a wide range of health issues that can affect sheep populations. It's not a single medical condition with a specific definition. Here are some examples of common diseases that can affect sheep:

1. Ovine Johne's Disease (OJD): A chronic, infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis. It affects the intestines and can cause weight loss, diarrhea, and death.
2. Footrot: A highly contagious bacterial infection that affects the feet of sheep, causing lameness, swelling, and pain. It's caused by the bacteria Dichelobacter nodosus.
3. Caseous Lymphadenitis (CL): A chronic infectious disease caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. It affects the lymph nodes and can cause abscesses, weight loss, and death.
4. Contagious Ecthyma (Orf): A highly contagious viral infection that affects the skin and mucous membranes of sheep, causing sores and lesions.
5. Mastitis: An inflammation of the mammary gland in sheep, usually caused by a bacterial infection. It can cause decreased milk production, fever, and loss of appetite.
6. Pneumonia: A respiratory infection that can affect sheep, causing coughing, difficulty breathing, and fever. It can be caused by various bacteria or viruses.
7. Enterotoxemia: A potentially fatal disease caused by the overproduction of toxins in the intestines of sheep, usually due to a bacterial infection with Clostridium perfringens.
8. Polioencephalomalacia (PEM): A neurological disorder that affects the brain of sheep, causing symptoms such as blindness, circling, and seizures. It's often caused by a thiamine deficiency or excessive sulfur intake.
9. Toxoplasmosis: A parasitic infection that can affect sheep, causing abortion, stillbirth, and neurological symptoms.
10. Blue tongue: A viral disease that affects sheep, causing fever, respiratory distress, and mouth ulcers. It's transmitted by insect vectors and is often associated with climate change.

Contraception is the use of various devices, methods, or medications to prevent pregnancy. The term is derived from the Latin words "contra" meaning "against" and "conceptio" meaning "conception." Contraceptive methods can be broadly categorized into temporary and permanent methods. Temporary methods include barriers such as condoms, diaphragms, cervical caps, and sponges; hormonal methods like the pill, patch, ring, injection, and emergency contraception; and fertility awareness-based methods that involve tracking ovulation and avoiding intercourse during fertile periods. Permanent methods include surgical procedures such as tubal ligation for women and vasectomy for men.

The primary goal of contraception is to prevent the sperm from reaching and fertilizing the egg, thereby preventing pregnancy. However, some contraceptive methods also offer additional benefits such as reducing the risk of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and regulating menstrual cycles. It's important to note that while contraception can prevent pregnancy, it does not protect against STIs, so using condoms is still recommended for individuals who are at risk of contracting STIs.

When choosing a contraceptive method, it's essential to consider factors such as effectiveness, safety, ease of use, cost, and personal preferences. It's also important to consult with a healthcare provider to determine the most appropriate method based on individual health history and needs.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "pets" is not a medical term. In general, a pet is a domesticated animal, usually kept for companionship or pleasure. They are not typically associated with medical definitions or terminology. If you have any questions related to veterinary medicine or the care of pets as it relates to human health, I'd be happy to try and help answer those!

Reproductive sterilization is a surgical procedure that aims to prevent reproduction by making an individual unable to produce viable reproductive cells or preventing the union of sperm and egg. In males, this is often achieved through a vasectomy, which involves cutting and sealing the vas deferens, the tubes that carry sperm from the testicles to the urethra. In females, sterilization is typically performed via a procedure called tubal ligation, where the fallopian tubes are cut, tied, or sealed, preventing the egg from traveling from the ovaries to the uterus and blocking sperm from reaching the egg. These methods are considered permanent forms of contraception; however, in rare cases, reversals may be attempted with varying degrees of success.

Animal welfare is a concept that refers to the state of an animal's physical and mental health, comfort, and ability to express normal behaviors. It encompasses factors such as proper nutrition, housing, handling, care, treatment, and protection from harm and distress. The goal of animal welfare is to ensure that animals are treated with respect and consideration, and that their needs and interests are met in a responsible and ethical manner.

The concept of animal welfare is based on the recognition that animals are sentient beings capable of experiencing pain, suffering, and emotions, and that they have intrinsic value beyond their usefulness to humans. It is guided by principles such as the "Five Freedoms," which include freedom from hunger and thirst, freedom from discomfort, freedom from pain, injury or disease, freedom to express normal behavior, and freedom from fear and distress.

Animal welfare is an important consideration in various fields, including agriculture, research, conservation, entertainment, and companionship. It involves a multidisciplinary approach that draws on knowledge from biology, ethology, veterinary medicine, psychology, philosophy, and law. Ultimately, animal welfare aims to promote the humane treatment of animals and to ensure their well-being in all aspects of their lives.

Medical legislation refers to laws and regulations that govern the practice of medicine and related healthcare fields. These laws are established by federal, state, or local governments to ensure that medical professionals provide safe, ethical, and effective care to their patients. They cover a wide range of issues including:

1. Licensing and certification of healthcare providers
2. Standards of care and professional conduct
3. Patient rights and privacy (e.g., HIPAA)
4. Prescription medication use and abuse
5. Medical malpractice and liability
6. Healthcare facility accreditation and safety
7. Public health and prevention measures
8. Research involving human subjects
9. Reimbursement for medical services (e.g., Medicare, Medicaid)
10. Telemedicine and telehealth practices

Medical legislation aims to protect both patients and healthcare providers while maintaining a high standard of care and promoting the overall health of the population.

Human-pet bonding is the emotional connection and attachment that develops between a person and their pet. This bond is characterized by feelings of affection, trust, and companionship. It can lead to various psychological and physiological benefits for both the human and the pet, such as reduced stress, increased mood, and improved mental and physical health. Factors contributing to this bond include shared experiences, positive interactions, and mutual attachment.

In medical and legal contexts, a minor is a person who has not yet reached the age of majority. The age of majority varies depending on the jurisdiction but is generally 18 or 21 years old. Minors are considered to be legally incompetent to make certain decisions for themselves, such as consenting to medical treatment or signing a contract. Therefore, in healthcare settings, minors typically require the consent of a parent or guardian before receiving medical care, except in specific circumstances where the minor is deemed mature enough to make their own decisions (e.g., emancipated minors).

Fetal death, also known as stillbirth or intrauterine fetal demise, is defined as the death of a fetus at 20 weeks of gestation or later. The criteria for defining fetal death may vary slightly by country and jurisdiction, but in general, it refers to the loss of a pregnancy after the point at which the fetus is considered viable outside the womb.

Fetal death can occur for a variety of reasons, including chromosomal abnormalities, placental problems, maternal health conditions, infections, and umbilical cord accidents. In some cases, the cause of fetal death may remain unknown.

The diagnosis of fetal death is typically made through ultrasound or other imaging tests, which can confirm the absence of a heartbeat or movement in the fetus. Once fetal death has been diagnosed, medical professionals will work with the parents to determine the best course of action for managing the pregnancy and delivering the fetus. This may involve waiting for labor to begin naturally, inducing labor, or performing a cesarean delivery.

Experiencing a fetal death can be a very difficult and emotional experience for parents, and it is important for them to receive supportive care from their healthcare providers, family members, and friends. Grief counseling and support groups may also be helpful in coping with the loss.

Women's rights, in a medical context, refer to the legal, social, and political rights and entitlements of women, specifically in relation to health, reproductive justice, and access to quality healthcare services. These rights encompass:

1. Autonomy over one's own body and medical decisions, including the right to informed consent and refusal of treatment.
2. Equitable access to comprehensive healthcare services, including sexual and reproductive healthcare, without discrimination based on gender, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, or other factors.
3. Protection from coerced sterilization, forced pregnancy, and other forms of reproductive oppression.
4. Access to safe and legal abortion services, as well as emergency contraception and other family planning methods.
5. The right to high-quality maternal healthcare, including prenatal care, skilled birth attendance, and postpartum care.
6. Protection from gender-based violence, including sexual assault, domestic violence, and female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C).
7. The right to accurate and comprehensive health education, including information about sexual and reproductive health.
8. Representation and participation in healthcare decision-making processes at all levels, from individual patient care to policy development.
9. Access to culturally competent and respectful healthcare services that recognize and address the unique needs and experiences of women.
10. The right to privacy and confidentiality in healthcare settings, including protection of medical records and personal health information.

Animal husbandry is the practice of breeding and raising animals for agricultural purposes, such as for the production of meat, milk, eggs, or fiber. It involves providing proper care for the animals, including feeding, housing, health care, and breeding management. The goal of animal husbandry is to maintain healthy and productive animals while also being mindful of environmental sustainability and animal welfare.

Neospora is a genus of intracellular parasites that belong to the phylum Apicomplexa. The most common species that affects animals is Neospora caninum, which is known to cause serious disease in cattle and dogs. It can also infect other warm-blooded animals, including sheep, goats, horses, and deer.

Neosporosis, the infection caused by Neospora, primarily affects the nervous system and muscles of the host animal. In cattle, it is a major cause of abortion, stillbirths, and neurological disorders. The parasite can be transmitted through the placenta from an infected mother to her offspring (congenital transmission), or through the ingestion of contaminated feed or water (horizontal transmission).

Neospora is a significant economic concern for the livestock industry, particularly in dairy and beef cattle operations. There is no effective vaccine or treatment available for neosporosis in animals, so prevention efforts focus on identifying and isolating infected animals to reduce the spread of the parasite.

Family planning services refer to comprehensive healthcare programs and interventions that aim to help individuals and couples prevent or achieve pregnancies, according to their desired number and spacing of children. These services typically include:

1. Counseling and education: Providing information about various contraceptive methods, their effectiveness, side effects, and appropriate use. This may also include counseling on reproductive health, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and preconception care.
2. Contraceptive services: Making a wide range of contraceptive options available to clients, including barrier methods (condoms, diaphragms), hormonal methods (pills, patches, injectables, implants), intrauterine devices (IUDs), and permanent methods (tubal ligation, vasectomy).
3. Screening and testing: Offering STI screening and testing, as well as cervical cancer screening for eligible clients.
4. Preconception care: Providing counseling and interventions to help women achieve optimal health before becoming pregnant, including folic acid supplementation, management of chronic conditions, and avoidance of harmful substances (tobacco, alcohol, drugs).
5. Fertility services: Addressing infertility issues through diagnostic testing, counseling, and medical or surgical treatments when appropriate.
6. Menstrual regulation: Providing manual vacuum aspiration or medication to safely and effectively manage incomplete miscarriages or unwanted pregnancies within the first trimester.
7. Pregnancy options counseling: Offering unbiased information and support to help individuals make informed decisions about their pregnancy, including parenting, adoption, or abortion.
8. Community outreach and education: Engaging in community-based initiatives to increase awareness of family planning services and promote reproductive health.
9. Advocacy: Working to remove barriers to accessing family planning services, such as policy changes, reducing stigma, and increasing funding for programs.

Family planning services are an essential component of sexual and reproductive healthcare and contribute significantly to improving maternal and child health outcomes, reducing unintended pregnancies, and empowering individuals to make informed choices about their reproductive lives.

"Cat" is a common name that refers to various species of small carnivorous mammals that belong to the family Felidae. The domestic cat, also known as Felis catus or Felis silvestris catus, is a popular pet and companion animal. It is a subspecies of the wildcat, which is found in Europe, Africa, and Asia.

Domestic cats are often kept as pets because of their companionship, playful behavior, and ability to hunt vermin. They are also valued for their ability to provide emotional support and therapy to people. Cats are obligate carnivores, which means that they require a diet that consists mainly of meat to meet their nutritional needs.

Cats are known for their agility, sharp senses, and predatory instincts. They have retractable claws, which they use for hunting and self-defense. Cats also have a keen sense of smell, hearing, and vision, which allow them to detect prey and navigate their environment.

In medical terms, cats can be hosts to various parasites and diseases that can affect humans and other animals. Some common feline diseases include rabies, feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and toxoplasmosis. It is important for cat owners to keep their pets healthy and up-to-date on vaccinations and preventative treatments to protect both the cats and their human companions.

Gestational age is the length of time that has passed since the first day of the last menstrual period (LMP) in pregnant women. It is the standard unit used to estimate the age of a pregnancy and is typically expressed in weeks. This measure is used because the exact date of conception is often not known, but the start of the last menstrual period is usually easier to recall.

It's important to note that since ovulation typically occurs around two weeks after the start of the LMP, gestational age is approximately two weeks longer than fetal age, which is the actual time elapsed since conception. Medical professionals use both gestational and fetal age to track the development and growth of the fetus during pregnancy.

In medical and legal terms, "personhood" refers to the status of being a person, which is typically associated with certain legal rights, protections, and privileges. The concept of personhood is often discussed in the context of bioethics, particularly in relation to questions about the moral and legal status of entities such as fetuses, embryos, and individuals with severe cognitive impairments or in vegetative states.

The criteria for personhood are a subject of debate and vary depending on cultural, religious, philosophical, and legal perspectives. However, some common factors that are often considered include consciousness, the ability to feel pain, the capacity for self-awareness and self-reflection, the ability to communicate, and the presence of a distinct genetic identity.

In medical contexts, personhood may be relevant to issues such as end-of-life care, organ donation, and reproductive rights. For example, some argue that personhood should be granted to fetuses at the moment of conception, while others believe that personhood is only achieved when a fetus becomes viable outside the womb or when a child is born alive.

Overall, the concept of personhood is complex and multifaceted, and it continues to be debated and refined in various fields and disciplines.

Mifepristone is a synthetic steroid that is used in the medical termination of pregnancy (also known as medication abortion or RU-486). It works by blocking the action of progesterone, a hormone necessary for maintaining pregnancy. Mifepristone is often used in combination with misoprostol to cause uterine contractions and expel the products of conception from the uterus.

It's also known as an antiprogestin or progesterone receptor modulator, which means it can bind to progesterone receptors in the body and block their activity. In addition to its use in pregnancy termination, mifepristone has been studied for its potential therapeutic uses in conditions such as Cushing's syndrome, endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and hormone-dependent cancers.

It is important to note that Mifepristone should be administered under the supervision of a licensed healthcare professional and it is not available over the counter. Also, it has some contraindications and potential side effects, so it's essential to have a consultation with a doctor before taking this medication.

Contraception behavior refers to the actions and decisions made by individuals or couples to prevent pregnancy. This can include the use of various contraceptive methods, such as hormonal birth control (e.g., pills, patches, rings), barrier methods (e.g., condoms, diaphragms), intrauterine devices (IUDs), and natural family planning techniques (e.g., fertility awareness-based methods).

Contraception behavior can be influenced by various factors, including personal beliefs, cultural norms, relationship dynamics, access to healthcare services, and knowledge about contraceptive options. It is an important aspect of sexual and reproductive health, as it allows individuals and couples to plan their families and make informed choices about whether and when to have children.

It's worth noting that while the term "contraception behavior" typically refers to actions taken specifically to prevent pregnancy, some contraceptive methods may also provide protection against sexually transmitted infections (STIs). For example, condoms are effective at preventing both pregnancy and STIs when used consistently and correctly.

Reproductive rights are a subset of human rights that include the right to plan a family, have children, or not have children, and the right to access information and services needed to do so. This can encompass issues such as access to contraception, safe abortion, reproductive health care, and education about sexual and reproductive health. Reproductive rights also include freedom from coercion, discrimination, and violence in relation to one's reproductive choices. These rights are recognized and protected under international law, including the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and various treaties and conventions on women's and human rights.

The birth rate is the number of live births that occur in a population during a specific period, usually calculated as the number of live births per 1,000 people per year. It is an important demographic indicator used to measure the growth or decline of a population over time. A higher birth rate indicates a younger population and faster population growth, while a lower birth rate suggests an older population and slower growth.

The birth rate can be affected by various factors, including socioeconomic conditions, cultural attitudes towards childbearing, access to healthcare services, and government policies related to family planning and reproductive health. It is also influenced by the age structure of the population, as women in their reproductive years (typically ages 15-49) are more likely to give birth.

It's worth noting that while the birth rate is an important indicator of population growth, it does not provide a complete picture of fertility rates or demographic trends. Other measures, such as the total fertility rate (TFR), which estimates the average number of children a woman would have during her reproductive years, are also used to analyze fertility patterns and population dynamics.

Dilatation and Curettage (D&C) is a medical procedure commonly performed on the uterus. The term "dilatation" refers to the widening or opening of the cervix, which is the lower part of the uterus that opens into the vagina. This is achieved using dilators, which are gradually inserted into the cervical canal to stretch it open.

The term "curettage" refers to the scraping or suctioning out of tissue from the lining of the uterus (endometrium). A curette, a long, loop-shaped surgical instrument, is used to scrape the lining, or suction equipment may be used to remove the tissue.

A D&C procedure is typically performed to diagnose and treat various conditions affecting the uterus, such as abnormal uterine bleeding, heavy menstrual periods, endometrial hyperplasia, or to remove residual tissue after a miscarriage or abortion. It's usually a minor surgical procedure that can be done in a hospital, clinic, or doctor's office, and is often performed under local anesthesia, conscious sedation, or general anesthesia depending on the situation and patient preference.

I apologize for any confusion, but "livestock" is not a term that has a medical definition. It is an agricultural term that refers to animals that are kept or raised on a farm or ranch for commercial purposes, such as the production of food, fiber, or labor. Examples of livestock include cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, poultry, and horses. I hope this clarifies any confusion. If you have any questions related to medical terminology, I would be happy to help.

Pregnancy outcome refers to the final result or status of a pregnancy, including both the health of the mother and the newborn baby. It can be categorized into various types such as:

1. Live birth: The delivery of one or more babies who show signs of life after separation from their mother.
2. Stillbirth: The delivery of a baby who has died in the womb after 20 weeks of pregnancy.
3. Miscarriage: The spontaneous loss of a pregnancy before the 20th week.
4. Abortion: The intentional termination of a pregnancy before the fetus can survive outside the uterus.
5. Ectopic pregnancy: A pregnancy that develops outside the uterus, usually in the fallopian tube, which is not viable and requires medical attention.
6. Preterm birth: The delivery of a baby before 37 weeks of gestation, which can lead to various health issues for the newborn.
7. Full-term birth: The delivery of a baby between 37 and 42 weeks of gestation.
8. Post-term pregnancy: The delivery of a baby after 42 weeks of gestation, which may increase the risk of complications for both mother and baby.

The pregnancy outcome is influenced by various factors such as maternal age, health status, lifestyle habits, genetic factors, and access to quality prenatal care.

The "beginning of human life" is a term that is often used in the context of medical ethics, particularly in discussions about issues such as abortion and stem cell research. However, there is no universally accepted medical definition of this term, as it is also influenced by philosophical, religious, and legal considerations.

From a biological perspective, human life begins at fertilization, when a sperm cell successfully penetrates and fuses with an egg cell to form a zygote. This single cell contains the complete genetic makeup of the future individual and has the potential to develop into a fully formed human being, given the right conditions.

However, some people argue that personhood or moral status does not begin until later stages of development, such as at implantation, when the zygote attaches to the uterine wall and begins to receive nutrients from the mother's body, or at viability, when the fetus can survive outside the womb with medical assistance.

Ultimately, the definition of "beginning of human life" is a complex and controversial issue that depends on one's values and beliefs. It is important to recognize and respect the diversity of opinions on this matter and engage in thoughtful and respectful dialogue about its implications for medical practice and policy.

Falconiformes is an order of diurnal birds of prey that includes falcons, hawks, eagles, vultures, and condors. These birds are characterized by their strong, hooked beaks, sharp talons, and excellent vision, which make them efficient hunters. They are widely distributed around the world and play a crucial role in maintaining the balance of ecosystems by controlling populations of small mammals, reptiles, and other birds.

The second trimester of pregnancy is the period between the completion of 12 weeks (the end of the first trimester) and 26 weeks (the beginning of the third trimester) of gestational age. It is often considered the most comfortable period for many pregnant women as the risk of miscarriage decreases significantly, and the symptoms experienced during the first trimester, such as nausea and fatigue, typically improve.

During this time, the uterus expands above the pubic bone, allowing more space for the growing fetus. The fetal development in the second trimester includes significant growth in size and weight, formation of all major organs, and the beginning of movement sensations that the mother can feel. Additionally, the fetus starts to hear, swallow and kick, and the skin is covered with a protective coating called vernix.

Prenatal care during this period typically includes regular prenatal appointments to monitor the mother's health and the baby's growth and development. These appointments may include measurements of the uterus, fetal heart rate monitoring, and screening tests for genetic disorders or other potential issues.

I believe there may be a misunderstanding in your question. "Goat diseases" refers to illnesses that affect goats specifically. It does not mean diseases that are caused by goats or related to them in some way. Here are some examples of goat diseases:

1. Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis (CAE): A viral disease that affects goats, causing arthritis, pneumonia, and sometimes encephalitis.
2. Caseous Lymphadenitis (CL): A bacterial disease that causes abscesses in the lymph nodes of goats.
3. Contagious Caprine Pleuropneumonia (CCPP): A contagious respiratory disease caused by mycoplasma bacteria.
4. Johne's Disease: A chronic wasting disease caused by a type of bacterium called Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.
5. Pasteurellosis: A bacterial disease that can cause pneumonia, septicemia, and other infections in goats.
6. Salmonellosis: A bacterial disease caused by Salmonella bacteria, which can cause diarrhea, fever, and septicemia in goats.
7. Soremouth (Orf): A viral disease that causes sores and scabs around the mouth and nose of goats.

These are just a few examples of diseases that can affect goats. If you have any specific questions about goat health or diseases, I would recommend consulting with a veterinarian who specializes in small ruminants.

Coccidiosis is a parasitic infection caused by protozoa of the Eimeria genus, which typically affects the intestinal tract of animals, including humans. The infection occurs when a person or animal ingests oocysts (the infective stage of the parasite) through contaminated food, water, or direct contact with infected feces.

In humans, coccidiosis is most commonly found in children living in poor sanitary conditions and in individuals with weakened immune systems, such as those with HIV/AIDS or organ transplant recipients on immunosuppressive therapy. The infection can cause watery diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and fever. In severe cases, it may lead to dehydration, weight loss, and even death in individuals with compromised immune systems.

In animals, particularly in poultry, swine, and ruminants, coccidiosis can cause significant economic losses due to decreased growth rates, poor feed conversion, and increased mortality. Preventive measures include improving sanitation, reducing overcrowding, and administering anticoccidial drugs or vaccines.

'Laboratory animals' are defined as non-human creatures that are used in scientific research and experiments to study various biological phenomena, develop new medical treatments and therapies, test the safety and efficacy of drugs, medical devices, and other products. These animals are kept under controlled conditions in laboratory settings and are typically purpose-bred for research purposes.

The use of laboratory animals is subject to strict regulations and guidelines to ensure their humane treatment and welfare. The most commonly used species include mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, dogs, cats, non-human primates, and fish. Other less common species may also be used depending on the specific research question being studied.

The primary goal of using laboratory animals in research is to advance our understanding of basic biological processes and develop new medical treatments that can improve human and animal health. However, it is important to note that the use of animals in research remains a controversial topic due to ethical concerns regarding their welfare and potential for suffering.

Pregnancy trimesters are a way to divide the duration of pregnancy into three 3-month (or approximately 13-week) segments. This division can help healthcare providers monitor and discuss specific developmental stages, symptoms, and care needs during each phase of the pregnancy. Here's a brief overview of what typically occurs in each trimester:

1. First Trimester (Week 1 - Week 12): During this period, major organs and structures begin to form in the developing fetus. Common symptoms experienced by the pregnant individual may include morning sickness, fatigue, breast tenderness, and frequent urination. Regular prenatal care should start during these early weeks to monitor both the mother's and baby's health.

2. Second Trimester (Week 13 - Week 26): This phase is often considered more comfortable for many pregnant individuals as some symptoms from the first trimester improve. The fetus continues to grow, and movement can be felt. Organs and systems continue to develop, and the fetus becomes more active. Common symptoms during this time include back pain, stretch marks, and swelling of the ankles and feet.

3. Third Trimester (Week 27 - Birth): The final trimester is marked by significant growth and weight gain for both the mother and baby. The fetus will turn into a head-down position in preparation for birth. Common symptoms during this time include shortness of breath, heartburn, difficulty sleeping, and contractions (which can indicate early labor). Regular prenatal care remains crucial to monitor the health of both the mother and baby as delivery approaches.

Parasitic diseases, animal, refer to conditions in animals that are caused by parasites, which are organisms that live on or inside a host and derive benefits from the host at its expense. Parasites can be classified into different groups such as protozoa, helminths (worms), and arthropods (e.g., ticks, fleas).

Parasitic diseases in animals can cause a wide range of clinical signs depending on the type of parasite, the animal species affected, and the location and extent of infection. Some common examples of parasitic diseases in animals include:

* Heartworm disease in dogs and cats caused by Dirofilaria immitis
* Coccidiosis in various animals caused by different species of Eimeria
* Toxoplasmosis in cats and other animals caused by Toxoplasma gondii
* Giardiasis in many animal species caused by Giardia spp.
* Lungworm disease in dogs and cats caused by Angiostrongylus vasorum or Aelurostrongylus abstrusus
* Tapeworm infection in dogs, cats, and other animals caused by different species of Taenia or Dipylidium caninum

Prevention and control of parasitic diseases in animals typically involve a combination of strategies such as regular veterinary care, appropriate use of medications, environmental management, and good hygiene practices.

Parental notification is a term used in the context of medical care, particularly in situations involving minors (individuals who are under the age of majority, which is 18 years old in most states in the US). It refers to the practice of informing or notifying a parent, legal guardian, or other responsible adult relative of a minor's decision to seek certain medical services, treatments, or procedures.

In some cases, parental notification may be required by law before a minor can receive specific medical interventions, such as abortion, mental health treatment, or certain surgical procedures. The specific requirements for parental notification vary depending on the jurisdiction and the type of medical service being sought.

The purpose of parental notification is to ensure that parents or guardians are involved in important medical decisions affecting their minor children, and to provide an opportunity for them to offer guidance, support, and consent. However, there may be exceptions to parental notification requirements in cases where the minor is mature enough to make informed decisions about their own health care, or when notifying a parent could put the minor at risk of harm or abuse.

Pregnancy in adolescence, also known as teenage pregnancy, refers to a pregnancy that occurs in females under the age of 20. This can be further categorized into early adolescent pregnancy (occurring between ages 10-14), middle adolescent pregnancy (occurring between ages 15-17), and late adolescent pregnancy (occurring between ages 18-19). Teenage pregnancy is associated with higher risks of complications for both the mother and the baby, including preterm birth, low birth weight, and increased risk of neonatal mortality. Additionally, teenage mothers are more likely to drop out of school and face socioeconomic challenges.

Contraceptive devices are medical products or tools specifically designed to prevent pregnancy by blocking or interfering with the fertilization of an egg by sperm, or the implantation of a fertilized egg in the uterus. There are various types of contraceptive devices available, each with its own mechanism of action and efficacy rate. Here are some common examples:

1. Intrauterine Devices (IUDs): These are small, T-shaped devices made of plastic or copper that are inserted into the uterus by a healthcare professional. IUDs can prevent pregnancy for several years and work by affecting the movement of sperm and changing the lining of the uterus to make it less receptive to implantation.
2. Contraceptive Implants: These are small, flexible rods that are inserted under the skin of the upper arm by a healthcare professional. The implant releases hormones that prevent ovulation and thicken cervical mucus to block sperm from reaching the egg.
3. Diaphragms and Cervical Caps: These are flexible, dome-shaped devices made of silicone or rubber that are inserted into the vagina before sex. They cover the cervix and prevent sperm from entering the uterus.
4. Male and Female Condoms: These are thin sheaths made of latex, polyurethane, or other materials that are placed over the penis (male condom) or inside the vagina (female condom) during sex to prevent sperm from entering the body.
5. Spermicides: These are chemicals that kill or disable sperm and can be used alone or in combination with other contraceptive methods such as condoms, diaphragms, or cervical caps. They come in various forms, including foams, creams, gels, films, and suppositories.

It's important to note that while contraceptive devices are effective at preventing pregnancy, they do not protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Using condoms is the best way to reduce the risk of STIs during sexual activity.

A "Food Inspection" is not a medical term per se, but rather it falls under the purview of public health and food safety. It refers to the process of examining, testing, and evaluating food products, production processes, and establishments to ensure they comply with regulatory standards, guidelines, and laws established to protect consumers from foodborne illnesses, allergens, chemical contaminants, and other potential hazards.

The inspection can be carried out by governmental agencies, such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), or local health departments, at various stages of food production, processing, distribution, and retail sale. The primary goal is to minimize the risk of contamination, ensure proper labeling, and maintain the overall safety and integrity of the food supply chain.

While not a medical definition, it's important to note that food inspections play a crucial role in preventing foodborne illnesses, which can lead to significant health complications for vulnerable populations, such as children, the elderly, pregnant women, and individuals with weakened immune systems.

Uterine hemorrhage, also known as uterine bleeding or gynecological bleeding, is an abnormal loss of blood from the uterus. It can occur in various clinical settings such as menstruation (known as menorrhagia), postpartum period (postpartum hemorrhage), or in non-pregnant women (dysfunctional uterine bleeding). The bleeding may be light to heavy, intermittent or continuous, and can be accompanied by symptoms such as pain, dizziness, or fainting. Uterine hemorrhage is a common gynecological problem that can have various underlying causes, including hormonal imbalances, structural abnormalities, coagulopathies, and malignancies. It is important to seek medical attention if experiencing heavy or prolonged uterine bleeding to determine the cause and receive appropriate treatment.

Ethnobotany is the scientific study of the traditional knowledge, practices, and beliefs about plants held by a particular group of people or culture. It involves the documentation and analysis of the ways in which people use plants for medicinal, food, shelter, clothing, dye, ritual, and other purposes. The field of ethnobotany draws on anthropology, botany, ecology, chemistry, and geography to understand the complex relationships between human cultures and their plant resources.

Ethnobotanists may conduct fieldwork with communities to learn about their traditional plant use, documenting this knowledge through interviews, observations, and collections of plant specimens. They may also study the ecological and cultural factors that shape plant use and management, as well as the impacts of globalization, environmental change, and other forces on traditional plant knowledge and practices.

The information gathered through ethnobotanical research can have important implications for conservation, human health, and sustainable development. For example, traditional plant remedies may provide leads for the development of new drugs or therapies, while understanding the cultural significance of plants can help inform efforts to protect biodiversity and support the rights of indigenous peoples and local communities.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "United States" is a geopolitical entity, specifically the name of the country consisting of 50 states, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

Defining "life" is a complex question that has been debated by philosophers, scientists, and theologians for centuries. From a biological or medical perspective, life can be defined as a characteristic that distinguishes physical entities that do have biological processes, such as growth, reproduction, and response to stimuli, from those that do not, either because such functions have ceased (death), or because they never had such functions and are classified as inanimate.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) defines life as "the condition that distinguishes animals and plants from inorganic matter, including the capacity for growth, reproduction, functional activity, and continual change preceding death."

It's important to note that there is no one universally accepted definition of life, and different fields and disciplines may have slightly different definitions or criteria.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "goats" is not a term commonly used in medical definitions. It is a common noun referring to the domesticated animal species Capra aegagrus hircus. If you have any questions about a specific medical condition or term, please provide that and I would be happy to help.

Pregnancy complications refer to any health problems that arise during pregnancy which can put both the mother and the baby at risk. These complications may occur at any point during the pregnancy, from conception until childbirth. Some common pregnancy complications include:

1. Gestational diabetes: a type of diabetes that develops during pregnancy in women who did not have diabetes before becoming pregnant.
2. Preeclampsia: a pregnancy complication characterized by high blood pressure and damage to organs such as the liver or kidneys.
3. Placenta previa: a condition where the placenta covers the cervix, which can cause bleeding and may require delivery via cesarean section.
4. Preterm labor: when labor begins before 37 weeks of gestation, which can lead to premature birth and other complications.
5. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR): a condition where the fetus does not grow at a normal rate inside the womb.
6. Multiple pregnancies: carrying more than one baby, such as twins or triplets, which can increase the risk of premature labor and other complications.
7. Rh incompatibility: a condition where the mother's blood type is different from the baby's, which can cause anemia and jaundice in the newborn.
8. Pregnancy loss: including miscarriage, stillbirth, or ectopic pregnancy, which can be emotionally devastating for the parents.

It is important to monitor pregnancy closely and seek medical attention promptly if any concerning symptoms arise. With proper care and management, many pregnancy complications can be treated effectively, reducing the risk of harm to both the mother and the baby.

Swine diseases refer to a wide range of infectious and non-infectious conditions that affect pigs. These diseases can be caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi, parasites, or environmental factors. Some common swine diseases include:

1. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS): a viral disease that causes reproductive failure in sows and respiratory problems in piglets and grower pigs.
2. Classical Swine Fever (CSF): also known as hog cholera, is a highly contagious viral disease that affects pigs of all ages.
3. Porcine Circovirus Disease (PCVD): a group of diseases caused by porcine circoviruses, including Porcine CircoVirus Associated Disease (PCVAD) and Postweaning Multisystemic Wasting Syndrome (PMWS).
4. Swine Influenza: a respiratory disease caused by type A influenza viruses that can infect pigs and humans.
5. Mycoplasma Hyopneumoniae: a bacterial disease that causes pneumonia in pigs.
6. Actinobacillus Pleuropneumoniae: a bacterial disease that causes severe pneumonia in pigs.
7. Salmonella: a group of bacteria that can cause food poisoning in humans and a variety of diseases in pigs, including septicemia, meningitis, and abortion.
8. Brachyspira Hyodysenteriae: a bacterial disease that causes dysentery in pigs.
9. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae: a bacterial disease that causes erysipelas in pigs.
10. External and internal parasites, such as lice, mites, worms, and flukes, can also cause diseases in swine.

Prevention and control of swine diseases rely on good biosecurity practices, vaccination programs, proper nutrition, and management practices. Regular veterinary check-ups and monitoring are essential to detect and treat diseases early.

Staphylococcus intermedius is a gram-positive, coagulase-variable, facultatively anaerobic bacterium that belongs to the Staphylococcus genus and the Staphylococccaceae family. It is part of the normal flora in the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract of dogs and cats, but can also cause opportunistic infections in animals and humans.

In humans, S. intermedius has been associated with various types of infections, including skin and soft tissue infections, endocarditis, septicemia, and device-related infections. These infections often occur in people with underlying medical conditions or compromised immune systems, and are frequently linked to animal contact or exposure.

It is important to note that the identification of Staphylococcus intermedius can be challenging due to its similarities with other coagulase-variable staphylococci, such as S. schleiferi and S. delphini. Therefore, molecular methods or a combination of phenotypic and genotypic tests may be necessary for accurate identification.

Catholicism is a branch of Christianity that recognizes the authority of the Pope and follows the teachings and traditions of the Roman Catholic Church. It is the largest Christian denomination in the world, with over a billion members worldwide. The beliefs and practices of Catholicism include the sacraments, prayer, and various forms of worship, as well as social justice initiatives and charitable works. The Catholic Church has a hierarchical structure, with the Pope at the top, followed by bishops, priests, and deacons. It places a strong emphasis on the teachings of Jesus Christ, the Virgin Mary, and the saints.

'Healthcare Records' or 'Medical Records' are defined as systematic collections of comprehensive information about a patient's health status, including their medical history, demographics, medications, treatment plans, progress notes, laboratory test results, imaging studies, and any other relevant healthcare-related information. These records serve as a vital tool for healthcare providers to make informed decisions regarding diagnosis, treatment, and ongoing care of patients. They also play a crucial role in maintaining continuity of care, supporting research and education, ensuring legal and ethical compliance, and improving overall healthcare quality and safety. Healthcare records may be maintained in paper form or digitally, following specific standards and regulations to ensure accuracy, confidentiality, and easy accessibility.

Brucellosis is a bacterial infection caused by the Brucella species, which are gram-negative coccobacilli. It is a zoonotic disease, meaning it can be transmitted from animals to humans. The most common way for humans to contract brucellosis is through consumption of contaminated animal products, such as unpasteurized milk or undercooked meat, from infected animals like goats, sheep, and cattle.

Humans can also acquire the infection through direct contact with infected animals, their tissues, or bodily fluids, especially in occupational settings like farming, veterinary medicine, or slaughterhouses. In rare cases, inhalation of contaminated aerosols or laboratory exposure can lead to brucellosis.

The onset of symptoms is usually insidious and may include fever, chills, night sweats, headache, muscle and joint pain, fatigue, and loss of appetite. The infection can disseminate to various organs, causing complications such as endocarditis, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, orchitis, and epididymoorchitis.

Diagnosis is confirmed through blood cultures, serological tests, or molecular methods like PCR. Treatment typically involves a long course of antibiotics, such as doxycycline combined with rifampin or streptomycin. Prevention measures include pasteurization of dairy products and cooking meat thoroughly before consumption. Vaccination is available for high-risk populations but not for general use due to the risk of adverse reactions and potential interference with serodiagnosis.

In medical terms, parity refers to the number of times a woman has given birth to a viable fetus, usually defined as a pregnancy that reaches at least 20 weeks' gestation. It is often used in obstetrics and gynecology to describe a woman's childbearing history and to assess potential risks associated with childbirth.

Parity is typically categorized as follows:

* Nulliparous: A woman who has never given birth to a viable fetus.
* Primiparous: A woman who has given birth to one viable fetus.
* Multiparous: A woman who has given birth to more than one viable fetus.

In some cases, parity may also consider the number of pregnancies that resulted in stillbirths or miscarriages, although this is not always the case. It's important to note that parity does not necessarily reflect the total number of pregnancies a woman has had, only those that resulted in viable births.

Laboratory Animal Science (also known as Experimental Animal Science) is a multidisciplinary field that involves the care, use, and breeding of animals for scientific research. It encompasses various disciplines such as veterinary medicine, biology, genetics, nutrition, and ethology to ensure the humane treatment, proper husbandry, and experimental validity when using animals in research.

The primary goal of laboratory animal science is to support and advance biological and medical knowledge by providing well-characterized and healthy animals for research purposes. This field also includes the development and implementation of guidelines, regulations, and standards regarding the use of animals in research to ensure their welfare and minimize any potential distress or harm.

In medical or legal terms, "illegitimacy" refers to the status of a child who is born to parents who are not married to each other. This concept is more commonly used in sociology and law rather than medicine. In some societies and historical periods, illegitimate children may have faced social stigma and discrimination, but this is less common in modern times. It's important to note that the concept of illegitimacy has been largely abandoned in many legal systems, and children are now recognized as having equal rights and status regardless of their parents' marital status.

I'm happy to help! However, I believe there might be a slight confusion in your question. "Students, Health Occupations" is not a medical term or definition per se, but rather a general description of individuals who are studying to become healthcare professionals.

Healthcare occupations encompass a wide range of professions, including (but not limited to) physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dentists, mental health professionals, allied health professionals (such as physical therapists, respiratory therapists, and diagnostic medical sonographers), and public health professionals.

Students in health occupations are individuals who are pursuing education and training to enter these professions. They may be enrolled in various types of educational programs, such as undergraduate or graduate degree programs, vocational schools, certificate programs, or on-the-job training. The specific requirements for becoming a healthcare professional vary depending on the profession and the location, but typically involve a combination of education, clinical training, licensure, and certification.

Population surveillance in a public health and medical context refers to the ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of health-related data for a defined population over time. It aims to monitor the health status, identify emerging health threats or trends, and evaluate the impact of interventions within that population. This information is used to inform public health policy, prioritize healthcare resources, and guide disease prevention and control efforts. Population surveillance can involve various data sources, such as vital records, disease registries, surveys, and electronic health records.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Judicial Role" is not a term that is typically used in medical definitions. It is a legal term that refers to the role and responsibilities of a judge in the administration of justice. This includes presiding over trials, interpreting and applying laws, and ensuring fair and impartial proceedings.

Psittacosis is a zoonotic infectious disease caused by the bacterium Chlamydia psittaci, which is typically found in birds. It can be transmitted to humans through inhalation of dried secretions or feces from infected birds, and less commonly, through direct contact with infected birds or their environments. The disease is characterized by symptoms such as fever, headache, muscle aches, cough, and pneumonia. In severe cases, it can lead to respiratory failure, heart inflammation, and even death if left untreated. It's important to note that psittacosis is treatable with antibiotics, and early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for a favorable prognosis.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "History, 20th Century" is a broad and complex topic that refers to the events, developments, and transformations that occurred throughout the world during the 1900s. It is not a medical term or concept. If you're interested in learning more about this historical period, I would recommend consulting a history textbook, reputable online resources, or speaking with a historian. They can provide detailed information about the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that took place during the 20th century.

Ectopic pregnancy is a type of abnormal pregnancy that occurs outside the uterine cavity. The most common site for an ectopic pregnancy is the fallopian tube, accounting for about 95% of cases. This condition is also known as tubal pregnancy. Other less common sites include the ovary, cervix, and abdominal cavity.

In a normal pregnancy, the fertilized egg travels down the fallopian tube and implants itself in the lining of the uterus. However, in an ectopic pregnancy, the fertilized egg implants and starts to develop somewhere other than the uterus. The growing embryo cannot survive outside the uterus, and if left untreated, an ectopic pregnancy can cause life-threatening bleeding due to the rupture of the fallopian tube or other organs.

Symptoms of ectopic pregnancy may include abdominal pain, vaginal bleeding, shoulder pain, lightheadedness, fainting, and in severe cases, shock. Diagnosis is usually made through a combination of medical history, physical examination, ultrasound, and blood tests to measure the levels of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a hormone produced during pregnancy.

Treatment for ectopic pregnancy depends on several factors, including the location, size, and growth rate of the ectopic mass, as well as the patient's overall health and desire for future pregnancies. Treatment options may include medication to stop the growth of the embryo or surgery to remove the ectopic tissue. In some cases, both methods may be used together. Early diagnosis and treatment can help prevent serious complications and improve the chances of preserving fertility in future pregnancies.

I apologize, but "Canada" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country located in North America, known for its vast wilderness, multicultural cities, and significant natural resources. If you have any questions related to healthcare or medical terms, I would be happy to help answer those!

"Dairying" is not a medical term. It refers to the industry or practice of producing and processing milk and milk products, such as butter, cheese, and yogurt, typically from cows but also from other animals like goats and sheep. Dairying involves various activities including breeding and raising dairy animals, milking, processing, and marketing milk and milk products. It is not a medical concept or procedure.

Xylazine is a central alpha-2 adrenergic agonist, often used in veterinary medicine as a sedative and analgesic. It can produce profound sedation, muscle relaxation, and analgesia. Xylazine is not approved for use in humans in many countries, including the United States, due to its potential for severe side effects such as respiratory depression, bradycardia (slow heart rate), and hypotension (low blood pressure).

Maternal age is a term used to describe the age of a woman at the time she becomes pregnant or gives birth. It is often used in medical and epidemiological contexts to discuss the potential risks, complications, and outcomes associated with pregnancy and childbirth at different stages of a woman's reproductive years.

Advanced maternal age typically refers to women who become pregnant or give birth at 35 years of age or older. This group faces an increased risk for certain chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome, and other pregnancy-related complications, including gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, and cesarean delivery.

On the other end of the spectrum, adolescent pregnancies (those that occur in women under 20 years old) also come with their own set of potential risks and complications, such as preterm birth, low birth weight, and anemia.

It's important to note that while maternal age can influence pregnancy outcomes, many other factors – including genetics, lifestyle choices, and access to quality healthcare – can also play a significant role in determining the health of both mother and baby during pregnancy and childbirth.

Placental diseases, also known as placental pathologies, refer to a group of conditions that affect the development and function of the placenta during pregnancy. The placenta is an organ that develops in the uterus during pregnancy and provides oxygen and nutrients to the developing fetus while removing waste products.

Placental diseases can have serious consequences for both the mother and the fetus, including preterm labor, growth restriction, stillbirth, and long-term health problems for the child. Some common placental diseases include:

1. Placental abruption: This occurs when the placenta separates from the uterine wall before delivery, causing bleeding and potentially harming the fetus.
2. Placental previa: This is a condition where the placenta implants in the lower part of the uterus, covering the cervix. It can cause bleeding and may require cesarean delivery.
3. Preeclampsia: This is a pregnancy-related disorder characterized by high blood pressure and damage to organs such as the liver and kidneys. Placental dysfunction is thought to play a role in its development.
4. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR): This occurs when the fetus does not grow properly due to poor placental function, leading to low birth weight and potential health problems.
5. Chorioamnionitis: This is an infection of the membranes surrounding the fetus, which can lead to preterm labor and other complications.
6. Placental infarction: This occurs when a portion of the placenta dies due to a lack of blood flow, which can lead to growth restriction or stillbirth.

Prompt diagnosis and treatment of placental diseases are essential for ensuring the best possible outcomes for both the mother and the fetus.

Gynecology is a branch of medicine that deals with the health of the female reproductive system. It includes the diagnosis, treatment, and management of conditions related to the female reproductive organs such as the vagina, cervix, uterus, ovaries, and fallopian tubes.

Gynecologists provide routine care for women, including Pap tests, breast exams, and family planning advice. They also treat a wide range of gynecological issues, from menstrual disorders and sexually transmitted infections to reproductive system cancers and hormonal imbalances. In addition, many gynecologists also provide obstetric care, making them both ob-gyns.

It's important for women to establish a relationship with a trusted gynecologist to ensure they receive regular checkups and are able to address any concerns or issues related to their reproductive health.

Anti-bacterial agents, also known as antibiotics, are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by bacteria. These agents work by either killing the bacteria or inhibiting their growth and reproduction. There are several different classes of anti-bacterial agents, including penicillins, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and tetracyclines, among others. Each class of antibiotic has a specific mechanism of action and is used to treat certain types of bacterial infections. It's important to note that anti-bacterial agents are not effective against viral infections, such as the common cold or flu. Misuse and overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, which is a significant global health concern.

I apologize, but "sheep" is not a term that has a medical definition. It is a common animal with the scientific name Ovis aries. If you have any medical or health-related questions, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

Helminthiasis, in general, refers to the infection or infestation of humans and animals by helminths, which are parasitic worms. When referring to "Animal Helminthiasis," it specifically pertains to the condition where animals, including domestic pets and livestock, are infected by various helminth species. These parasitic worms can reside in different organs of the animal's body, leading to a wide range of clinical signs depending on the worm species and the location of the infestation.

Animal Helminthiasis can be caused by different types of helminths:

1. Nematodes (roundworms): These include species like Ascaris suum in pigs, Toxocara cati and Toxascaris leonina in cats, and Toxocara canis in dogs. They can cause gastrointestinal issues such as diarrhea, vomiting, and weight loss.
2. Cestodes (tapeworms): Examples include Taenia saginata in cattle, Echinococcus granulosus in sheep and goats, and Dipylidium caninum in dogs and cats. Tapeworm infestations may lead to gastrointestinal symptoms like diarrhea or constipation and may also cause vitamin deficiencies due to the worm's ability to absorb nutrients from the host animal's digestive system.
3. Trematodes (flukes): These include liver flukes such as Fasciola hepatica in sheep, goats, and cattle, and schistosomes that can affect various animals, including birds and mammals. Liver fluke infestations may cause liver damage, leading to symptoms like weight loss, decreased appetite, and jaundice. Schistosome infestations can lead to issues in multiple organs depending on the species involved.

Preventing and controlling Helminthiasis in animals is crucial for maintaining animal health and welfare, as well as ensuring food safety for humans who consume products from these animals. Regular deworming programs, good hygiene practices, proper pasture management, and monitoring for clinical signs are essential components of a comprehensive parasite control strategy.

I'm not aware of a specific medical definition for "ceremonial behavior." However, in general, ceremonial behaviors are actions or rituals that are performed in a formal, ritualistic manner, often as part of a cultural, religious, or social tradition. These behaviors can serve various purposes, such as marking important life events, expressing shared values and beliefs, or reinforcing social bonds.

In some cases, ceremonial behaviors may have health implications. For example, participation in cultural or religious rituals can provide a sense of community and support, which can have positive effects on mental health. Additionally, certain ceremonial practices, such as meditation or prayer, may have direct physiological effects that contribute to stress reduction and relaxation.

However, it's important to note that the term "ceremonial behavior" is not a medical diagnosis or clinical concept, and its meaning can vary depending on the context in which it is used.

Coxiella burnetii is a gram-negative, intracellular bacterium that causes Q fever, a zoonotic disease with various clinical manifestations ranging from asymptomatic seroconversion to acute and chronic forms. The bacterium is highly infectious and can be transmitted to humans through inhalation of contaminated aerosols or direct contact with infected animals or their products. C. burnetii has a unique ability to survive and replicate within host cells, particularly within phagocytic vacuoles, by inhibiting phagosome-lysosome fusion and altering the intracellular environment to promote its survival.

The bacterium exhibits a biphasic developmental cycle, consisting of small cell variants (SCVs) and large cell variants (LCVs). SCVs are metabolically inactive and highly resistant to environmental stressors, including heat, desiccation, and disinfectants. LCVs, on the other hand, are metabolically active and undergo replication within host cells. C. burnetii can form persistent infections, which may contribute to chronic Q fever and its associated complications, such as endocarditis and vascular infection.

Q fever is a worldwide distributed disease, with a higher incidence in rural areas where livestock farming is prevalent. The primary reservoirs for C. burnetii are domestic animals, including cattle, sheep, and goats, although wild animals and arthropods can also serve as potential hosts. Effective antibiotic treatment options for Q fever include doxycycline and fluoroquinolones, while vaccination with the phase I whole-cell vaccine is available in some countries to prevent infection in high-risk populations.

"Swine" is a common term used to refer to even-toed ungulates of the family Suidae, including domestic pigs and wild boars. However, in a medical context, "swine" often appears in the phrase "swine flu," which is a strain of influenza virus that typically infects pigs but can also cause illness in humans. The 2009 H1N1 pandemic was caused by a new strain of swine-origin influenza A virus, which was commonly referred to as "swine flu." It's important to note that this virus is not transmitted through eating cooked pork products; it spreads from person to person, mainly through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

'Chlamydophila psittaci' is a gram-negative, obligate intracellular bacterium that causes psittacosis, also known as parrot fever. It is commonly found in birds, particularly parrots and psittacines, but can also infect other bird species, mammals, and humans. In humans, it can cause a wide range of symptoms, including fever, headache, cough, and pneumonia. Human-to-human transmission is rare, and the disease is typically acquired through inhalation of dried secretions or feces from infected birds.

Q fever is a zoonotic disease caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii. It is characterized by acute or chronic flu-like symptoms, pneumonia, and hepatitis. The bacteria are primarily transmitted to humans through inhalation of contaminated dust or aerosols from infected animals such as cattle, sheep, and goats. Q fever can also be transmitted through consumption of unpasteurized milk or direct contact with infected animals. It is often asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic in animals but can cause severe disease in humans.

The acute form of Q fever typically presents with sudden onset of high fever, severe headache, fatigue, muscle pain, and cough. Some patients may also develop pneumonia or hepatitis. The chronic form of the disease is less common but more serious, often affecting people with compromised immune systems. Chronic Q fever can lead to endocarditis, an infection of the inner lining of the heart, which can be life-threatening if left untreated.

Diagnosis of Q fever typically involves a combination of clinical evaluation, serological testing, and PCR (polymerase chain reaction) assays. Treatment usually involves antibiotics such as doxycycline or fluoroquinolones for several weeks to months, depending on the severity and duration of the illness. Prevention measures include avoiding contact with infected animals, wearing protective clothing and masks when handling animal products, and pasteurizing milk before consumption.

Religion and medicine are two distinct fields that can intersect in various ways. While religion can be defined as a set of beliefs, practices, and rituals related to the divine or supernatural, medicine is concerned with the maintenance of health and the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and cure of disease, illness, and other physical and mental impairments in humans.

A medical definition of "Religion and Medicine" might refer to the study of the relationship between religious beliefs, practices, and experiences, and health outcomes, healthcare delivery, and medical decision-making. This can include exploring how religious beliefs and practices influence health behaviors, coping mechanisms, social support networks, and access to care, as well as how they shape attitudes towards medical interventions, end-of-life decisions, and bioethical issues.

Religion can also play a role in the provision of healthcare services, such as through faith-based organizations that operate hospitals, clinics, and other health facilities. Additionally, religious leaders and communities may provide spiritual care and support to patients and their families, complementing the medical care provided by healthcare professionals.

Overall, the intersection of religion and medicine is a complex and multifaceted area of study that requires an interdisciplinary approach, drawing on insights from fields such as anthropology, sociology, psychology, theology, and public health.

Zolazepam is a veterinary medication that belongs to a class of drugs called benzodiazepines. It is used in the induction and maintenance of anesthesia in animals, often in combination with other medications. Zolazepam works by depressing the central nervous system, producing sedation, muscle relaxation, and amnesia.

In veterinary medicine, zolazepam is commonly combined with tiletamine, another dissociative anesthetic, to form a drug called Telazol. This combination provides balanced anesthesia with minimal cardiovascular and respiratory depression.

It's important to note that zolazepam is not approved for use in humans and should only be administered by trained veterinary professionals under strict supervision.

Infectious pregnancy complications refer to infections that occur during pregnancy and can affect the mother, fetus, or both. These infections can lead to serious consequences such as preterm labor, low birth weight, birth defects, stillbirth, or even death. Some common infectious agents that can cause pregnancy complications include:

1. Bacteria: Examples include group B streptococcus, Escherichia coli, and Listeria monocytogenes, which can cause sepsis, meningitis, or pneumonia in the mother and lead to preterm labor or stillbirth.
2. Viruses: Examples include cytomegalovirus, rubella, varicella-zoster, and HIV, which can cause congenital anomalies, developmental delays, or transmission of the virus to the fetus.
3. Parasites: Examples include Toxoplasma gondii, which can cause severe neurological damage in the fetus if transmitted during pregnancy.
4. Fungi: Examples include Candida albicans, which can cause fungal infections in the mother and lead to preterm labor or stillbirth.

Preventive measures such as vaccination, good hygiene practices, and avoiding high-risk behaviors can help reduce the risk of infectious pregnancy complications. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of infections during pregnancy are also crucial to prevent adverse outcomes.

"History, 19th Century" is not a medical term or concept. It refers to the historical events, developments, and figures related to the 1800s in various fields, including politics, culture, science, and technology. However, if you are looking for medical advancements during the 19th century, here's a brief overview:

The 19th century was a period of significant progress in medicine, with numerous discoveries and innovations that shaped modern medical practices. Some notable developments include:

1. Edward Jenner's smallpox vaccine (1796): Although not strictly within the 19th century, Jenner's discovery laid the foundation for vaccination as a preventive measure against infectious diseases.
2. Germ theory of disease: The work of Louis Pasteur, Robert Koch, and others established that many diseases were caused by microorganisms, leading to the development of antiseptic practices and vaccines.
3. Anesthesia: In 1842, Crawford Long first used ether as an anesthetic during surgery, followed by the introduction of chloroform in 1847 by James Simpson.
4. Antisepsis and asepsis: Joseph Lister introduced antiseptic practices in surgery, significantly reducing postoperative infections. Later, the concept of asepsis (sterilization) was developed to prevent contamination during surgical procedures.
5. Microbiology: The development of techniques for culturing and staining bacteria allowed for better understanding and identification of pathogens.
6. Physiology: Claude Bernard's work on the regulation of internal body functions, or homeostasis, contributed significantly to our understanding of human physiology.
7. Neurology: Jean-Martin Charcot made significant contributions to the study of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease.
8. Psychiatry: Sigmund Freud developed psychoanalysis, a new approach to understanding mental illnesses.
9. Public health: The 19th century saw the establishment of public health organizations and initiatives aimed at improving sanitation, water quality, and vaccination programs.
10. Medical education reforms: The Flexner Report in 1910 led to significant improvements in medical education standards and practices.

'Bird diseases' is a broad term that refers to the various medical conditions and infections that can affect avian species. These diseases can be caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, or toxic substances and can affect pet birds, wild birds, and poultry. Some common bird diseases include:

1. Avian influenza (bird flu) - a viral infection that can cause respiratory symptoms, decreased appetite, and sudden death in birds.
2. Psittacosis (parrot fever) - a bacterial infection that can cause respiratory symptoms, fever, and lethargy in birds and humans who come into contact with them.
3. Aspergillosis - a fungal infection that can cause respiratory symptoms and weight loss in birds.
4. Candidiasis (thrush) - a fungal infection that can affect the mouth, crop, and other parts of the digestive system in birds.
5. Newcastle disease - a viral infection that can cause respiratory symptoms, neurological signs, and decreased egg production in birds.
6. Salmonellosis - a bacterial infection that can cause diarrhea, lethargy, and decreased appetite in birds and humans who come into contact with them.
7. Trichomoniasis - a parasitic infection that can affect the mouth, crop, and digestive system in birds.
8. Chlamydiosis (psittacosis) - a bacterial infection that can cause respiratory symptoms, lethargy, and decreased appetite in birds and humans who come into contact with them.
9. Coccidiosis - a parasitic infection that can affect the digestive system in birds.
10. Mycobacteriosis (avian tuberculosis) - a bacterial infection that can cause chronic weight loss, respiratory symptoms, and skin lesions in birds.

It is important to note that some bird diseases can be transmitted to humans and other animals, so it is essential to practice good hygiene when handling birds or their droppings. If you suspect your bird may be sick, it is best to consult with a veterinarian who specializes in avian medicine.

Endometritis is a medical condition that refers to the inflammation of the endometrium, which is the innermost layer of the uterus. It is often caused by infections, such as bacterial or fungal infections, that enter the uterus through various routes, including childbirth, miscarriage, or surgical procedures.

The symptoms of endometritis may include abnormal vaginal discharge, pelvic pain, fever, and abdominal cramping. In severe cases, it can lead to complications such as infertility, ectopic pregnancy, or sepsis. Treatment typically involves the use of antibiotics to clear the infection, as well as supportive care to manage symptoms and promote healing.

It is important to seek medical attention if you experience any symptoms of endometritis, as prompt treatment can help prevent complications and improve outcomes.

Foot rot, also known as pododermatitis, is a common infectious disease in cloven-hoofed animals such as sheep, goats, and cattle. It's typically caused by a mixture of bacteria, usually Fusobacterium necrophorum and Prevotella spp., that infect the soft tissues of the foot, leading to inflammation, necrosis (tissue death), and often foul-smelling discharge.

The infection often begins between the claws or toes, where the skin is more susceptible to damage and moisture accumulation. The affected area may become painful, swollen, and sensitive to pressure, making it difficult for the animal to walk or stand. In severe cases, foot rot can lead to lameness, decreased feed intake, weight loss, and even death if left untreated.

Foot rot is highly contagious and can spread quickly among animals in close contact, such as those in confined spaces or sharing pastures. Prevention strategies include maintaining good sanitation and dry conditions, trimming hooves regularly to prevent overgrowth and reduce moisture accumulation, and vaccinating against the bacteria responsible for foot rot. Rapid detection and treatment of infected animals are crucial to controlling the spread of this disease in animal populations.

An animal population group refers to a collection of animals of the same species that live in a specific geographic area and interact with each other. These groups can vary in size and can be as small as a few individuals or as large as millions of individuals. The study of animal population groups is known as "population ecology" and it examines the dynamics of animal populations, including their distribution, abundance, demographics, and genetic structure.

Animal population groups can be structured into subgroups based on various factors such as age, sex, or social status. These subgroups may have different behaviors, habitats, or resource needs, which can affect their survival and reproduction. The study of animal population groups is important for understanding the dynamics of wildlife populations, managing wildlife resources, and conserving biodiversity.

"Marital status" is not a medical term, but it is often used in medical records and forms to indicate whether a person is single, married, divorced, widowed, or in a civil union. It is a social determinant of health that can have an impact on a person's access to healthcare, health behaviors, and health outcomes. For example, research has shown that people who are unmarried, divorced, or widowed may have worse health outcomes than those who are married. However, it is important to note that this relationship is complex and influenced by many other factors, including socioeconomic status, age, and overall health.

Rift Valley Fever (RVF) is a viral zoonotic disease that primarily affects animals, but can also have serious consequences for humans. It is caused by the Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV), which belongs to the family Bunyaviridae and the genus Phlebovirus.

The disease is transmitted through the bite of infected mosquitoes or through contact with the blood, milk, or other bodily fluids of infected animals such as cattle, sheep, goats, and camels. In humans, RVF can cause a range of symptoms, from mild fever and headache to severe complications such as retinitis, encephalitis, and hemorrhagic fever, which can be fatal in some cases.

RVF is endemic in parts of Africa, particularly in the Rift Valley region, and has also been reported in the Arabian Peninsula. It poses a significant public health and economic threat to affected regions due to its potential to cause large-scale outbreaks with high mortality rates in both animals and humans. Prevention and control measures include vaccination of animals, vector control, and avoidance of mosquito bites.

Bacterial infections are caused by the invasion and multiplication of bacteria in or on tissues of the body. These infections can range from mild, like a common cold, to severe, such as pneumonia, meningitis, or sepsis. The symptoms of a bacterial infection depend on the type of bacteria invading the body and the area of the body that is affected.

Bacteria are single-celled microorganisms that can live in many different environments, including in the human body. While some bacteria are beneficial to humans and help with digestion or protect against harmful pathogens, others can cause illness and disease. When bacteria invade the body, they can release toxins and other harmful substances that damage tissues and trigger an immune response.

Bacterial infections can be treated with antibiotics, which work by killing or inhibiting the growth of bacteria. However, it is important to note that misuse or overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, making treatment more difficult. It is also essential to complete the full course of antibiotics as prescribed, even if symptoms improve, to ensure that all bacteria are eliminated and reduce the risk of recurrence or development of antibiotic resistance.

Antiparasitic agents are a type of medication used to treat parasitic infections. These agents include a wide range of drugs that work to destroy, inhibit the growth of, or otherwise eliminate parasites from the body. Parasites are organisms that live on or inside a host and derive nutrients at the host's expense.

Antiparasitic agents can be divided into several categories based on the type of parasite they target. Some examples include:

* Antimalarial agents: These drugs are used to treat and prevent malaria, which is caused by a parasite that is transmitted through the bites of infected mosquitoes.
* Antiprotozoal agents: These drugs are used to treat infections caused by protozoa, which are single-celled organisms that can cause diseases such as giardiasis, amoebic dysentery, and sleeping sickness.
* Antihelminthic agents: These drugs are used to treat infections caused by helminths, which are parasitic worms that can infect various organs of the body, including the intestines, lungs, and skin. Examples include roundworms, tapeworms, and flukes.

Antiparasitic agents work in different ways to target parasites. Some disrupt the parasite's metabolism or interfere with its ability to reproduce. Others damage the parasite's membrane or exoskeleton, leading to its death. The specific mechanism of action depends on the type of antiparasitic agent and the parasite it is targeting.

It is important to note that while antiparasitic agents can be effective in treating parasitic infections, they can also have side effects and potential risks. Therefore, it is essential to consult with a healthcare provider before starting any antiparasitic medication to ensure safe and appropriate use.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Jurisprudence" is not a term typically used in medical definitions. Jurisprudence refers to the theory and philosophy of law, or the study of legal systems, principles, and practices. It is a subject that falls under the purview of lawyers, judges, and scholars of law. If you have any questions about medical terminology, I'd be happy to help with those!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "morals" is not a term that has a medical definition. Morals refer to personal or societal beliefs about right and wrong behavior. It is a concept that falls under the realm of ethics, philosophy, and sociology rather than medicine. If you have any questions related to medical terminologies or concepts, I would be happy to help clarify those for you.

Women's health services refer to medical services that are specifically designed, focused on, or tailored to the unique physiological and psychological needs of women, throughout various stages of their lives. These services encompass a wide range of healthcare areas including:

1. Gynecology and obstetrics - covering routine preventive care, family planning, prenatal and postnatal care, as well as management of gynecological conditions like menstrual disorders, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and reproductive system cancers (e.g., cervical, ovarian, and endometrial cancer).
2. Breast health - including breast cancer screening, diagnostics, treatment, and survivorship care, as well as education on breast self-examination and risk reduction strategies.
3. Mental health - addressing women's mental health concerns such as depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), eating disorders, and perinatal mood disorders, while also considering the impact of hormonal changes, life events, and societal expectations on emotional wellbeing.
4. Sexual health - providing care for sexual concerns, dysfunctions, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), as well as offering education on safe sexual practices and promoting healthy relationships.
5. Cardiovascular health - addressing women's specific cardiovascular risks, such as pregnancy-related complications, and managing conditions like hypertension and high cholesterol to prevent heart disease, the leading cause of death for women in many countries.
6. Bone health - focusing on prevention, diagnosis, and management of osteoporosis and other bone diseases that disproportionately affect women, particularly after menopause.
7. Menopause care - providing support and treatment for symptoms related to menopause, such as hot flashes, sleep disturbances, and mood changes, while also addressing long-term health concerns like bone density loss and heart disease risk.
8. Preventive care - offering routine screenings and vaccinations specific to women's health needs, including cervical cancer screening (Pap test), breast cancer screening (mammography), human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, and osteoporosis screening.
9. Education and counseling - empowering women with knowledge about their bodies, sexual and reproductive health, and overall wellbeing through evidence-based resources and support.
10. Integrative care - addressing the whole person, including mental, emotional, and spiritual wellbeing, by incorporating complementary therapies like acupuncture, mindfulness, and yoga into treatment plans as appropriate.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

"Chlamydophila" is a genus of bacteria that includes several species that can cause human diseases. The most well-known species in this genus is "Chlamydophila trachomatis," which is the leading cause of preventable blindness worldwide and can also cause sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Other species in the genus include "Chlamydophila pneumoniae," which can cause respiratory infections, and "Chlamydophila psittaci," which can cause psittacosis, a type of pneumonia that is often associated with exposure to birds.

It's worth noting that the taxonomy of these bacteria has been subject to some debate and revision in recent years. Some experts have proposed reclassifying the genus "Chlamydophila" as a subgroup within the genus "Chlamydia," which would make the species "Chlamydophila trachomatis" become "Chlamydia trachomatis," and so on. However, this proposal has not been universally accepted, and both classifications continue to be used in the scientific literature.

"Legislation as Topic" is a legal term that refers to laws, regulations, or statutes related to medicine, healthcare, and the medical field. This can include legislation regarding the practice of medicine, patient rights, healthcare financing, medical research, pharmaceuticals, and public health, among other things. Essentially, "Legislation as Topic" covers any law or regulation that impacts the medical community, healthcare system, or individual patients. It is a broad category that can encompass many different areas of law and policy.

Congenital abnormalities, also known as birth defects, are structural or functional anomalies that are present at birth. These abnormalities can develop at any point during fetal development, and they can affect any part of the body. They can be caused by genetic factors, environmental influences, or a combination of both.

Congenital abnormalities can range from mild to severe and may include structural defects such as heart defects, neural tube defects, and cleft lip and palate, as well as functional defects such as intellectual disabilities and sensory impairments. Some congenital abnormalities may be visible at birth, while others may not become apparent until later in life.

In some cases, congenital abnormalities may be detected through prenatal testing, such as ultrasound or amniocentesis. In other cases, they may not be diagnosed until after the baby is born. Treatment for congenital abnormalities varies depending on the type and severity of the defect, and may include surgery, therapy, medication, or a combination of these approaches.

Tiletamine is a veterinary medication that belongs to the class of drugs known as dissociative anesthetics. It is often used in combination with zolazepam, and the combination is sold under the brand name Telazol. This drug combination is primarily used for the induction and maintenance of anesthesia in various animal species.

Tiletamine works by blocking the action of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, which are involved in pain perception, learning, and memory. By doing so, it produces a state of dissociation, where animals may appear to be conscious but are not aware of their surroundings or the procedures being performed on them.

It is important to note that tiletamine should only be used under the direction of a licensed veterinarian, as its use requires proper training and experience to ensure safe and effective administration.

Maternal mortality is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as "the death of a woman while pregnant or within 42 days of termination of pregnancy, irrespective of the duration and site of the pregnancy, from any cause related to or aggravated by the pregnancy or its management but not from accidental or incidental causes."

This definition highlights that maternal mortality is a preventable death that occurs during pregnancy, childbirth, or in the postpartum period, and it can be caused by various factors related to or worsened by the pregnancy or its management. The WHO also collects data on maternal deaths due to direct obstetric causes (such as hemorrhage, hypertensive disorders, sepsis, and unsafe abortion) and indirect causes (such as malaria, anemia, and HIV/AIDS).

Maternal mortality is a significant public health issue worldwide, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Reducing maternal mortality is one of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) set by the United Nations, with a target to reduce the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births by 2030.

I must apologize, but there seems to be a misunderstanding. The term "internationality" is not a commonly used medical term with a specific definition in the field of medicine or healthcare. It is a more general term that can refer to the quality or state of being international or global in scope, relevance, or application. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help clarify those for you.

A fetus is the developing offspring in a mammal, from the end of the embryonic period (approximately 8 weeks after fertilization in humans) until birth. In humans, the fetal stage of development starts from the eleventh week of pregnancy and continues until childbirth, which is termed as full-term pregnancy at around 37 to 40 weeks of gestation. During this time, the organ systems become fully developed and the body grows in size. The fetus is surrounded by the amniotic fluid within the amniotic sac and is connected to the placenta via the umbilical cord, through which it receives nutrients and oxygen from the mother. Regular prenatal care is essential during this period to monitor the growth and development of the fetus and ensure a healthy pregnancy and delivery.

A disease outbreak is defined as the occurrence of cases of a disease in excess of what would normally be expected in a given time and place. It may affect a small and localized group or a large number of people spread over a wide area, even internationally. An outbreak may be caused by a new agent, a change in the agent's virulence or host susceptibility, or an increase in the size or density of the host population.

Outbreaks can have significant public health and economic impacts, and require prompt investigation and control measures to prevent further spread of the disease. The investigation typically involves identifying the source of the outbreak, determining the mode of transmission, and implementing measures to interrupt the chain of infection. This may include vaccination, isolation or quarantine, and education of the public about the risks and prevention strategies.

Examples of disease outbreaks include foodborne illnesses linked to contaminated food or water, respiratory infections spread through coughing and sneezing, and mosquito-borne diseases such as Zika virus and West Nile virus. Outbreaks can also occur in healthcare settings, such as hospitals and nursing homes, where vulnerable populations may be at increased risk of infection.

Protozoan infections in animals refer to diseases caused by the invasion and colonization of one or more protozoan species in an animal host's body. Protozoa are single-celled eukaryotic organisms that can exist as parasites and can be transmitted through various modes, such as direct contact with infected animals, contaminated food or water, vectors like insects, and fecal-oral route.

Examples of protozoan infections in animals include:

1. Coccidiosis: It is a common intestinal disease caused by several species of the genus Eimeria that affects various animals, including poultry, cattle, sheep, goats, and pets like cats and dogs. The parasites infect the epithelial cells lining the intestines, causing diarrhea, weight loss, dehydration, and sometimes death in severe cases.
2. Toxoplasmosis: It is a zoonotic disease caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii that can infect various warm-blooded animals, including humans, livestock, and pets like cats. The parasite forms cysts in various tissues, such as muscles, brain, and eyes, causing mild to severe symptoms depending on the host's immune status.
3. Babesiosis: It is a tick-borne disease caused by several species of Babesia protozoa that affect various animals, including cattle, horses, dogs, and humans. The parasites infect red blood cells, causing anemia, fever, weakness, and sometimes death in severe cases.
4. Leishmaniasis: It is a vector-borne disease caused by several species of Leishmania protozoa that affect various animals, including dogs, cats, and humans. The parasites are transmitted through the bite of infected sandflies and can cause skin lesions, anemia, fever, weight loss, and sometimes death in severe cases.
5. Cryptosporidiosis: It is a waterborne disease caused by the protozoan Cryptosporidium parvum that affects various animals, including humans, livestock, and pets like dogs and cats. The parasites infect the epithelial cells lining the intestines, causing diarrhea, abdominal pain, and dehydration.

Prevention and control of these diseases rely on various measures, such as vaccination, chemoprophylaxis, vector control, and environmental management. Public awareness and education are also essential to prevent the transmission and spread of these diseases.

'Supreme Court Decisions' refer to the legal rulings made by the Supreme Court of the United States, which is the highest court in the federal judiciary of the US. These decisions are the final word on matters of federal law, including constitutional interpretation, and they establish precedents that guide future decision-making in federal and state courts. They can have significant impacts on various aspects of American society, politics, and law.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "poultry" is not a medical term. It is a agricultural and culinary term that refers to domestic birds (such as chickens, ducks, geese, and turkeys) that are kept for their eggs, meat, or feathers. The study and care of these birds would fall under the field of veterinary medicine, but "poultry" itself is not a medical term.

An abattoir is a facility where animals are slaughtered and processed for human consumption. It is also known as a slaughterhouse. The term "abattoir" comes from the French word "abattre," which means "to take down" or "slaughter." In an abattoir, animals such as cattle, pigs, sheep, and chickens are killed and then butchered into smaller pieces of meat that can be sold to consumers.

Abattoirs must follow strict regulations to ensure the humane treatment of animals and the safety of the meat products they produce. These regulations cover various aspects of the slaughtering and processing process, including animal handling, stunning, bleeding, evisceration, and inspection. The goal of these regulations is to minimize the risk of contamination and ensure that the meat is safe for human consumption.

It's important to note that while abattoirs play an essential role in providing a reliable source of protein for humans, they can also be controversial due to concerns about animal welfare and the environmental impact of large-scale animal agriculture.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Ontario" is not a medical term. It is the name of a province in Canada, similar to how "California" is the name of a state in the United States. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health conditions, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you!

Staphylococcus is a genus of Gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic bacteria that are commonly found on the skin and mucous membranes of humans and other animals. Many species of Staphylococcus can cause infections in humans, but the most notable is Staphylococcus aureus, which is responsible for a wide range of illnesses, from minor skin infections to life-threatening conditions such as pneumonia, endocarditis, and sepsis.

Staphylococcus species are non-motile, non-spore forming, and typically occur in grape-like clusters when viewed under a microscope. They can be coagulase-positive or coagulase-negative, with S. aureus being the most well-known coagulase-positive species. Coagulase is an enzyme that causes the clotting of plasma, and its presence is often used to differentiate S. aureus from other Staphylococcus species.

These bacteria are resistant to many commonly used antibiotics, including penicillin, due to the production of beta-lactamases. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a particularly problematic strain that has developed resistance to multiple antibiotics and can cause severe, difficult-to-treat infections.

Proper hand hygiene, use of personal protective equipment, and environmental cleaning are crucial measures for preventing the spread of Staphylococcus in healthcare settings and the community.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

Lameness in animals refers to an alteration in the animal's normal gait or movement, which is often caused by pain, injury, or disease affecting the locomotor system. This can include structures such as bones, joints, muscles, tendons, and ligaments. The severity of lameness can vary from subtle to non-weight bearing, and it can affect one or more limbs.

Lameness can have various causes, including trauma, infection, degenerative diseases, congenital defects, and neurological disorders. In order to diagnose and treat lameness in animals, a veterinarian will typically perform a physical examination, observe the animal's gait and movement, and may use diagnostic imaging techniques such as X-rays or ultrasound to identify the underlying cause. Treatment for lameness can include medication, rest, physical therapy, surgery, or a combination of these approaches.

Traditional medicine (TM) refers to health practices, approaches, knowledge and beliefs incorporating plant, animal and mineral-based medicines, spiritual therapies, manual techniques and exercises, applied singularly or in combination to treat, diagnose and prevent illnesses or maintain well-being. Although traditional medicine has been practiced since prehistoric times, it is still widely used today and may include:

1. Traditional Asian medicines such as acupuncture, herbal remedies, and qigong from China; Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani and Siddha from India; and Jamu from Indonesia.
2. Traditional European herbal medicines, also known as phytotherapy.
3. North American traditional indigenous medicines, including Native American and Inuit practices.
4. African traditional medicines, such as herbal, spiritual, and manual techniques practiced in various African cultures.
5. South American traditional medicines, like Mapuche, Curanderismo, and Santo Daime practices from different countries.

It is essential to note that traditional medicine may not follow the scientific principles, evidence-based standards, or quality control measures inherent to conventional (also known as allopathic or Western) medicine. However, some traditional medicines have been integrated into modern healthcare systems and are considered complementary or alternative medicines (CAM). The World Health Organization encourages member states to develop policies and regulations for integrating TM/CAM practices into their healthcare systems, ensuring safety, efficacy, and quality while respecting cultural diversity.

Clinical pathology is a medical specialty that focuses on the diagnosis of diseases through the examination of organs, tissues, and bodily fluids, such as blood and urine. It involves the use of laboratory tests to identify abnormalities in the body's cells, chemicals, and functions that may indicate the presence of a specific disease or condition. Clinical pathologists work closely with other healthcare professionals to help manage patient care, provide treatment recommendations, and monitor the effectiveness of treatments. They are responsible for supervising the laboratory testing process, ensuring accurate results, and interpreting the findings in the context of each patient's medical history and symptoms. Overall, clinical pathology plays a critical role in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of many different types of diseases and conditions.

Obstetrics is a branch of medicine and surgery concerned with the care of women during pregnancy, childbirth, and the postnatal period. It involves managing potential complications that may arise during any stage of pregnancy or delivery, as well as providing advice and guidance on prenatal care, labor and delivery, and postpartum care. Obstetricians are medical doctors who specialize in obstetrics and can provide a range of services including routine check-ups, ultrasounds, genetic testing, and other diagnostic procedures to monitor the health and development of the fetus. They also perform surgical procedures such as cesarean sections when necessary.

The placenta is an organ that develops in the uterus during pregnancy and provides oxygen and nutrients to the growing baby through the umbilical cord. It also removes waste products from the baby's blood. The placenta attaches to the wall of the uterus, and the baby's side of the placenta contains many tiny blood vessels that connect to the baby's circulatory system. This allows for the exchange of oxygen, nutrients, and waste between the mother's and baby's blood. After the baby is born, the placenta is usually expelled from the uterus in a process called afterbirth.

I apologize, but "Berlin" is not a medical term or condition. Berlin is the capital and largest city of Germany, known for its rich history, culture, and scientific contributions. It does not have a specific medical definition. If you have any questions related to medical conditions or terminology, I would be happy to try to help answer those for you.

Sulfamethazine is a long-acting, oral sulfonamide antibiotic. Its chemical name is Sulfamethazine, and its molecular formula is C12H14N4O2S. It is primarily used to treat various bacterial infections, such as respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, and skin infections.

It works by inhibiting the growth of bacteria by interfering with their ability to synthesize folic acid, an essential component for bacterial reproduction. Sulfamethazine has a broad spectrum of activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. However, its use has declined in recent years due to the emergence of bacterial strains resistant to sulfonamides and the availability of other antibiotics with better safety profiles.

Like all medications, Sulfamethazine can cause side effects, including nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, and skin rashes. In rare cases, it may also cause severe adverse reactions such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis. It is essential to use this medication only under the supervision of a healthcare professional and follow their instructions carefully.

Sublingual administration refers to a route of delivering medication or other substances through placement under the tongue, allowing for rapid absorption into the bloodstream through the mucous membranes located there. This method can allow for quick onset of action and avoids first-pass metabolism in the liver that may occur with oral administration. Common examples of sublingual medications include nitroglycerin for angina pectoris and certain forms of hormone replacement therapy.

Arcanobacterium is a genus of Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria that are facultatively anaerobic and non-spore forming. These bacteria were previously classified as part of the Corynebacterium genus but were reclassified due to genetic differences. They are normal flora in the human respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, but some species have been associated with human diseases such as endocarditis, bacteremia, and wound infections. The most well-known species is Arcanobacterium haemolyticum, which can cause pharyngitis and skin infections. Proper identification of these bacteria is important for appropriate treatment, as some species may be resistant to certain antibiotics.

A laboratory (often abbreviated as lab) is a facility that provides controlled conditions in which scientific or technological research, experiments, and measurements may be performed. In the medical field, laboratories are specialized spaces for conducting diagnostic tests and analyzing samples of bodily fluids, tissues, or other substances to gain insights into patients' health status.

There are various types of medical laboratories, including:

1. Clinical Laboratories: These labs perform tests on patient specimens to assist in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases. They analyze blood, urine, stool, CSF (cerebrospinal fluid), and other samples for chemical components, cell counts, microorganisms, and genetic material.
2. Pathology Laboratories: These labs focus on the study of disease processes, causes, and effects. Histopathology involves examining tissue samples under a microscope to identify abnormalities or signs of diseases, while cytopathology deals with individual cells.
3. Microbiology Laboratories: In these labs, microorganisms like bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites are cultured, identified, and studied to help diagnose infections and determine appropriate treatments.
4. Molecular Biology Laboratories: These labs deal with the study of biological molecules, such as DNA, RNA, and proteins, to understand their structure, function, and interactions. They often use techniques like PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and gene sequencing for diagnostic purposes.
5. Immunology Laboratories: These labs specialize in the study of the immune system and its responses to various stimuli, including infectious agents and allergens. They perform tests to diagnose immunological disorders, monitor immune function, and assess vaccine effectiveness.
6. Toxicology Laboratories: These labs analyze biological samples for the presence and concentration of chemicals, drugs, or toxins that may be harmful to human health. They help identify potential causes of poisoning, drug interactions, and substance abuse.
7. Blood Banks: Although not traditionally considered laboratories, blood banks are specialized facilities that collect, test, store, and distribute blood and its components for transfusion purposes.

Medical laboratories play a crucial role in diagnosing diseases, monitoring disease progression, guiding treatment decisions, and assessing patient outcomes. They must adhere to strict quality control measures and regulatory guidelines to ensure accurate and reliable results.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Human Rights" is a social, political, and legal concept, rather than a medical one. Human rights are basic rights and freedoms to which all individuals are entitled, regardless of nationality, sex, ethnicity, religion, language, or any other status. They include civil and political rights, such as the right to life, liberty, and freedom of expression; as well as social, cultural and economic rights, like the right to participate in culture, the right to food, and the right to work and receive an education.

However, in the context of healthcare, human rights are crucial. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights recognizes the right to medical care and the right to enjoy the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health. Healthcare providers have a responsibility to respect and protect their patients' human rights, ensuring that they receive care without discrimination, that their privacy is protected, and that they are involved in decisions regarding their healthcare.

Violations of human rights can significantly impact an individual's health and well-being, making the promotion and protection of human rights a critical public health issue.

Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an arbovirus, a type of virus that is transmitted through the bite of infected arthropods such as mosquitoes and ticks. It belongs to the family Bunyaviridae and the genus Phlebovirus. The virus was first identified in 1930 during an investigation into a large epidemic of cattle deaths near Lake Naivasha in the Rift Valley of Kenya.

RVFV primarily affects animals, particularly sheep, goats, and cattle, causing severe illness and death in newborn animals and abortions in pregnant females. The virus can also infect humans, usually through contact with infected animal tissues or fluids, or through the bite of an infected mosquito. In humans, RVFV typically causes a self-limiting febrile illness, but in some cases, it can lead to more severe complications such as encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) and retinitis (inflammation of the retina), which can result in permanent vision loss.

RVFV is endemic to parts of Africa, particularly in the Rift Valley region, but it has also been found in other parts of the continent, as well as in Saudi Arabia and Yemen. The virus can be transmitted through the movement of infected animals or contaminated animal products, as well as through the spread of infected mosquitoes by wind or travel.

Prevention measures for RVFV include vaccination of livestock, use of personal protective equipment (PPE) when handling animals or their tissues, and avoidance of mosquito bites in areas where the virus is known to be present. There is currently no approved vaccine for humans, but several candidates are in development. Treatment for RVFV infection typically involves supportive care to manage symptoms and prevent complications.

New World camelids are a family of mammals (Camelidae) that are native to South America. The family includes four species: the llama (Lama glama), the alpaca (Vicugna pacos), the guanaco (Lama guanicoe), and the vicuña (Vicugna vicugna). These animals are characterized by their long necks, long legs, and a pad on their chest instead of a true knee joint. They are known for their ability to survive in harsh environments with limited water and food resources.

An Intrauterine Device (IUD) is a long-acting, reversible contraceptive device that is inserted into the uterus to prevent pregnancy. It is a small T-shaped piece of flexible plastic with strings attached to it for removal. There are two types of IUDs available: hormonal and copper. Hormonal IUDs release progestin, which thickens cervical mucus and thins the lining of the uterus, preventing sperm from reaching and fertilizing an egg. Copper IUDs, on the other hand, produce an inflammatory reaction in the uterus that is toxic to sperm and eggs, preventing fertilization.

IUDs are more than 99% effective at preventing pregnancy and can remain in place for several years, depending on the type. They are easily removable by a healthcare provider if a woman wants to become pregnant or choose another form of contraception. IUDs do not protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs), so it is important to use condoms in addition to an IUD for protection against STIs.

In summary, Intrauterine Devices are small, T-shaped plastic devices that are inserted into the uterus to prevent pregnancy. They come in two types: hormonal and copper, both of which work by preventing fertilization. IUDs are highly effective, long-acting, and reversible forms of contraception.

A Veterinary Service in the military refers to the branch of medical care that is responsible for the health and well-being of military animals, such as dogs, horses, and other service animals. This can include preventative medicine, medical treatment, surgical care, and disease control for these animals. Additionally, veterinary services in the military may also be involved in research related to military animals, as well as providing support in the event of biological or chemical warfare involving animals. Personnel working in military veterinary services are typically licensed veterinarians with additional training in military procedures and protocols.

Veterinary surgery refers to the surgical procedures performed on animals by trained veterinarians or veterinary surgeons. It involves the use of various surgical techniques and tools to diagnose, treat, or prevent diseases and injuries in animals. This can include soft tissue surgeries such as abdominal or thoracic surgeries, orthopedic surgeries for bone and joint issues, neurological surgeries, oncological surgeries for the removal of tumors, and reconstructive surgeries. Veterinary surgeons must complete extensive education and training in order to provide safe and effective surgical care for animals.

Oxytetracycline is a broad-spectrum antibiotic, which is part of the tetracycline class. It works by inhibiting bacterial protein synthesis, thereby preventing bacterial growth and reproduction. Medical definition: "A linear tetra cyclic amide antibiotic derived from Streptomyces rimosus, with a wide range of antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. It is used especially in the treatment of rickettsial infections, respiratory tract infections, skin and soft tissue infections, and sexually transmitted diseases." (Source: Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary)

Wild animals are those species of animals that are not domesticated or tamed by humans and live in their natural habitats without regular human intervention. They can include a wide variety of species, ranging from mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, to insects and other invertebrates.

Wild animals are adapted to survive in specific environments and have behaviors, physical traits, and social structures that enable them to find food, shelter, and mates. They can be found in various habitats such as forests, grasslands, deserts, oceans, rivers, and mountains. Some wild animals may come into contact with human populations, particularly in urban areas where their natural habitats have been destroyed or fragmented.

It is important to note that the term "wild" does not necessarily mean that an animal is aggressive or dangerous. While some wild animals can be potentially harmful to humans if provoked or threatened, many are generally peaceful and prefer to avoid contact with people. However, it is essential to respect their natural behaviors and habitats and maintain a safe distance from them to prevent any potential conflicts or harm to either party.

Government regulation in the context of medicine refers to the rules, guidelines, and laws established by government agencies to control, monitor, and standardize various aspects of healthcare. These regulations are designed to protect patients, promote public health, ensure quality of care, and regulate the healthcare industry. Examples of government regulation in medicine include:

1. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations for drug approval, medical device clearance, and food safety.
2. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) regulations for healthcare reimbursement, quality measures, and program eligibility.
3. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations for workplace safety in healthcare settings.
4. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations to minimize environmental impacts from healthcare facilities and pharmaceutical manufacturing.
5. State medical boards' regulations for licensing, disciplining, and monitoring physicians and other healthcare professionals.
6. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulations for patient privacy and data security.
7. Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) regulations for laboratory testing quality and standards.
8. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) regulations to prevent deceptive or unfair trade practices in healthcare marketing and advertising.
9. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) guidelines for evidence-based practice and patient safety.
10. Public Health Service Act (PHSA) regulations related to infectious diseases, bioterrorism preparedness, and substance abuse treatment.

I believe there might be a bit of confusion in your question. "History" is a subject that refers to events, ideas, and developments of the past. It's not something that has a medical definition. However, if you're referring to the "21st century" in a historical context, it relates to the period from 2001 to the present. It's an era marked by significant advancements in technology, medicine, and society at large. But again, it doesn't have a medical definition. If you meant something else, please provide more context so I can give a more accurate response.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "human characteristics" is not a medical term or concept. It refers to the typical traits, attributes, and features that define humans as a species, both physically and behaviorally. Physical human characteristics include bipedal locomotion, large brains, and fine motor skills, while behavioral characteristics can include complex language use, self-awareness, and sociality.

However, if you have any specific medical or health-related questions, I would be happy to help answer them to the best of my ability!

Postcoital contraception, also known as emergency contraception, refers to methods used to prevent pregnancy after sexual intercourse has already occurred. These methods are typically used in situations where regular contraception has failed or was not used, such as in cases of condom breakage or forgotten birth control pills.

There are two main types of postcoital contraception:

1. Emergency contraceptive pill (ECP): Also known as the "morning-after pill," this is a hormonal medication that can be taken up to 5 days after unprotected sex, but it is most effective when taken within 72 hours. There are two types of ECPs available: progestin-only and combined estrogen-progestin. The progestin-only pill is preferred because it has fewer side effects and is just as effective as the combined pill.
2. Copper intrauterine device (IUD): This is a small, T-shaped device made of flexible plastic and copper that is inserted into the uterus by a healthcare provider. The IUD can be inserted up to 5 days after unprotected sex to prevent pregnancy. It is the most effective form of emergency contraception available, and it also provides ongoing protection against pregnancy for up to 10 years, depending on the type of IUD.

It's important to note that postcoital contraception should not be used as a regular method of contraception, but rather as a backup in case of emergencies. It is also not effective in preventing sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Regular contraceptive methods, such as condoms and hormonal birth control, are the best ways to prevent unintended pregnancies and STIs.

I apologize for the confusion, but "Nebramycin" is not a recognized term in medicine or pharmacology. It's possible there may be a spelling error or it could be a less known or obsolete term. If you meant "Neomycin," I can provide the definition:

Neomycin is an aminoglycoside antibiotic, which is used primarily to treat various types of infections caused by bacteria. It functions by binding to the 30S subunit of the bacterial ribosome, thereby inhibiting protein synthesis and leading to bacterial cell death. Neomycin is not typically used systemically due to its potential for kidney and ear toxicity. Instead, it's often used topically in the form of creams, ointments, or eye drops, or as an oral medication for intestinal bacteria before certain surgeries.

Andrology is a branch of medical science that deals with the male reproductive system and male sexual concerns. It involves the study, diagnosis, and treatment of various conditions related to male infertility, erectile dysfunction, ejaculation disorders, prostate diseases, testicular cancer, and other issues affecting the male reproductive and sexual health.

Andrologists are medical professionals who specialize in this field, often working closely with urologists to provide comprehensive care for their patients. They may also collaborate with reproductive endocrinologists to address fertility concerns and offer treatments such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) or hormone therapy.

In addition to clinical practice, andrology research focuses on understanding the physiology of male reproduction and sexual function, developing new diagnostic tools and therapies, and improving existing treatments for various conditions affecting men's health.

Conscience is not a medical term, but it is a concept that is often discussed in the context of ethics, psychology, and philosophy. In general, conscience refers to an individual's sense of right and wrong, which guides their behavior and decision-making. It is sometimes described as an inner voice or a moral compass that helps people distinguish between right and wrong actions.

While conscience is not a medical term, there are medical conditions that can affect a person's ability to distinguish between right and wrong or to make ethical decisions. For example, certain neurological conditions, such as frontotemporal dementia, can impair a person's moral judgment and decision-making abilities. Similarly, some mental health disorders, such as psychopathy, may be associated with reduced moral reasoning and empathy, which can affect a person's conscience.

It is worth noting that the concept of conscience is complex and multifaceted, and there is ongoing debate among philosophers, psychologists, and neuroscientists about its nature and origins. Some theories suggest that conscience is a product of socialization and cultural influences, while others propose that it has a more fundamental basis in human biology and evolution.

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is a laboratory technique used to amplify specific regions of DNA. It enables the production of thousands to millions of copies of a particular DNA sequence in a rapid and efficient manner, making it an essential tool in various fields such as molecular biology, medical diagnostics, forensic science, and research.

The PCR process involves repeated cycles of heating and cooling to separate the DNA strands, allow primers (short sequences of single-stranded DNA) to attach to the target regions, and extend these primers using an enzyme called Taq polymerase, resulting in the exponential amplification of the desired DNA segment.

In a medical context, PCR is often used for detecting and quantifying specific pathogens (viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites) in clinical samples, identifying genetic mutations or polymorphisms associated with diseases, monitoring disease progression, and evaluating treatment effectiveness.

There is no universally accepted medical definition for "Value of Life" as it is a concept that encompasses both medical, ethical, and philosophical considerations. However, in the context of healthcare, the value of life may refer to the benefits, outcomes, or improvements in quality of life that are gained through medical interventions or treatments. This can include extending lifespan, improving functional ability, relieving symptoms, and enhancing overall well-being.

Ultimately, the value of life is subjective and depends on individual and societal values, beliefs, and preferences. Healthcare providers must consider these factors when making treatment decisions and engaging in end-of-life care discussions with patients and their families. It's important to note that the medical community does not assign a monetary value to human life.

Veterinary Sports Medicine is a branch of veterinary medicine that deals with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of injuries and diseases related to athletic activities in animals. This field combines knowledge from various areas such as exercise physiology, biomechanics, nutrition, and rehabilitation to help improve an animal's performance and overall health in sports and work. It also includes the use of advanced diagnostic techniques like imaging and laboratory tests to assess injuries and develop effective treatment plans. The ultimate goal is to enhance the animal's comfort, well-being, and ability to perform at its best, whether in competition or during regular exercise.

Environmental Microbiology is a branch of microbiology that deals with the study of microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, and other microscopic entities, that are found in various environments such as water, soil, air, and organic matter. This field focuses on understanding how these microbes interact with their surroundings, their role in various ecological systems, and their impact on human health and the environment. It also involves studying the genetic and biochemical mechanisms that allow microorganisms to survive and thrive in different environmental conditions, as well as the potential uses of microbes for bioremediation, bioenergy, and other industrial applications.

Medical reference books are comprehensive and authoritative resources that provide detailed information about various aspects of medical science, diagnosis, treatment, and patient care. These books serve as a crucial source of knowledge for healthcare professionals, students, researchers, and educators in the medical field. They cover a wide range of topics including anatomy, physiology, pathology, pharmacology, clinical procedures, medical ethics, and public health issues.

Some common types of medical reference books are:

1. Textbooks: These are extensive resources that offer in-depth knowledge on specific medical subjects or general medical principles. They often contain illustrations, diagrams, and case studies to facilitate learning and understanding. Examples include Gray's Anatomy for detailed human anatomy or Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine for internal medicine.

2. Handbooks: These are compact and concise guides that focus on practical applications of medical knowledge. They are designed to be easily accessible and quickly referenced during patient care. Examples include the Merck Manual, which provides information on various diseases and their management, or the Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine for quick reference during clinical practice.

3. Formularies: These books contain detailed information about medications, including dosages, side effects, drug interactions, and contraindications. They help healthcare professionals make informed decisions when prescribing medications to patients. Examples include the British National Formulary (BNF) or the American Hospital Formulary Service (AHFS).

4. Atlases: These are visual resources that provide detailed illustrations or photographs of human anatomy, pathology, or medical procedures. They serve as valuable tools for learning and teaching medical concepts. Examples include Netter's Atlas of Human Anatomy or Sabiston Textbook of Surgery.

5. Dictionaries: These reference books provide definitions and explanations of medical terms, abbreviations, and jargon. They help healthcare professionals and students understand complex medical language. Examples include Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary or Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

6. Directories: These resources list contact information for healthcare facilities, organizations, and professionals. They are useful for locating specific services or individuals within the medical community. Examples include the American Medical Association (AMA) Directory of Physicians or the National Provider Identifier (NPI) Registry.

7. Guidelines: These books provide evidence-based recommendations for clinical practice in various medical specialties. They help healthcare professionals make informed decisions when managing patient care. Examples include the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidelines or the American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines.

8. Research compendiums: These resources compile research articles, reviews, and meta-analyses on specific medical topics. They help healthcare professionals stay up-to-date with the latest scientific findings and advancements in their field. Examples include the Cochrane Library or the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

9. Case reports: These books present detailed accounts of individual patient cases, including symptoms, diagnoses, treatments, and outcomes. They serve as valuable learning tools for healthcare professionals and students. Examples include the Archives of Internal Medicine or the New England Journal of Medicine.

10. Ethics manuals: These resources provide guidance on ethical issues in medicine, such as informed consent, patient autonomy, and confidentiality. They help healthcare professionals navigate complex moral dilemmas in their practice. Examples include the American Medical Association (AMA) Code of Medical Ethics or the World Medical Association (WMA) Declaration of Geneva.

Ivermectin is an anti-parasitic drug that is used to treat a variety of infections caused by parasites such as roundworms, threadworms, and lice. It works by paralyzing and killing the parasites, thereby eliminating the infection. Ivermectin is available in various forms, including tablets, creams, and solutions for topical use, as well as injections for veterinary use.

Ivermectin has been shown to be effective against a wide range of parasitic infections, including onchocerciasis (river blindness), strongyloidiasis, scabies, and lice infestations. It is also being studied as a potential treatment for other conditions, such as COVID-19, although its effectiveness for this use has not been proven.

Ivermectin is generally considered safe when used as directed, but it can cause side effects in some people, including skin rashes, nausea, and diarrhea. It should be used with caution in pregnant women and people with certain medical conditions, such as liver or kidney disease.

Bovine mastitis is a common inflammatory condition that affects the mammary gland (udder) of dairy cows. It's primarily caused by bacterial infections, with Escherichia coli (E. coli), Streptococcus spp., and Staphylococcus aureus being some of the most common pathogens involved. The infection can lead to varying degrees of inflammation, which might result in decreased milk production, changes in milk composition, and, if left untreated, potentially severe systemic illness in the cow.

The clinical signs of bovine mastitis may include:
- Redness and heat in the affected quarter (or quarters) of the udder
- Swelling and pain upon palpation
- Decreased milk production or changes in milk appearance (such as flakes, clots, or watery consistency)
- Systemic signs like fever, loss of appetite, and depression in severe cases

Mastitis can be classified into two main types: clinical mastitis, which is characterized by visible signs of inflammation, and subclinical mastitis, where the infection might not present with obvious external symptoms but could still lead to decreased milk quality and production.

Prevention and control measures for bovine mastitis include good milking practices, maintaining a clean and dry environment for the cows, practicing proper udder hygiene, administering antibiotics or other treatments as necessary, and regularly monitoring milk for signs of infection through somatic cell count testing.

Parental consent refers to the legal right and obligation of parents or guardians to make decisions on behalf of a minor child, including providing authorization for medical treatment. The specific requirements for parental consent may vary depending on jurisdiction, but generally, it involves providing written permission for a medical procedure or treatment after being fully informed about the nature, risks, benefits, and alternatives of the proposed care.

In some cases, parental consent may be required for routine medical procedures, while in other situations, it may only be necessary for more invasive or higher-risk treatments. Healthcare providers must obtain appropriate parental consent before performing medical procedures on minors to ensure that they are acting within the bounds of the law and protecting the best interests of their patients.

It's important to note that in some circumstances, such as when a minor is mature enough to make their own healthcare decisions or if seeking treatment for certain sensitive issues (such as reproductive health), parental consent may not be required, and the minor may be able to provide informed consent themselves.

"Tick control" is not a medical term per se, but it is a common term used in public health and medicine to refer to the methods and practices aimed at reducing or preventing the population of ticks in a given area. This can include various strategies such as:

1. Landscape management: Modifying the environment to make it less tick-friendly, for example, by clearing leaf litter, brush, and tall grasses around homes and recreational areas.
2. Chemical control: Using pesticides to kill ticks in the environment or on animals. This can include treating vegetation, animal feed and bedding, or using tick repellents on human skin or clothing.
3. Biological control: Using natural predators or pathogens of ticks to reduce their populations.
4. Personal protection: Using protective clothing, insect repellent, and other measures to prevent tick bites when spending time outdoors.
5. Public education: Informing the public about the risks associated with ticks and how to protect themselves, as well as the importance of reporting tick bites and removing ticks promptly and properly.

Tick control is an important aspect of preventing tick-borne diseases, which can have serious health consequences for humans and animals.

I'm not sure I understand your question. "Denmark" is a country located in Northern Europe, and it is not a medical term or concept. It is the southernmost of the Nordic countries, and it consists of the Jutland peninsula and several islands in the Baltic Sea. The capital city of Denmark is Copenhagen.

If you are looking for information about a medical condition that may be associated with Denmark, could you please provide more context or clarify your question? I would be happy to help you with more specific information if I can.

Uterine perforation is a medical condition that refers to the piercing or puncturing of the uterine wall. This can occur during various medical procedures such as dilatation and curettage (D&C), insertion of an intrauterine device (IUD), or during childbirth. It can also be caused by trauma or infection. Uterine perforation can lead to serious complications, such as bleeding, infection, and damage to surrounding organs. If left untreated, it can be life-threatening. Symptoms of uterine perforation may include severe abdominal pain, heavy vaginal bleeding, fever, and signs of shock. Immediate medical attention is required for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Bacterial DNA refers to the genetic material found in bacteria. It is composed of a double-stranded helix containing four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) - that are linked together by phosphodiester bonds. The sequence of these bases in the DNA molecule carries the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of bacteria.

Bacterial DNA is circular in most bacterial species, although some have linear chromosomes. In addition to the main chromosome, many bacteria also contain small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids that can carry additional genes and provide resistance to antibiotics or other environmental stressors.

Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA enclosed within a nucleus, bacterial DNA is present in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it is in direct contact with the cell's metabolic machinery. This allows for rapid gene expression and regulation in response to changing environmental conditions.

Data collection in the medical context refers to the systematic gathering of information relevant to a specific research question or clinical situation. This process involves identifying and recording data elements, such as demographic characteristics, medical history, physical examination findings, laboratory results, and imaging studies, from various sources including patient interviews, medical records, and diagnostic tests. The data collected is used to support clinical decision-making, inform research hypotheses, and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or interventions. It is essential that data collection is performed in a standardized and unbiased manner to ensure the validity and reliability of the results.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Moral Obligations" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. The term "moral obligations" is more related to ethics and philosophy, referring to the duties or actions that are considered right or wrong based on a set of moral principles or values.

However, in a broader sense, healthcare professionals may use the term "moral obligations" to refer to their professional responsibility and commitment to providing compassionate, respectful, and high-quality care to all patients, regardless of their background, beliefs, or circumstances. This concept is closely related to medical ethics and professionalism, which provide guidelines for ethical decision-making in clinical practice.

Food contamination is the presence of harmful microorganisms, chemicals, or foreign substances in food or water that can cause illness or injury to individuals who consume it. This can occur at any stage during production, processing, storage, or preparation of food, and can result from various sources such as:

1. Biological contamination: This includes the presence of harmful bacteria, viruses, parasites, or fungi that can cause foodborne illnesses. Examples include Salmonella, E. coli, Listeria, and norovirus.

2. Chemical contamination: This involves the introduction of hazardous chemicals into food, which may occur due to poor handling practices, improper storage, or exposure to environmental pollutants. Common sources of chemical contamination include pesticides, cleaning solvents, heavy metals, and natural toxins produced by certain plants or fungi.

3. Physical contamination: This refers to the presence of foreign objects in food, such as glass, plastic, hair, or insects, which can pose a choking hazard or introduce harmful substances into the body.

Preventing food contamination is crucial for ensuring food safety and protecting public health. Proper hygiene practices, temperature control, separation of raw and cooked foods, and regular inspections are essential measures to minimize the risk of food contamination.

Ruminants are a category of hooved mammals that are known for their unique digestive system, which involves a process called rumination. This group includes animals such as cattle, deer, sheep, goats, and giraffes, among others. The digestive system of ruminants consists of a specialized stomach with multiple compartments (the rumen, reticulum, omasum, and abomasum).

Ruminants primarily consume plant-based diets, which are high in cellulose, a complex carbohydrate that is difficult for many animals to digest. In the rumen, microbes break down the cellulose into simpler compounds, producing volatile fatty acids (VFAs) that serve as a major energy source for ruminants. The animal then regurgitates the partially digested plant material (known as cud), chews it further to mix it with saliva and additional microbes, and swallows it again for further digestion in the rumen. This process of rumination allows ruminants to efficiently extract nutrients from their fibrous diets.

Magnesium compounds refer to substances that contain magnesium (an essential mineral) combined with other elements. These compounds are formed when magnesium atoms chemically bond with atoms of other elements. Magnesium is an alkaline earth metal and it readily forms stable compounds with various elements due to its electron configuration.

Examples of magnesium compounds include:

1. Magnesium oxide (MgO): Also known as magnesia, it is formed by combining magnesium with oxygen. It has a high melting point and is used in various applications such as refractory materials, chemical production, and agricultural purposes.
2. Magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2): Often called milk of magnesia, it is a common antacid and laxative. It is formed by combining magnesium with hydroxide ions.
3. Magnesium chloride (MgCl2): This compound is formed when magnesium reacts with chlorine gas. It has various uses, including as a de-icing agent, a component in fertilizers, and a mineral supplement.
4. Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4): Also known as Epsom salts, it is formed by combining magnesium with sulfur and oxygen. It is used as a bath salt, a laxative, and a fertilizer.
5. Magnesium carbonate (MgCO3): This compound is formed when magnesium reacts with carbon dioxide. It has various uses, including as a fire retardant, a food additive, and a dietary supplement.

These are just a few examples of the many different magnesium compounds that exist. Each compound has its unique properties and applications based on the elements it is combined with.

I believe there may be a slight confusion in your question. The profession of nursing is not differentiated by gender, and the term "male nurse" is not a medical definition used in the healthcare field. Instead, we use the term "nurse" to describe a qualified professional who provides care, support, and education to patients and their families. This includes tasks such as administering medications, monitoring patient conditions, collaborating with other healthcare providers, and promoting overall well-being.

However, if you are asking for a definition of a male individual working in the nursing profession, it would be: "A person assigned male at birth who has completed the necessary education and training to become a registered nurse (RN), licensed practical nurse (LPN), or advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) and provides direct patient care, support, and education within the healthcare system."

"Age factors" refer to the effects, changes, or differences that age can have on various aspects of health, disease, and medical care. These factors can encompass a wide range of issues, including:

1. Physiological changes: As people age, their bodies undergo numerous physical changes that can affect how they respond to medications, illnesses, and medical procedures. For example, older adults may be more sensitive to certain drugs or have weaker immune systems, making them more susceptible to infections.
2. Chronic conditions: Age is a significant risk factor for many chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and arthritis. As a result, age-related medical issues are common and can impact treatment decisions and outcomes.
3. Cognitive decline: Aging can also lead to cognitive changes, including memory loss and decreased decision-making abilities. These changes can affect a person's ability to understand and comply with medical instructions, leading to potential complications in their care.
4. Functional limitations: Older adults may experience physical limitations that impact their mobility, strength, and balance, increasing the risk of falls and other injuries. These limitations can also make it more challenging for them to perform daily activities, such as bathing, dressing, or cooking.
5. Social determinants: Age-related factors, such as social isolation, poverty, and lack of access to transportation, can impact a person's ability to obtain necessary medical care and affect their overall health outcomes.

Understanding age factors is critical for healthcare providers to deliver high-quality, patient-centered care that addresses the unique needs and challenges of older adults. By taking these factors into account, healthcare providers can develop personalized treatment plans that consider a person's age, physical condition, cognitive abilities, and social circumstances.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

A Laboratory Infection, also known as a laboratory-acquired infection (LAI), is an infection that occurs in individuals who are exposed to pathogens or other harmful microorganisms while working in a laboratory setting. These infections can occur through various routes of exposure, including inhalation, skin contact, or ingestion of contaminated materials.

Laboratory infections pose significant risks to laboratory workers, researchers, and even visitors who may come into contact with infectious agents during their work or visit. To minimize these risks, laboratories follow strict biosafety protocols, including the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), proper handling and disposal of contaminated materials, and adherence to established safety guidelines.

Examples of laboratory infections include tuberculosis, salmonella, hepatitis B and C, and various other bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic infections. Prompt diagnosis, treatment, and implementation of appropriate infection control measures are crucial to prevent the spread of these infections within the laboratory setting and beyond.

Intravaginal administration refers to the delivery of medications or other substances directly into the vagina. This route of administration can be used for local treatment of vaginal infections or inflammation, or to deliver systemic medication that is absorbed through the vaginal mucosa.

Medications can be administered intravaginally using a variety of dosage forms, including creams, gels, foams, suppositories, and films. The choice of dosage form depends on several factors, such as the drug's physicochemical properties, the desired duration of action, and patient preference.

Intravaginal administration offers several advantages over other routes of administration. It allows for direct delivery of medication to the site of action, which can result in higher local concentrations and fewer systemic side effects. Additionally, some medications may be more effective when administered intravaginally due to their ability to bypass first-pass metabolism in the liver.

However, there are also potential disadvantages to intravaginal administration. Some women may find it uncomfortable or inconvenient to use this route of administration, and there is a risk of leakage or expulsion of the medication. Additionally, certain medications may cause local irritation or allergic reactions when administered intravaginally.

Overall, intravaginal administration can be a useful route of administration for certain medications and conditions, but it is important to consider the potential benefits and risks when choosing this method.

Public health is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as "the art and science of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting human health through organized efforts of society." It focuses on improving the health and well-being of entire communities, populations, and societies, rather than individual patients. This is achieved through various strategies, including education, prevention, surveillance of diseases, and promotion of healthy behaviors and environments. Public health also addresses broader determinants of health, such as access to healthcare, housing, food, and income, which have a significant impact on the overall health of populations.

Brucellosis, bovine is a bacterial infection caused by Brucella abortus that primarily affects cattle. It can also spread to other animals and humans through direct contact with infected animals or ingestion of contaminated food or drink. In animals, it causes abortion, reduced milk production, and weight loss. In humans, it can cause fever, sweats, headaches, joint pain, and weakness. Human infections are rare in countries where milk is pasteurized and proper sanitation measures are in place. It is also known as undulant fever or Malta fever.

Reproductive health, as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO), is "a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being in all matters relating to the reproductive system and its functions and processes. It implies that people are able to have a satisfying and safe sex life, the capability to reproduce, and the freedom to decide if, when, and how often to do so. It also includes their right to access information and services that enable them to do this."

This definition emphasizes not only the biological aspects of reproduction but also the social and personal dimensions of sexuality and reproductive health. It recognizes that individuals have the right to make informed choices about their reproductive lives, and it highlights the importance of access to information and services in realizing these rights.

Tylosin is defined as a macrolide antibiotic produced by the bacterium Streptomyces fradiae. It is primarily used in veterinary medicine to treat various bacterial infections in animals, such as respiratory and digestive tract infections caused by susceptible organisms.

Tylosin works by binding to the 50S subunit of the bacterial ribosome, inhibiting protein synthesis and thereby preventing bacterial growth. It has a broad spectrum of activity against gram-positive bacteria, including some strains that are resistant to other antibiotics. However, tylosin is not commonly used in human medicine due to its potential for causing hearing damage and other side effects.

In addition to its use as an antibiotic, tylosin has also been used as a growth promoter in animal feed to improve feed efficiency and weight gain. However, this practice has been banned in some countries due to concerns about the development of antibiotic resistance and the potential risks to human health.

A dissertation is a long formal piece of writing that is based on original research, usually presenting the author's findings and conclusions. In academic terms, a dissertation is a document submitted in support of candidature for an academic degree or professional qualification, typically representing completion of a research project undertaken over a number of years.

Dissertations in the field of medicine are often required as part of a medical degree program, such as an MD or PhD. These dissertations typically involve conducting original research in a specific area of medicine, analyzing data, and presenting findings in a clear and concise manner. The dissertation process includes identifying a research question or hypothesis, designing and implementing a study to test the question or hypothesis, analyzing the resulting data, and writing up the findings in a clear and coherent way.

The format of medical dissertations typically includes an abstract, introduction, methods section, results section, discussion section, and conclusion. The dissertation may also include appendices, figures, tables, and references. The length of a medical dissertation can vary widely depending on the field of study and the requirements of the academic institution, but they are often several hundred pages long.

The defense of a dissertation is a formal presentation and examination of the research that the student has conducted, in front of a panel of experts in the field. The defense typically includes a brief presentation of the research findings, followed by questions from the examiners. Successful completion of the dissertation and defense is usually required to earn a medical degree.

A "tick infestation" is not a formal medical term, but it generally refers to a situation where an individual has a large number of ticks (Ixodida: Acarina) on their body or in their living environment. Ticks are external parasites that feed on the blood of mammals, birds, and reptiles.

An infestation can occur in various settings, including homes, gardens, parks, and forests. People who spend time in these areas, especially those with pets or who engage in outdoor activities like camping, hiking, or hunting, are at a higher risk of tick encounters.

Tick infestations can lead to several health concerns, as ticks can transmit various diseases, such as Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis, and babesiosis, among others. It is essential to take preventive measures to avoid tick bites and promptly remove any attached ticks to reduce the risk of infection.

If you suspect a tick infestation in your living environment or on your body, consult a healthcare professional or a pest control expert for proper assessment and guidance on how to proceed.

"Health Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices" (HKAP) is a term used in public health to refer to the knowledge, beliefs, assumptions, and behaviors that individuals possess or engage in that are related to health. Here's a brief definition of each component:

1. Health Knowledge: Refers to the factual information and understanding that individuals have about various health-related topics, such as anatomy, physiology, disease processes, and healthy behaviors.
2. Attitudes: Represent the positive or negative evaluations, feelings, or dispositions that people hold towards certain health issues, practices, or services. These attitudes can influence their willingness to adopt and maintain healthy behaviors.
3. Practices: Encompass the specific actions or habits that individuals engage in related to their health, such as dietary choices, exercise routines, hygiene practices, and use of healthcare services.

HKAP is a multidimensional concept that helps public health professionals understand and address various factors influencing individual and community health outcomes. By assessing and addressing knowledge gaps, negative attitudes, or unhealthy practices, interventions can be designed to promote positive behavior change and improve overall health status.

A non-medical internship is not specifically related to the field of medicine. It generally refers to an organized period of work experience, often temporary, in which a person typically a student or trainee, gains practical knowledge and skills in a particular industry or profession. The intern is supervised and mentored by experienced professionals in the field. Non-medical internships can be found in various sectors such as business, engineering, law, education, media, technology, and many others. They provide an opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge gained in the classroom to real-world situations and help interns develop professional competencies and networks.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Italy" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country located in Southern Europe. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

A fatal outcome is a term used in medical context to describe a situation where a disease, injury, or illness results in the death of an individual. It is the most severe and unfortunate possible outcome of any medical condition, and is often used as a measure of the severity and prognosis of various diseases and injuries. In clinical trials and research, fatal outcome may be used as an endpoint to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of different treatments or interventions.

Canine hip dysplasia (CHD) is a common skeletal disorder in dogs, particularly in large and giant breeds, characterized by the abnormal development and degeneration of the coxofemoral joint - the joint where the head of the femur (thigh bone) meets the acetabulum (hip socket) of the pelvis. This condition is often caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors that lead to laxity (looseness) of the joint, which can result in osteoarthritis (OA), pain, and decreased mobility over time.

In a healthy hip joint, the femoral head fits snugly into the acetabulum, allowing smooth and stable movement. However, in dogs with CHD, the following abnormalities may occur:

1. Shallow acetabulum: The hip socket may not be deep enough to provide adequate coverage of the femoral head, leading to joint instability.
2. Flared acetabulum: The rim of the acetabulum may become stretched and flared due to excessive forces exerted on it by the lax joint.
3. Misshapen or malformed femoral head: The femoral head may not have a normal round shape, further contributing to joint instability.
4. Laxity of the joint: The ligament that holds the femoral head in place within the acetabulum (ligamentum teres) can become stretched, allowing for excessive movement and abnormal wear of the joint surfaces.

These changes can lead to the development of osteoarthritis, which is characterized by the breakdown and loss of cartilage within the joint, as well as the formation of bone spurs (osteophytes) and thickening of the joint capsule. This results in pain, stiffness, and decreased range of motion, making it difficult for affected dogs to perform everyday activities such as walking, running, or climbing stairs.

Canine hip dysplasia is typically diagnosed through a combination of physical examination, medical history, and imaging techniques such as radiographs (X-rays). Treatment options may include conservative management, such as weight management, exercise modification, joint supplements, and pain medication, or surgical intervention, such as total hip replacement. The choice of treatment depends on the severity of the disease, the age and overall health of the dog, and the owner's financial resources.

Preventing canine hip dysplasia is best achieved through selective breeding practices that aim to eliminate affected animals from breeding populations. Additionally, maintaining a healthy weight, providing appropriate exercise, and ensuring proper nutrition throughout a dog's life can help reduce the risk of developing this debilitating condition.

Fetal resorption, also known as fetal demise or intrauterine fetal death, is a medical term that refers to the absorption of a nonviable fetus by the mother's body after its death in utero. This process typically occurs before the 20th week of gestation and may go unnoticed if it happens early in pregnancy.

During fetal resorption, the fetal tissue is broken down and absorbed by the mother's body, leaving no visible remains of the fetus. The placenta and other surrounding tissues may still be present, but they often undergo changes as well. In some cases, a small amount of fetal tissue may be expelled from the uterus during the resorption process.

The causes of fetal resorption can vary, including chromosomal abnormalities, maternal health conditions, infections, and environmental factors. It is essential to seek medical attention if a woman suspects fetal resorption or experiences any unusual symptoms during pregnancy, such as vaginal bleeding or decreased fetal movement, to ensure proper diagnosis and management.

Ethics is a branch of philosophy that involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong conduct. In the medical field, ethics refers to the principles that guide doctors, nurses, and other healthcare professionals in making decisions about patient care. These principles often include respect for autonomy (the right of patients to make their own decisions), non-maleficence (doing no harm), beneficence (acting in the best interests of the patient), and justice (fairness in the distribution of resources). Medical ethics may also involve considerations of confidentiality, informed consent, and end-of-life decision making.

Colonialism, in a medical context, can refer to the process by which colonial powers imposed their own medical practices and systems upon the colonized peoples. This could include the introduction of new diseases (through forced contact or migration), the spread of infectious diseases due to poor living conditions and lack of access to healthcare, and the imposition of Western medical theories and treatments on non-Western cultures. Colonialism also had a profound impact on the social determinants of health, such as poverty, education, and housing, which further exacerbated health disparities between colonizers and the colonized. Additionally, colonial powers often used medicine as a tool of control and domination, for example by forcing indigenous peoples to undergo medical procedures or experiments without their consent.

A Salmonella infection in animals refers to the presence and multiplication of Salmonella enterica bacteria in non-human animals, causing an infectious disease known as salmonellosis. Animals can become infected through direct contact with other infected animals or their feces, consuming contaminated food or water, or vertical transmission (from mother to offspring). Clinical signs vary among species but may include diarrhea, fever, vomiting, weight loss, and sepsis. In some cases, animals can be asymptomatic carriers, shedding the bacteria in their feces and acting as a source of infection for other animals and humans. Regular monitoring, biosecurity measures, and appropriate sanitation practices are crucial to prevent and control Salmonella infections in animals.

Reproductive health services refer to the provision of health care services that aim to enhance reproductive health and well-being. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), reproductive health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being in all matters relating to the reproductive system and its functions and processes.

Reproductive health services may include:

1. Family planning: This includes counseling, education, and provision of contraceptives to prevent unintended pregnancies and promote planned pregnancies.
2. Maternal and newborn health: This includes antenatal care, delivery services, postnatal care, and newborn care to ensure safe pregnancy and childbirth.
3. Sexual health: This includes counseling, testing, and treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV/AIDS, and education on sexual health and responsible sexual behavior.
4. Infertility services: This includes diagnosis and treatment of infertility, including assisted reproductive technologies such as in vitro fertilization (IVF).
5. Abortion services: This includes safe abortion services, post-abortion care, and counseling to prevent unsafe abortions and reduce maternal mortality and morbidity.
6. Menstrual health: This includes providing access to menstrual hygiene products, education on menstrual health, and treatment of menstrual disorders.
7. Adolescent reproductive health: This includes providing age-appropriate sexual and reproductive health education, counseling, and services to adolescents.

Reproductive health services aim to promote sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), which include the right to access information, education, and services; the right to make informed choices about one's own body and reproduction; and the right to be free from discrimination, coercion, and violence in relation to one's sexuality and reproduction.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "France" is not a medical term or concept. France is the largest country in Western Europe and the third-largest in Europe after Russia and Ukraine. It has been a major player in world affairs for centuries, with a significant cultural and artistic influence. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help answer those for you.

Microbial sensitivity tests, also known as antibiotic susceptibility tests (ASTs) or bacterial susceptibility tests, are laboratory procedures used to determine the effectiveness of various antimicrobial agents against specific microorganisms isolated from a patient's infection. These tests help healthcare providers identify which antibiotics will be most effective in treating an infection and which ones should be avoided due to resistance. The results of these tests can guide appropriate antibiotic therapy, minimize the potential for antibiotic resistance, improve clinical outcomes, and reduce unnecessary side effects or toxicity from ineffective antimicrobials.

There are several methods for performing microbial sensitivity tests, including:

1. Disk diffusion method (Kirby-Bauer test): A standardized paper disk containing a predetermined amount of an antibiotic is placed on an agar plate that has been inoculated with the isolated microorganism. After incubation, the zone of inhibition around the disk is measured to determine the susceptibility or resistance of the organism to that particular antibiotic.
2. Broth dilution method: A series of tubes or wells containing decreasing concentrations of an antimicrobial agent are inoculated with a standardized microbial suspension. After incubation, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) is determined by observing the lowest concentration of the antibiotic that prevents visible growth of the organism.
3. Automated systems: These use sophisticated technology to perform both disk diffusion and broth dilution methods automatically, providing rapid and accurate results for a wide range of microorganisms and antimicrobial agents.

The interpretation of microbial sensitivity test results should be done cautiously, considering factors such as the site of infection, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the antibiotic, potential toxicity, and local resistance patterns. Regular monitoring of susceptibility patterns and ongoing antimicrobial stewardship programs are essential to ensure optimal use of these tests and to minimize the development of antibiotic resistance.

A hydatidiform mole, also known as a molar pregnancy, is a type of gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD), which is a group of rare disorders that involve abnormal growth of the placental tissue.

In a hydatidiform mole, there is an abnormal fertilization event leading to the growth of a mass of grapelike cysts in the uterus instead of a normal pregnancy. The chromosomes from the sperm and egg do not combine properly, resulting in an extra set of chromosomes, which leads to the development of the mole.

Hydatidiform moles can be complete or partial:

* Complete hydatidiform mole (CHM): This type arises when an egg without a nucleus is fertilized by one or two sperm, leading to the growth of abnormal placental tissue with no embryo. The chromosomes come from the father only, and there are typically 46 chromosomes, all of paternal origin.
* Partial hydatidiform mole (PHM): This type occurs when an egg is fertilized by two sperm or a single sperm that duplicates itself, resulting in an abnormal placenta with some fetal tissue. The chromosomes are of both maternal and paternal origin, and the placental tissue has a mix of normal and abnormal cells.

Hydatidiform moles can cause vaginal bleeding, rapid uterine enlargement, and high levels of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) hormone in the blood. They are usually detected during an ultrasound exam and require medical treatment to prevent complications such as gestational trophoblastic neoplasia, a malignant form of GTD that can spread to other organs.

I'm not aware of any recognized medical definition for the term "Iowa." Iowa is actually a state located in the Midwestern United States. It is known for its agricultural production, particularly corn and soybeans, and it is home to various cities such as Des Moines, Cedar Rapids, and Davenport. If you have any medical or health-related question, I would be happy to help with that instead.

Logistic models, specifically logistic regression models, are a type of statistical analysis used in medical and epidemiological research to identify the relationship between the risk of a certain health outcome or disease (dependent variable) and one or more independent variables, such as demographic factors, exposure variables, or other clinical measurements.

In contrast to linear regression models, logistic regression models are used when the dependent variable is binary or dichotomous in nature, meaning it can only take on two values, such as "disease present" or "disease absent." The model uses a logistic function to estimate the probability of the outcome based on the independent variables.

Logistic regression models are useful for identifying risk factors and estimating the strength of associations between exposures and health outcomes, adjusting for potential confounders, and predicting the probability of an outcome given certain values of the independent variables. They can also be used to develop clinical prediction rules or scores that can aid in decision-making and patient care.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Social Media" is a term related to communication technologies, particularly websites and applications that enable users to create and share content or to participate in social networking. It is not a medical concept or term, and therefore, it does not have a medical definition. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I'd be happy to help with those!

"Drug-induced abnormalities" refer to physical or physiological changes that occur as a result of taking medication or drugs. These abnormalities can affect various organs and systems in the body and can range from minor symptoms, such as nausea or dizziness, to more serious conditions, such as liver damage or heart rhythm disturbances.

Drug-induced abnormalities can occur for several reasons, including:

1. Direct toxicity: Some drugs can directly damage cells and tissues in the body, leading to abnormalities.
2. Altered metabolism: Drugs can interfere with normal metabolic processes in the body, leading to the accumulation of harmful substances or the depletion of essential nutrients.
3. Hormonal imbalances: Some drugs can affect hormone levels in the body, leading to abnormalities.
4. Allergic reactions: Some people may have allergic reactions to certain drugs, which can cause a range of symptoms, including rashes, swelling, and difficulty breathing.
5. Interactions with other drugs: Taking multiple medications or drugs at the same time can increase the risk of drug-induced abnormalities.

It is important for healthcare providers to monitor patients closely for signs of drug-induced abnormalities and to adjust medication dosages or switch to alternative treatments as necessary. Patients should also inform their healthcare providers of any symptoms they experience while taking medication, as these may be related to drug-induced abnormalities.

Occupational diseases are health conditions or illnesses that occur as a result of exposure to hazards in the workplace. These hazards can include physical, chemical, and biological agents, as well as ergonomic factors and work-related psychosocial stressors. Examples of occupational diseases include respiratory illnesses caused by inhaling dust or fumes, hearing loss due to excessive noise exposure, and musculoskeletal disorders caused by repetitive movements or poor ergonomics. The development of an occupational disease is typically related to the nature of the work being performed and the conditions in which it is carried out. It's important to note that these diseases can be prevented or minimized through proper risk assessment, implementation of control measures, and adherence to safety regulations.

Protozoan infections are diseases caused by microscopic, single-celled organisms known as protozoa. These parasites can enter the human body through contaminated food, water, or contact with an infected person or animal. Once inside the body, they can multiply and cause a range of symptoms depending on the type of protozoan and where it infects in the body. Some common protozoan infections include malaria, giardiasis, amoebiasis, and toxoplasmosis. Symptoms can vary widely but may include diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, fatigue, and skin rashes. Treatment typically involves the use of antiprotozoal medications to kill the parasites and alleviate symptoms.

Species specificity is a term used in the field of biology, including medicine, to refer to the characteristic of a biological entity (such as a virus, bacterium, or other microorganism) that allows it to interact exclusively or preferentially with a particular species. This means that the biological entity has a strong affinity for, or is only able to infect, a specific host species.

For example, HIV is specifically adapted to infect human cells and does not typically infect other animal species. Similarly, some bacterial toxins are species-specific and can only affect certain types of animals or humans. This concept is important in understanding the transmission dynamics and host range of various pathogens, as well as in developing targeted therapies and vaccines.

"Toxoplasma" is a genus of protozoan parasites, and the most well-known species is "Toxoplasma gondii." This particular species is capable of infecting virtually all warm-blooded animals, including humans. It's known for its complex life cycle that involves felines (cats) as the definitive host.

Infection in humans, called toxoplasmosis, often occurs through ingestion of contaminated food or water, or through contact with cat feces that contain T. gondii oocysts. While many people infected with Toxoplasma show no symptoms, it can cause serious health problems in immunocompromised individuals and developing fetuses if a woman becomes infected during pregnancy.

It's important to note that while I strive to provide accurate information, this definition should not be used for self-diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a healthcare professional for medical advice.

Anthelmintics are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by parasitic worms, also known as helminths. These medications work by either stunting the growth of the worms, paralyzing them, or killing them outright, allowing the body to expel the worms through normal bodily functions. Anthelmintics are commonly used to treat infections caused by roundworms, tapeworms, flukeworms, and hookworms. Examples of anthelmintic drugs include albendazole, mebendazole, praziquantel, and ivermectin.

Female infertility is a condition characterized by the inability to conceive after 12 months or more of regular, unprotected sexual intercourse or the inability to carry a pregnancy to a live birth. The causes of female infertility can be multifactorial and may include issues with ovulation, damage to the fallopian tubes or uterus, endometriosis, hormonal imbalances, age-related factors, and other medical conditions.

Some common causes of female infertility include:

1. Ovulation disorders: Conditions such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), thyroid disorders, premature ovarian failure, and hyperprolactinemia can affect ovulation and lead to infertility.
2. Damage to the fallopian tubes: Pelvic inflammatory disease, endometriosis, or previous surgeries can cause scarring and blockages in the fallopian tubes, preventing the egg and sperm from meeting.
3. Uterine abnormalities: Structural issues with the uterus, such as fibroids, polyps, or congenital defects, can interfere with implantation and pregnancy.
4. Age-related factors: As women age, their fertility declines due to a decrease in the number and quality of eggs.
5. Other medical conditions: Certain medical conditions, such as diabetes, celiac disease, and autoimmune disorders, can contribute to infertility.

In some cases, female infertility can be treated with medications, surgery, or assisted reproductive technologies (ART) like in vitro fertilization (IVF). A thorough evaluation by a healthcare professional is necessary to determine the underlying cause and develop an appropriate treatment plan.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Health services accessibility refers to the degree to which individuals and populations are able to obtain needed health services in a timely manner. It includes factors such as physical access (e.g., distance, transportation), affordability (e.g., cost of services, insurance coverage), availability (e.g., supply of providers, hours of operation), and acceptability (e.g., cultural competence, language concordance).

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), accessibility is one of the key components of health system performance, along with responsiveness and fair financing. Improving accessibility to health services is essential for achieving universal health coverage and ensuring that everyone has access to quality healthcare without facing financial hardship. Factors that affect health services accessibility can vary widely between and within countries, and addressing these disparities requires a multifaceted approach that includes policy interventions, infrastructure development, and community engagement.

Reproduction, in the context of biology and medicine, refers to the process by which organisms produce offspring. It is a complex process that involves the creation, development, and growth of new individuals from parent organisms. In sexual reproduction, this process typically involves the combination of genetic material from two parents through the fusion of gametes (sex cells) such as sperm and egg cells. This results in the formation of a zygote, which then develops into a new individual with a unique genetic makeup.

In contrast, asexual reproduction does not involve the fusion of gametes and can occur through various mechanisms such as budding, fragmentation, or parthenogenesis. Asexual reproduction results in offspring that are genetically identical to the parent organism.

Reproduction is a fundamental process that ensures the survival and continuation of species over time. It is also an area of active research in fields such as reproductive medicine, where scientists and clinicians work to understand and address issues related to human fertility, contraception, and genetic disorders.

Seroepidemiologic studies are a type of epidemiological study that measures the presence and levels of antibodies in a population's blood serum to investigate the prevalence, distribution, and transmission of infectious diseases. These studies help to identify patterns of infection and immunity within a population, which can inform public health policies and interventions.

Seroepidemiologic studies typically involve collecting blood samples from a representative sample of individuals in a population and testing them for the presence of antibodies against specific pathogens. The results are then analyzed to estimate the prevalence of infection and immunity within the population, as well as any factors associated with increased or decreased risk of infection.

These studies can provide valuable insights into the spread of infectious diseases, including emerging and re-emerging infections, and help to monitor the effectiveness of vaccination programs. Additionally, seroepidemiologic studies can also be used to investigate the transmission dynamics of infectious agents, such as identifying sources of infection or tracking the spread of antibiotic resistance.

Animal Care Committees (ACCs), also known as Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees (IACUCs) in the United States, are committees required by regulations to oversee the humane treatment and use of animals in research and teaching at institutions such as universities, hospitals, and pharmaceutical companies.

The main responsibilities of ACCs include reviewing and approving animal use protocols, inspecting animal facilities and laboratories, ensuring compliance with relevant policies and regulations, and providing training and education to researchers and staff on the ethical treatment of animals. The members of ACCs typically include veterinarians, scientists, non-scientists, and community members who can provide a balanced perspective on the use of animals in research and teaching.

Fertility is the natural ability to conceive or to cause conception of offspring. In humans, it is the capacity of a woman and a man to reproduce through sexual reproduction. For women, fertility usually takes place during their reproductive years, which is from adolescence until menopause. A woman's fertility depends on various factors including her age, overall health, and the health of her reproductive system.

For men, fertility can be affected by a variety of factors such as age, genetics, general health, sexual function, and environmental factors that may affect sperm production or quality. Factors that can negatively impact male fertility include exposure to certain chemicals, radiation, smoking, alcohol consumption, drug use, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

Infertility is a common medical condition affecting about 10-15% of couples trying to conceive. Infertility can be primary or secondary. Primary infertility refers to the inability to conceive after one year of unprotected sexual intercourse, while secondary infertility refers to the inability to conceive following a previous pregnancy.

Infertility can be treated with various medical and surgical interventions depending on the underlying cause. These may include medications to stimulate ovulation, intrauterine insemination (IUI), in vitro fertilization (IVF), or surgery to correct anatomical abnormalities.

Toxoplasmosis is a zoonotic disease, meaning it can be transmitted from animals to humans. It is caused by the intracellular protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. This parasite can infect a wide range of warm-blooded animals, including birds and mammals, as intermediate hosts. However, cats are the primary definitive host for this parasite because the sexual stage of the parasite's life cycle occurs in their intestines, leading to the shedding of oocysts (environmentally resistant stages) in their feces.

Animals can become infected with Toxoplasma gondii through several routes:

1. Ingestion of sporulated oocysts from contaminated soil, water, or food.
2. Consumption of tissue cysts present in the tissues of infected animals during predation.
3. Vertical transmission (transplacental) from an infected mother to her offspring.

Clinical signs and symptoms of toxoplasmosis in animals can vary depending on their age, immune status, and the parasite's virulence. In many cases, animals may not show any apparent signs of infection, but some may develop:

1. Generalized illness with fever, lethargy, and loss of appetite.
2. Lymphadenopathy (swollen lymph nodes).
3. Neurological symptoms such as tremors, ataxia (lack of coordination), or seizures if the central nervous system is affected.
4. Eye lesions, including inflammation and scarring of the retina, which can lead to vision loss in severe cases.
5. Reproductive issues, such as abortion, stillbirths, or birth defects in offspring when pregnant females are infected.

It is important to note that while toxoplasmosis can cause significant health problems in animals, particularly in immunocompromised individuals and developing fetuses, it is often asymptomatic or mild in healthy adult animals. Nonetheless, the zoonotic potential of Toxoplasma gondii highlights the importance of practicing good hygiene and taking necessary precautions when handling infected animals or their waste to minimize the risk of transmission to humans.

Medically, "milk" is not defined. However, it is important to note that human babies are fed with breast milk, which is the secretion from the mammary glands of humans. It is rich in nutrients like proteins, fats, carbohydrates (lactose), vitamins and minerals that are essential for growth and development.

Other mammals also produce milk to feed their young. These include cows, goats, and sheep, among others. Their milk is often consumed by humans as a source of nutrition, especially in dairy products. However, the composition of these milks can vary significantly from human breast milk.

Poultry diseases refer to a wide range of infectious and non-infectious disorders that affect domesticated birds, particularly those raised for meat, egg, or feather production. These diseases can be caused by various factors including viruses, bacteria, fungi, parasites, genetic predisposition, environmental conditions, and management practices.

Infectious poultry diseases are often highly contagious and can lead to significant economic losses in the poultry industry due to decreased production, increased mortality, and reduced quality of products. Some examples of infectious poultry diseases include avian influenza, Newcastle disease, salmonellosis, colibacillosis, mycoplasmosis, aspergillosis, and coccidiosis.

Non-infectious poultry diseases can be caused by factors such as poor nutrition, environmental stressors, and management issues. Examples of non-infectious poultry diseases include ascites, fatty liver syndrome, sudden death syndrome, and various nutritional deficiencies.

Prevention and control of poultry diseases typically involve a combination of biosecurity measures, vaccination programs, proper nutrition, good management practices, and monitoring for early detection and intervention. Rapid and accurate diagnosis of poultry diseases is crucial to implementing effective treatment and prevention strategies, and can help minimize the impact of disease outbreaks on both individual flocks and the broader poultry industry.

Feces are the solid or semisolid remains of food that could not be digested or absorbed in the small intestine, along with bacteria and other waste products. After being stored in the colon, feces are eliminated from the body through the rectum and anus during defecation. Feces can vary in color, consistency, and odor depending on a person's diet, health status, and other factors.

The carpal joints are a group of articulations in the wrist region of the human body. They consist of eight bones, which are arranged in two rows. The proximal row includes the scaphoid, lunate, triquetral, and pisiform bones, while the distal row includes the trapezium, trapezoid, capitate, and hamate bones.

The carpal joints can be further divided into several smaller joints, including:
1. The midcarpal joint: This joint is located between the proximal and distal rows of carpal bones and allows for flexion, extension, and circumduction movements of the wrist.
2. The radiocarpal joint: This joint is located between the distal end of the radius bone and the scaphoid and lunate bones in the proximal row. It allows for flexion, extension, radial deviation, and ulnar deviation movements of the wrist.
3. The intercarpal joints: These are the joints located between the individual carpal bones within each row. They allow for small gliding movements between the bones.

The carpal joints are surrounded by a fibrous capsule, ligaments, and muscles that provide stability and support to the wrist. The smooth articular cartilage covering the surfaces of the bones allows for smooth movement and reduces friction during articulation.

I am not a medical professional, but I can tell you that "book collecting" is not a medical term or condition. It is a hobby or interest in which an individual collects books, often due to their value, historical significance, rarity, or personal interest in the subject matter. Some people may also collect books as an investment. If you have any specific questions about book collecting or its potential impact on health, such as the effects of heavy books on physical health, I would be happy to try and help answer those!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Humanism" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a philosophical and ethical stance that emphasizes the value and agency of human beings, their capacities and responsibilities, and concerns for their survival, dignity, and well-being.

However, in a broader context, Humanism in healthcare often refers to a approach that focuses on treating patients with respect, dignity, and compassion, recognizing their individual needs and preferences, and promoting patient autonomy and informed decision-making. This approach is consistent with the principles of patient-centered care and shared decision-making, which are widely recognized as important components of high-quality healthcare.

Aftercare, in a medical context, refers to the ongoing care and support provided to a patient following a medical treatment, procedure, or hospitalization. The goal of aftercare is to promote recovery, prevent complications, manage symptoms, and ensure the overall well-being of the patient. Aftercare may include follow-up appointments with healthcare providers, medication management, physical therapy, wound care, lifestyle modifications, and psychological support. It is an essential part of the treatment process that helps patients transition back to their normal lives and maintain their health and wellness in the long term.

A disease reservoir refers to a population or group of living organisms, including humans, animals, and even plants, that can naturally carry and transmit a particular pathogen (disease-causing agent) without necessarily showing symptoms of the disease themselves. These hosts serve as a source of infection for other susceptible individuals, allowing the pathogen to persist and circulate within a community or environment.

Disease reservoirs can be further classified into:

1. **Primary (or Main) Reservoir**: This refers to the species that primarily harbors and transmits the pathogen, contributing significantly to its natural ecology and maintaining its transmission cycle. For example, mosquitoes are the primary reservoirs for many arboviruses like dengue, Zika, and chikungunya viruses.

2. **Amplifying Hosts**: These hosts can become infected with the pathogen and experience a high rate of replication, leading to an increased concentration of the pathogen in their bodies. This allows for efficient transmission to other susceptible hosts or vectors. For instance, birds are amplifying hosts for West Nile virus, as they can become viremic (have high levels of virus in their blood) and infect feeding mosquitoes that then transmit the virus to other animals and humans.

3. **Dead-end Hosts**: These hosts may become infected with the pathogen but do not contribute significantly to its transmission cycle, as they either do not develop sufficient quantities of the pathogen to transmit it or do not come into contact with potential vectors or susceptible hosts. For example, humans are dead-end hosts for many zoonotic diseases like rabies, as they cannot transmit the virus to other humans.

Understanding disease reservoirs is crucial in developing effective strategies for controlling and preventing infectious diseases, as it helps identify key species and environments that contribute to their persistence and transmission.

"Agricultural Workers' Diseases" is a term used to describe a variety of health conditions and illnesses that are associated with agricultural work. These can include both acute and chronic conditions, and can be caused by a range of factors including exposure to chemicals, dusts, allergens, physical injuries, and biological agents such as bacteria and viruses.

Some common examples of Agricultural Workers' Diseases include:

1. Pesticide poisoning: This can occur when agricultural workers are exposed to high levels of pesticides or other chemicals used in farming. Symptoms can range from mild skin irritation to severe neurological damage, depending on the type and amount of chemical exposure.
2. Respiratory diseases: Agricultural workers can be exposed to a variety of dusts and allergens that can cause respiratory problems such as asthma, bronchitis, and farmer's lung. These conditions are often caused by prolonged exposure to moldy hay, grain dust, or other organic materials.
3. Musculoskeletal injuries: Agricultural workers are at risk of developing musculoskeletal injuries due to the physical demands of their job. This can include back pain, repetitive strain injuries, and sprains and strains from lifting heavy objects.
4. Zoonotic diseases: Agricultural workers who come into contact with animals are at risk of contracting zoonotic diseases, which are illnesses that can be transmitted between animals and humans. Examples include Q fever, brucellosis, and leptospirosis.
5. Heat-related illnesses: Agricultural workers who work outside in hot weather are at risk of heat-related illnesses such as heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

Prevention of Agricultural Workers' Diseases involves a combination of engineering controls, personal protective equipment, and training to help workers understand the risks associated with their job and how to minimize exposure to hazards.

Communicable disease control is a branch of public health that focuses on preventing and controlling the spread of infectious diseases within a population. The goal is to reduce the incidence and prevalence of communicable diseases through various strategies, such as:

1. Surveillance: Monitoring and tracking the occurrence of communicable diseases in a population to identify trends, outbreaks, and high-risk areas.
2. Prevention: Implementing measures to prevent the transmission of infectious agents, such as vaccination programs, education campaigns, and environmental interventions (e.g., water treatment, food safety).
3. Case management: Identifying, diagnosing, and treating cases of communicable diseases to reduce their duration and severity, as well as to prevent further spread.
4. Contact tracing: Identifying and monitoring individuals who have been in close contact with infected persons to detect and prevent secondary cases.
5. Outbreak response: Coordinating a rapid and effective response to disease outbreaks, including the implementation of control measures, communication with affected communities, and evaluation of interventions.
6. Collaboration: Working closely with healthcare providers, laboratories, policymakers, and other stakeholders to ensure a coordinated and comprehensive approach to communicable disease control.
7. Research: Conducting research to better understand the epidemiology, transmission dynamics, and prevention strategies for communicable diseases.

Effective communicable disease control requires a multidisciplinary approach that combines expertise in medicine, epidemiology, microbiology, public health, social sciences, and healthcare management.

Ethnopharmacology is a branch of pharmacology that focuses on the study of traditional medicines and their active components, as well as the cultural, historical, and social practices surrounding their use. It involves the interdisciplinary investigation of indigenous knowledge, beliefs, and customs related to medicinal plants and other natural remedies.

The main objectives of ethnopharmacology include:

1. Identifying and documenting traditional medicines and healing practices used by various cultures around the world.
2. Investigating the pharmacological properties and mechanisms of action of these traditional remedies, often through laboratory experiments and clinical trials.
3. Evaluating the safety, efficacy, and quality of traditional medicines to establish their potential therapeutic value in modern healthcare settings.
4. Promoting the sustainable use of natural resources and preserving indigenous knowledge and cultural heritage related to traditional medicine.
5. Fostering collaboration between scientists, healthcare professionals, and local communities to develop new drugs, therapies, and treatment approaches based on traditional medicines.

Examples of ethnopharmacological research include studying the active ingredients in Ayurvedic herbs, evaluating the effectiveness of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) formulations, and investigating the potential benefits of psychoactive plants used in shamanic rituals.

"Evidence for Parachlamydia in bovine abortion". Veterinary Microbiology. 135 (1-2): 169-174. doi:10.1016/j.vetmic.2008.09.049. ... Parachlamydia and Chlamydiaceae in bovine abortion" (PDF). Veterinary Microbiology. 152 (3-4): 385-393. doi:10.1016/j.vetmic. ... Researchers in Switzerland randomly selected 235 late term abortions in cattle during the breeding season of 2003 and 2004 and ...
"Campylobacter fetus fetus abortions in vaccinated ewes". New Zealand Veterinary Journal. 48 (5): 155-157. doi:10.1080/ ... where few sporadic abortions are followed by large numbers of abortions in the herd. In naïve herds, the incidence of abortions ... Late-term abortion is the main outcome of a Cff infection. Abortion outbreaks can be seen with Cff in a susceptible ewe herd, ... Late term abortions have been reported for Cfv infections in cows, but are much less likely than early embryonic loss. Cows ...
"Abortion in Cattle". Merck Veterinary Manual. A number of toxins can cause abortion in cows. Raising Healthy Rabbits, Dr. W. ... Toxic abortion is a medical phenomenon of spontaneous abortion, miscarriage, or stillbirth caused by toxins in the environment ... "toxic abortion, gastro-enteritis and abortion with dystrophic and haemorrhagic lesions of the foetus." Cadmium has been ... "a considerable number of cases of toxic abortion" being caused by untreated dental caries. Study of pollution-caused abortion ...
... abortion; xenotransplantation; embryology, surrogacy and genetics; medicines, including veterinary medicines; health and safety ...
Abortion seems to be a notable complication of PHF, as was showcased in a study that infected pregnant mares with N. risticii ... Rikihisa Y (October 2006). "New findings on members of the family Anaplasmataceae of veterinary importance". Annals of the New ... If a pregnant mare is infected with N. risticii and has symptoms of PHF, there is a chance that it may cause abortion and ... PHF is not a well documented cause for equine abortion, and is often not chosen as a differential diagnosis. However, it could ...
1991). Foothill abortion (epizootic bovine abortion). Veterinary Medicine Extension, University of California, Davis, CA. ... It is the primary vector of the bacterium that causes Epizootic Bovine Abortion, a severe and commercially-important disease ... 2002). Diagnosis of epizootic bovine abortion in Nevada and identification of the vector. J. Vet. Diagn. Invest. 14, 205-210. ... 2016). Cattle Management Strategies To Minimize Foothill Abortion. University of California, Agriculture and Natural Resources ...
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine. 25 (4): 772-783. doi:10.1111/j.1939-1676.2011.0750.x. PMID 21745245. "Abortion in ... 2008). "Vaccines". Current Veterinary Therapy: Food Animal Practice (5th ed.). St Louis, Missouri: Saunders. pp. 192-193. ISBN ... and various other diseases likely including late-term abortion. Not all infected cows get sick - some shed the disease without ...
Crowley, James Patrick (October 1964). "Abortion and perinatal mortality in sheep associated with toxoplasmosis". Irish Journal ... Sinclair studied veterinary medicine at the Royal Veterinary College in Edinburgh. He graduated in 1943 and returned to his ... May 1989). "Letters". Veterinary News. New York: New York State Veterinary Medical Society. 53 (5): 191-202. hdl:2027/coo. ... In the 1920s, his elder brother, Donald, was a veterinary student at the Royal School of Veterinary Studies in the University ...
Increasing genetic diversity allows emergence of severe outbreaks characterized by an elevated abortion rate as well as ... Veterinary Microbiology. 151 (3-4): 229-237. doi:10.1016/j.vetmic.2011.03.003. PMID 21474258. Hermann, J.R.; Muñoz-Zanzi, C.A ... Journal of Veterinary Medical Science. 56 (2): 389-391. doi:10.1292/jvms.56.389. ISSN 0916-7250. PMID 8075233. Chueh, L. L.; ... "Porcine epidemic abortion and respiratory syndrome (mystery swine disease). Isolation in Spain of the causative agent and ...
It has also been studied in the treatment of threatened abortion. It has been used in veterinary medicine as well. It has been ... The use of acetomepegrenol in the therapy of threatened abortion]". Akusherstvo I Ginekologiia (in Russian) (9): 37-40. PMID ... Veterinary drugs, Drugs in the Soviet Union). ...
This effect is used in animals to induce estrus and to cause abortion. Cooper M (January 1981). "Prostaglandins in veterinary ... Veterinary drugs, Cyclopentanes, All stub articles, Veterinary medicine stubs). ... Plumb DC (2015). "Cloprostenol Sodium". Plumb's Veterinary Drug Handbook (8th ed.). Wiley. ISBN 9781118911938. v t e (Articles ...
... and the agent of epizootic bovine abortion". Medical and Veterinary Entomology. 25 (3): 337-43. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2915.2011. ... putative agent of epizootic bovine abortion". American Journal of Veterinary Research. 55 (11): 1509-15. PMID 7879972. Teglas, ... B. coriaceae is a suspected pathogen in cattle, in which it is suspected to cause abortion (specifically, epizootic bovine ... nov.: Putative Agent of Epizootic Bovine Abortion". International Journal of Systematic Bacteriology. 37 (1): 72-74. doi: ...
"Abortion in Horses - Reproductive System". Merck Veterinary Manual. Retrieved 2023-02-21. Pfeifer, Mallory (2020-03-12). " ... Medical and veterinary entomology have a strong link to economic entomology. Insects pose both benefits as well as ... Medical and veterinary entomology. Gary R. Mullen, Lance A. Durden. San Diego, Calif.: Academic Press/Elsevier. 2002. ISBN 978- ... The illness facilitated by these insects can induce abortions and has caused up to 300-500 million dollars of loss in Kentucky ...
The veterinary administration of Zlin prevented the spread of the ASF infection by confining the contaminated zone via odor ... In pregnant sows, spontaneous abortions may occur. In milder infections, affected pigs lose weight, become thin, and develop ... National_Veterinary_Institute_(Sweden) Afrikansk svinpest. Retrieved: 2023-09-07. China culls 900 pigs after reports of first ... According to the data available with the veterinary department, over 15,000 pigs has been recorded dead from the 9 affected ...
THOV is a significant veterinary pathogen, for example, causing a febrile illness and abortion in sheep. As of February 2015, ... including a febrile illness and abortion in sheep. In artificial laboratory infections, it is highly pathogenic in hamsters and ...
"Isolation of a filterable agent causing arteritis of horses and abortion by mares; its differentiation from the equine abortion ... Zacks MA, Paessler S (January 2010). "Encephalitic alphaviruses". Veterinary Microbiology. 140 (3-4): 281-6. doi:10.1016/j. ... Veterinary Research. 41 (6): 44. doi:10.1051/vetres/2010016. PMC 2850149. PMID 20197026. Bryans JT, Crowe ME, Doll ER, McCollum ...
Another brother, Robert Julius Formad, was also a pathologist, an expert on veterinary oncology. Marie Formad graduated from ... the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania in 1886, with a thesis titled "Some Notes on Criminal Abortion". Formad was elected ... "Necrology: Henri F. Formad". Journal of Comparative Medicine and Veterinary Archives. 13: 447-448. April 1892. "2 Nieces to ...
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 260 (7): 780-788. doi:10.2460/javma.21.09.0429. ISSN 0003-1488. PMC ... and practices regarding livestock abortion-associated zoonoses in the United States indicate potential occupational health risk ... Association of Zookeepers website Association of Zoos and Aquariums International Congress of Zookeepers website Veterinary ...
Abortion in dairy cattle was also observed as a major cause of disease by neosporosis. Although this disease is worldwide, it ... Veterinary Parasitology. 168 (1-2): 121-124. doi:10.1016/j.vetpar.2009.09.055. PMID 19879051. Mineo, T.W.P.; A.O.T. Carrasco; T ... Arnold, M. "Neospora caninum Abortion in Cattle , Animal & Food Sciences". afs.ca.uky.edu. Dubey, JP; Schares, G; Ortega-Mora, ... In addition to being an important cause of cattle abortions, neosporosis is a significant disease in dogs throughout the world ...
In 1920 he travelled to the Veterinary High School, Berne where he obtained his doctoral degree of Dr. Med. Vet. for his thesis ... Between 1913 and 1919 he conducted research on tuberculosis, contagious abortion and botulism. ... Alongside his academic duties, he earned the degree of Doctor of Veterinary Science (DVSc) from the University of South Africa ... That same year he established the first private veterinary practice in Knysna, and in 1977, when a younger colleague also ...
In other animals, C. pecorum has been associated with abortion, conjunctivitis, encephalomyelitis, enteritis, arthritis, and ... The Veterinary Journal. 201 (3): 322-326. doi:10.1016/j.tvjl.2014.05.037. ISSN 1090-0233. PMID 24954870. Walker, Evelyn; Moore ... Australian Veterinary Journal. 90 (11): 457-463. doi:10.1111/j.1751-0813.2012.00963.x. PMID 23106328. Govendir, M.; Hanger, J ... Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 35 (2): 147-154. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2885.2011.01307.x. PMID 21569052. ...
Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research. Canadian Veterinary Medical Association. 67 (3): 194-197. PMC 227052. PMID 12889725. ... In some countries abortion is legal and women have the right to make the choice about abortion. In some areas, abortion is ... Countries that permit abortions have different limits on how late in pregnancy abortion is allowed. Abortion rates are similar ... Countries with restrictive abortion laws have higher rates of unsafe abortion and similar overall abortion rates compared to ...
... or veterinary medicines. So-called 'backstreet' abortionists were fairly common, although their bloody efforts could be fatal. ... But in what follows the term abortion will always refer to an induced abortion. Abortion laws and their enforcement have ... abortion-rights movements were successful in having abortion bans repealed. While abortion remains legal in most of the West, ... He performed an abortion, then illegal, and was put on trial on charges of procuring abortion. Bourne was eventually acquitted ...
... from material submitted to the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at Iowa State University during an outbreak of swine abortion ... Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation. 2 (3): 171-175. doi:10.1177/104063879000200303. PMID 2094443. Alexander, A. D ...
Live vaccines require a single injection but are known to cause birth defects and abortions in sheep and induce only low-level ... Different types of vaccines for veterinary use are available. The killed vaccines are not practical in routine animal field ... An epizootic (animal disease epidemic) of RVF is usually first indicated by a wave of unexplained abortions.[citation needed] ... Bird BH, Ksiazek TG, Nichol ST, Maclachlan NJ (April 2009). "Rift Valley fever virus". Journal of the American Veterinary ...
C. fetus can cause spontaneous abortions in cattle and sheep, and is an opportunistic pathogen in humans. Campylobacter spp. ... Fletcher RD (1965). "Activity and morphology of Vibrio coli phage". American Journal of Veterinary Research. 26 (111): 361-4. ... Campylobacter Infections at eMedicine Sauerwein RW, Bisseling J, Horrevorts AM (1993). "Septic abortion associated with ... Veterinary Research. 36 (3): 351-382. doi:10.1051/vetres:2005012. PMID 15845230. "Campylobacter". European Food Safety ...
... for Ruminant Abortion and Neonatal Mortality Studies is considered to be a Center of Excellence of the Faculty of Veterinary ... Veterinary Pathobiology (D.V.Sc.), Comparative Histology (Ph.D.), Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M.), and Veterinary ... There are 400 enrollees majoring in the B.Sc., Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M.), Doctor of Veterinary Science (D.V.Sc.), ... The programs and degrees offered are Large Animal Internal Medicine (D.V.Sc.), Veterinary Parasitology (Ph.D.), Veterinary ...
"Members of the Veterinary Medicine Caucus". Veterinary Medicine Caucus. Retrieved October 12, 2018. "North Carolina Scorecard ... Caldwell, Christopher (July 22, 2007). "The Antiwar, Anti-Abortion, Anti- Drug-Enforcement-Administration, Anti-Medicare ... Jones was a member of the Congressional NextGen 9-1-1 Caucus and the Veterinary Medicine Caucus. Jones co-sponsored four ...
v t e (Articles with short description, Short description is different from Wikidata, Veterinary protozoology, Protozoal ... abortion and infertility) Besnoitia bennetti in horses and donkeys (characterized by a widespread, serious dermatitis) ... diseases, All stub articles, Veterinary medicine stubs). ... Merck Veterinary Manual. "Besnoitiosis". The Free Dictionary. ...
... abortion, duty of care, rights to refuse treatment). Veterinary ethics does not have such a strong interplay. It is rare to ... Veterinary News. New York State Veterinary Medical Society. 1965. Front Office Management for the Veterinary Team - E-Book. ... Veterinary ethics combines veterinary professional ethics and the subject of animal ethics. The subject of veterinary ethics ... They can be seen as the founders of the subject in veterinary ethics. Currently, most veterinary schools teach veterinary ...
Learn about the veterinary topic of Abortion in Horses. Find specific details on this topic and related topics from the Merck ... Abortion in Horses By Patricia L. Sertich , VMD, DACT, Department of Clinical Studies-New Bolton Center, School of Veterinary ... Twin pregnancy is the most common noninfectious cause of abortion in mares Abortion in Horses Twin pregnancy is the most common ... Because of the risk of abortion and dystocia Dystocia in Horses Most causes of dystocia in the mare are due to abnormal ...
... teen-aged girls reportedly taking veterinary medications meant to induce abortion in cows to perform their own abortions. ... teen-aged girls reportedly taking veterinary medications meant to induce abortion in cows to perform their own abortions. ... teen-aged girls reportedly taking veterinary medications meant to induce abortion in cows to perform their own abortions. ... Advisory: Teens reportedly using veterinary meds for abortions. Mar 20, 2009. Rachael Zimlich, BSN, RN ...
Salmonella abortions in cattle. 14 July 20 LISA HULME-MOIR. This month has seen two cases from the Northland and Taranaki ... In the South Island, we continue to see late-term abortions due to Salmonella Brandenburg. In 2019, 21 cases were diagnosed ... Most commonly Salmonella abortions are accompanied by signs of systemic illness, scouring and dehydration in the dam with ... Although historically Salmonella abortions have only been seen very sporadically in the North Island, it is worth considering ...
If convalescent samples will not be collected, or when infectious abortion is strongly suspected due to history, immediate ...
State of Texas: New law takes away some Texas Veterinary … 19 hours ago. ... Supreme Court is asked to reject limits on a drug used in the most common method of abortion by: MARK SHERMAN, Associated Press ... Abortion opponents filed their challenge to mifepristone in November and initially won a sweeping ruling in April revoking the ... The case would be the first major abortion dispute decided by the Supreme Court since it overturned Roe v. Wade last year. That ...
"Evidence for Parachlamydia in bovine abortion". Veterinary Microbiology. 135 (1-2): 169-174. doi:10.1016/j.vetmic.2008.09.049. ... Parachlamydia and Chlamydiaceae in bovine abortion" (PDF). Veterinary Microbiology. 152 (3-4): 385-393. doi:10.1016/j.vetmic. ... Researchers in Switzerland randomly selected 235 late term abortions in cattle during the breeding season of 2003 and 2004 and ...
Half of the mares brain was sent in formalin to the University of Pretoria, Onderstepoort, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences for ... Fatal Neurologic Disease and Abortion in Mare Infected with Lineage 1 West Nile Virus, South Africa On This Page ... This strain appears to have been associated with abortion of the fetus and death of the mare. To our knowledge, the only ... Venter M, Human S, van Niekerk S, Williams J, van Eeden C, Freeman F. Fatal Neurologic Disease and Abortion in Mare Infected ...
Learn about the causes of abortion in horses. ISSN 1198-712X, Published September 2005 ... Department of Veterinary Science, University of Kentucky. 2004. 13 (Apr, 2): 4-5. ... Viral abortion. Equine herpesvirus (EHV-1 abortion virus) is most often associated with abortions in mares, while herpesvirus ... Infectious causes of abortion. Over the past six years, infectious abortions have accounted for approximately one-third of all ...
... administering specific antibiotics before lambing based on veterinary recommendations; isolating aborting ewes; removing ... Loves Labor Lost: Small Ruminant Abortion Storms. Loves Labor Lost: Small Ruminant Abortion Storms. Author: Dr. Susan Kerr, ... Toxoplasma Abortion. Toxoplasma gondii, a parasitic disease of cats, can cause abortion in sheep and goats that ingest feed or ... Salmonella Abortion. Several species of Salmonella can cause abortion if ingested by a pregnant doe or ewe, especially if a ...
p>As the standard theriogenology text for veterinary students, Veterinary Reproduction and Obstetrics is also a great ... Veterinary control of reproduction in beef herds 28. Fertility and infertility in Bos indicus 29. Infertility and abortion in ... Veterinary control of herd fertility in intensively-managed dairy herds 26. Veterinary control of herd fertility in pastoral ... As the standard theriogenology text for veterinary students, Veterinary Reproduction and Obstetrics is also a great reference ...
16. Dairy cattle abortion in California: evaluation of diagnostic laboratory data. 210-8页 作者:A A,Jamaluddin; J T,Case; D W,Hird ... Journal of veterinary diagnostic investigation : official publication of the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory ... 5. Mycobacterium avium complex abortion in a mare. 257-8页 作者:P,Hélie; R,Higgins ... official publication of the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians, Inc SCI · MEDLINE · ...
Listeria is also a common veterinary pathogen, being associated with abortion and encephalitis in sheep and cattle. It can be ...
ABORTION AND PREGNANCY LOSS IN DOGS Abortion or pregnancy loss may be caused by problems with the fetus or the bitch. Causes & ... Notes from University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine * ULTRASOUND IMAGING OF THE REPRODUCTIVE TRACT OF THE BITCH. ... CANINE ABORTION. Abortion is uncommon in the bitch, but when it does occur, owners should be aware of the treatment options and ... CANINE ABORTION. A must read! Excellent explanations and advise here.. *CRYPTORCHIDISM IN THE CANINE. An easy-to-read complete ...
keywords = "Abortion, Veterinary, Animals, Cattle, Dairying, Female, Lactation, Linear Models, Mastitis, Bovine, Pregnancy, ... In: Veterinary Record, Vol. 167, No. 7, 14.08.2010, p. 238-40.. Research output: Contribution to journal › Article › peer- ... abortion and mastitis, and improving milking and fertility performance using detailed data from the Langhill herd. ... abortion and mastitis, and improving milking and fertility performance using detailed data from the Langhill herd.", ...
Pathology in Practice published on 15 Feb 2015 by American Veterinary Medical Association. ... Rarely, A equuli had been reported to cause abortion, septicemia, and polyarthritis in swine.3 Currently, 2 subspecies of A ... A 24-hour-old filly was evaluated at the Kansas State University Veterinary Health Center because of diarrhea and inability to ... Laurie A. Beard Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506. ...
Not recommended for all stages of gestation - i.e. potential to cause delayed estrus or abortions ... Animal Health Diagnostic Center New York State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. 607.253.3900 Directions ...
The Veterinary Manual was first published in 1955 as a service to the community. The legacy of this great resource continues in ... Enter search terms to find related veterinary topics, multimedia and more.. Advanced Search:. • Use " " for phrases. o [ " ...
... it induces labor and can cause abortions. Further, Dex is a steroid and should only be used under veterinary supervision. Both ... In all cases, it is your responsibility to obtain veterinary services and advice before using any of the information provided ...
Learn about the veterinary topic of Equine Herpesvirus Infection (Equine Viral Rhinopneumonitis). Find specific details on this ... Most of these outbreaks are caused by strains of EHV-4. Infection of pregnant mares with EHV-1 may result in abortion 2 to 12 ... The Merck Veterinary Manual was first published in 1955 as a service to the community. The legacy of this great resource ... DVM, MS, DACVIM, Equine Internal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University ...
... veterinary events, classifieds for vets, reports, news, presentations, videos, clinical pictures, training programs, courses, ... 29.10.2007 Influence of beef bull semen on the of abortion in Neospora-seropositive dairy cows. *25.10.2007 Prevalence of ... 07.09.2009 Factors regarding the abortion rate in herds with high incidence of Neospora. *19.08.2009 Body Condition Change Ante ... 21.07.2005 First ESAVS Veterinary Study Programmes in China*01.07.2005 Clostridium difficile with increased virulence in the UK ...
Obtain appropriate veterinary care, a certificate of veterinary inspection, or proof of rabies vaccination (or all of these) ... Ill animals, animals known to be infected with a zoonotic pathogen, and animals from herds with a recent history of abortion, ... Compendium of veterinary standard precautions for zoonotic disease prevention in veterinary personnel: national association of ... Psittacine birds (e.g., parrots, parakeets, and cockatiels): Consult the psittacosis compendium,†† and seek veterinary advice. ...
G. M. Allan and J. A. Ellis, "Porcine circoviruses: a review," Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, vol. 12, no. 1, ... K. H. West, J. M. Bystrom, C. Wojnarowicz et al., "Myocarditis and abortion associated with intrauterine infection of sows with ... in Proceedings of the 19th International Pig Veterinary Society Congress Proceedings (IPVS 06), Abstract no. 168, Copenhagen, ... Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 3-10, 1998. ...
Abortion Panel - Caprine/Ovine Serology. Detection of antibodies to common pathogens that cause abortion in sheep and goats. ... Abortion Panel - Livestock Bacterial (Culture). Identification of common bacterial pathogens that cause abortion in livestock ... Interpretation of results by a veterinary endocrinologist is included. ...
Abortion Panel - Livestock Bacterial (Culture). Identification of common bacterial pathogens that cause abortion in livestock ...
... the veterinary chain. I stayed on as CEO for a couple of years before I ran for regent in 2016. ... Youve said you are an abortion-rights opponent. What does that mean in terms of if and when you think abortions should be ... She would allow abortion in cases of rape, incest and the health of the mother or fetus. She opposes a new state law that ... Heidi Ganahl, GOP candidate for Governor, would restrict abortion, expand charter schools and get oil and gas back to work`. ...
Oregons abortion clinics are also not held to the same quality standards as other health (or even veterinary) clinics. These ... the 1973 case that legalized abortion in the United States. Even if the Court eventually overturned Roe, however, abortion ... Oregon, for example, is one of the few states with zero abortion regulations. Legally, any woman can abort her son or daughter ... A positive ruling on the Gestational Age Act, in other words, is likely not to affect Oregons current abortion laws at all. ...
Veterinary researchers at Oregon State University (OSU) announced today that they have linked a major abortion epidemic in ... A horse farm in Northern New Jersey experienced high abortion rates in early June in pastures where there was an abundance of ... A farm in Northern New Jersey experienced high abortion rates in early June in fields where there were Eastern tent ... Oregon State Study Links Virus to 2001 Kentucky Abortions Press Release June 23, 2006 ...
The rate of abortion among pregnant infected ewes is almost 100%. An outbreak of RVF in animals frequently manifests itself as ... It has been used experimentally to protect veterinary and laboratory personnel at high risk of exposure to RVF. Other candidate ... Only 1 dose of the live vaccine is required to provide long-term immunity but this vaccine may result in spontaneous abortion ... The disease also results in significant economic losses due to death and abortion among RVF-infected livestock. ...
Inquiry notes coordinated submissions pro & contra abortion 4 months 1 week ago ...
  • This month has seen two cases from the Northland and Taranaki districts involving late-term abortions due to Salmonella Bovismorbificans. (gribblesvets.co.nz)
  • In the South Island, we continue to see late-term abortions due to Salmonella Brandenburg. (gribblesvets.co.nz)
  • This bacteria causes weak lambs, stillbirths, and high rates of late-term abortions, especially in first-time dams. (oregonstate.edu)
  • New York legalized late-term abortions in early January of this year after Governor Andrew Cuomo signed the atrocious bill into law following its passage by the New York legislature. (californiafamily.org)
  • Late-term abortions, which once were illegal in New York, now are allowed, and non-doctors may perform abortions. (californiafamily.org)
  • Apparently to the Governor, reducing the declawing of cats is more important than reducing the number of late term abortions. (californiafamily.org)
  • In sheep, WNV infection may result in abortion, stillbirth, and neonatal death ( 3 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Mummification, abortion or stillbirth. (infonet-biovision.org)
  • He joined the team after Associate Dean Karl Jandrey of the School of Veterinary Medicine invited him to their weekly Zoom calls. (ucdavis.edu)
  • For his pioneering work in the field of genetics, Dr. Ralph L. Brinster, the Richard King Mellon Professor of Reproductive Physiology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, has been awarded the 2010 National Medal of Science. (avma.org)
  • Dr. Brinster earned his VMD degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine in 1960. (avma.org)
  • The most common cause of viral abortion in mares is equine rhinopneumonitis, which is caused by equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1). (merckvetmanual.com)
  • Equine herpesvirus ( EHV-1 abortion virus) is most often associated with abortions in mares, while herpesvirus EHV-4 ( rhinopneumonitis virus ) is usually associated with respiratory disease in young horses. (ontario.ca)
  • The abortion rate may approach 100% in a herd of susceptible mares. (ontario.ca)
  • Infection of pregnant mares with EHV-1 may result in abortion 2 to 12 weeks after infection. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • Potomac horse fever (PHF) is an acute enterocolitis syndrome producing mild colic, fever, and diarrhea in horses of all ages, as well as abortion in pregnant mares. (edu.vn)
  • Researchers at the University of Guelph are searching for clues to better manage a virus that can cause late gestation abortion in mares. (horse-canada.com)
  • However, based on the information MPI collects from the country's veterinary diagnostic laboratories, we have noticed an increase in the reported incidence of Salmonellosis in dairy cattle since 2015, most notably involving the serotype Bovismorbificans. (gribblesvets.co.nz)
  • The source notes that animal ingestion of "low quality forage having some toxicity" harms livestock health, especially with cattle and horses, leading to numerous cases of "toxic abortion, gastro-enteritis and abortion with dystrophic and haemorrhagic lesions of the foetus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Listeria is also a common veterinary pathogen, being associated with abortion and encephalitis in sheep and cattle. (medscape.com)
  • The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) seeks to recruit an MSc graduate fellow to work on Cross-sectional study of abortions in dairy cattle in Nandi County. (advance-africa.com)
  • The successful MSc fellow will conduct the baseline cross-sectional study to the determine the prevalence of abortion causing pathogens in a population of dairy cattle in Nandi County, Kenya. (advance-africa.com)
  • RB51 is a live, attenuated strain that was licensed conditionally by the Veterinary Services, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA, on February 23, 1996, for vaccination of cattle in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • Wisconsin - Veterinarians in the rural Midwest were warned of a possible new trend -- teen-aged girls reportedly taking veterinary medications meant to induce abortion in cows to perform their own abortions. (dvm360.com)
  • Toxic abortion is observed in both humans and in animals such as cows, hares, and horses. (wikipedia.org)
  • order to address this major challenge for dairy producers and to reduce both the direct losses from mortality and retarded growth as well as the indirect loss of genetic potential, the research proposes to conduct a longitudinal study of abortion in cows. (advance-africa.com)
  • The disease is caused by a herpes virus and usually results in respiratory disease, but may also cause sporadic abortions in cows. (infonet-biovision.org)
  • Abortions generally occur in late pregnancy and aborting cows may or may not have shown respiratory signs previously. (infonet-biovision.org)
  • That ruling has led to bans on abortion at all stages of pregnancy in 15 states, with some exceptions, and once cardiac activity can be detected, which is around six weeks, in two others. (kxan.com)
  • Abortions occur in the last one to two months of pregnancy and rates can range from 20 to 90% in a herd/flock during an outbreak. (oregonstate.edu)
  • The state of Mississippi is specifically asking America's highest court to allow them to enforce a voter-approved ban on abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy. (ortl.org)
  • Abortion is the premature termination of pregnancy. (edu.vn)
  • It defines health care provider very broadly and says the decision to abort a viable child can be for a woman's "life or health" without specifying if that is her physical or mental health, so it's not at all crazy for people to interpret this act as making abortion legal at any time in a pregnancy. (thefp.com)
  • During epidemics the sudden occurrence of mass abortions at all stages of pregnancy especially in sheep and camels, deaths in new-born animals and severe influenza like occasionally also fatal haemorrhagic disease in humans are characteristic. (infonet-biovision.org)
  • Abortion is ending a pregnancy using medicine or surgery. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Abortion with medicine (pills) is usually only done in the first 9 to 11 weeks or so of pregnancy. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Later in pregnancy, abortions are more complicated and usually have to be done surgically. (msdmanuals.com)
  • However, you should keep in mind that using birth control to prevent pregnancy is safer than having an abortion. (msdmanuals.com)
  • dubious - discuss][medical citation needed] Some instances have been reported of women intentionally seeking to induce toxic abortion, where circumstances make medical abortion difficult to obtain, by exposing themselves to environmental toxins. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a medical abortion, the doctor gives you medicine that makes your uterus contract and push the fetus out. (msdmanuals.com)
  • These abortions occur predominantly in the last trimester and usually are not associated with a respiratory infection. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • Most abortions due to this virus occur between 8 and 11 months of gestation, although they may occur as early as 5 months. (ontario.ca)
  • In addition to abortions, stillborn and weak lambs can occur. (oregonstate.edu)
  • Ultimately, when abortions occur, we can look back and see if the shedding pattern changed and if one type of sampling was a key indicator. (horse-canada.com)
  • When serious problems occur from an abortion, they usually occur in the first week after having an abortion. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Among 50 women, 4 experienced spontaneous abortions during previous pregnancies. (bvsalud.org)
  • Sheep Veterinary Society presents… the series SHEEP MEET events throughout 2022. (sheepvetsoc.org.uk)
  • In joining our society you can expect information and support relating to sheep veterinary care including: access to our private members forum, and support from veterinarians experts for their interest and knowledge in sheep related care. (sheepvetsoc.org.uk)
  • Enzootic abortion is caused by a pathogen called Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci serotype 1). (oregonstate.edu)
  • In the absence of abortion, there are no clinical signs as the pathogen is very well adapted to the host. (beefmagazine.com)
  • Problems are seen at the next lambing, i.e. barren ewes, stillbirths, abortions and persistently infected lambs which will continue to act as a source of infection for the rest of the flock. (infonet-biovision.org)
  • Learn about the causes of abortion in horses. (ontario.ca)
  • There can be many causes of abortion, from infection to noninfectious causes such as exposure to toxins in the environment or genetics. (edu.vn)
  • These agents gain entrance to the reproductive tract and travel to the uterus, causing infection of the fetal membranes, resulting in abortion. (ontario.ca)
  • Retention of the placenta is often a sequel to bacterial abortion as is infection of the uterus (endometritis and/or metritis). (ontario.ca)
  • Leptospira infection in horses is manifested as either abortion or recurrent uveitis (moon blindness) in the horse. (ontario.ca)
  • In the present study, we found that production of regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) due to B. abortus infection contributes to abortion in pregnant mice. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Neutralization of RANTES, induced by B. abortus infection, served to prevent abortion. (elsevierpure.com)
  • On May 26-27, 1997, nine persons (a farmer, four veterinary clinicians, and four veterinary students) in Manhattan, Kansas, participated in an attempted vaginal delivery, a cesarean delivery, and a necropsy on a stillborn calf that died because of Brucella abortus infection. (cdc.gov)
  • She opposes a new state law that cements the right to abortion care in Colorado. (cpr.org)
  • The Supreme Court's decision overturning the federal constitutional right to abortion has left confusion in its wake. (rhs.org)
  • Although the decision is less than a month old, abortion providers in states that protect the right to abortion say they are already seeing high numbers of patients traveling for care. (rhs.org)
  • Further work might help reduce the number of animals culled involuntarily, by identifying key factors associated with the incidence of an assisted calving, abortion and mastitis, and improving milking and fertility performance using detailed data from the Langhill herd. (ed.ac.uk)
  • When a livestock herd is infected, it is very expensive to eliminate the disease and frequently the herd is depopulated, which can be devastating to the owners,' said Steven Olsen, research leader and supervisory veterinary medical officer at ARS's Infectious Bacterial Diseases Research Laboratory at the National Animal Disease Center in Ames, Iowa. (beefmagazine.com)
  • When infected wildlife transmit the disease to domestic livestock, the risk of female members of the herd experiencing abortions increases, which can lead to additional exposures. (beefmagazine.com)
  • The researchers began with a survey of Ontario horse farms to better understand the current state of the industry, looking at herd sizes, abortion rates and prevalence of EHV-related diseases. (horse-canada.com)
  • No EAV -related abortions were diagnosed at the Animal Health Laboratory, University of Guelph, from 1998 to 2004 footnote 3 [3] . (ontario.ca)
  • Sarah Gregory] Hello, I'm Sarah Gregory, and today I'm talking with Dr. Kerry Sondgeroth, a veterinary bacteriologist at the Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory and an associate professor at the University of Wyoming. (cdc.gov)
  • In 2010, lineage 1 West Nile virus was detected in South Africa in the brain of a pregnant mare that succumbed to neurologic disease and in her aborted fetus, suggesting an association with abortion in horses. (cdc.gov)
  • Abortion in horses may result from a variety of causes. (ontario.ca)
  • First-year veterinary medicine students learn how to check the health and how to work with horses at the Center for Equine Health. (ucdavis.edu)
  • Horses carrying equine herpesvirus (EHV) may exhibit signs as minor as a runny nose and mild fever, but the virus is a major cause of neurological, respiratory and reproductive disease, including abortions, in the equine industry. (horse-canada.com)
  • We report a case of WNV with fatal neurologic disease and abortion in a horse. (cdc.gov)
  • The equine arteritis virus can cause equine viral arteritis (EVA) abortion. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • Equine arteritis virus ( EAV ) has the potential to cause abortion as well as the more commonly observed contagious respiratory disease and semen-shedding state in infected carrier stallions. (ontario.ca)
  • The Supreme Court has previously ruled that states cannot restrict abortion before the age of viability. (ortl.org)
  • Equine herpesvirus ( EHV-1 ) is the major infectious agent, accounting for 18% of all abortion diagnoses footnote 3 [3] . (ontario.ca)
  • Several species of bacteria have been incriminated as causative agents of equine abortion and sterility. (ontario.ca)
  • In 1932, the Journal of State Medicine reported on a natural variation, with the occurrence of "a considerable number of cases of toxic abortion" being caused by untreated dental caries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Poor conception rates and/or the occurrence of abortions or still-births - that should be below 1% - may signal infectious disease, such as leptospirosis, is to blame. (thepigsite.com)
  • The Women's Health Protection Act would legalize abortion nationally up until fetal viability. (thefp.com)
  • Ruminant agriculture sustains coxiellosis losses in the millions of dollars per year due to abortions, abortion storms, weak offspring, and lost milk production during treatment. (usda.gov)
  • The American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) issued an advisory on its Web site after hearing that the Wisconsin Veterinary Medical Association alerted the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) to the trend, apparently a way for girls to end unwanted pregnancies without the cost of an abortion or having their parents find out. (dvm360.com)
  • Also, having an abortion doesn't raise your chance of problems with future pregnancies. (msdmanuals.com)
  • If convalescent samples will not be collected, or when infectious abortion is strongly suspected due to history, immediate testing of acute sample may be warranted. (cornell.edu)
  • Over the past six years, infectious abortions have accounted for approximately one-third of all abortions diagnosed. (ontario.ca)
  • Genetic defects, stress, weather flukes, and nutritional mishaps will always conspire to make a few animals miscarry, but several management and infectious causes can result in huge abortion wrecks. (oregonstate.edu)
  • There are many potential causes of abortions in small ruminants, but infectious diseases are the main culprits. (oregonstate.edu)
  • Veterinarians must be vigilant in storing, prescribing and using veterinary products that can harm humans in light of this most recent trend, cautions AAHA. (dvm360.com)
  • Study of pollution-caused abortion in humans ceased for a considerable time, interest renewing in the 2000s. (wikipedia.org)
  • As of January 1, 2017, all antibiotics deemed important to humans and mixed in the feed require a veterinary feed directive (a written order). (sheep101.info)
  • The Supreme Court is being asked to reverse an appellate ruling that would cut off mail-order access to a drug used in the most common method of abortion in the United States. (kxan.com)
  • The case would be the first major abortion dispute decided by the Supreme Court since it overturned Roe v. Wade last year. (kxan.com)
  • She said the Supreme Court should overturn Roe v. Wade and leave decisions about abortion to the states. (cpr.org)
  • Pro-life advocates across the nation celebrated when the Supreme Court announced in mid-May that it would hear a Mississippi case on whether states can ban second-trimester abortions before the baby can survive outside his or her mother's womb. (ortl.org)
  • The case holds the potential for the Supreme Court to reexamine the low-quality legal logic used in Roe v Wade, the 1973 case that legalized abortion in the United States. (ortl.org)
  • The New York Reproductive Health Act goes beyond Roe v. Wade , allowing unborn babies to be aborted even when the U.S. Supreme Court has said states may restrict abortions. (californiafamily.org)
  • Officials say, however, that they have little power in this new battle over abortion because it will be fought on the state level and they are wary of setting up new cases that could allow the Supreme Court to strip more federal powers. (rhs.org)
  • The disease also results in significant economic losses due to death and abortion among RVF-infected livestock. (who.int)
  • Pathogens that cause abortion may also be zoonoses placing the livestock workers at risk. (advance-africa.com)
  • Other factors can affect fertility, warns Derek Armstrong, MLC veterinary advisor. (thepigsite.com)
  • you could have mastitis, ear infections, abortion, and then depending on the severity of the pneumonia, yes it can be fatal. (cdc.gov)
  • Vibrionic abortion is caused by Campylobacter fetus or Campylobacter jejuni, organisms that live in the intestinal tract. (oregonstate.edu)
  • According to the UC Davis researchers, their study is the first of its kind to focus on resilience across three medical fields: veterinary, nursing and medicine. (ucdavis.edu)
  • B.A. and doctor of veterinary medicine degrees from the University of Minnesota. (publicradio.org)
  • What happens during an abortion with medicine? (msdmanuals.com)
  • Toxoplamosis is a ubiquitous anthropozoonosis that occupies a large place in human and veterinary medicine. (bvsalud.org)
  • By Veterinary Laboratories Agency - This report monitors trends in the major endemic pig diseases and utilises the farmfile and VIDA (Veterinary Investigation Disease Analysis) databases. (thepigsite.com)
  • She would allow abortion in cases of rape, incest and the health of the mother or fetus. (cpr.org)
  • In a surgical abortion, the fetus is removed from your uterus through your vagina. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Vaccines are available as aids to prevent abortion due to EHV-1 infections. (ontario.ca)
  • The vaccines that are currently available are the best we have but are of questionable value in preventing abortion. (ontario.ca)
  • We hope to develop highly effective vaccines that not only prevent abortions, but also reduce or shorten infections after exposure,' he said. (beefmagazine.com)
  • The Veterinary Manual was first published in 1955 as a service to the community. (msdvetmanual.com)
  • A challenge to productivity in dairy farming is abortion or early calf death. (advance-africa.com)
  • An Experimental Investigation Concerning Toxic Abortion Produced by Chemical Agents by Morris M. Datnow M.D., BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Volume 35, Issue 4, pages 693-724, December 1928, DOI: 10.1111/j.http://natres.psu.ac.th/Link/SoilCongress/bdd/symp25/1322-t.pdf-0528.1928.tb12372.x, published online: 25 AUG 2005. (wikipedia.org)
  • BVD is the most commonly diagnosed virus in bovine abortion cases in Europe and North America. (infonet-biovision.org)
  • No one (including relatives or fathers) can prevent an abortion. (ortl.org)
  • Excellent records will facilitate recognition and diagnosis of abortions. (oregonstate.edu)
  • It's not a regulated drug that needs to be locked up, either, says May, and many veterinary clinics in the Midwest employ teens. (dvm360.com)
  • Oregon's abortion clinics are also not held to the same quality standards as other health (or even veterinary) clinics. (ortl.org)
  • Premonitory clinical signs of impending abortion may be only premature mammary gland development. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • It can also be hard to identify clinically as, in the absence of abortions or stillbirths, the disease causes no distinct clinical signs. (beefmagazine.com)
  • The administration is seeking to buttress abortion access, but abortion rights advocates continue to complain that the federal response to the court's action has been slow and weak. (rhs.org)
  • Both subtypes have the potential to cause respiratory disease and abortion. (ontario.ca)
  • Guidelines to reduce risk for disease from animals in health-care and veterinary facilities and from service animals (e.g., guide dogs) have been developed ( 2--6 ). (cdc.gov)
  • When there is a high fever resulting from systemic or respiratory disease this can also cause abortion. (infonet-biovision.org)
  • Something pushes it over the edge to disease manifestation, explains Dr. Brandon Lillie, a pathologist in the Department of Pathobiology at the University of Guelph's Ontario Veterinary College (OVC). (horse-canada.com)
  • Public opinion on the issue of abortion is pretty stable with most Americans wanting some legal abortion and broad opposition against overturning Roe v. Wade. (thefp.com)
  • One of the most enjoyable parts of cataloguing Henry Gray's material is not just the insights into past veterinary practice, but also the veterinary surgeons behind that practice. (rcvsknowledge.org)
  • Henry Gray qualified from the London Veterinary College in 1885 and set up a practice in Kensington on Earls Court Road (pictured below), though sadly this original facade no longer exists. (rcvsknowledge.org)
Rift Valley Fever Outbreak --- Kenya, November 2006--January 2007