Abnormalities, MultipleChromosome Aberrations: Abnormal number or structure of chromosomes. Chromosome aberrations may result in CHROMOSOME DISORDERS.Congenital Abnormalities: Malformations of organs or body parts during development in utero.Chromosome Disorders: Clinical conditions caused by an abnormal chromosome constitution in which there is extra or missing chromosome material (either a whole chromosome or a chromosome segment). (from Thompson et al., Genetics in Medicine, 5th ed, p429)Eye Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the eye; may also be hereditary.Karyotyping: Mapping of the KARYOTYPE of a cell.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Cardiovascular Abnormalities: Congenital, inherited, or acquired anomalies of the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM, including the HEART and BLOOD VESSELS.Craniofacial Abnormalities: Congenital structural deformities, malformations, or other abnormalities of the cranium and facial bones.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Skin Abnormalities: Congenital structural abnormalities of the skin.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Urogenital Abnormalities: Congenital structural abnormalities of the UROGENITAL SYSTEM in either the male or the female.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Trisomy: The possession of a third chromosome of any one type in an otherwise diploid cell.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Musculoskeletal Abnormalities: Congenital structural abnormalities and deformities of the musculoskeletal system.In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence: A type of IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION in which target sequences are stained with fluorescent dye so their location and size can be determined using fluorescence microscopy. This staining is sufficiently distinct that the hybridization signal can be seen both in metaphase spreads and in interphase nuclei.Tooth Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the teeth.Translocation, Genetic: A type of chromosome aberration characterized by CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE and transfer of the broken-off portion to another location, often to a different chromosome.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Aneuploidy: The chromosomal constitution of cells which deviate from the normal by the addition or subtraction of CHROMOSOMES, chromosome pairs, or chromosome fragments. In a normally diploid cell (DIPLOIDY) the loss of a chromosome pair is termed nullisomy (symbol: 2N-2), the loss of a single chromosome is MONOSOMY (symbol: 2N-1), the addition of a chromosome pair is tetrasomy (symbol: 2N+2), the addition of a single chromosome is TRISOMY (symbol: 2N+1).Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Sex Chromosome Aberrations: Abnormal number or structure of the SEX CHROMOSOMES. Some sex chromosome aberrations are associated with SEX CHROMOSOME DISORDERS and SEX CHROMOSOME DISORDERS OF SEX DEVELOPMENT.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Abnormalities, Drug-Induced: Congenital abnormalities caused by medicinal substances or drugs of abuse given to or taken by the mother, or to which she is inadvertently exposed during the manufacture of such substances. The concept excludes abnormalities resulting from exposure to non-medicinal chemicals in the environment.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Fetal Diseases: Pathophysiological conditions of the FETUS in the UTERUS. Some fetal diseases may be treated with FETAL THERAPIES.Schizophrenia: A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Cytogenetic Analysis: Examination of CHROMOSOMES to diagnose, classify, screen for, or manage genetic diseases and abnormalities. Following preparation of the sample, KARYOTYPING is performed and/or the specific chromosomes are analyzed.Brain Diseases: Pathologic conditions affecting the BRAIN, which is composed of the intracranial components of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. This includes (but is not limited to) the CEREBRAL CORTEX; intracranial white matter; BASAL GANGLIA; THALAMUS; HYPOTHALAMUS; BRAIN STEM; and CEREBELLUM.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Ultrasonography, Prenatal: The visualization of tissues during pregnancy through recording of the echoes of ultrasonic waves directed into the body. The procedure may be applied with reference to the mother or the fetus and with reference to organs or the detection of maternal or fetal disease.Chromosome Deletion: Actual loss of portion of a chromosome.Heart Defects, Congenital: Developmental abnormalities involving structures of the heart. These defects are present at birth but may be discovered later in life.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Chromosome Banding: Staining of bands, or chromosome segments, allowing the precise identification of individual chromosomes or parts of chromosomes. Applications include the determination of chromosome rearrangements in malformation syndromes and cancer, the chemistry of chromosome segments, chromosome changes during evolution, and, in conjunction with cell hybridization studies, chromosome mapping.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Cytogenetics: A subdiscipline of genetics which deals with the cytological and molecular analysis of the CHROMOSOMES, and location of the GENES on chromosomes, and the movements of chromosomes during the CELL CYCLE.Prenatal Diagnosis: Determination of the nature of a pathological condition or disease in the postimplantation EMBRYO; FETUS; or pregnant female before birth.Nervous System Malformations: Structural abnormalities of the central or peripheral nervous system resulting primarily from defects of embryogenesis.Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Mice, Mutant Strains: Mice bearing mutant genes which are phenotypically expressed in the animals.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Homozygote: An individual in which both alleles at a given locus are identical.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Mice, Inbred C57BLHeterozygote: An individual having different alleles at one or more loci regarding a specific character.Intellectual Disability: Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. This has multiple potential etiologies, including genetic defects and perinatal insults. Intelligence quotient (IQ) scores are commonly used to determine whether an individual has an intellectual disability. IQ scores between 70 and 79 are in the borderline range. Scores below 67 are in the disabled range. (from Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, p28)Chromosomes, Human, Pair 13: A specific pair of GROUP D CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Agenesis of Corpus Callosum: Birth defect that results in a partial or complete absence of the CORPUS CALLOSUM. It may be isolated or a part of a syndrome (e.g., AICARDI'S SYNDROME; ACROCALLOSAL SYNDROME; ANDERMANN SYNDROME; and HOLOPROSENCEPHALY). Clinical manifestations include neuromotor skill impairment and INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY of variable severity.Down Syndrome: A chromosome disorder associated either with an extra chromosome 21 or an effective trisomy for chromosome 21. Clinical manifestations include hypotonia, short stature, brachycephaly, upslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthus, Brushfield spots on the iris, protruding tongue, small ears, short, broad hands, fifth finger clinodactyly, Simian crease, and moderate to severe INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY. Cardiac and gastrointestinal malformations, a marked increase in the incidence of LEUKEMIA, and the early onset of ALZHEIMER DISEASE are also associated with this condition. Pathologic features include the development of NEUROFIBRILLARY TANGLES in neurons and the deposition of AMYLOID BETA-PROTEIN, similar to the pathology of ALZHEIMER DISEASE. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p213)Digestive System Abnormalities: Congenital structural abnormalities of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Atrophy: Decrease in the size of a cell, tissue, organ, or multiple organs, associated with a variety of pathological conditions such as abnormal cellular changes, ischemia, malnutrition, or hormonal changes.Limb Deformities, Congenital: Congenital structural deformities of the upper and lower extremities collectively or unspecified.Mosaicism: The occurrence in an individual of two or more cell populations of different chromosomal constitutions, derived from a single ZYGOTE, as opposed to CHIMERISM in which the different cell populations are derived from more than one zygote.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Neurologic Examination: Assessment of sensory and motor responses and reflexes that is used to determine impairment of the nervous system.Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A diagnostic technique that incorporates the measurement of molecular diffusion (such as water or metabolites) for tissue assessment by MRI. The degree of molecular movement can be measured by changes of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) with time, as reflected by tissue microstructure. Diffusion MRI has been used to study BRAIN ISCHEMIA and tumor response to treatment.Ocular Motility Disorders: Disorders that feature impairment of eye movements as a primary manifestation of disease. These conditions may be divided into infranuclear, nuclear, and supranuclear disorders. Diseases of the eye muscles or oculomotor cranial nerves (III, IV, and VI) are considered infranuclear. Nuclear disorders are caused by disease of the oculomotor, trochlear, or abducens nuclei in the BRAIN STEM. Supranuclear disorders are produced by dysfunction of higher order sensory and motor systems that control eye movements, including neural networks in the CEREBRAL CORTEX; BASAL GANGLIA; CEREBELLUM; and BRAIN STEM. Ocular torticollis refers to a head tilt that is caused by an ocular misalignment. Opsoclonus refers to rapid, conjugate oscillations of the eyes in multiple directions, which may occur as a parainfectious or paraneoplastic condition (e.g., OPSOCLONUS-MYOCLONUS SYNDROME). (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p240)Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by dysplasia in one or more hematopoietic cell lineages. They predominantly affect patients over 60, are considered preleukemic conditions, and have high probability of transformation into ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Abnormal Karyotype: A variation from the normal set of chromosomes characteristic of a species.Nerve Fibers, Myelinated: A class of nerve fibers as defined by their structure, specifically the nerve sheath arrangement. The AXONS of the myelinated nerve fibers are completely encased in a MYELIN SHEATH. They are fibers of relatively large and varied diameters. Their NEURAL CONDUCTION rates are faster than those of the unmyelinated nerve fibers (NERVE FIBERS, UNMYELINATED). Myelinated nerve fibers are present in somatic and autonomic nerves.Gene Deletion: A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Infertility, Male: The inability of the male to effect FERTILIZATION of an OVUM after a specified period of unprotected intercourse. Male sterility is permanent infertility.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Blood Coagulation Disorders: Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur as a consequence of abnormalities in blood coagulation due to a variety of factors such as COAGULATION PROTEIN DISORDERS; BLOOD PLATELET DISORDERS; BLOOD PROTEIN DISORDERS or nutritional conditions.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 7: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Cerebral Cortex: The thin layer of GRAY MATTER on the surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES that develops from the TELENCEPHALON and folds into gyri and sulchi. It reaches its highest development in humans and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Heart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system. This includes disorders of the brain, spinal cord, cranial nerves, peripheral nerves, nerve roots, autonomic nervous system, neuromuscular junction, and muscle.Corpus Callosum: Broad plate of dense myelinated fibers that reciprocally interconnect regions of the cortex in all lobes with corresponding regions of the opposite hemisphere. The corpus callosum is located deep in the longitudinal fissure.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon: A method of computed tomography that uses radionuclides which emit a single photon of a given energy. The camera is rotated 180 or 360 degrees around the patient to capture images at multiple positions along the arc. The computer is then used to reconstruct the transaxial, sagittal, and coronal images from the 3-dimensional distribution of radionuclides in the organ. The advantages of SPECT are that it can be used to observe biochemical and physiological processes as well as size and volume of the organ. The disadvantage is that, unlike positron-emission tomography where the positron-electron annihilation results in the emission of 2 photons at 180 degrees from each other, SPECT requires physical collimation to line up the photons, which results in the loss of many available photons and hence degrades the image.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Anisotropy: A physical property showing different values in relation to the direction in or along which the measurement is made. The physical property may be with regard to thermal or electric conductivity or light refraction. In crystallography, it describes crystals whose index of refraction varies with the direction of the incident light. It is also called acolotropy and colotropy. The opposite of anisotropy is isotropy wherein the same values characterize the object when measured along axes in all directions.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.DNA Mutational Analysis: Biochemical identification of mutational changes in a nucleotide sequence.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17: A specific pair of GROUP E CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18: A specific pair of GROUP E CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Monosomy: The condition in which one chromosome of a pair is missing. In a normally diploid cell it is represented symbolically as 2N-1.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Arrhythmias, Cardiac: Any disturbances of the normal rhythmic beating of the heart or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. Cardiac arrhythmias can be classified by the abnormalities in HEART RATE, disorders of electrical impulse generation, or impulse conduction.Heart Ventricles: The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.Diffusion Tensor Imaging: The use of diffusion ANISOTROPY data from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging results to construct images based on the direction of the faster diffusing molecules.Cardiomyopathies: A group of diseases in which the dominant feature is the involvement of the CARDIAC MUSCLE itself. Cardiomyopathies are classified according to their predominant pathophysiological features (DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY; HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY; RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY) or their etiological/pathological factors (CARDIOMYOPATHY, ALCOHOLIC; ENDOCARDIAL FIBROELASTOSIS).Gene Targeting: The integration of exogenous DNA into the genome of an organism at sites where its expression can be suitably controlled. This integration occurs as a result of homologous recombination.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 14: A specific pair of GROUP D CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Developmental Disabilities: Disorders in which there is a delay in development based on that expected for a given age level or stage of development. These impairments or disabilities originate before age 18, may be expected to continue indefinitely, and constitute a substantial impairment. Biological and nonbiological factors are involved in these disorders. (From American Psychiatric Glossary, 6th ed)Sturge-Weber Syndrome: A non-inherited congenital condition with vascular and neurological abnormalities. It is characterized by facial vascular nevi (PORT-WINE STAIN), and capillary angiomatosis of intracranial membranes (MENINGES; CHOROID). Neurological features include EPILEPSY; cognitive deficits; GLAUCOMA; and visual defects.Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Electroretinography: Recording of electric potentials in the retina after stimulation by light.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Retinal DiseasesMaxillofacial Abnormalities: Congenital structural deformities, malformations, or other abnormalities of the maxilla and face or facial bones.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Cerebellum: The part of brain that lies behind the BRAIN STEM in the posterior base of skull (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR). It is also known as the "little brain" with convolutions similar to those of CEREBRAL CORTEX, inner white matter, and deep cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain balance, and learn motor skills.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Spermatozoa: Mature male germ cells derived from SPERMATIDS. As spermatids move toward the lumen of the SEMINIFEROUS TUBULES, they undergo extensive structural changes including the loss of cytoplasm, condensation of CHROMATIN into the SPERM HEAD, formation of the ACROSOME cap, the SPERM MIDPIECE and the SPERM TAIL that provides motility.Respiratory System Abnormalities: Congenital structural abnormalities of the respiratory system.Fetus: The unborn young of a viviparous mammal, in the postembryonic period, after the major structures have been outlined. In humans, the unborn young from the end of the eighth week after CONCEPTION until BIRTH, as distinguished from the earlier EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Autistic Disorder: A disorder beginning in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual. (DSM-V)Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Jaw Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the jaw.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Chromosomes, Human, 6-12 and X: The medium-sized, submetacentric human chromosomes, called group C in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 and the X chromosome.Radiography, Thoracic: X-ray visualization of the chest and organs of the thoracic cavity. It is not restricted to visualization of the lungs.Amniocentesis: Percutaneous transabdominal puncture of the uterus during pregnancy to obtain amniotic fluid. It is commonly used for fetal karyotype determination in order to diagnose abnormal fetal conditions.Temporal Lobe: Lower lateral part of the cerebral hemisphere responsible for auditory, olfactory, and semantic processing. It is located inferior to the lateral fissure and anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE.Dominance, Cerebral: Dominance of one cerebral hemisphere over the other in cerebral functions.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 5: One of the two pairs of human chromosomes in the group B class (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 4-5).Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1: A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Epilepsy: A disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of paroxysmal brain dysfunction due to a sudden, disorderly, and excessive neuronal discharge. Epilepsy classification systems are generally based upon: (1) clinical features of the seizure episodes (e.g., motor seizure), (2) etiology (e.g., post-traumatic), (3) anatomic site of seizure origin (e.g., frontal lobe seizure), (4) tendency to spread to other structures in the brain, and (5) temporal patterns (e.g., nocturnal epilepsy). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p313)Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Turner Syndrome: A syndrome of defective gonadal development in phenotypic females associated with the karyotype 45,X (or 45,XO). Patients generally are of short stature with undifferentiated GONADS (streak gonads), SEXUAL INFANTILISM, HYPOGONADISM, webbing of the neck, cubitus valgus, elevated GONADOTROPINS, decreased ESTRADIOL level in blood, and CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS. NOONAN SYNDROME (also called Pseudo-Turner Syndrome and Male Turner Syndrome) resembles this disorder; however, it occurs in males and females with a normal karyotype and is inherited as an autosomal dominant.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3: A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification.Organ Size: The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.Metabolic Diseases: Generic term for diseases caused by an abnormal metabolic process. It can be congenital due to inherited enzyme abnormality (METABOLISM, INBORN ERRORS) or acquired due to disease of an endocrine organ or failure of a metabolically important organ such as the liver. (Stedman, 26th ed)Fetal Death: Death of the developing young in utero. BIRTH of a dead FETUS is STILLBIRTH.Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 12: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Embryo, Mammalian: The entity of a developing mammal (MAMMALS), generally from the cleavage of a ZYGOTE to the end of embryonic differentiation of basic structures. For the human embryo, this represents the first two months of intrauterine development preceding the stages of the FETUS.Neural Conduction: The propagation of the NERVE IMPULSE along the nerve away from the site of an excitation stimulus.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Animals, Newborn: Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute: Clonal expansion of myeloid blasts in bone marrow, blood, and other tissue. Myeloid leukemias develop from changes in cells that normally produce NEUTROPHILS; BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and MONOCYTES.Echoencephalography: Use of reflected ultrasound in the diagnosis of intracranial pathologic processes.Frontal Lobe: The part of the cerebral hemisphere anterior to the central sulcus, and anterior and superior to the lateral sulcus.Microcephaly: A congenital abnormality in which the CEREBRUM is underdeveloped, the fontanels close prematurely, and, as a result, the head is small. (Desk Reference for Neuroscience, 2nd ed.)Genes, Recessive: Genes that influence the PHENOTYPE only in the homozygous state.Observer Variation: The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).Seizures: Clinical or subclinical disturbances of cortical function due to a sudden, abnormal, excessive, and disorganized discharge of brain cells. Clinical manifestations include abnormal motor, sensory and psychic phenomena. Recurrent seizures are usually referred to as EPILEPSY or "seizure disorder."Eye Diseases: Diseases affecting the eye.Ventricular Dysfunction, Left: A condition in which the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the left ventricular wall.Sensation Disorders: Disorders of the special senses (i.e., VISION; HEARING; TASTE; and SMELL) or somatosensory system (i.e., afferent components of the PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM).Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Mouth Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the mouth.Gene Rearrangement: The ordered rearrangement of gene regions by DNA recombination such as that which occurs normally during development.Bone Diseases, DevelopmentalChromosomes, Human, X: The human female sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and all female gametes in humans.Ultrasonography: The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.Myocardial Contraction: Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.Malformations of Cortical Development: Abnormalities in the development of the CEREBRAL CORTEX. These include malformations arising from abnormal neuronal and glial CELL PROLIFERATION or APOPTOSIS (Group I); abnormal neuronal migration (Group II); and abnormal establishment of cortical organization (Group III). Many INBORN METABOLIC BRAIN DISORDERS affecting CNS formation are often associated with cortical malformations. They are common causes of EPILEPSY and developmental delay.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.Vaginal Smears: Collection of pooled secretions of the posterior vaginal fornix for cytologic examination.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 21: A specific pair of GROUP G CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Foot Deformities, Congenital: Alterations or deviations from normal shape or size which result in a disfigurement of the foot occurring at or before birth.Skull: The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.Pregnancy Trimester, Second: The middle third of a human PREGNANCY, from the beginning of the 15th through the 28th completed week (99 to 196 days) of gestation.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Mice, Neurologic Mutants: Mice which carry mutant genes for neurologic defects or abnormalities.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Movement Disorders: Syndromes which feature DYSKINESIAS as a cardinal manifestation of the disease process. Included in this category are degenerative, hereditary, post-infectious, medication-induced, post-inflammatory, and post-traumatic conditions.Embryonic and Fetal Development: Morphological and physiological development of EMBRYOS or FETUSES.Growth Disorders: Deviations from the average values for a specific age and sex in any or all of the following: height, weight, skeletal proportions, osseous development, or maturation of features. Included here are both acceleration and retardation of growth.Nerve Tissue ProteinsBlood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Ploidies: The degree of replication of the chromosome set in the karyotype.Chromosomes, Human, 13-15: The medium-sized, acrocentric human chromosomes, called group D in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 13, 14, and 15.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Vision Disorders: Visual impairments limiting one or more of the basic functions of the eye: visual acuity, dark adaptation, color vision, or peripheral vision. These may result from EYE DISEASES; OPTIC NERVE DISEASES; VISUAL PATHWAY diseases; OCCIPITAL LOBE diseases; OCULAR MOTILITY DISORDERS; and other conditions (From Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p132).Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Alleles: Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.Autopsy: Postmortem examination of the body.Cerebral Ventricles: Four CSF-filled (see CEREBROSPINAL FLUID) cavities within the cerebral hemispheres (LATERAL VENTRICLES), in the midline (THIRD VENTRICLE) and within the PONS and MEDULLA OBLONGATA (FOURTH VENTRICLE).
(1/804) Perinatal nephropathies.

The purpose of this paper is to review the development of the mammalian kidney and to assess the influence that various perinatal manipulations may have on the developmental process either morphologically or functionally. Immature kidneys in general have less functional capacity than adult kidneys and a low rate of glomerular filtration, perhaps related to renal blood flow, which appears to limit the disposition of a fluid or solute load. Tubular reabsorption is also limited leading to the urinary loss of glucose, amino acids, bicarbonate and phosphate. Although the relatively low function of the immature kidney is a normal part of development, its capacity to respond under conditions of stress may be less adequate than in adults. An additional concern is that a variety of perinatal manipulations, such as the incidental or accidental ingestion of a chemical, may lead to varying degrees of altered morphogenesis or functional development of the kidney. Chemical induced renal anomalies may be of several types, but in typical teratology experiments hydronephrosis may be the most frequent observation. The functional consequences of these renal malformations may be lethal or inconsequential or while an animal may be able to survive and develop normally in the presence of a renal malformation, it is possible that a stressful situation would unmask a functional malformation which could compromise survival. Thus, some renal abnormalities may be subtle enough to go unnoticed without experimental tests. Without such tests it is impossible to evaluate the effect of functional alterations on successful adaptation.  (+info)

(2/804) Developmental pathways: Sonic hedgehog-Patched-GLI.

Developmental pathways are networks of genes that act coordinately to establish the body plan. Disruptions of genes in one pathway can have effects in related pathways and may result in serious dysmorphogenesis or cancer. Environmental exposures can be associated with poor pregnancy outcomes, including dysmorphic offspring or children with a variety of diseases. An important goal of environmental science should be reduction of these poor outcomes. This will require an understanding of the genes affected by specific exposures and the consequence of alterations in these genes or their products, which in turn will require an understanding of the pathways critical in development. The ligand Sonic hedgehog, the receptors Patched and Smoothened, and the GLI family of transcription factors represent one such pathway. This pathway illustrates several operating principles important in the consideration of developmental consequences of environmental exposures to toxins.  (+info)

(3/804) Young women taking isotretinoin still conceive. Role of physicians in preventing disaster.

QUESTION: One of my adolescent patients was prescribed isotretinoin for severe acne by a dermatologist. I was shocked to discover she does not use any means of contraception. The dermatologist insists he told her about the need for contraception. How can we do better? ANSWER: Clearly this dermatologist, like many of his colleagues, does not comply with the Pregnancy Prevention Program. Until physicians become more aware of this program, babies will continue to be born with embryopathy due to isotretinoin.  (+info)

(4/804) Embryonic and postnatal injections of bromodeoxyuridine produce age-dependent morphological and behavioral abnormalities.

The mitotic marker 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was injected twice daily (60 mg/kg) into pregnant hooded rats on one of embryonic days (E) 11, 12, 13, 15, 17, or 21, or into rat pups on postnatal day (P) 10. The principal findings were the following: (1) BrdU exposure on E11 produces profound effects on body morphology, and animals must be fed a special diet because of chronic tooth abnormalities; (2) BrdU exposure at E17 or earlier produces a change in coat spotting pattern, the precise pattern varying with age; (3) BrdU exposure on E15 or earlier produces a reduction in both brain and body weight; (4) BrdU exposure on E17 or earlier reduces cortical thickness; (5) BrdU exposure on E11-E13 and at P10 reduces cerebellar size relative to cerebral size; (6) spatial learning is significantly affected after injections of BrdU at E11-E17, but the largest effect is on E17; (7) the deficit in spatial learning may be related in part to a reduction in visual acuity; and (8) skilled forelimb ability is most disrupted after BrdU exposure at E15 but is also impaired after injections on E13 or earlier. BrdU thus has teratological effects on body, brain, and behavior that vary with the developmental age of the fetus or infant.  (+info)

(5/804) Longitudinal limb deficiencies and the sclerotomes. An analysis of 378 dysmelic malformations induced by thalidomide.

The pathogenesis of longitudinal reduction deformities of the limbs, or dysmelia, is still a matter of debate. Their morphological pattern was defined from a large collection of radiographs of children with dysmelia following the thalidomide disaster. We compared radiographs of 378 of these limbs with the sclerotomes which are areas of segmental sensory innervation of the limb skeleton defined by the radiation of referred pain. The pattern of dysmelia matched the sclerotomes closely in 279 limbs (73.5%). The principles of skeletal reduction in dysmelia are explained by the arrangement of the sclerotomes. The congruence between two separate and independent data sets shows that both patterns are expressions of the underlying segmental sensory innervation of the skeleton, and that the sensory nervous system is involved in the process of limb morphogenesis and teratogenesis.  (+info)

(6/804) Pregnancy in patients after valve replacement.

This report is based on information obtained from a questionnaire sent to major cardiac centres in the United Kingdom. This produced details of 39 pregnancies in 34 patients after valve replacement. The 39 pregnancies gave rise to 30 healthy babies. The small size of the series probably reflects both the increasing rarity of young women with rheumatic heart disease in this country and the cautious attitude of their cardiologists. This makes it likely that these women represented the best end of the spectrum of cardiac function after valve replacement. Twenty-four pregnancies in 20 women who were not given anticoagulants producted 23 healthy babies and 1 spontaneous abortion. This group comprised 6 patients with free aortic homografts, 1 patient with a fascia lata mitral valve, 1 with a Beall tricuspid prosthesis, 1 with a combined mitral homograft and Starr Edwards aortic prosthesis, and 1 with mitral and aortic frame-mounted fascia lata valves. There were no maternal deaths or thromboembolic complications in this group which included 5 patients who were in atrial fibrillation. Fifteen pregnancies in 14 women who received anticoagulants gave rise to 7 healthy babies. The fetal losses were one stillbirth, one intrauterine death at 34 weeks, and 3 spontaneous abortions; one surviving child has hydrocephalus as a result of blood clot and there were 2 maternal deaths. This group included 13 patients with Starr Edwards valves, 11 mitral and 2 aortic. A patient with a Hammersmith mitral valve was the only one to have been treated with heparin and her valve thrombosed. One patient with a mounted mitral homograft had a cerebral embolus. Nine of these patients were in atrial fibrillation. In 3 additional patients the valve replacement was carried out during pregnancy. Two of the patients survived operation. In one of these who was treated with warfarin the pregnancy well, but there is an increased fetal wastage in patients pregnancy gave rise to a congenitally malformed baby who died in the neonatal period. The baby born to the mother who did not receive anticoagulants has a hare-lip and talipes. Women with artificial valves can tolerate the haemodynamic load of pregnancy well, but there is an increased fetal wastage in patients taking oral anticoagulants. This is probably largely attributable to fetal haemorrhage but there is also a risk of malformation caused by a teratogenic effect of warfarin. Experience gained in non-pregnant patients suggests that withholding anticoagulatns in pregnant patients with prosthetic valves would usually be undersirable but warfarin should be avoided. The advantages of biological valves were apparent in this series.  (+info)

(7/804) Developmental damage, increased lipid peroxidation, diminished cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression, and lowered prostaglandin E2 levels in rat embryos exposed to a diabetic environment.

Previous experimental studies suggest that diabetic embryopathy is associated with an excess of radical oxygen species (ROS), as well as with a disturbance of prostaglandin (PG) metabolism. We aimed to investigate the relationship between these pathways and used hyperglycemia in vitro (embryo culture for 24-48 h) and maternal diabetes in vivo to affect embryonic development. Subsequently, we assessed lipid peroxidation and gene expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and -2 and measured the concentration of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in embryos and membranes. Both hyperglycemia in vitro and maternal diabetes in vivo caused embryonic dysmorphogenesis and increased embryonic levels of 8-epi-PGF2alpha, an indicator of lipid peroxidation. Addition of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) to the culture medium normalized the morphology and 8-epi-PGF2alpha concentration of the embryos exposed to high glucose. Neither hyperglycemia nor diabetes altered COX-1 expression, but embryonic COX-2 expression was diminished on gestational day 10. The PGE2 concentration of day 10 embryos and membranes was decreased after exposure to high glucose in vitro or diabetes in vivo. In vitro addition of NAC to high glucose cultures largely rectified morphology and restored PGE2 concentration, but without normalizing the COX-2 expression in embryos and membranes. Hyperglycemia/diabetes-induced downregulation of embryonic COX-2 gene expression may be a primary event in diabetic embryopathy, leading to lowered PGE2 levels and dysmorphogenesis. Antioxidant treatment does not prevent the decrease in COX-2 mRNA levels but restores PGE2 concentrations, suggesting that diabetes-induced oxidative stress aggravates the loss of COX-2 activity. This may explain in part the antiteratogenic effect of antioxidant treatment.  (+info)

(8/804) Scanning electron microscopy of lithium-induced exogastrulae of Xenopus laevis.

Lithium-induced exogastrulae are abnormal embryos which fail to complete gastrulation and do not form normal neural structures. Scanning electron microscopy has been used to compare the surface structure of the ectoderm cells of exogastrulae with that of the ectoderm cells of normal embryos and has shown that the appearance of ciliated cells is delayed in exogastrulae. In addition, the structure of endoderm cells, which remain exposed in these embryos, has been studied.  (+info)

*  Complications of pregnancy
Exposure to Pharmaceutical drugs in pregnancy. Anti-depressants, for example, may increase risks of such outcomes as preterm ... Caused by: Pregnancy-induced hypercoagulability as a physiological response to potential massive bleeding at childbirth. ... Prenatal methamphetamine exposure can cause premature birth and congenital abnormalities. Other investigations have revealed ... Caused by: Various causes; risk factors include maternal hypertension, trauma, and drug use. Treatment: Immediate delivery if ...
*  Hypodontia
"Severe and Unrecognized Dental Abnormalities After Drug-Induced Epidermal Necrolysis". Arch Dermatol. 145 (11): 1332-1333. doi: ... A relationship was also postulated between abnormalities of the brainstem and the presence of agenesis. Hypodontia is often ... December 2009). "Impact of radiation and chemotherapy on risk of dental abnormalities: a report from the Childhood Cancer ... allergy and toxic epidermal necrolysis after drug. Infectious causes of hypodontia: rubella, candida. The Journal of the ...
*  Panniculitis
... and more rarely with anatomic pancreatic abnormalities, pseudocysts, or drug-induced pancreatitis. Factitial panniculitis is a ... hepatic dysfunction and Coagulation abnormalities. CHP may occur either isolated or as part of cutaneous manifestations of ... panniculitis that may be induced by the injection of organic materials, povidone, feces, saliva, vaginal fluid, and oils. ...
*  Electrocardiography
... genetic and drug-induced Right and left atrial abnormality Electrolytes disturbances & intoxication: Digitalis intoxication ... drug-induced QT prolongation) Assessing severity of electrolyte abnormalities, such as hyperkalemia Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy ... "The "normothermic" Osborn wave induced by severe hypercalcemia". Tex Heart Inst J. 27: 316-7. PMC 101092 . PMID 11093425. ... the effects of cardiac drugs, and the function of implanted pacemakers. Play media The etymology of the word is derived from ...
*  Melanocortin 4 receptor
... predicting individual susceptibility to drug-induced adverse effects causing weight gain and related metabolic abnormalities. ... "Association between common variants near the melanocortin 4 receptor gene and severe antipsychotic drug-induced weight gain". ... Drug Discovery. 7 (4): 307-23. doi:10.1038/nrd2331. PMID 18323849. Fosgerau K, Raun K, Nilsson C, Dahl K, Wulff BS (February ... Giuliani D, Neri L, Canalini F, Calevro A, Ottani A, Vandini E, Sena P, Zaffe D, Guarini S (July 2015). "NDP-α-MSH induces ...
*  Drug-induced nail changes
... are caused by drug administration which may result in a large number of nail abnormalities, usually ...
*  Chromonychia
... can be induced by antineoplastic drugs with few distinct forms, the most frequently seen is melanonychia. Although ... Chromonychia is a term used to indicate an abnormality in color of the substance or surface of the nail plate or subungual ... a few cytostatics may cause these changes, the drugs most commonly involved are adriamycin, cyclophosphamide and vincristine, ...
*  Posterior cingulate
Recently it was found that the psychedelic drug psilocybin induces an altered state of consciousness and is related to abnormal ... Therefore, the functional abnormalities of the PCC might be an accumulation of remote and widespread damage in the brain. The ... Structural and functional abnormalities in the PCC result in a range of neurological and psychiatric disorders. The PCC likely ... Further abnormalities in the PCC, abnormal NMDA, cannabinoid, and DABAergic receptor binding have been found with post-mortem ...
*  List of diseases (D)
... drug induced Dyskinesia Dysmorphism abnormal vocalization mental retardation Dysmorphism cleft palate loose skin ... retardation eye abnormality Dwarfism short limb absent fibulas very short digits Dwarfism stiff joint ocular abnormalities ... Double tachycardia induced by catecholamines Double uterus-hemivagina-renal agenesis Down syndrome Doxorubicin-induced ... Duplication of urethra Dupont-Sellier-Chochillon syndrome Dupuytren subungual exostosis Dupuytren's contracture Dust-induced ...
*  Prostaglandin EP2 receptor
... particular aspirin and nonsteroidal inflammatory drug-induced asthma syndromes) and rhinitis; glaucoma; various diseases of the ... nervous system; fractures, osteoporosis, and other bone abnormalities; pulmonary fibrosis; certain forms of malignant disease ... The following drugs that act on EP2 but also other prostaglandin receptors are in clinical use: Iloprost activates EP2, EP3, ... The following drugs are in development or proposed to be candidates for development as highly selective EP2 agonists for the ...
*  Electrophysiology study
Last, the electrophysiologist may administer various drugs (proarrhythmic agents) to induce arrhythmia. If the arrhythmia is ... The doctor will pace each chamber of the heart one by one, looking for any abnormalities. Then the electrophysiologist tries to ... or drugs. In order to reach the heart with a catheter, a site will be prepared that will allow access to the heart via an ... reproduced by the drugs, the electrophysiologist will search out the source of the abnormal electrical activity. The entire ...
*  Radical (chemistry)
Free radicals may also be involved in Parkinson's disease, senile and drug-induced deafness, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's. ... skin pigmentary melanin abnormalities, deafness, arthritis, and diabetes mellitus. The free-radical theory of aging proposes ... Because free radicals are necessary for life, the body has a number of mechanisms to minimize free-radical-induced damage and ... Some of the symptoms of aging such as atherosclerosis are also attributed to free-radical induced oxidation of cholesterol to 7 ...
*  Neutropenia
... drug-induced neutropenia). Additionally, acute neutropenia can be commonly seen from patients recovering from a viral infection ... metabolic abnormalities, as well as cancer or infections. Neutropenia itself is a rare entity, but can be clinically common in ... Neutropenia can be the result of a variety of consequences, including from certain types of drugs, environmental toxins, ... inflammation-inducing chemicals) that are present naturally in the body. These factors are used regularly in cancer treatment ...
*  Myoclonus
Identifying whether or not abnormalities in these pathways cause myoclonus may help in efforts to develop drug treatments and ... drugs that induce sleep, and for glycine, an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is important for the control of motor and sensory ... and similar drugs, and is possibly a sign of high and/or rapidly increasing serum levels of these drugs. Myoclonic jerks caused ... chemical or drug poisoning, as a side effect of certain drugs (such as tramadol, quinolones, benzodiazepine, gabapentin, ...
*  Cannabis in pregnancy
said there was "... increasing evidence from animal studies showing that cannabinoid drugs ... induce enduring neurobehavioral ... but abnormalities in the endocannabinoid system during the phase of placental development are also linked with problems in ... Drugs in pregnancy Fonseca BM, Correia-da-Silva G, Almada M, Costa MA, Teixeira NA (2013). "The Endocannabinoid System in the ... Hoell I, Havemann-Reinecke U (October 2011). "[Pregnant opioid addicted patients and additional drug intake. Part I. Toxic ...
*  Amenorrhea
To treat drug-induced amenorrhoea, stopping the medication on the advice of a doctor is a usual course of action. Looking at ... might correct abnormalities of Functional Hypothalamic Amenorrhoea (FHA) related to the condition of stress-related amenorrhoea ... A woman in this situation may be unable to become pregnant, even with the help of drugs. Long-term amenorrhoea leads to an ... New research suggests that adding a dosage of Metformin to an anti-psychotic drug regimen can restore menstruation. Metformin ...
*  Tuberculosis management
The drug most frequently implicated as causing a drug fever is RMP: details are given in the entry on rifampicin. Drug-induced ... Untreated TB in pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of miscarriage and major fetal abnormality, and treatment of ... Drug-induced hepatitis is discussed in a separate section above. Pregnancy itself is not a risk factor for TB. Rifampicin makes ... The same scheme as is used for test dosing for drug-induced hepatitis (described below) may be used. ...
*  Spasmodic torticollis
These conditions are listed below: Perinatal (during birth) cerebral injury Kernicterus Cerebrovascular diseases Drug induced ... neurological abnormalities other than dystonia, abnormalities on brain imaging, particularly in the basal ganglia. To further ... These drugs have fallen out of fashion due to various serious side effects: sedation, parkinsonism, and tardive dyskinesia. ... How to induce neuroplasticity. A new approach to rehabilitate dystonias. Galene editions 2012. Adam OR, Jankovic J (2007). " ...
*  Moxifloxacin
Coadministration of moxifloxacin with other drugs that also prolong the QT interval or induce bradycardia (e.g., beta-blockers ... including those with conduction abnormalities. Well-controlled studies of the safety of moxifloxacin in pregnancy or lactating ... "Center for drug evaluation and research Application number 21-598" (PDF). Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 15 April 2005. ... Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. Food and Drug Administration. Retrieved 31 July 2009. Bayer AG (6 November 2007). " ...
*  Disease model of addiction
... exposure to a drug of abuse to induce changes in a vulnerable brain that drive the compulsive seeking and taking of drugs, and ... and cellular adaptations that occur in specific brain regions to mediate addiction-associated behavioral abnormalities. These ... Genetic factors and mental disorders can contribute to the severity of drug addiction. Approximately fifty percent of the ... Despite the importance of numerous psychosocial factors, at its core, drug addiction involves a biological process: the ability ...
*  Critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency
... or use of enzyme inducing drugs such as phenytoin. Treatment with imidazole drugs such as etomidate, ketoconazole and ... Several blood test abnormalities can suggest corticosteroid insufficiency, such as hypoglycemia, hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, ... Both a metyrapone-induced decrease in cortisol and hypoglycemia are potentially harmful to intensive care patients. The exact ... Furthermore, anaesthesia drugs like etomidate could interfere with the HPA axis. The secretion also loses its normal diurnal ...
*  Interstitial lung disease
carbon bblack, ink mist) Organic Hypersensitivity pneumonitis Drug-induced Antibiotics Chemotherapeutic drugs Antiarrhythmic ... syndrome Malignancy Lymphangitic carcinomatosis Predominantly in childrenDiffuse developmental disorders Growth abnormalities ... the Food and Drug Administration approved a new drug for the treatment of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF). This drug, Ofev ... This drug has been shown to slow the decline of lung function although the drug has not been shown to reduce mortality or ...
*  Life-process model of addiction
... exposure to a drug of abuse to induce changes in a vulnerable brain that drive the compulsive seeking and taking of drugs, and ... and cellular adaptations that occur in specific brain regions to mediate addiction-associated behavioral abnormalities. These ... Stanton Peele Drug abuse SMART Recovery Moderation Management Alcoholics Anonymous Nestler EJ (December 2013). "Cellular basis ... DESPITE THE IMPORTANCE OF NUMEROUS PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS, AT ITS CORE, DRUG ADDICTION INVOLVES A BIOLOGICAL PROCESS: the ability ...
*  Sulfhemoglobinemia
... is usually drug induced. Drugs associated with sulfhemoglobinemia include sulphonamides and sulfasalazine. ... even though a blood count test may not show any abnormalities in the blood. This discoloration is called cyanosis, and is ... Gopalachar AS, Bowie VL, Bharadwaj P (June 2005). "Phenazopyridine-induced sulfhemoglobinemia". Ann Pharmacother. 39 (6): 1128- ... all serious medical abnormalities. On June 8, 2007, Canadian anesthesiologists Dr. Stephan Schwarz, Dr. Giuseppe Del Vicario, ...
*  Torticollis
Other categories include: Osseous Traumatic CNS/PNS Ocular Non-muscular soft tissue Spasmodic Drug induced The congenital ... Radiographs of the cervical spine should be obtained to rule out obvious bony abnormality, and MRI should be considered if ... The use of certain drugs, such as antipsychotics, can cause torticollis. Antiemetics - Neuroleptic Class - Phenothiazines There ... Velickovic, M; Benabou, R; Brin, MF (2001). "Cervical dystonia pathophysiology and treatment options". Drugs. 61 (13): 1921-43 ...
*  Cervical cancer
"FDA Approves First Drug Treatment for Late-Stage Cervical Cancer". U.S. Food and Drug Administration. 2006-06-15. Archived from ... Smoking can increase the risk in women a few different ways, which can be by direct and indirect methods of inducing cervical ... was developed to place emphasis on the spectrum of abnormality in these lesions, and to help standardise treatment. It ... On June 15, 2006, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the use of a combination of two chemotherapy drugs, hycamtin and ...
*  Necrotizing vasculitis
... or drug-induced vasculitis, but is not diagnostic. Electromyography. It is useful if a systemic vasculitis is suspected and ... and vascular wall abnormalities. Arteriography are not diagnostic in itself if other accessible areas for biopsy are present. ... Hypersensitivity vasculitis (allergic vasculitis). Usually due to a hypersensitivity reaction to a known drug. Drugs most ... At least 3 out of 5 criteria yields sensitivity and specificity of 71 and 84%: age > 16 use of possible triggering drug in ...
Musculoskeletal Abnormalities | Profiles RNS  Musculoskeletal Abnormalities | Profiles RNS
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced. *Abnormalities, Multiple. *Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced. *Abnormalities, Severe Teratoid. * ... "Musculoskeletal Abnormalities" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH ( ... This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Musculoskeletal Abnormalities" by people in this website by ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Musculoskeletal Abnormalities" by people in Profiles. ...
more infohttps://profiles.umassmed.edu/display/114043
Ventricular Tachycardia (VT) Ablation or Escalated Drug Therapy - Tabular View - ClinicalTrials.gov  Ventricular Tachycardia (VT) Ablation or Escalated Drug Therapy - Tabular View - ClinicalTrials.gov
electrolyte abnormalities, drug induced arrhythmia). *Are known to be ineligible to take amiodarone (eg. active hepatitis, ... Ventricular Tachycardia (VT) Ablation or Escalated Drug Therapy (VANISH). The safety and scientific validity of this study is ... Ventricular Tachycardia (VT) Ablation or Escalated Drug Therapy. Official Title ICMJE Ventricular Tachycardia Ablation or ... Failed' first-line antiarrhythmic drug therapy as defined by one of:. *Appropriate ICD therapy or sustained VT occurred while ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/record/NCT00905853
Internet Archive Search: creator:(Thomas Shepard) AND -description:(Google)  Internet Archive Search: creator:(Thomas Shepard) AND -description:(Google)
Topics: Teratogenic agents, Abnormalities, Drug-induced, Teratogens. JSTOR Early Journal Content, The Yale Law Journal ...
more infohttp://archive.org/search.php?query=creator%3A%28Thomas%20Shepard%29%20AND%20-description%3A%28Google%29
Teratological risk evaluation and prevention of voluntary abortion.  Teratological risk evaluation and prevention of voluntary abortion.
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced*. Abortion, Induced / statistics & numerical data*. Adult. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. ...
more infohttp://www.biomedsearch.com/nih/Teratological-risk-evaluation-prevention-voluntary/16582865.html
Green tea extract increases cyclophosphamide-induced teratogenesis by modulating the expression of cytochrome P-450 mRNA.  Green tea extract increases cyclophosphamide-induced teratogenesis by modulating the expression of cytochrome P-450 mRNA.
... visceral and skeletal abnormalities induced by cyclophosphamide were investigated in rats. Pregnant rats were daily ... Abnormalities, Drug-Induced*. Animals. Aryl Hydrocarbon Hydroxylases / biosynthesis*, genetics. Camellia sinensis / chemistry* ... Drug Synergism. Female. Fetal Development / drug effects, physiology. Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental / drug effects ... abnormalities. When pre-treated with GTE, cyclophosphamide-induced body weight loss and abnormalities of fetuses were ...
more infohttp://www.biomedsearch.com/nih/Green-tea-extract-increases-cyclophosphamide/19103281.html
Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences Listings | Yale School of Medicine  Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences Listings | Yale School of Medicine
22q11 Deletion Syndrome; Abnormalities, Drug-Induced; Abortion, Threatened; Agenesis of Corpus Callosum; Amniotic Fluid; Aortic ... Congenital Abnormalities; Fetal Diseases; Heart Defects, Congenital; Pregnancy Complications Clinical Interests. ...
more infohttps://medicine.yale.edu/intranet/facultybydept/obgynfac.aspx
Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences Listings | Yale School of Medicine  Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences Listings | Yale School of Medicine
22q11 Deletion Syndrome; Abnormalities, Drug-Induced; Abortion, Threatened; Agenesis of Corpus Callosum; Amniotic Fluid; Aortic ... Congenital Abnormalities; Fetal Diseases; Heart Defects, Congenital; Pregnancy Complications Clinical Interests. ...
more infohttp://medicine.yale.edu/intranet/facultybydept/obgynfac.aspx
What We Study  What We Study
Drug Induced Abnormality. * Eicosanoids. * Embryogenesis. * Environmental Impacts * Epigenetics. * Fetal Development / ...
more infohttps://tools.niehs.nih.gov/topics/
Platelet-Oriented Inhibition in New TIA and Minor Ischemic Stroke (POINT) Trial - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov  Platelet-Oriented Inhibition in New TIA and Minor Ischemic Stroke (POINT) Trial - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov
History of drug-induced hematologic or hepatic abnormalities. *Anticipated requirement for long-term (,7 day) non-study ... Qualifying ischemic event induced by angiography or surgery.. *Severe non-cardiovascular comorbidity with life expectancy ,3 ... Drug: Clopidogrel Loading dose of 600mg followed by 75 milligrams, oral, one tablet daily for 89 days ... Drug: placebo Loading dose of 8 tablets followed by one tablet daily for 89 days ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00991029?term=NCT00991029&rank=1
Platelet Reactivity in Acute Non-disabling Cerebrovascular Events - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov  Platelet Reactivity in Acute Non-disabling Cerebrovascular Events - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov
History of drug-induced hematologic or hepatic abnormalities. *Low white blood cell (,2 x10^9/L) or platelet count (,100 x10^9/ ... Drugs: Ticagrelor and Acetylsalicylic acid.. Drug: Ticagrelor and Acetylsalicylic acid This group will receive a 180 mg loading ... Drugs: Clopidogrel and Acetylsalicylic acid.. Drug: Clopidogrel and Acetylsalicylic acid This group will receive a 300 mg ... Drug: Ticagrelor and Acetylsalicylic acid Drug: Clopidogrel and Acetylsalicylic acid Phase 2 Phase 3 ...
more infohttps://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show?term=ASPIRIN+AND+P2&rank=8
Hypodontia - Wikipedia  Hypodontia - Wikipedia
"Severe and Unrecognized Dental Abnormalities After Drug-Induced Epidermal Necrolysis". Arch. Dermatol. 145 (11): 1332-1333. doi ... Common environmental factors include infection, trauma and drugs which predispose to the condition. In hereditary cases, ... A relationship was also postulated between abnormalities of the brainstem and the presence of agenesis.[13] ... "Impact of radiation and chemotherapy on risk of dental abnormalities: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study" ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypodontia
Rolatuss-SR  - Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy, Alcohol | RxWiki  Rolatuss-SR - Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy, Alcohol | RxWiki
Abnormalities, Drug-induced. *Bradycardia. *Colic. *Colonic Diseases. *Common Cold. *Diverticulitis. *Drug Toxicity ...
more infohttps://www.rxwiki.com/rolatuss-sr
Respa-A.R.M.  - Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy, Alcohol | RxWiki  Respa-A.R.M. - Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy, Alcohol | RxWiki
Abnormalities, Drug-induced. *Bradycardia. *Colic. *Colonic Diseases. *Common Cold. *Diverticulitis. *Drug Toxicity ...
more infohttps://www.rxwiki.com/respa-arm
Mary G Carey, PhD, RN, FAHA, FAAN | Faculty Directory | University of Rochester School of Nursing



		  Mary G Carey, PhD, RN, FAHA, FAAN | Faculty Directory | University of Rochester School of Nursing
Carey M, Al-Zaiti SS, Kozik TM, Pelter MM (2015). Drug Induced ECG Abnormalities. Am J Crit Care, 24 (4), 365-6. ... Pelter M.M., Kozik T.M., Carey M.G. (2006). ECG changes during induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest. American Journal of ... Kozik, TM, Carey MG, Al-Zaiti SS, Pelter MM (2014). Heart-rate induced conduction defects. American Journal Critical Care, 24 ( ... Al-Zaiti, SS, Hostler, D., Kozik, TM, Pelter MM, Carey,l MG (2014). Repolarization abnormalities in young athletes. American ...
more infohttps://www.son.rochester.edu/faculty/detail/mgcarey/
New Treatments May Be Worth the Wait in CLL  New Treatments May Be Worth the Wait in CLL
Some patients develop liver function abnormalities and drug-induced hepatitis.. William Wierda, center medical director for the ... "If you stop the drugs, the disease will progress, and so patients must stay on those drugs continuously." Cancer drugs are ... Older Drugs Remain Available. With so many new options, might it be possible to move away from chemo, maybe even ditch the ... Because the drugs are so new, we don't have long-term data yet, but, says Wierda, "we're starting to see more patients ...
more infohttps://www.curetoday.com/publications/cure/2015/summer-2015/new-treatments-may-be-worth-the-wait-in-cll
Free Dentistry Flashcards about Medical Emergencies  Free Dentistry Flashcards about Medical Emergencies
blood dyscrasia, bleeding disorders, liver dysfunction, and drug-induced clotting abnormalities. What are the follow-up ... Which U.S. Food and Drug Administration categories of drugs are considered safe for use with pregnant clients? A. A and B B. A ... any drug capable of causing a birth defect in the fetus. Valvulopathy. a disorder of valve function causing a variety of ... What class of drugs should be avoided during pregnancy? NSAIDS, Tetracyline. What can NSAIDS do during pregnancy to the mother? ...
more infohttps://www.studystack.com/flashcard-1866808
Andersen-Tawil syndrome: prospective cohort analysis and expansion of the phenotype. - Semantic Scholar  Andersen-Tawil syndrome: prospective cohort analysis and expansion of the phenotype. - Semantic Scholar
... and neuromuscular abnormalities. Approximately 70% of patients have mutations in KCNJ2, resulting in dysfunction of the inward- ... Drug-induced Inhibition and Trafficking Disruption of ion Channels: Pathogenesis of QT Abnormalities and Drug-induced Fatal ... and neuromuscular abnormalities. Approximately 70% of patients have mutations in KCNJ2, resulting in dysfunction of the inward- ...
more infohttps://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Andersen-Tawil-syndrome%3A-prospective-cohort-and-of-Yoon-Oberoi/3984035a4f1b2be3656201141a12c0915bf43488
Toxins  | Free Full-Text | Evaluation of the Liver Toxicity of Pterocephalus hookeri Extract via Triggering Necrosis | HTML  Toxins | Free Full-Text | Evaluation of the Liver Toxicity of Pterocephalus hookeri Extract via Triggering Necrosis | HTML
This finding indicated that the liver toxicity induced by BUE from P. hookeri was mainly caused by necrosis, which provides an ... The mechanical study suggested that BUE-induced liver toxicity was closely associated with necrosis detected by MTT and ... suggested that liver toxicity was mainly induced by BUE. ... Drug-induced liver injury causes abnormalities in biomarkers in ... Holt, M.P.; Ju, C. Mechanisms of drug-induced liver injury. AAPS J. 2006, 8, E48-E54. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed] ...
more infohttps://www.mdpi.com/2072-6651/11/3/142/htm
Pneumotox » Drug » Venocuran  Pneumotox » Drug » Venocuran
A discontinued drug against venous disorders composed of phenopyrazone (pyrazolone derivative), horse-chestnut extract, and ... XVIII.o Eye catcher: Drug-induced musculoskeletal abnormalities * * XIX Cytology, biochemistry of BAL, pleural fluid or FNA ... The Drug-Induced Respiratory Disease Website. Philippe Camus, M.D.. Dijon, France. ... A discontinued drug against venous disorders composed of phenopyrazone (pyrazolone derivative), horse-chestnut extract, and ...
more infohttp://pneumotox.com/drug/view/749/venocuran/
Pneumotox » Drug » Oil-based formulations  Pneumotox » Drug » Oil-based formulations
Drugs injected IM, intradermally or (rarely IV) as oil-based formulations or oil/lipid depots, particularly sexual/anabolic ... XVIII.o Eye catcher: Drug-induced musculoskeletal abnormalities * * XIX Cytology, biochemistry of BAL, pleural fluid or FNA ... The Drug-Induced Respiratory Disease Website. Philippe Camus, M.D.. Dijon, France. ... Drugs injected IM, intradermally or (rarely IV) as oil-based formulations or oil/lipid depots, particularly sexual/anabolic ...
more infohttp://pneumotox.com/drug/view/1124/oil-based-formulations/
  • Musculoskeletal Abnormalities" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (umassmed.edu)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Musculoskeletal Abnormalities" by people in this website by year, and whether "Musculoskeletal Abnormalities" was a major or minor topic of these publications. (umassmed.edu)
  • Below are the most recent publications written about "Musculoskeletal Abnormalities" by people in Profiles. (umassmed.edu)
  • Green tea extract increases cyclophosphamide-induced teratogenesis by modulating the expression of cytochrome P-450 mRNA. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The effects of green tea extract (GTE) on the fetal development and external, visceral and skeletal abnormalities induced by cyclophosphamide were investigated in rats. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Then, the comparison research between ethyl acetate extract (EAE) and n-butanol extract (BUE) suggested that liver toxicity was mainly induced by BUE. (mdpi.com)
  • A discontinued drug against venous disorders composed of phenopyrazone (pyrazolone derivative), horse-chestnut extract, and Miroton (glycosides extracted from white squill [Urginea maritima], convallaria, oleander and adonis). (pneumotox.com)
  • The mechanical study suggested that BUE-induced liver toxicity was closely associated with necrosis detected by MTT and propidium iodide (PI) staining, via releasing lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), reducing the fluidity, and increasing the permeability of the cell membrane. (mdpi.com)
  • This finding indicated that the liver toxicity induced by BUE from P. hookeri was mainly caused by necrosis, which provides an important theoretical support for further evaluation of the safety of this folk medicine. (mdpi.com)
  • 1) Pterocephalus hookeri could induce liver toxicity in vivo and in vitro. (mdpi.com)
  • However, a potentially serious lung infection if the drug is discontinued after a period afterwards, carry out the child from fitting smoke detectors throughout your home, in case a fire will probably arrange for you because they do not return within 2 weeks after therapy and to enhance digestion, unless contraindicated by a specialist. (biointegrity.org)
  • and peak serum concentrations of mercury following inorganic mercury salts, but because it does metabolize some drugs, including oral or intravenous sodium thiosulfate is usually nonspecific or unknown. (biointegrity.org)
  • Did you experience many side effects while taking this drug? (rxwiki.com)