Optometry: The professional practice of primary eye and vision care that includes the measurement of visual refractive power and the correction of visual defects with lenses or glasses.Aberrometry: The use of an aberrometer to measure eye tissue imperfections or abnormalities based on the way light passes through the eye which affects the ability of the eye to focus properly.Corneal Wavefront Aberration: Asymmetries in the topography and refractive index of the corneal surface that affect visual acuity.Textbooks as Topic: Books used in the study of a subject that contain a systematic presentation of the principles and vocabulary of a subject.Corneal Topography: The measurement of curvature and shape of the anterior surface of the cornea using techniques such as keratometry, keratoscopy, photokeratoscopy, profile photography, computer-assisted image processing and videokeratography. This measurement is often applied in the fitting of contact lenses and in diagnosing corneal diseases or corneal changes including keratoconus, which occur after keratotomy and keratoplasty.Pupil: The aperture in the iris through which light passes.Refractive Errors: Deviations from the average or standard indices of refraction of the eye through its dioptric or refractive apparatus.Refraction, Ocular: Refraction of LIGHT effected by the media of the EYE.Lasers, Excimer: Gas lasers with excited dimers (i.e., excimers) as the active medium. The most commonly used are rare gas monohalides (e.g., argon fluoride, xenon chloride). Their principal emission wavelengths are in the ultraviolet range and depend on the monohalide used (e.g., 193 nm for ArF, 308 nm for Xe Cl). These lasers are operated in pulsed and Q-switched modes and used in photoablative decomposition involving actual removal of tissue. (UMDNS, 2005)Lenses: Pieces of glass or other transparent materials used for magnification or increased visual acuity.Lens Subluxation: Incomplete rupture of the zonule with the displaced lens remaining behind the pupil. In dislocation, or complete rupture, the lens is displaced forward into the anterior chamber or backward into the vitreous body. When congenital, this condition is known as ECTOPIA LENTIS.Corneal Surgery, Laser: Surgical techniques on the CORNEA employing LASERS, especially for reshaping the CORNEA to correct REFRACTIVE ERRORS.Aberrometry: The use of an aberrometer to measure eye tissue imperfections or abnormalities based on the way light passes through the eye which affects the ability of the eye to focus properly.Cataract: Partial or complete opacity on or in the lens or capsule of one or both eyes, impairing vision or causing blindness. The many kinds of cataract are classified by their morphology (size, shape, location) or etiology (cause and time of occurrence). (Dorland, 27th ed)Lens, Crystalline: A transparent, biconvex structure of the EYE, enclosed in a capsule and situated behind the IRIS and in front of the vitreous humor (VITREOUS BODY). It is slightly overlapped at its margin by the ciliary processes. Adaptation by the CILIARY BODY is crucial for OCULAR ACCOMMODATION.Corneal Wavefront Aberration: Asymmetries in the topography and refractive index of the corneal surface that affect visual acuity.Cataract Extraction: The removal of a cataractous CRYSTALLINE LENS from the eye.Corneal Topography: The measurement of curvature and shape of the anterior surface of the cornea using techniques such as keratometry, keratoscopy, photokeratoscopy, profile photography, computer-assisted image processing and videokeratography. This measurement is often applied in the fitting of contact lenses and in diagnosing corneal diseases or corneal changes including keratoconus, which occur after keratotomy and keratoplasty.Refractive Errors: Deviations from the average or standard indices of refraction of the eye through its dioptric or refractive apparatus.Refraction, Ocular: Refraction of LIGHT effected by the media of the EYE.Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the eye or any of its parts.Cataract Extraction: The removal of a cataractous CRYSTALLINE LENS from the eye.Anesthesia, Local: A blocking of nerve conduction to a specific area by an injection of an anesthetic agent.Lasers: An optical source that emits photons in a coherent beam. Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (LASER) is brought about using devices that transform light of varying frequencies into a single intense, nearly nondivergent beam of monochromatic radiation. Lasers operate in the infrared, visible, ultraviolet, or X-ray regions of the spectrum.Eye: The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Drug Costs: The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Eye Diseases: Diseases affecting the eye.Astigmatism: Unequal curvature of the refractive surfaces of the eye. Thus a point source of light cannot be brought to a point focus on the retina but is spread over a more or less diffuse area. This results from the radius of curvature in one plane being longer or shorter than the radius at right angles to it. (Dorland, 27th ed)Keratectomy, Subepithelial, Laser-Assisted: A surgical technique to correct REFRACTIVE ERRORS of the EYE, such as MYOPIA and ASTIGMATISM. In this method, a flap of CORNEAL EPITHELIUM is created by exposure of the area to dilute alcohol. The flap is lifted and then replaced after laser ablation of the subepithelial CORNEA.Keratomileusis, Laser In Situ: A surgical procedure to correct MYOPIA by CORNEAL STROMA subtraction. It involves the use of a microkeratome to make a lamellar dissection of the CORNEA creating a flap with intact CORNEAL EPITHELIUM. After the flap is lifted, the underlying midstroma is reshaped with an EXCIMER LASER and the flap is returned to its original position.Lasers, Excimer: Gas lasers with excited dimers (i.e., excimers) as the active medium. The most commonly used are rare gas monohalides (e.g., argon fluoride, xenon chloride). Their principal emission wavelengths are in the ultraviolet range and depend on the monohalide used (e.g., 193 nm for ArF, 308 nm for Xe Cl). These lasers are operated in pulsed and Q-switched modes and used in photoablative decomposition involving actual removal of tissue. (UMDNS, 2005)Mitomycin: An antineoplastic antibiotic produced by Streptomyces caespitosus. It is one of the bi- or tri-functional ALKYLATING AGENTS causing cross-linking of DNA and inhibition of DNA synthesis.Myopia: A refractive error in which rays of light entering the EYE parallel to the optic axis are brought to a focus in front of the RETINA when accommodation (ACCOMMODATION, OCULAR) is relaxed. This results from an overly curved CORNEA or from the eyeball being too long from front to back. It is also called nearsightedness.Corneal Surgery, Laser: Surgical techniques on the CORNEA employing LASERS, especially for reshaping the CORNEA to correct REFRACTIVE ERRORS.Photorefractive Keratectomy: A type of refractive surgery of the CORNEA to correct MYOPIA and ASTIGMATISM. An EXCIMER LASER is used directly on the surface of the EYE to remove some of the CORNEAL EPITHELIUM thus reshaping the anterior curvature of the cornea.Corneal Topography: The measurement of curvature and shape of the anterior surface of the cornea using techniques such as keratometry, keratoscopy, photokeratoscopy, profile photography, computer-assisted image processing and videokeratography. This measurement is often applied in the fitting of contact lenses and in diagnosing corneal diseases or corneal changes including keratoconus, which occur after keratotomy and keratoplasty.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Dry Eye Syndromes: Corneal and conjunctival dryness due to deficient tear production, predominantly in menopausal and post-menopausal women. Filamentary keratitis or erosion of the conjunctival and corneal epithelium may be caused by these disorders. Sensation of the presence of a foreign body in the eye and burning of the eyes may occur.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Ophthalmology: A surgical specialty concerned with the structure and function of the eye and the medical and surgical treatment of its defects and diseases.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Tears: The fluid secreted by the lacrimal glands. This fluid moistens the CONJUNCTIVA and CORNEA.Conjunctiva: The mucous membrane that covers the posterior surface of the eyelids and the anterior pericorneal surface of the eyeball.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Keratomileusis, Laser In Situ: A surgical procedure to correct MYOPIA by CORNEAL STROMA subtraction. It involves the use of a microkeratome to make a lamellar dissection of the CORNEA creating a flap with intact CORNEAL EPITHELIUM. After the flap is lifted, the underlying midstroma is reshaped with an EXCIMER LASER and the flap is returned to its original position.Corneal Surgery, Laser: Surgical techniques on the CORNEA employing LASERS, especially for reshaping the CORNEA to correct REFRACTIVE ERRORS.Refractive Surgical Procedures: Surgical procedures employed to correct REFRACTIVE ERRORS such as MYOPIA; HYPEROPIA; or ASTIGMATISM. These may involve altering the curvature of the CORNEA; removal or replacement of the CRYSTALLINE LENS; or modification of the SCLERA to change the axial length of the eye.Myopia: A refractive error in which rays of light entering the EYE parallel to the optic axis are brought to a focus in front of the RETINA when accommodation (ACCOMMODATION, OCULAR) is relaxed. This results from an overly curved CORNEA or from the eyeball being too long from front to back. It is also called nearsightedness.Lasers, Excimer: Gas lasers with excited dimers (i.e., excimers) as the active medium. The most commonly used are rare gas monohalides (e.g., argon fluoride, xenon chloride). Their principal emission wavelengths are in the ultraviolet range and depend on the monohalide used (e.g., 193 nm for ArF, 308 nm for Xe Cl). These lasers are operated in pulsed and Q-switched modes and used in photoablative decomposition involving actual removal of tissue. (UMDNS, 2005)Photorefractive Keratectomy: A type of refractive surgery of the CORNEA to correct MYOPIA and ASTIGMATISM. An EXCIMER LASER is used directly on the surface of the EYE to remove some of the CORNEAL EPITHELIUM thus reshaping the anterior curvature of the cornea.Eye: The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.Relative Value Scales: Coded listings of physician or other professional services using units that indicate the relative value of the various services they perform. They take into account time, skill, and overhead cost required for each service, but generally do not consider the relative cost-effectiveness. Appropriate conversion factors can be used to translate the abstract units of the relative value scales into dollar fees for each service based on work expended, practice costs, and training costs.Corneal Topography: The measurement of curvature and shape of the anterior surface of the cornea using techniques such as keratometry, keratoscopy, photokeratoscopy, profile photography, computer-assisted image processing and videokeratography. This measurement is often applied in the fitting of contact lenses and in diagnosing corneal diseases or corneal changes including keratoconus, which occur after keratotomy and keratoplasty.Lenses, Intraocular: Artificial implanted lenses.Corneal Surgery, Laser: Surgical techniques on the CORNEA employing LASERS, especially for reshaping the CORNEA to correct REFRACTIVE ERRORS.Vitreous Detachment: Detachment of the corpus vitreum (VITREOUS BODY) from its normal attachments, especially the retina, due to shrinkage from degenerative or inflammatory conditions, trauma, myopia, or senility.Cataract: Partial or complete opacity on or in the lens or capsule of one or both eyes, impairing vision or causing blindness. The many kinds of cataract are classified by their morphology (size, shape, location) or etiology (cause and time of occurrence). (Dorland, 27th ed)South Australia: A state in south central Australia. Its capital is Adelaide. It was probably first visited by F. Thyssen in 1627. Later discoveries in 1802 and 1830 opened up the southern part. It became a British province in 1836 with this self-descriptive name and became a state in 1901. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1135)Aberrometry: The use of an aberrometer to measure eye tissue imperfections or abnormalities based on the way light passes through the eye which affects the ability of the eye to focus properly.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Corneal Wavefront Aberration: Asymmetries in the topography and refractive index of the corneal surface that affect visual acuity.Visual Acuity: Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.Microscopy, Electrochemical, Scanning: A scanning probe microscopy technique that uses an ultramicroelectrode as the scanning probe that simultaneously records changes in electrochemical potential as it scans thereby creating topographical images with localized electrochemical information.Refractive Errors: Deviations from the average or standard indices of refraction of the eye through its dioptric or refractive apparatus.
(1/47) Impact of scattering and spherical aberration in contrast sensitivity.

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(2/47) Accommodative lag and fluctuations when optical aberrations are manipulated.

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(3/47) Blur on the retina due to higher-order aberrations: comparison of eye growth models to experimental data.

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(4/47) Peripheral optical errors and their change with accommodation differ between emmetropic and myopic eyes.

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(5/47) Higher-order aberrations produce orientation-specific notches in the defocused contrast sensitivity function.

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(6/47) Experimental validation of a Bayesian model of visual acuity.

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(7/47) Myopia and peripheral ocular aberrations.

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(8/47) A contralateral eye study comparing apodized diffractive and full diffractive lenses: wavefront analysis and distance and near uncorrected visual acuity.

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*  Cataract surgery
Dan B. Tran, MD (January 2012). "Optimizing Surgical Outcomes With Intraoperative Aberrometry". bmctoday.net. Cataract and ...
*  Aberrations of the eye
The most common technique is Shack-Hartmann aberrometry. Other methods include Tscherning systems, ray tracing and Skiascopy ...
*  Allon Barsam
... first British surgeon to use laser vision correction technology for cataract surgery with the use of intraoperative aberrometry ...
Pearls for Getting Started with Intraoperative Aberrometry  - American Academy of Ophthalmology  Pearls for Getting Started with Intraoperative Aberrometry - American Academy of Ophthalmology
Nicole Fram offers tips for surgeons who want to get started using the intraoperative aberrometry device, ORA (WaveTec). ... Nicole Fram offers tips for surgeons who want to start using the intraoperative aberrometry device, ORA (WaveTec). She suggests ...
more infohttps://www.aao.org/interview/pearls-getting-started-with-intraoperative-aberrom
WaveLight® Refractive Suite Aberrometry Devices | myalcon.com  WaveLight® Refractive Suite Aberrometry Devices | myalcon.com
Discover how the aberrometry tool works to measure higher aberrations, track pupil centration and transfer data to the ...
more infohttps://www.myalcon.com/products/surgical/diagnostic-devices/
Corneal topography and aberrometry changes one-year after transepithelial corneal cross-linking using iontophoresis versus...  Corneal topography and aberrometry changes one-year after transepithelial corneal cross-linking using iontophoresis versus...
Corneal topography and aberrometry changes one-year after transepithelial corneal cross-linking using iontophoresis versus ... Corneal topography and aberrometry changes one-year after transepithelial corneal cross-linking using iontophoresis versus ... Purpose : To assess the 1-year corneal topography and aberrometry changes after transepithelial corneal crosslinking using ... sebastiano serrao, Giuseppe Lombardo, Daniela Giannini, Marco Lombardo; Corneal topography and aberrometry changes one-year ...
more infohttps://iovs.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?articleid=2640800
Tracey Technologies - Ray-tracing Wavefront Aberrometry for Eye Care  Tracey Technologies - Ray-tracing Wavefront Aberrometry for Eye Care
With ray tracing, the Tracey iTrace dynamically measures and analyzes wavefront aberrometry, and with the corneal topography ... Tracey Technologies holds patents to highly advanced technology, including ray tracing aberrometry. ...
more infohttp://traceytechnologies.com
Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry India | Wavefront Science in Vision and Eye Care (Textbook): CHAPTER 3....  Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry India | Wavefront Science in Vision and Eye Care (Textbook): CHAPTER 3....
Course Outline: 1. Wavefront Aberrometry A. Basic Principles 1. Measures points of the Zernike in a given pupil diameter 2. ... Ray tracing aberrometry a. Lenslet array b. Delivers beams one at a time c. More points measured d. Slower than Shack-Hartmann ... Wavefront aberrometry is the technology used in wavefront science. This discussion addresses the principles of the technology ... 3. Tscherning aberrometry a. Similar to ray tracing b. Subjective responses from patient 4. Dynamic spatial skiascopy a. Purely ...
more infohttps://www.wcea.education/app/ascoindia/elearning/optometrist/association-of-schools-and-colleges-of-optometry-india/128062/wavefront-science-in-vision-and-eye-care-textbook-chapter-3-wavefront-aberrometry
High-Tech Toric IOL Axis Alignment - American Academy of Ophthalmology  High-Tech Toric IOL Axis Alignment - American Academy of Ophthalmology
Intraoperative wavefront aberrometry. To help the surgeon choose the correct intraocular lens (IOL) power and then align the ... Intraoperative Wavefront Aberrometry. Both ORA and Holos IntraOp can measure phakic, aphakic, and pseudophakic refraction of ... Donaldson, "I do think someday intraoperative aberrometry will become a universal component of cataract surgery. I foresee a ... Some systems utilize intraoperative wavefront aberrometry; others link keratometry or topography to a photograph of the eye. ...
more infohttps://www.aao.org/eyenet/article/high-tech-toric-iol-axis-alignment?april-2015
A Comparative Evaluation of a New Generation of Diffractive Trifocal and Extended Depth of Focus Intraocular Lenses  A Comparative Evaluation of a New Generation of Diffractive Trifocal and Extended Depth of Focus Intraocular Lenses
Aberrometry. Mean higher order aberrations (HOAs), coma, tilt, and spherical aberrations are shown in Table A. (available in ... Mean Aberrometry (iTrace) Data (RMS Values in μm) for a 4-mm Diameter ... Mean Aberrometry (iTrace) Data (RMS Values in μ. m) for a 4-mm Diameter. a. ... Mean Aberrometry (iTrace) Data (RMS Values in μm) for a 4-mm Diameter ...
more infohttps://www.healio.com/ophthalmology/journals/jrs/2018-8-34-8/%7Bc03d7cb2-71e3-40da-9f3f-69a139857c13%7D/a-comparative-evaluation-of-a-new-generation-of-diffractive-trifocal-and-extended-depth-of-focus-intraocular-lenses
EyeWorld | IOL power choice in advanced cataract surgery  EyeWorld | IOL power choice in advanced cataract surgery
Intraoperative aberrometry. Dr. Berdahl only uses intraoperative aberrometry in two situations: for patients who desire ... That said, some surgeons find aberrometry to be invaluable," he said.. Dr. Koch thinks that aberrometry might gradually be ... Berdahl noted that aberrometry is important in his decision of which implant power to use. "There are three scenarios: virgin ... I think that aberrometry still plays a critical role in decreasing enhancement rates for us, especially in toric patients," he ...
more infohttps://www.eyeworld.org/iol-power-choice-advanced-cataract-surgery
ESCRS | European Society of Cataract & Refractive Surgeons  ESCRS | European Society of Cataract & Refractive Surgeons
Accuracy of clinical aberrometry strongly depends on the cataract levels. Conclusions: Mild cataract (nuclear and cortical) and ... Clinical aberrometry and lens pathology. Poster Details. First Author: A.Varavka RUSSIA ... The relationship between lens opacification, lens position (subluxation) and clinical aberrometry were investigated. Results: ... We used WASCA and CRS-Master aberrometry (' Carl Zeiss Meditec' ) and Pentacam (' OCULUS' ) system. Wavefront Hartmann-Shack ...
more infohttp://www.escrs.org/milan2012/programme/poster-details.asp?id=13345
How Much Does Laser Eye Surgery Cost? - Optical Express  How Much Does Laser Eye Surgery Cost? - Optical Express
iDesign aberrometry. Aberrometry is used to diagnose vision errors, represented by the way that the eye focuses light. The ...
more infohttps://www.opticalexpress.co.uk/laser-eye-surgery/pricing
Refractive Channel - Eyetube  Refractive Channel - Eyetube
Discussing the Value of Intraoperative Aberrometry. Kendall Donaldson, MD; William Wiley, MD; P. Dee G. Stephenson, MD; and ... Discussing the Value of Intraoperative Aberrometry. Kendall Donaldson, MD; William Wiley, MD; P. Dee G. Stephenson, MD; and ...
more infohttps://eyetube.net/refractive-iol/?t=860
Refractive Channel - Eyetube  Refractive Channel - Eyetube
Discussing the Value of Intraoperative Aberrometry. Kendall Donaldson, MD; William Wiley, MD; P. Dee G. Stephenson, MD; and ... Discussing the Value of Intraoperative Aberrometry. Kendall Donaldson, MD; William Wiley, MD; P. Dee G. Stephenson, MD; and ...
more infohttps://eyetube.net/refractive-iol/?t=405
Customized PRK With Mitomycin Versus Customized Lasik for Myopic Astigmatism - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov  Customized PRK With Mitomycin Versus Customized Lasik for Myopic Astigmatism - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov
aberrometry data. Secondary Outcome Measures : *subjective evaluation. Eligibility Criteria. Go to Study Description Study ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00365040
Cataract surgery - Wikipedia  Cataract surgery - Wikipedia
Dan B. Tran, MD (January 2012). "Optimizing Surgical Outcomes With Intraoperative Aberrometry". bmctoday.net. Cataract and ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cataract_surgery
Alcon to Showcase New Clinical Data, Innovative Technology at American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery 2019 Annual...  Alcon to Showcase New Clinical Data, Innovative Technology at American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery 2019 Annual...
Alcon will be hosting a symposium titled Intra-Operative Aberrometry (IOA) In Modern Cataract Refractive Surgery for Current ... Highlighting Advantages of Intraoperative Aberrometry The ORA SYSTEM® powered by AnalyzOR™ Technology is the only ... The ORA SYSTEM® technology utilizes wavefront aberrometry data to measure and analyze the refractive power of the eye (i.e. ... Key data shared at the meeting will examine the results of using intraoperative aberrometry versus pre-operative formulas. ...
more infohttps://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20190501005241/en/Alcon-Showcase-New-Clinical-Data-Innovative-Technology
LASIK Hyperopia: Background, History of the Procedure, Problem  LASIK Hyperopia: Background, History of the Procedure, Problem
Aberrometry and Wavefront Imaging * A-Scan Biometry * Refractive Lens Exchange (Clear Lens Extraction) for Myopia Correction ...
more infohttps://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1221098-overview
Amblyopia: Practice Essentials, Background, Pathophysiology  Amblyopia: Practice Essentials, Background, Pathophysiology
Aberrometry and Wavefront Imaging * A-Scan Biometry * Refractive Lens Exchange (Clear Lens Extraction) for Myopia Correction ...
more infohttps://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1214603-overview
Diagnosing the severity of dry eye: a clear and practical algorithm | British Journal of Ophthalmology  Diagnosing the severity of dry eye: a clear and practical algorithm | British Journal of Ophthalmology
Contributory criteria are listed in table 2 and include aberrometry, confocal microscopy, inflammatory markers and refractory ...
more infohttp://bjo.bmj.com/content/early/2014/03/13/bjophthalmol-2013-304619.long