Symptom Assessment: Evaluation of manifestations of disease.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Behavioral Symptoms: Observable manifestations of impaired psychological functioning.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Affective Symptoms: Mood or emotional responses dissonant with or inappropriate to the behavior and/or stimulus.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Fatigue: The state of weariness following a period of exertion, mental or physical, characterized by a decreased capacity for work and reduced efficiency to respond to stimuli.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Respiration Disorders: Diseases of the respiratory system in general or unspecified or for a specific respiratory disease not available.Schizophrenia: A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Cough: A sudden, audible expulsion of air from the lungs through a partially closed glottis, preceded by inhalation. It is a protective response that serves to clear the trachea, bronchi, and/or lungs of irritants and secretions, or to prevent aspiration of foreign materials into the lungs.Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms: Symptoms of disorders of the lower urinary tract including frequency, NOCTURIA; urgency, incomplete voiding, and URINARY INCONTINENCE. They are often associated with OVERACTIVE BLADDER; URINARY INCOMPETENCE; and INTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS. Lower urinary tract symptoms in males were traditionally called PROSTATISM.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Gastroesophageal Reflux: Retrograde flow of gastric juice (GASTRIC ACID) and/or duodenal contents (BILE ACIDS; PANCREATIC JUICE) into the distal ESOPHAGUS, commonly due to incompetence of the LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER.Schizophrenic Psychology: Study of mental processes and behavior of schizophrenics.Psychotic Disorders: Disorders in which there is a loss of ego boundaries or a gross impairment in reality testing with delusions or prominent hallucinations. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Gastrointestinal Diseases: Diseases in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Urination Disorders: Abnormalities in the process of URINE voiding, including bladder control, frequency of URINATION, as well as the volume and composition of URINE.Respiratory Tract DiseasesComorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Psychophysiologic Disorders: A group of disorders characterized by physical symptoms that are affected by emotional factors and involve a single organ system, usually under AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM control. (American Psychiatric Glossary, 1988)Headache: The symptom of PAIN in the cranial region. It may be an isolated benign occurrence or manifestation of a wide variety of HEADACHE DISORDERS.Respiratory Sounds: Noises, normal and abnormal, heard on auscultation over any part of the RESPIRATORY TRACT.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Personality Inventory: Check list, usually to be filled out by a person about himself, consisting of many statements about personal characteristics which the subject checks.Prodromal Symptoms: Clinical or physiological indicators that precede the onset of disease.Hot Flashes: A sudden, temporary sensation of heat predominantly experienced by some women during MENOPAUSE. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Dyspnea: Difficult or labored breathing.Dyspepsia: Impaired digestion, especially after eating.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A disorder with chronic or recurrent colonic symptoms without a clearcut etiology. This condition is characterized by chronic or recurrent ABDOMINAL PAIN, bloating, MUCUS in FECES, and an erratic disturbance of DEFECATION.Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.Hallucinations: Subjectively experienced sensations in the absence of an appropriate stimulus, but which are regarded by the individual as real. They may be of organic origin or associated with MENTAL DISORDERS.Constipation: Infrequent or difficult evacuation of FECES. These symptoms are associated with a variety of causes, including low DIETARY FIBER intake, emotional or nervous disturbances, systemic and structural disorders, drug-induced aggravation, and infections.Delusions: A false belief regarding the self or persons or objects outside the self that persists despite the facts, and is not considered tenable by one's associates.Depressive Disorder, Major: Marked depression appearing in the involution period and characterized by hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and agitation.Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Life Change Events: Those occurrences, including social, psychological, and environmental, which require an adjustment or effect a change in an individual's pattern of living.Flatulence: Production or presence of gas in the gastrointestinal tract which may be expelled through the anus.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Sleep Disorders: Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Affect: The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Heartburn: Substernal pain or burning sensation, usually associated with regurgitation of gastric juice into the esophagus.Antipsychotic Agents: Agents that control agitated psychotic behavior, alleviate acute psychotic states, reduce psychotic symptoms, and exert a quieting effect. They are used in SCHIZOPHRENIA; senile dementia; transient psychosis following surgery; or MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; etc. These drugs are often referred to as neuroleptics alluding to the tendency to produce neurological side effects, but not all antipsychotics are likely to produce such effects. Many of these drugs may also be effective against nausea, emesis, and pruritus.Cognitive Therapy: A direct form of psychotherapy based on the interpretation of situations (cognitive structure of experiences) that determine how an individual feels and behaves. It is based on the premise that cognition, the process of acquiring knowledge and forming beliefs, is a primary determinant of mood and behavior. The therapy uses behavioral and verbal techniques to identify and correct negative thinking that is at the root of the aberrant behavior.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Rhinitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA, the mucous membrane lining the NASAL CAVITIES.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.United StatesPremenstrual Syndrome: A combination of distressing physical, psychologic, or behavioral changes that occur during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Symptoms of PMS are diverse (such as pain, water-retention, anxiety, cravings, and depression) and they diminish markedly 2 or 3 days after the initiation of menses.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Irritable Mood: Abnormal or excessive excitability with easily triggered anger, annoyance, or impatience.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal: Allergic rhinitis that occurs at the same time every year. It is characterized by acute CONJUNCTIVITIS with lacrimation and ITCHING, and regarded as an allergic condition triggered by specific ALLERGENS.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: An anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent, persistent obsessions or compulsions. Obsessions are the intrusive ideas, thoughts, or images that are experienced as senseless or repugnant. Compulsions are repetitive and seemingly purposeful behavior which the individual generally recognizes as senseless and from which the individual does not derive pleasure although it may provide a release from tension.Factor Analysis, Statistical: A set of statistical methods for analyzing the correlations among several variables in order to estimate the number of fundamental dimensions that underlie the observed data and to describe and measure those dimensions. It is used frequently in the development of scoring systems for rating scales and questionnaires.Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: Disorders characterized by impairment of the ability to initiate or maintain sleep. This may occur as a primary disorder or in association with another medical or psychiatric condition.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Musculoskeletal Diseases: Diseases of the muscles and their associated ligaments and other connective tissue and of the bones and cartilage viewed collectively.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Bipolar Disorder: A major affective disorder marked by severe mood swings (manic or major depressive episodes) and a tendency to remission and recurrence.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Interview, Psychological: A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system. This includes disorders of the brain, spinal cord, cranial nerves, peripheral nerves, nerve roots, autonomic nervous system, neuromuscular junction, and muscle.Nausea: An unpleasant sensation in the stomach usually accompanied by the urge to vomit. Common causes are early pregnancy, sea and motion sickness, emotional stress, intense pain, food poisoning, and various enteroviruses.Antidepressive Agents: Mood-stimulating drugs used primarily in the treatment of affective disorders and related conditions. Several MONOAMINE OXIDASE INHIBITORS are useful as antidepressants apparently as a long-term consequence of their modulation of catecholamine levels. The tricyclic compounds useful as antidepressive agents (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, TRICYCLIC) also appear to act through brain catecholamine systems. A third group (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, SECOND-GENERATION) is a diverse group of drugs including some that act specifically on serotonergic systems.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Mood Disorders: Those disorders that have a disturbance in mood as their predominant feature.Respiratory Function Tests: Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Psychological Tests: Standardized tests designed to measure abilities, as in intelligence, aptitude, and achievement tests, or to evaluate personality traits.Palliative Care: Care alleviating symptoms without curing the underlying disease. (Stedman, 25th ed)Forced Expiratory Volume: Measure of the maximum amount of air that can be expelled in a given number of seconds during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination . It is usually given as FEV followed by a subscript indicating the number of seconds over which the measurement is made, although it is sometimes given as a percentage of forced vital capacity.Vomiting: The forcible expulsion of the contents of the STOMACH through the MOUTH.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Substance Withdrawal Syndrome: Physiological and psychological symptoms associated with withdrawal from the use of a drug after prolonged administration or habituation. The concept includes withdrawal from smoking or drinking, as well as withdrawal from an administered drug.Age of Onset: The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Agricultural Workers' Diseases: Diseases in persons engaged in cultivating and tilling soil, growing plants, harvesting crops, raising livestock, or otherwise engaged in husbandry and farming. The diseases are not restricted to farmers in the sense of those who perform conventional farm chores: the heading applies also to those engaged in the individual activities named above, as in those only gathering harvest or in those only dusting crops.Sickness Impact Profile: A quality-of-life scale developed in the United States in 1972 as a measure of health status or dysfunction generated by a disease. It is a behaviorally based questionnaire for patients and addresses activities such as sleep and rest, mobility, recreation, home management, emotional behavior, social interaction, and the like. It measures the patient's perceived health status and is sensitive enough to detect changes or differences in health status occurring over time or between groups. (From Medical Care, vol.xix, no.8, August 1981, p.787-805)Dissociative Disorders: Sudden temporary alterations in the normally integrative functions of consciousness.Dust: Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Personality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.Skin Tests: Epicutaneous or intradermal application of a sensitizer for demonstration of either delayed or immediate hypersensitivity. Used in diagnosis of hypersensitivity or as a test for cellular immunity.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Dizziness: An imprecise term which may refer to a sense of spatial disorientation, motion of the environment, or lightheadedness.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Common Cold: A catarrhal disorder of the upper respiratory tract, which may be viral or a mixed infection. It generally involves a runny nose, nasal congestion, and sneezing.Peak Expiratory Flow Rate: Measurement of the maximum rate of airflow attained during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination. Common abbreviations are PEFR and PFR.Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Hypesthesia: Absent or reduced sensitivity to cutaneous stimulation.Menopause: The last menstrual period. Permanent cessation of menses (MENSTRUATION) is usually defined after 6 to 12 months of AMENORRHEA in a woman over 45 years of age. In the United States, menopause generally occurs in women between 48 and 55 years of age.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Colonic Diseases, Functional: Chronic or recurrent colonic disorders without an identifiable structural or biochemical explanation. The widely recognized IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME falls into this category.Climacteric: Physiologic period, characterized by endocrine, somatic, and psychic changes with the termination of ovarian function in the female. It may also accompany the normal diminution of sexual activity in the male.Paresthesia: Subjective cutaneous sensations (e.g., cold, warmth, tingling, pressure, etc.) that are experienced spontaneously in the absence of stimulation.Delayed Diagnosis: Non-optimal interval of time between onset of symptoms, identification, and initiation of treatment.Caregivers: Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Dyspareunia: Recurrent genital pain occurring during, before, or after SEXUAL INTERCOURSE in either the male or the female.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Depression, Postpartum: Depression in POSTPARTUM WOMEN, usually within four weeks after giving birth (PARTURITION). The degree of depression ranges from mild transient depression to neurotic or psychotic depressive disorders. (From DSM-IV, p386)Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Conversion Disorder: A disorder whose predominant feature is a loss or alteration in physical functioning that suggests a physical disorder but that is actually a direct expression of a psychological conflict or need.Parkinson Disease: A progressive, degenerative neurologic disease characterized by a TREMOR that is maximal at rest, retropulsion (i.e. a tendency to fall backwards), rigidity, stooped posture, slowness of voluntary movements, and a masklike facial expression. Pathologic features include loss of melanin containing neurons in the substantia nigra and other pigmented nuclei of the brainstem. LEWY BODIES are present in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus but may also be found in a related condition (LEWY BODY DISEASE, DIFFUSE) characterized by dementia in combination with varying degrees of parkinsonism. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1059, pp1067-75)Hypersensitivity: Altered reactivity to an antigen, which can result in pathologic reactions upon subsequent exposure to that particular antigen.Chest Pain: Pressure, burning, or numbness in the chest.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Fibromyalgia: A common nonarticular rheumatic syndrome characterized by myalgia and multiple points of focal muscle tenderness to palpation (trigger points). Muscle pain is typically aggravated by inactivity or exposure to cold. This condition is often associated with general symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, stiffness, HEADACHES, and occasionally DEPRESSION. There is significant overlap between fibromyalgia and the chronic fatigue syndrome (FATIGUE SYNDROME, CHRONIC). Fibromyalgia may arise as a primary or secondary disease process. It is most frequent in females aged 20 to 50 years. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1494-95)Pelvic Pain: Pain in the pelvic region of genital and non-genital origin and of organic or psychogenic etiology. Frequent causes of pain are distension or contraction of hollow viscera, rapid stretching of the capsule of a solid organ, chemical irritation, tissue ischemia, and neuritis secondary to inflammatory, neoplastic, or fibrotic processes in adjacent organs. (Kase, Weingold & Gershenson: Principles and Practice of Clinical Gynecology, 2d ed, pp479-508)Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Urinary Incontinence: Involuntary loss of URINE, such as leaking of urine. It is a symptom of various underlying pathological processes. Major types of incontinence include URINARY URGE INCONTINENCE and URINARY STRESS INCONTINENCE.Gastroparesis: Chronic delayed gastric emptying. Gastroparesis may be caused by motor dysfunction or paralysis of STOMACH muscles or may be associated with other systemic diseases such as DIABETES MELLITUS.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Bronchitis: Inflammation of the large airways in the lung including any part of the BRONCHI, from the PRIMARY BRONCHI to the TERTIARY BRONCHI.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Internal-External Control: Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).Urologic Diseases: Pathological processes of the URINARY TRACT in both males and females.Deglutition Disorders: Difficulty in SWALLOWING which may result from neuromuscular disorder or mechanical obstruction. Dysphagia is classified into two distinct types: oropharyngeal dysphagia due to malfunction of the PHARYNX and UPPER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER; and esophageal dysphagia due to malfunction of the ESOPHAGUS.Neurologic Examination: Assessment of sensory and motor responses and reflexes that is used to determine impairment of the nervous system.JapanMental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale: A scale comprising 18 symptom constructs chosen to represent relatively independent dimensions of manifest psychopathology. The initial intended use was to provide more efficient assessment of treatment response in clinical psychopharmacology research; however, the scale was readily adapted to other uses. (From Hersen, M. and Bellack, A.S., Dictionary of Behavioral Assessment Techniques, p. 87)Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Placebos: Any dummy medication or treatment. Although placebos originally were medicinal preparations having no specific pharmacological activity against a targeted condition, the concept has been extended to include treatments or procedures, especially those administered to control groups in clinical trials in order to provide baseline measurements for the experimental protocol.Hypersensitivity, Immediate: Hypersensitivity reactions which occur within minutes of exposure to challenging antigen due to the release of histamine which follows the antigen-antibody reaction and causes smooth muscle contraction and increased vascular permeability.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Spirometry: Measurement of volume of air inhaled or exhaled by the lung.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Arthralgia: Pain in the joint.Anti-Asthmatic Agents: Drugs that are used to treat asthma.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Pruritus: An intense itching sensation that produces the urge to rub or scratch the skin to obtain relief.Allergens: Antigen-type substances that produce immediate hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Early Diagnosis: Methods to determine in patients the nature of a disease or disorder at its early stage of progression. Generally, early diagnosis improves PROGNOSIS and TREATMENT OUTCOME.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Sleep Disorders, Intrinsic: Dyssomnias (i.e., insomnias or hypersomnias) associated with dysfunction of internal sleep mechanisms or secondary to a sleep-related medical disorder (e.g., sleep apnea, post-traumatic sleep disorders, etc.). (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Sweating: The process of exocrine secretion of the SWEAT GLANDS, including the aqueous sweat from the ECCRINE GLANDS and the complex viscous fluids of the APOCRINE GLANDS.Panic Disorder: A type of anxiety disorder characterized by unexpected panic attacks that last minutes or, rarely, hours. Panic attacks begin with intense apprehension, fear or terror and, often, a feeling of impending doom. Symptoms experienced during a panic attack include dyspnea or sensations of being smothered; dizziness, loss of balance or faintness; choking sensations; palpitations or accelerated heart rate; shakiness; sweating; nausea or other form of abdominal distress; depersonalization or derealization; paresthesias; hot flashes or chills; chest discomfort or pain; fear of dying and fear of not being in control of oneself or going crazy. Agoraphobia may also develop. Similar to other anxiety disorders, it may be inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.SwedenGastrointestinal Agents: Drugs used for their effects on the gastrointestinal system, as to control gastric acidity, regulate gastrointestinal motility and water flow, and improve digestion.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Self-Assessment: Appraisal of one's own personal qualities or traits.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Sick Building Syndrome: A group of symptoms that are two- to three-fold more common in those who work in large, energy-efficient buildings, associated with an increased frequency of headaches, lethargy, and dry skin. Clinical manifestations include hypersensitivity pneumonitis (ALVEOLITIS, EXTRINSIC ALLERGIC); allergic rhinitis (RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, PERENNIAL); ASTHMA; infections, skin eruptions, and mucous membrane irritation syndromes. Current usage tends to be less restrictive with regard to the type of building and delineation of complaints. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)NorwayFamily: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Psychomotor Agitation: A feeling of restlessness associated with increased motor activity. This may occur as a manifestation of nervous system drug toxicity or other conditions.Great BritainPregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Obsessive Behavior: Persistent, unwanted idea or impulse which is considered normal when it does not markedly interfere with mental processes or emotional adjustment.Air Pollutants, Occupational: Air pollutants found in the work area. They are usually produced by the specific nature of the occupation.Statistics as Topic: The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.Sensation Disorders: Disorders of the special senses (i.e., VISION; HEARING; TASTE; and SMELL) or somatosensory system (i.e., afferent components of the PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM).
... is a rare entity; approximately 222 cases of LDD have been reported in medical literature.[3] Symptoms ... The tumors are usually found on the left cerebellar hemisphere, and consist of abnormal hypertrophic ganglion cells that are ... The tumor, though benign, may cause neurological injury including abnormal movements. MICROSCOPY(lhermitte-duclos disease) 1, ...
Symptoms may include: *Abnormal odor. *Bleeding. *Bumps. *Caking skin buildup that appears white or another color than one's ... Hair falling out in clumps is one symptom of a set of symptoms that may indicate a thyroid concern. In many gynecological exams ... Any of these symptoms may indicate a need for professional assistance from a dermatologist or trichologist for diagnosis. ... Some arise inexplicably, and often only the symptoms can be treated for management of the condition (example: dandruff). There ...
Undiagnosed abnormal genital bleeding. *Cholestatic jaundice of pregnancy or jaundice with prior pill use ... Headaches with focal neurological symptoms. *Major surgery with prolonged immobilization. *Known or suspected carcinoma of the ...
As a symptom, it is commonly seen in patients suffering from schizophrenia, and is considered a negative symptom. It can ... Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 103, 750-757 Sumiyoshi, C.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Nohara, S.; Yamashita, I.; Matsui, M.; Kurachi, M.; ... Although alogia is found as a symptom in a variety of health disorders, it is most commonly found as a negative symptom of ... and negative symptom factors. However, alogia is seen to contain both positive and negative symptoms, with the poverty of ...
Symptoms[edit]. *Abnormal strength and direction of urinary stream. *Visible narrow opening at the meatus in boys ...
Signs and symptoms[edit]. A man with congestive heart failure and marked jugular venous distension. External jugular vein ... Heart attack, high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythm, excessive alcohol use, infection, heart damage[2][3]. ... The symptoms of heart failure are largely determined by which side of the heart fails. The left side pumps blood into the ... Another symptom of heart failure is paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea: a sudden nighttime attack of severe breathlessness, usually ...
"Symptoms Of Bulimia Nervosa". Illawarra Mercury. February 23, 2001. Archived from the original on February 21, 2016.. [ ... Trull, Thimothy (2010-10-08). Abnormal Psychology and Life: A Dimensional Approach. Belmont CA: Wadsworth, Cengage Learning. pp ... Symptoms. Eating a large amount of food in a short amount of time followed by vomiting or the use of laxatives, often normal ... Waller, G (1992). "Sexual abuse and the severity of bulimic symptoms". The British Journal of Psychiatry. 161: 90-3. doi: ...
Nolen-Hoeksema, S. (2014). Somatic Symptom and Dissociative Disorders. In (ab)normal Psychology (6th ed., p. 164). Penn, Plaza ... In other words, symptoms of dissociation may manifest differently at different stages of child and adolescent development and ... Quetiapine is initiated at 25-50 mg PO bid and increased by 50 mg PO bid q3d until symptom resolution is achieved. The higher ... Experiences and symptoms of dissociation can range from the more mundane to those associated with posttraumatic stress disorder ...
Ab)normal Psychology" (6th edition). McGraw-Hill. p.343] Nolan-Hoeksema, Susan (2014). Abnormal Psychology (6 ed.). McGraw-Hill ... The diagnosis is made only when the behavior is not a part of the symptom complex of anorexia nervosa and when the behavior ... Abnormal levels of many hormones, notably serotonin, have been shown to be responsible for some disordered eating behaviors. ... Studies have shown that young females that read fashion magazines tend to have more bulimic symptoms than those females who do ...
Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified XIX S00-T98 Injury, poisoning and ... F68.0) Elaboration of physical symptoms for psychological reasons. *(F68.1) Intentional production or feigning of symptoms or ... F23.0) Acute polymorphic psychotic disorder without symptoms of schizophrenia. *(F23.1) Acute polymorphic psychotic disorder ... F31.2) Bipolar affective disorder, current episode manic with psychotic symptoms. *(F31.3) Bipolar affective disorder, current ...
Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified XIX S00-T98 Injury, poisoning and ... Symptoms, signs, and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, NEC (R00-R94). *Systemic connective tissue disorders (M30-M36) ...
Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified XIX S00-T98 Injury, poisoning and ...
Specify type of symptom or deficit as: *With weakness or paralysis. *With abnormal movement (e.g. tremor, dystonic movement, ... Usually the physical symptoms of the syndrome affect the senses or movement. Common symptoms include blindness, partial or ... The first evidence of functional neurological symptom disorder dates back to 1900 BC, when the symptoms were blamed on the ... "Conversion and somatic symptom disorders". Retrieved 25 November 2015.. *^ a b Stone J, Carson A, Sharpe M (2005). "Functional ...
Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified XIX S00-T98 Injury, poisoning and ...
"Dimensions of dysfunctional attitudes as vulnerabilities to depressive symptoms". Journal of Abnormal Psychology. 104 (3): 431- ... Higher total scores indicate more severe depressive symptoms. Some items on the original BDI had more than one statement marked ... It is not surprising then that Kaiser, Hunka, and Bianchini (1971) concluded that the affective symptoms of depression are less ... ISBN 978-0-471-74584-6. Zimmerman M. Using scales to monitor symptoms and treatment of depression (measurement based care). In ...
These symptoms may lead the victim to present the symptoms as the source of the problem. Child abuse, especially chronic abuse ... ISBN 1-4325-0431-2. McDougall, W (1926). Outline of abnormal psychology. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. Mitchell, TW (1921 ... Other symptoms sometimes found along with dissociation in victims of traumatic abuse (often referred to as "sequelae to abuse ... Dissociation has been described as one of a constellation of symptoms experienced by some victims of multiple forms of ...
This means that most often the symptoms start in the feet and progress upwards, and usually symptoms are more severe in the ... Abnormal QST results can be attributed to dysfunction in the central nervous system. Furthermore, QST is limited by a patient's ... Paresthesias are abnormal sensations. They are often described as numbness, burning, cold, prickling, pins and needles along ... Sensory symptoms of small fiber neuropathy are highly variable. Common complaints include paresthesias, dysesthesias, and ...
Rumination is the focused attention on the symptoms of one's distress, and on its possible causes and consequences, as opposed ... Journal of Abnormal Psychology. 109 (3): 504-511. doi:10.1037/0021-843x.109.3.504. PMID 11016119.. ... Measures of rumination and worry have also demonstrated high correlations, above and beyond that of symptom measures of anxiety ... Rumination has been found to predict changes in both depression and anxiety symptoms and individuals with major depression have ...
Symptoms of hair loss include hair loss in patches usually in circular patterns, dandruff, skin lesions, and scarring. Alopecia ... If the hair count is ,100/day, it is considered abnormal except after shampooing, where hair counts will be up to 250 and be ... Symptoms. Loss of hair from part of the head or body.[1]. ... Signs and symptoms. A case of mid-frontal baldness: Andre ... Psychological problems due to baldness, if present, are typically most severe at the onset of symptoms.[11] ...
Characteristics and symptoms[edit]. The primary symptom of camptocormia is abnormal forward bending of the torso. This bending ... Worsening of symptoms is possible but rare in occurrence.[2] Treatment of the underlying cause of the disease can alleviate the ... Camptocormia, also known as bent spine syndrome (BSS), is a symptom of a multitude of diseases that is most commonly seen in ... This classification differentiates it from a similar syndrome known as kyphosis.[2] Although camptocormia is a symptom of many ...
25 (3). Comer, R. J. (2007). Abnormal Psychology Sixth Edition. New York, NY: Worth Publishers. Comer, R. J. (2007). Abnormal ... In schizophrenia, asociality is one of the main 5 so-called negative symptoms, the others being avolition, anhedonia, reduced ... Davidson, Gerald C.; Neale, John M. (1994). Abnormal Psychology, 6th Edition. New York: John Wiley & Sons. ISBN 978-0-471-56891 ... ISBN 978-0-632-06388-8. Velligan DI and Alphs LD (March 1, 2008). "Negative Symptoms in Schizophrenia: The Importance of ...
Elizabeth acted abnormal by hiding "...under furniture, complained of fever, barked like a dog, and screamed and cried out of ... Others believe it was caused by ergots in the rye, which have been known to cause similar symptoms. Elizabeth's other friends ... Abigail complained of similar symptoms shortly after Betty's episodes. John Hale claimed to have personally seen the harm being ... In the Sewall household, Elizabeth did experience some symptoms but ultimately regained full health. In 1693, the Salem Witch ...
A food allergy is an abnormal immune response to food.[1] The symptoms of the allergic reaction may range from mild to severe.[ ... Antihistamines can alleviate some of the milder symptoms of an allergic reaction, but do not treat all symptoms of anaphylaxis. ... Signs and symptoms[edit]. Food allergies usually have a fast onset (from seconds to one hour) and may include:[13] ... When symptoms are related to a drop in blood pressure, the person is said to be in anaphylactic shock. Anaphylaxis occurs when ...
Symptoms. Lump, abnormal bleeding, prolonged cough, unexplained weight loss, change in bowel movements[1]. ... Local symptoms. Local symptoms may occur due to the mass of the tumor or its ulceration. For example, mass effects from lung ... Systemic symptoms. General symptoms occur due to effects that are not related to direct or metastatic spread. These may include ... When cancer begins, it produces no symptoms. Signs and symptoms appear as the mass grows or ulcerates. The findings that result ...
Abnormal activity in the PCC has been linked to schizophrenia, a mental disorder with common symptoms such as hallucinations, ... There are also abnormal PCC responses during task performance.[31] These abnormalities may contribute to psychotic symptoms of ... In fact, PCC function is abnormal in ADHD.[4] Within the DMN, functional connectivity is reduced and resting state activity is ... Abnormal PCC functional connectivity has been linked to major depression, with variable results. One study reports increased ...
Symptoms may also include increased hunger, feeling tired, and sores that do not heal.[3] Often symptoms come on slowly.[6] ... "Draft Recommendation Statement Screening for Abnormal Glucose and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus". U.S. Preventive Services Task ... Other symptoms may include loss of taste.[24] Many people, however, have no symptoms during the first few years and are ... Symptoms. Increased thirst, frequent urination, unexplained weight loss, increased hunger[3]. Complications. Hyperosmolar ...
... author the symptoms and signs of the psychological disorder that includes memory loss ... Models of Abnormal Behavior - research papers discuss that model abnormal behaviors are based on the theory that abnormal ... Symptoms of Dissociative Disorders. Symptoms associated with psychogenic amnesia include a memory loss associated with extreme ... Abnormal Psychology - Remember that abnormal psychology involves identifying the criteria for judging whether a behavior is ...
Associated symptoms and signs include convulsions, tics, and grimacing. Pinpoint your symptoms and signs with MedicineNets ... Learn about the diseases and conditions that may cause abnormal facial expressions, and read about the medications used in ... home/mental health center/ mental health a-z list/symptom checker/abnormal facial expressions symptoms ... Abnormal Facial Expressions: Symptoms & Signs. *Medical Author: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD. ...
This symptom is not the same as showing poor posture or slumping over. Rather, its a tendency to hold a particular body ... Abnormal posturing refers to rigid body movements and chronic abnormal positions of the body. ... Preventing Abnormal Posturing. Abnormal posturing is a symptom of an injury, disease, or illness. Ignoring symptoms may cause ... Abnormal posturing refers to rigid body movements and chronic abnormal positions of the body. This symptom is not the same as ...
Read about liver disease symptoms like fatigue, yellowing of the skin, nausea, and more. ... Hepatitis C, Hep B, Hep A: Symptoms, Causes, Treatment See Slideshow From Healthy Resources. *Common Signs of Hep C ... Symptoms also may depend upon the type of liver disease.. *The inflammation of hepatitis may be associated with pain in the ... Gilberts Disease with abnormal bilirubin metabolism. Cancer. *Primary liver cancers arise directly from cells within the liver ...
Read about liver disease symptoms like fatigue, yellowing of the skin, nausea, and more. ...
Scientifically known as an Arrhythmia or tachycardia, based on the type, abnormal... ... Abnormal heartbeat is a more common problem than people care to understand. ... What Are The Symptoms of Brain Tumor?. The symptoms of a brain tumor in the adults can be general or specific. One of the most ... There are multiple heart rhythm disorders/Arrhythmia types and abnormal heartbeat can also be classified as one of the symptoms ...
Treatments and Tools for abnormal mri. Find abnormal mri information, treatments for abnormal mri and abnormal mri symptoms. ... MedHelps abnormal mri Center for Information, Symptoms, Resources, ... Posts on abnormal mri (32). MRI report says clinically significant, but neurology says its normal. - Multiple Sclerosis ... Hello I am a 37 female, I had gotten a MRI done and it came back with Abnormal findings fro... ...
Find abnormal heart rate information, treatments for abnormal heart rate and abnormal heart rate symptoms. ... MedHelps abnormal heart rate Center for Information, Symptoms, Resources, Treatments and Tools for abnormal heart rate. ... I found out that my boyfriend (who is 26 now) had a fast, somewhat abnormal heart rate as a... ... Can a child grow out of an abnormal heart rate? - Heart Rhythm Community ...
List of 70 causes for Abnormal rigidity and Gait disorder, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, ... Abnormal rigidity:*Causes: Abnormal rigidity *Introduction: Abnormal rigidity *Abnormal rigidity: Add a 3rd symptom *Abnormal ... Abnormal rigidity: Add a 3rd symptom *Abnormal rigidity: Remove a symptom *Start with new symptoms *How this tool works Narrow ... Abnormal *Abnormal pain (6 causes) *Rigidity (96 causes) *more symptoms...» Broaden Your Search: Remove a Symptom. *REMOVE ...
List of 37 causes for Abnormal neck sensation and Gait disorder, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient ... Abnormal neck sensation: Add a 3rd symptom *Abnormal neck sensation: Remove a symptom *Start with new symptoms *How this tool ... Sensation symptoms (6520 causes) *more symptoms...» Broaden Your Search: Remove a Symptom. *REMOVE Abnormal neck sensation ... Causes of General Symptom Types. Research the causes of related medical symptoms such as: *Abnormal *Abnormal pain (6 causes) * ...
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Metrorrhagia was the most distressing presenting symptom. When menorrhagia was the presenting symptom, the probability of ... Patients with multiple ULs had significantly more abnormal uterine bleeding. In patients with menorrhagia or metrorrhagia, ... Abnormal uterine bleeding as a presenting symptom is related to multiple uterine leiomyoma: an ultrasound-based study José ... having an ultrasound diagnosis of UL was 73.3%. Metrorrhagia or menorrhagia, as presenting symptom, was significantly related ...
Abnormal weight loss (R63.5) Abnormal weight gain (R63.8) Other symptoms and signs concerning food and fluid intake (R64) ... Abnormal reflex Hyperreflexia (R29.3) Abnormal posture (R29.4) Clicking hip (R29.8) Other and unspecified symptoms and signs ... Abnormal level of blood mineral (R79.8) Other specified abnormal findings of blood chemistry Abnormal blood-gas level (R79.9) ... Abnormal findings on diagnostic imaging of lung (R92) Abnormal findings on diagnostic imaging of breast (R93) Abnormal findings ...
Prevalence or incidence of diseases and medical conditions possibly causing symptom Abnormal fingernail shape as a symptom, ... Symptoms: symptom center, symptom groups Related medical articles for symptom Abnormal fingernail shape: *Symptom: Abnormal ... Possible causes of symptom: Abnormal fingernail shape (12 conditions) Medical Tools & Articles:. ... Symptom Search *Symptom Checker *Medical Dictionary Medical Articles: *Disease & Treatments Search *Misdiagnosis Center *Full ...
Prevalence or incidence of diseases and medical conditions possibly causing symptom Abnormal peripheral smear in children as a ... Symptoms: symptom center, symptom groups Related medical articles for symptom Abnormal peripheral smear in children: *Symptom: ... Abnormal peripheral smear in children *Possible causes of symptom: Abnormal peripheral smear in children (11 conditions) ... Symptom Search *Symptom Checker *Medical Dictionary Medical Articles: *Disease & Treatments Search *Misdiagnosis Center *Full ...
ANOTHER: Florida physician refers patient to toxicologist, who concluded "symptoms are due to the elevated, abnormal levels of ... and concluded all of my symptoms are due to the elevated, abnormal levels of chemicals present in my system from the Gulf oil ... Local doctor links spill to symptoms, Walton Sun, November 02, 2010:. Okaloosa Island resident Joseph Yerkes says he recently ... Good for him! Thats taking initiative on your symptoms! Thats what you have to do. And leave town… ...
You can hear abnormal breath sounds in the form of wheezing, ronchi, and rales. Certain pathological conditions of lung like ... The accumulated fluid in the lung tissue precipitates abnormal breath sound.. Symptoms Of Bronchial Breath Sounds. Abnormal ... Causes Of Abnormal Bronchial Breath Sounds: Signs & Symptoms. By upu Posted on February 13, 2018. Updated on February 12, 2018 ... Symptoms of Asthma: Bronchial, Cardiac, In Children, Exercise Induced Asthma *Symptoms of Asthma: Common Triggers and Signs of ...
mandibular deviation / abnormal occlusion / accompanied general symptom / CMD / Moire topography / facial morphology / body ... The relation between the mandibutar deviation with abnormal occlusion and the Accompanied General Symptoms. Research Project ... Publications] Gengo Yoshino, et al.: The Relasion between the Abnormal Chewing Patterns and the Accompanied General Symptoms ... The authors analyzed the interrelation between the abnormal chewing patterns caused by abnormal occlusion in cranio mandibular ...
Thus, abnormal exposure to Ro 64-0802 might have contributed, at least in part, to the development of neuropsychiatric symptoms ... We report a case of a 15-year-old Japanese female with influenza infection who developed abnormal psychiatric symptoms after ... Her delirium-like symptoms, including insomnia, visual hallucinations, and a long-term memory deficit, disappeared after ... Abnormal slowing in the electroencephalogram, which is characteristic of influenza-associated encephalopathy, was not observed ...
List of 351 causes for Abnormal thinking and Fear, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and much ... Abnormal thinking:*Causes: Abnormal thinking *Introduction: Abnormal thinking *Abnormal thinking: Add a 3rd symptom *Abnormal ... Abnormal *Abnormal pain (6 causes) *Thinking *more symptoms...» Broaden Your Search: Remove a Symptom. *REMOVE Abnormal ... Abnormal thinking: Add a 3rd symptom *Abnormal thinking: Remove a symptom *Start with new symptoms *How this tool works ...
List of causes of Abnormal vaginal bleeding and Anemia, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and ... Abnormal vaginal bleeding: Add a 3rd symptom *Abnormal vaginal bleeding: Remove a symptom *Start with new symptoms *How this ... Bleeding symptoms (1783 causes) *Bleeding disorder *more symptoms...» Broaden Your Search: Remove a Symptom. *REMOVE Abnormal ... Abnormal vaginal bleeding AND Anemia - Causes of All Symptoms *Abnormal vaginal bleeding OR Anemia - 919 causes Abnormal ...
I was doing a search for abnormal bleeding and came acrost this site.I am in my late 30s, 2 kids and always had normal 29 day ... My period has been abnormal for 3 months. The first month I had my period a week early, the second month I bled for nine days ... My period has been abnormal for 3 months. The first month I had my period a week early, the second month I bled for nine days ... I have noted my periods have been at the right time but seemed a little strong with strong pain symptoms for about 3-4 months ...
Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is bleeding from the uterus that is longer than usual or that occurs at an irregular time. ... Women with severe symptoms that dont improve or who have a cancerous or precancerous diagnosis may require other procedures ... Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is bleeding from the uterus that is longer than usual or that occurs at an irregular time. ... Abnormal uterine bleeding: etiology and management of acute and chronic excessive bleeding. In: Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Lentz ...
... is a set of symptoms that can be disruptive to a mans daily routine. This guide can help you stop symptoms early and get ... Abnormal symptoms. Noticing blood in the urine, or experiencing painful urination are other more serious symptoms that can ... When you notice symptoms. If you notice symptoms, try to avoid carbonated and caffeinated beverages, and pay very close ... One of the three types of symptoms that can occur are urge symptoms, which are characterized by a strong urge to use the ...
These are common narcolepsy symptoms. Check out this article to find out more about this neurological disorder. ... Abnormal Sleepiness During the Day. A hard-to-control urge to sleep at the wrong time is one of the hallmarks of narcolepsy. ... Narcolepsy Symptoms. While the first symptoms usually occur in late teens and early adulthood, they can appear at any age. They ... These symptoms are coupled with excessive sleepiness during the day.. Cataplexy involves an unexpected lack of muscle tone ...
  • Scientifically known as an Arrhythmia or tachycardia, based on the type, abnormal heartbeats may be caused by defective heart tissue or defective electrical impulses. (sooperarticles.com)
  • Women who have unclear, borderline or abnormal results on Pap smear will have to undergo further diagnostic tests. (medindia.net)
  • The immune system plays a role in fighting bacteria or infections and in destroying abnormal cells. (healthline.com)
  • These cells are smeared on a slide and studied under the microscope to look for abnormal cells. (medindia.net)
  • Most times these cancers are asymptomatic until their pain causes other symptoms, like compression of a nerve," Dr. Moroney says. (rd.com)
  • Based on these sequential events, it is suggested that human papillomavirus vaccination is related to the transiently high prevalence of the previously mentioned symptoms including chronic regional pain syndrome and autonomic and cognitive dysfunctions in the vaccinated patients. (springer.com)
  • What are the symptoms and signs of liver disease? (rxlist.com)
  • The liver is a large organ and a significant amount of liver tissue needs to be damaged before a person experiences symptoms of disease. (rxlist.com)
  • GPs frequently see patients with abnormal liver function tests, but which of them actually have alcoholic or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)? (gponline.com)
  • Fatty liver disease can be classified into alcoholic or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) due to a wide range of possible causes, and it can be histologically difficult to distinguish the two: the structural features within the cells, which show an abnormal accumulation of triglycerides in the liver cells due to a disruption of the fat metabolism, are pretty much the same in both forms. (gponline.com)
  • What constitutes an abnormal stomach pain? (natureword.com)
  • Well, stomachs pain are all abnormal since they signal something is not right. (natureword.com)
  • It is not clear what causes the belly pain in IBS , but it is believed to be due either to abnormal contractions of the intestinal muscles (for example, spasm ) or abnormally sensitive nerves within the intestines that give rise to painful sensations inappropriately ( visceral hyper- sensitivity). (rxlist.com)
  • The pain saved me," says the cancer survivor of her original symptom. (bestlifeonline.com)
  • As is to be expected, back pain is a common symptom of Scheuermann's disease. (verywell.com)
  • In Japan, after receiving human papillomavirus vaccination, a significant number of adolescent girls experienced various symptoms, the vast majority of which have been ascribed to chronic regional pain syndrome, orthostatic intolerance, and/or cognitive dysfunction. (springer.com)
  • The main symptoms consisted of chronic regional pain syndrome, and autonomic and cognitive dysfunctions. (springer.com)
  • Heart surgery in the past: Heart attack, abnormal heart valves, previous heart surgery, or any other form of heart damage can be a potential causative of heart rhythm disorders. (sooperarticles.com)
  • The authors analyzed the interrelation between the abnormal chewing patterns caused by abnormal occlusion in cranio mandibular disorders (CMD) and the accompanied general symptoms using sirognathograph analyzing system III and the screening guestionnaire of The Japanese Academy of Occlusion and Health. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Improvement of the Accompanied General Symptoms in the Craniomandibular Disorders by the Correction of Both Alignment and Biteplane Therapy'The Journal of the Japanese Academy of Occlusion and Health. (nii.ac.jp)
  • We therefore aimed to (1) determine whether there are reciprocal relations between moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary behavior, on one hand, and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition defined symptoms of major depressive disorder, on the other and (2) assess the extent of stability in depressive symptoms from age 6 to 10 years. (aappublications.org)
  • At both age 6 and 8 years, higher MVPA predicted fewer symptoms of major depressive disorders 2 years later. (aappublications.org)
  • The DSM-IV considers symptoms such as depersonalization, derealization and psychogenic amnesia to be core features of dissociative disorders. (wikipedia.org)