Tooth Wear: Loss of the tooth substance by chemical or mechanical processesTooth Attrition: The wearing away of a tooth as a result of tooth-to-tooth contact, as in mastication, occurring only on the occlusal, incisal, and proximal surfaces. It is chiefly associated with aging. It is differentiated from TOOTH ABRASION (the pathologic wearing away of the tooth substance by friction, as brushing, bruxism, clenching, and other mechanical causes) and from TOOTH EROSION (the loss of substance caused by chemical action without bacterial action). (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p86)Tooth Erosion: Progressive loss of the hard substance of a tooth by chemical processes that do not involve bacterial action. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p296)Tooth: One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.Bruxism: A disorder characterized by grinding and clenching of the teeth.Tooth Abrasion: The pathologic wearing away of the tooth substance by brushing, bruxism, clenching, and other mechanical causes. It is differentiated from TOOTH ATTRITION in that this type of wearing away is the result of tooth-to-tooth contact, as in mastication, occurring only on the occlusal, incisal, and proximal surfaces. It differs also from TOOTH EROSION, the progressive loss of the hard substance of a tooth by chemical processes not involving bacterial action. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p2)Tooth Crown: The upper part of the tooth, which joins the lower part of the tooth (TOOTH ROOT) at the cervix (TOOTH CERVIX) at a line called the cementoenamel junction. The entire surface of the crown is covered with enamel which is thicker at the extremity and becomes progressively thinner toward the cervix. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p216)Papio cynocephalus: A species of baboon in the family CERCOPITHECIDAE found in southern equatorial and east Africa. They are smaller than PAPIO ANUBIS and have a thinner mane.Dental Enamel: A hard thin translucent layer of calcified substance which envelops and protects the dentin of the crown of the tooth. It is the hardest substance in the body and is almost entirely composed of calcium salts. Under the microscope, it is composed of thin rods (enamel prisms) held together by cementing substance, and surrounded by an enamel sheath. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)Photography, Dental: Photographic techniques used in ORTHODONTICS; DENTAL ESTHETICS; and patient education.Toothbrushing: The act of cleaning teeth with a brush to remove plaque and prevent tooth decay. (From Webster, 3d ed)Dental Occlusion: The relationship of all the components of the masticatory system in normal function. It has special reference to the position and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth for the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p556, p472)Odontometry: Measurement of tooth characteristics.Anthropology, Physical: The comparative science dealing with the physical characteristics of humans as related to their origin, evolution, and development in the total environment.Northwestern United States: The geographic area of the northwestern region of the United States. The states usually included in this region are Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.Dentin: The hard portion of the tooth surrounding the pulp, covered by enamel on the crown and cementum on the root, which is harder and denser than bone but softer than enamel, and is thus readily abraded when left unprotected. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth Loss: The failure to retain teeth as a result of disease or injury.Dental Restoration Wear: Occlusal wear of the surfaces of restorations and surface wear of dentures.Tooth Germ: The collective tissues from which an entire tooth is formed, including the DENTAL SAC; ENAMEL ORGAN; and DENTAL PAPILLA. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth, Deciduous: The teeth of the first dentition, which are shed and replaced by the permanent teeth.Tooth Root: The part of a tooth from the neck to the apex, embedded in the alveolar process and covered with cementum. A root may be single or divided into several branches, usually identified by their relative position, e.g., lingual root or buccal root. Single-rooted teeth include mandibular first and second premolars and the maxillary second premolar teeth. The maxillary first premolar has two roots in most cases. Maxillary molars have three roots. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p690)Dental Models: Presentation devices used for patient education and technique training in dentistry.Tooth Eruption: The emergence of a tooth from within its follicle in the ALVEOLAR PROCESS of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE into the ORAL CAVITY. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)General Practice, Dental: Nonspecialized dental practice which is concerned with providing primary and continuing dental care.Acids: Chemical compounds which yield hydrogen ions or protons when dissolved in water, whose hydrogen can be replaced by metals or basic radicals, or which react with bases to form salts and water (neutralization). An extension of the term includes substances dissolved in media other than water. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Polyethylene: A vinyl polymer made from ethylene. It can be branched or linear. Branched or low-density polyethylene is tough and pliable but not to the same degree as linear polyethylene. Linear or high-density polyethylene has a greater hardness and tensile strength. Polyethylene is used in a variety of products, including implants and prostheses.Tooth, Supernumerary: An extra tooth, erupted or unerupted, resembling or unlike the other teeth in the group to which it belongs. Its presence may cause malposition of adjacent teeth or prevent their eruption.Tooth Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the teeth.Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.Tooth Extraction: The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)Molar: The most posterior teeth on either side of the jaw, totaling eight in the deciduous dentition (2 on each side, upper and lower), and usually 12 in the permanent dentition (three on each side, upper and lower). They are grinding teeth, having large crowns and broad chewing surfaces. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p821)Prader-Willi Syndrome: An autosomal dominant disorder caused by deletion of the proximal long arm of the paternal chromosome 15 (15q11-q13) or by inheritance of both of the pair of chromosomes 15 from the mother (UNIPARENTAL DISOMY) which are imprinted (GENETIC IMPRINTING) and hence silenced. Clinical manifestations include MENTAL RETARDATION; MUSCULAR HYPOTONIA; HYPERPHAGIA; OBESITY; short stature; HYPOGONADISM; STRABISMUS; and HYPERSOMNOLENCE. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p229)Polyethylenes: Synthetic thermoplastics that are tough, flexible, inert, and resistant to chemicals and electrical current. They are often used as biocompatible materials for prostheses and implants.Tooth, Nonvital: A tooth from which the dental pulp has been removed or is necrotic. (Boucher, Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Tooth, Impacted: A tooth that is prevented from erupting by a physical barrier, usually other teeth. Impaction may also result from orientation of the tooth in an other than vertical position in the periodontal structures.Tooth Discoloration: Any change in the hue, color, or translucency of a tooth due to any cause. Restorative filling materials, drugs (both topical and systemic), pulpal necrosis, or hemorrhage may be responsible. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p253)Tooth, Unerupted: A normal developing tooth which has not yet perforated the oral mucosa or one that fails to erupt in the normal sequence or time interval expected for the type of tooth in a given gender, age, or population group.Incisor: Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)Odontogenesis: The process of TOOTH formation. It is divided into several stages including: the dental lamina stage, the bud stage, the cap stage, and the bell stage. Odontogenesis includes the production of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS), dentin (DENTINOGENESIS), and dental cementum (CEMENTOGENESIS).Tooth Cervix: The constricted part of the tooth at the junction of the crown and root or roots. It is often referred to as the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), the line at which the cementum covering the root of a tooth and the enamel of the tooth meet. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p530, p433)Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Saliva: The clear, viscous fluid secreted by the SALIVARY GLANDS and mucous glands of the mouth. It contains MUCINS, water, organic salts, and ptylin.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Cleft Lip: Congenital defect in the upper lip where the maxillary prominence fails to merge with the merged medial nasal prominences. It is thought to be caused by faulty migration of the mesoderm in the head region.Cleft Palate: Congenital fissure of the soft and/or hard palate, due to faulty fusion.Alveoloplasty: Conservative contouring of the alveolar process, in preparation for immediate or future denture construction. (Dorland, 28th ed)Anodontia: Congenital absence of the teeth; it may involve all (total anodontia) or only some of the teeth (partial anodontia, hypodontia), and both the deciduous and the permanent dentition, or only teeth of the permanent dentition. (Dorland, 27th ed)Dental Devices, Home Care: Devices used in the home by persons to maintain dental and periodontal health. The devices include toothbrushes, dental flosses, water irrigators, gingival stimulators, etc.Denture, Partial: A denture replacing one or more (but not all) natural teeth. It is supported and retained by underlying tissue and some or all of the remaining teeth.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Dental Care: The total of dental diagnostic, preventive, and restorative services provided to meet the needs of a patient (from Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982).Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Dental Health Services: Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.
Abfraction is the loss of tooth structure from flexural forces. As teeth flex under pressure, the arrangement of teeth touching ... A common source of this type of tooth wear is excessive force when using a toothbrush. Erosion is the loss of tooth structure ... Bottom teeth of a seven-year-old, showing primary teeth (left), a lost primary tooth (middle), and a permanent tooth (right) ... All primary teeth are normally later replaced with their permanent counterparts. Permanent teeth[edit]. Among permanent teeth, ...
Tooth wear or breakage. Limited range of motion in the jaw and cervical (neck) spine. Painful or sore head and/or neck muscles ... Poor airway control Sleep/arousal disorder Changes in brain chemistry and neurotransmitter balance Bruxism Abfraction Tooth ... By balancing the muscles, joints, and teeth, and controlling the way the body feels pain in the head and neck areas, long ... This major pathway of nerves controls pain signals from the teeth, face, head, and neck, and carries them to the brain. ...
These forms of tooth wear can further lead to a condition known as abfraction, where by tooth tissue is 'fractured' due to ... Tooth wear (also termed non-carious tooth substance loss) refers to loss of tooth substance by means other than dental caries ... However, tooth wear is often a combination of the above processes. Many clinicians therefore make diagnoses such as "tooth wear ... "Clinical measurement of tooth wear: Tooth Wear Indices" (PDF). Journal of Clinical and Experimental Dentistry: e48-e53. doi: ...
Tooth tissue is gradually weakened causing tissue loss through fracture and chipping or successively worn away leaving a non- ... Abfraction is a form of non-carious tooth tissue loss that occurs along the gingival margin.[1] In other words, abfraction is a ... Abfraction is a theoretical concept explaining a loss of tooth structure not caused by tooth decay (non-carious cervical ... Researchers have proposed that abfraction is caused by forces on the tooth from the teeth touching together, occlusal forces, ...
Tooth wear *Abrasion. *Abfraction. *Acid erosion. *Attrition. Periodontium (gingiva, periodontal ligament, cementum, alveolus ...
... which can wear down enamel and gum tissue, cracked teeth or grinding of teeth (bruxism).[10] ... Remineralization of teeth. References[edit]. *^ a b c d e f g h i j Karim, B. F. A; Gillam, D. G (2013). "The Efficacy of ... will help prevent receding gums and tooth wear around the cervical margin of teeth.[11] Non-abrasive toothpaste should be used, ... A non-abrasive diet will also help to prevent tooth wear.[11] Flossing each day also helps to prevent gum recession caused by ...
Tooth wear *Abrasion. *Abfraction. *Acid erosion. *Attrition. Periodontium (gingiva, periodontal ligament, cementum, alveolus ...
Common causes of oral ulceration include rubbing on sharp edges of teeth, fillings, crowns, false teeth (dentures), or braces ( ... This may occur in those who eat or drink before a local anesthetic has worn off. The normal painful sensation is absent and a ... Holding an aspirin tablet next to a painful tooth in an attempt to relieve pulpitis (toothache) is common, and leads to ... There may be nearby causative factor, e.g. a broken tooth with a sharp edge that is traumatizing the tissues. Otherwise, the ...
Tooth wear *Abrasion. *Abfraction. *Acid erosion. *Attrition. Periodontium (gingiva, periodontal ligament, cementum, alveolus ... Each tooth is divided into four gingival units (mesial, distal, buccal, and lingual) and given a score from 0-3 based on the ... A study indicates the fluoridated hydrogen peroxide-based mouth rinse can remove teeth stain and reduce gingivitis.[11] ... Gingivitis before (top) and after (bottom) a thorough mechanical debridement of the teeth. ...
Tooth wear *Abrasion. *Abfraction. *Acid erosion. *Attrition. Periodontium (gingiva, periodontal ligament, cementum, alveolus ...
Tooth wear *Abrasion. *Abfraction. *Acid erosion. *Attrition. Periodontium (gingiva, periodontal ligament, cementum, alveolus ...
Tooth wear *Abrasion. *Abfraction. *Acid erosion. *Attrition. Periodontium (gingiva, periodontal ligament, cementum, alveolus ...
Tooth wear *Abrasion. *Abfraction. *Acid erosion. *Attrition. Periodontium (gingiva, periodontal ligament, cementum, alveolus ... Chronic low-grade trauma due to parafunctional habits (e.g. rubbing the tongue against the teeth or pressing it against the ... of papillae on the tip of the tongue may be a sign that the tongue is being habitually pressed against the teeth. The number ...
... changes in the position of teeth). Normally splints are only worn during sleep, and therefore probably do nothing for people ... They can be designed to fit onto the upper teeth or the lower teeth. They may cover all the teeth in one arch (full coverage ... of the enamel of the occlusal surfaces of teeth, with the aim of allowing the upper teeth to fit with the lower teeth in a more ... The mechanism of this tooth movement is that the splint effectively holds some teeth out of contact and puts all the force of ...
Tooth wear *Abrasion. *Abfraction. *Acid erosion. *Attrition. Periodontium (gingiva, periodontal ligament, cementum, alveolus ... Root resorption and tooth movement are rare. Differential Diagnosis[edit]. Condensing osteitis, sclerosing osteomyelitis, ... It appears as a radiopaque (light area) around a tooth, usually a premolar or molar. There is no sign of inflammation of the ... Idiopathic osteosclerosis is a condition which may be found around the roots of a tooth. It is usually painless and found ...
Tooth wear *Abrasion. *Abfraction. *Acid erosion. *Attrition. Periodontium (gingiva, periodontal ligament, cementum, alveolus ... frictional trauma from a sharp surface in the mouth such as broken tooth, or from tooth brushing.[8] ... Trauma can be reduced by avoiding rough or sharp foodstuffs and by brushing teeth with care. If sodium lauryl sulfate is ...
Tooth wear *Abrasion. *Abfraction. *Acid erosion. *Attrition. Periodontium (gingiva, periodontal ligament, cementum, alveolus ...
Tooth wear *Abrasion. *Abfraction. *Acid erosion. *Attrition. Periodontium (gingiva, periodontal ligament, cementum, alveolus ... sometimes the gums of the upper teeth) or the lower jaw (tongue or gums of the lower teeth) respectively.[26] Oral involvement ... tooth loss, periodontitis (gum disease), pulp calcification, pulp necrosis, periapical lesions and tooth developmental ... postherpetic neuralgia is very rare in people under 50 and wears off in time; in older people the pain wore off more slowly, ...
Versatility: Composite fillings can be used to repair chipped, broken or worn teeth which would not be repairable using amalgam ... abfraction) lesions caused by NCTSL. Contraindications include: in high stress-bearing areas, restoration of large multi- ... between teeth using a shell-like veneer or Reshaping of teeth Full or partial crowns on single teeth Bridges spanning 2-3 teeth ... Bonding to tooth structure: Composite fillings micro-mechanically bond to tooth structure. This strengthens the tooth's ...
... , also known as dental erosion, is a type of tooth wear. It is defined as the irreversible loss of tooth structure ... Dentistry portal Abrasion Abfraction Attrition Bruxism Adrian Lussi. Dental Erosion: From Diagnosis to Therapy. Karger ... and the gaps between teeth will become larger. There can be evidence of wear on surfaces of teeth not expected to be in contact ... Even low sugar contained in fruit is bad for the teeth since it is the sugar/acid exposure time which erodes the teeth, not the ...
These forms of tooth wear can further lead to a condition known as abfraction, where by tooth tissue is fractured due to ... Tooth wear (also termed non-carious tooth substance loss) refers to loss of tooth substance by means other than dental caries ... However, tooth wear is often a combination of the above processes. Many clinicians therefore make diagnoses such as "tooth wear ... "Clinical measurement of tooth wear: Tooth Wear Indices" (PDF). Journal of Clinical and Experimental Dentistry: e48-e53. doi: ...
Abfraction is the loss of tooth structure from flexural forces. As teeth flex under pressure, the arrangement of teeth touching ... A common source of this type of tooth wear is excessive force when using a toothbrush. Erosion is the loss of tooth structure ... Bottom teeth of a seven-year-old, showing primary teeth (left), a lost primary tooth (middle), and a permanent tooth (right) ... All primary teeth are normally later replaced with their permanent counterparts. Permanent teeth[edit]. Among permanent teeth, ...
Abfraction: This refers specifically to the loss of tooth enamel at the necks of the teeth (the thinner part right at the gum ... Tooth Wear. With proper care, your teeth can last a lifetime. But some amount of wear as we age is normal. By "wear," we mean ... Treating Worn Teeth. In order to treat your worn teeth, we need to figure out what is causing the wear. We can accomplish this ... Types of Tooth Wear. Tooth wear can result from one or more of these processes:. Abrasion: This is caused by the interaction of ...
Abfraction: This refers specifically to the loss of tooth enamel at the necks of the teeth (the thinner part right at the gum ... Treating Worn Teeth. In order to treat your worn teeth, the cause of the wear must be determined during a simple oral ... Types of Tooth Wear. Tooth wear can result from one or more of these processes:. Abrasion: This is caused by the interaction of ... With proper care, your teeth can last a lifetime. But some amount of wear as we age is normal. By "wear," we mean loss of tooth ...
Abfraction: This refers specifically to the loss of tooth enamel at the necks of the teeth (the thinner part right at the gum ... Treating Worn Teeth. In order to treat your worn teeth, the cause of the wear must be determined during a simple oral ... Types of Tooth Wear. Tooth wear can result from one or more of these processes:. Abrasion: This is caused by the interaction of ... With proper care, your teeth can last a lifetime. But some amount of wear as we age is normal. By "wear," we mean loss of tooth ...
B. abfraction C. attrition D. abrasion E. All of the above. *Gastric acids are never associated with erosive tooth wear (ETW). ... A. Begin Erosion Wear Experiment B. Basic Erosive Wear Exam C. Basic Enamel Wasting Estimate D. Biological Enamel Wear ... A. be familiar with and recognize tooth wear lesions at the earliest possible stage B. implement preventive and treatment ... B. Dissolution of tooth surfaces by acids that are not of biological origin. C. Dissolution of tooth surfaces by either dietary ...
WebMD explains what tooth enamel is, what causes it to erode, how to prevent enamel loss, and how to treat it. ... Tooth erosion happens when acids wear away the enamel on teeth. Enamel erosion can be caused by the following:. *Excessive soft ... Abfraction. This occurs from stress fractures in the tooth such as cracks from flexing or bending of the tooth. ... How is tooth enamel loss treated? What is tooth enamel?. Enamel is the thin outer covering of the tooth. This tough shell is ...
To treat nonpathologic wear or abrasion, or abfraction lesions in the absence of decay. ... "cracked tooth syndrome." Furthermore, an asymptomatic tooth or a tooth with craze lines does not require endodontic services, ... "Cracked tooth syndrome" requires adequate documentation of extent of fracture, location and how it was diagnosed. Tooth must be ... Cracked tooth syndrome must be diagnosed with documented diagnostic tests and supported by a narrative; tooth must be ...
A Critical Review of Non-carious Cervical (Wear) Lesions and the Role of Abfraction, Erosion, and Abrasion. Bartlett, D. W.; ... The terms abfraction and abrasion describe the cause of lesions found along the cervical margins of teeth. Erosion, ... A CLASSIFICATION OF TEETH THE DISEASED PULPS AND APICES OF WHICH ARE RELATED TO INFECTIVE FOCAL AND SYSTEMIC SEQUELAE. ... Home » A CLASSIFICATION OF TEETH THE DISEASED PULPS AND APICES OF WHICH ARE RELATED TO INFECTIVE FOCAL AND SYSTEMIC SEQUELAE ...
Tooth tissue is gradually weakened causing tissue loss through fracture and chipping or successively worn away leaving a non- ... Abfraction is a form of non-carious tooth tissue loss that occurs along the gingival margin.[1] In other words, abfraction is a ... Abfraction is a theoretical concept explaining a loss of tooth structure not caused by tooth decay (non-carious cervical ... Researchers have proposed that abfraction is caused by forces on the tooth from the teeth touching together, occlusal forces, ...
Damage to the buccal tooth structure can be very severe:. Until recently, I believed that abfraction was responsible for the ... Tooth Wear-Abrasion page 2-DoctorSpiller.com. Table of Contents. *1 Toothpaste Abuse**1.0.1 The signs and symptoms of ... The second most common cause of tooth wear is toothpaste abuse. As you may recall from the first page in this series, ... Sandblasted teeth:. The earliest sign of toothpaste abuse is the gradual elimination of the surface anatomy on the teeth, just ...
These lesions were not caused by tooth decay. They were caused by a process called abfraction, which is fully explained on the ... Tooth wear pages-1-2-3-4-5-6-7. Tooth wear Introduction. If you have been in practice long enough, you will have run into ... Tooth wear-Attrition page 1-DoctorSpiller.com. Table of Contents. *1 Tooth wear Introduction*1.1 Terminology*1.1.1 Toothbrush ... Attrition is now a generic term defined as the pathologic wear of teeth from abrasion and/or erosion. Everyone wears down their ...
... but it may cause tooth sensitivity and decay. Learn what to watch for and how a dentist may treat one here. ... An appliance or night guard can protect the teeth from further wear. However, Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dentistry ... Abfraction lesions are lost tooth structure. The lesions occur gradually, making the tooth appear to vanish over time. They ... Causes of Abfraction Lesions. The lesions have been attributed to mechanical stress from chewing function or teeth grinding. ...
Bartlett DW, Shah P (2006) A critical review of non-carious cervical (wear) lesions and the role of abfraction, erosion, and ... Lussi A (2006) Erosive tooth wear-a multifactorial condition of growing concern and increasing knowledge. Monogr Oral Sci 20:1- ... Gerschman JA, Ruben J, Gebart-Eaglemont J (1994) Low level laser therapy for dentinal tooth hypersensitivity. Aust Dent J 39(6 ... Kakaboura A, Rahiotis C, Thomaidis S, Doukoudakis S (2005) Clinical effectiveness of two agents on the treatment of tooth ...
What is Abfraction?. Abfraction can be defined as the loss of tooth structure from flexural forces. The teeth have a tendency ... The tooth wear occurs on - posterior teeth occlusal surfaces, anterior teeth incisal edges, maxillary anterior teeth palatal ... Tooth becomes more yellow with increased exposing of dentin.. 2.Tooth Sensitivity - since the worn out tooth enamel exposes the ... This FAQ gives the details on tooth wear.. Tooth Enamel and its characteristics. The outermost part of a tooth is the enamel ...
... for the treatment of abfraction lesions. Methods: Thirty patients with abfraction lesions in at least two premolar teeth were ... wear, retention, secondary caries and hypersensitivity. The statistical analysis was based on Friedman ANOVA test and Mann- ... One tooth was restored with CR Z100TM (3M, St. Paul, MN, USA), and the other was restored with RMGIC VitremerTM (3M). The ... Clinical evaluation of two materials in the restoration of abfraction lesions. Braz. J. Oral Sci. []. 2015, 14, 4, pp. 287-293 ...
Keywords : composite resins; glass ionomer cements; tooth wear.. · text in English · pdf in English ... for the treatment of abfraction lesions. Methods: Thirty patients with abfraction lesions in at least two premolar teeth were ... One tooth was restored with CR Z100TM (3M, St. Paul, MN, USA), and the other was restored with RMGIC VitremerTM (3M). The ... Clinical evaluation of two materials in the restoration of abfraction lesions. Braz. J. Oral Sci. [online]. 2015, vol.14, n.4, ...
... titanium TMD TMJ tooth tooth replacement tooth storage tooth structure tooth surface loss tooth syndrome toothwear tooth wear ... These non-carious processes may include abrasion, corrosion and possibly abfraction, acting alone or in combination. ... The BSRD have published guidelines on tooth wear which we as a profession will be managing indefinitely and more commonly as ... The therapeutic management of tooth wear lesions does not require the removal of diseased tissue. Nevertheless, diverse ...
Tooth Abrasion/etiology , Decision Making , Dentists , Tooth Wear/diagnosis , Tooth Wear/etiology , Tooth Erosion/diagnosis , ... of the teeth presented some kind of cervical lesion, the mandibular premolars being the most affected (30.58%). Abfraction was ... Tooth Erosion/therapy , Tooth Abrasion/etiology , Tooth Abrasion/prevention & control , Tooth Abrasion/therapy , Tooth Wear , ... Humans , Tooth Abrasion/etiology , Tooth Abrasion/pathology , Tooth Cervix/injuries , Tooth Erosion/etiology , Tooth Erosion/ ...
1. The non-bacterial loss of tooth tissue due to frictional wear by extrinsic agents. Common causes are toothbrushing, ... abfraction Reference type: Overview Page. Subject: Medicine and health, Dentistry. The loss of tooth structure in the cervical ... A tooth, tooth root, or implant used to support a fixed or removable prosthesis (bridge or partial denture). It may provide ... A material used to smooth or roughen a softer material by mechanical wear. It may be delivered in a high pressure stream of air ...
After performing a thorough clinical examination, I noted a severely worn dentition, widespread abfraction lesions, and ... Poorly Shaped Teeth. Photos in the Smile Gallery show how natural teeth that are oddly shaped and pointed in different ... Reverse Smile and Small Teeth. An imaginary line around the incisal edges of the upper front teeth should follow the superior ... Overlapped, Crowded and Crooked Teeth. Teeth that are overlapped, crowded or crooked can cause oral health problems, such as ...
Chewing kibble creates a special force, the abfraction force, that rocks the tooth and the rocking wears away tooth roots. This ... How are pets teeth different from peoples teeth?. Dogs teeth only touch in one or two places (unlike your teeth), and their ... teeth are pushed out by erupting permanent teeth. If the deciduous tooth doesnt give way, or is retained, the permanent teeth ... Teeth are held in these sockets by ligaments and cementum. When dental disease affects tooth ligaments and cementum, the tooth ...
... teeth whitening, implants, veneers & other dental care. Call today to make an appointment! ... Treating Worn Teeth. In order to treat your worn teeth, the cause of the wear must be determined during a simple oral ... Abfraction: This refers specifically to the loss of tooth enamel at the necks of the teeth (the thinner part right at the gum ... Types of Tooth Wear. Tooth wear can result from one or more of these processes:. Abrasion: This is caused by the interaction of ...
... presence of wear facets; broken teeth and / or restorations; presence of abfraction; masseter hypertony; lingual indentations ... including tooth abrasion. Esthetic and functional restoration of worn teeth is fundamental for dentofacial rehabilitation. The ... The patient was instructed to keep using the splint to sleep in order to prevent tooth wear, even if the pain ceased completely ... When the frequency of self-reported SB increased to more than 4 times per week, the combination of this finding with tooth wear ...
Abfraction. Wear, or notching, at the neck of a tooth at or below the gumline. Often sensitive, often accompanied by gum ... A tooth that is "stuck", or can grow no further into the mouth. Usually referrs to wisdom teeth, but any tooth can be impacted ... Replacing a missing tooth by placing at least two crowns on adjacent teeth and suspending a false tooth, or pontic, in between ... Artificial tooth roots that are placed into and fuse with the bone of the jaw. They can be used to replace teeth or to support ...
  • The relationship of the upper and lower teeth on closure, which is also referred to as occlusion. (heinefamilydental.com)
  • Sometimes the forces between the upper and lower teeth can lead to extreme flexing of the teeth. (leichhardtstdental.com.au)
  • Use one swab for your upper teeth, a separate one for your lower teeth, and then throw them away. (herbalyzer.com)
  • Lab-made guards are a great way to add a barrier between your upper and lower teeth to prevent grinding and clenching but is only effective if patients are able to use it daily. (alemanydental.com)
  • A few other signs of grinding are tori (similar to callouses) formed on the outside of the upper teeth, in the gum region, and on the inside of the lower teeth in the gum region. (wikihow.com)
  • Bonus: Paying better attention to your chompers will increase the likelihood that you'll notice if something is awry, like chips, cracks or areas where your upper and lower teeth might be wearing into one another. (billingsfamilydds.com)
  • Regular visits to your dentist for routine cleaning and polishing can help remove most surface stains and make sure your teeth stay healthy. (webmd.com)
  • The appearance of the teeth is the first sign of teeth grinding our dentist will notice. (leichhardtstdental.com.au)
  • A dentist should make a dental grill by taking a proper impression of the teeth versus a jeweler or a grill vendor. (colgate.com)
  • By visiting the dentist on a frequent and regular basis for professional tooth cleanings, a majority of these surface stains can be removed. (brightonimplantclinic.co.uk)
  • Rather than the abrupt changes that can occur from an accidental injury to the teeth, the subtle changes that can also occur from various forms of wear and tear can sneak up and cause considerable damage before you or your dentist sounds the alert that something is in fact damaging your teeth. (drschwan.com)
  • After a few days of treating the tooth pain with OTC pain killers to no avail, and Gorgeous quickly tiring of my request for Gerber-quality consistency with each entree put in front of me, I finally relented and called the dentist. (snakesinthegrassblog.com)
  • With that in mind, how do you go about finding a dentist to replace your worn out work? (michaelweissdds.com)
  • The first thing I recommend is you give your dentist another chance to get the dental bonding to look natural with your other teeth, with the understanding that if he can't do it to your satisfaction, he'll provide you with a refund so you can get it done properly. (michaelweissdds.com)
  • These thin, tooth-colored coverings may not seem like much at first, but you would be amazed how much they can makeover a smile once your Long Island City dentist, Dr. Steven Manson, applies them to the front surface of your teeth. (drstevenmanson.com)
  • The dentist will gently nub up the tooth and gum using a local anaesthetic. (andrewbrowndental.co.uk)
  • Diagnosis of the early stages of wear is very difficult so it's important that you keep a close eye on the condition of your teeth and have regular check-ups with your dentist. (wikihow.com)
  • In fact, because it only works on natural tooth structure, your teeth would whiten but not the dental bonding, making the disparity even worse. (michaelweissdds.com)
  • As you can see from the image above, dental bonding can and should look completely natural blending in seamlessly with the natural tooth structure around it. (michaelweissdds.com)
  • If you want to whiten your teeth later on, your natural tooth structure will whiten but not the dental bonding. (michaelweissdds.com)
  • Now, dental work can be made entirely of porcelain or materials that more closely mimic the appearance of natural tooth structure. (healthywebsites.org)
  • For any restoration if you want the best polishability, the best lifelike luster of a natural tooth, the best refractive and reflective index, the best long-term maintenance over time with the least wear, and the best simulation of natural tooth structure, then Renamel Microfill is King. (cosmedent.com)
  • Early research has shown that the toothbrush itself does not damage the teeth without additional abrasive, in spite of aggressive brushing. (doctorspiller.com)
  • However, the addition of abrasive in the form of toothpaste DOES abrade away tooth structure. (doctorspiller.com)
  • All toothpastes contain some form of abrasive (usually varying amounts of silica) in order to "polish" the teeth. (doctorspiller.com)
  • Although the toothbrush does not damage the teeth by itself in spite of aggressive brushing, the addition of abrasive, in the form of toothpaste DOES abrade away tooth structure, a bit like a rag wheel with pumice on it will abrade away the acrylic on a denture. (doctorspiller.com)
  • Abrasions, on the other hand, are attributed to improper tooth brushing and the use of abrasive toothpastes. (colgate.com)
  • The removal of tooth structure by blasting a tooth with air and an abrasive, which can prevent the need for anesthetic. (heinefamilydental.com)
  • The patient is then sent home with a new tooth brushing method, an extra soft toothbrush, a sample of non-abrasive gel toothpaste and dietary recommendations. (cdeworld.com)
  • 13 In combination with the periodontal mechanoreceptors (PMRs), afferent information is sent to the brain on the horizontal and vertical forces applied to teeth. (pocketdentistry.com)
  • Enamel varies in thickness over the surface of the tooth and is often thickest at the cusp , up to 2.5 mm, and thinnest at its border, which is seen clinically as the cementoenamel junction (CEJ). (bionity.com)
  • When Children Grind Their Teeth Many children grind their teeth as they sleep, and the grating sounds of this habit can really set a parent's own teeth on edge. (moffettdental.com)
  • People will grind their teeth at various times throughout their life, on and off depending on the stress levels in their life. (leichhardtstdental.com.au)
  • People that grind their teeth a lot tend to have a lot of recession with a ledge or a notch forming where the tooth joins the gum. (leichhardtstdental.com.au)
  • The anatomic crown of a tooth is the area covered in enamel above the cementoenamel junction (CEJ) or "neck" of the tooth. (wikipedia.org)
  • At one time, it was thought that this type of tooth notching was caused by improper brushing habits, such as forcefully scrubbing back and forth against the neck of the tooth. (alemanydental.com)
  • Saliva plays a key role in keeping teeth healthy and strong. (webmd.com)
  • Not only does saliva increase the health of the body tissues, it protects enamel by coating the teeth in protective calcium and other minerals. (webmd.com)
  • In a healthy mouth , calcium -rich saliva helps strengthen teeth, even if you drink an acidic soda or juice. (webmd.com)
  • The Saliva in your mouth has calcium that helps in strengthening and re-mineralizing the teeth. (allcaredentalclinic.in)
  • Depending on your personal situation, we can also recommend artificial saliva, moisture replacement products or a moisturizing tooth paste. (pfdentist.com)
  • A true multi-tasker, saliva contributes in many ways to the function and health of the body, from stronger teeth to more efficient digestion. (vanhoosedental.com)
  • The visible crown of the tooth is not the most important area for dental disease-the important area is just under the edge of the gum, or the gingival margin where it is difficult for you to see without using dental tools. (1800petmeds.com)
  • As the cemento-enamel junction of the tooth curves apically from its more coronal interdental position, the gingival margin follows this curvature, creating the characteristic scalloping contour of healthy gingiva. (springeropen.com)
  • A review of the literature reveals little to no evidence that toothbrushes and dentifrice are capable of causing significant damage to teeth. (cdeworld.com)