Methods to repair breaks in abdominal tissues caused by trauma or to close surgical incisions during abdominal surgery.
An absorbable suture material used also as ligating clips, as pins for internal fixation of broken bones, and as ligament reinforcement for surgically managed ligament injuries. Its promising characteristics are elasticity, complete biodegradability, and lack of side effects such as infections.
Methods to repair breaks in tissue caused by trauma or to close surgical incisions.
Materials used in closing a surgical or traumatic wound. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Pathologic process consisting of a partial or complete disruption of the layers of a surgical wound.
Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).
Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.
Devices which are very resistant to wear and may be used over a long period of time. They include items such as wheelchairs, hospital beds, artificial limbs, etc.
An incision in the vagina.
A long, narrow, and flat bone commonly known as BREASTBONE occurring in the midsection of the anterior thoracic segment or chest region, which stabilizes the rib cage and serves as the point of origin for several muscles that move the arms, head, and neck.
Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.
That portion of the body that lies between the THORAX and the PELVIS.
A technique of closing incisions and wounds, or of joining and connecting tissues, in which staples are used as sutures.
Incision into the side of the abdomen between the ribs and pelvis.
General or unspecified injuries involving organs in the abdominal cavity.
Polymers where the main polymer chain comprises recurring amide groups. These compounds are generally formed from combinations of diamines, diacids, and amino acids and yield fibers, sheeting, or extruded forms used in textiles, gels, filters, sutures, contact lenses, and other biomaterials.
Propylene or propene polymers. Thermoplastics that can be extruded into fibers, films or solid forms. They are used as a copolymer in plastics, especially polyethylene. The fibers are used for fabrics, filters and surgical sutures.
The outer margins of the ABDOMEN, extending from the osteocartilaginous thoracic cage to the PELVIS. Though its major part is muscular, the abdominal wall consists of at least seven layers: the SKIN, subcutaneous fat, deep FASCIA; ABDOMINAL MUSCLES, transversalis fascia, extraperitoneal fat, and the parietal PERITONEUM.
Muscles forming the ABDOMINAL WALL including RECTUS ABDOMINIS, external and internal oblique muscles, transversus abdominis, and quadratus abdominis. (from Stedman, 25th ed)
A hernia caused by weakness of the anterior ABDOMINAL WALL due to midline defects, previous incisions, or increased intra-abdominal pressure. Ventral hernias include UMBILICAL HERNIA, incisional, epigastric, and spigelian hernias.
Invasion of the site of trauma by pathogenic microorganisms.
Opening or penetration through the wall of the INTESTINES.
First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.
Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.

A prospective, randomised, controlled, double-blind phase I-II clinical trial on the safety of A-Part Gel as adhesion prophylaxis after major abdominal surgery versus non-treated group. (1/26)

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Decompressive laparotomy with temporary abdominal closure versus percutaneous puncture with placement of abdominal catheter in patients with abdominal compartment syndrome during acute pancreatitis: background and design of multicenter, randomised, controlled study. (2/26)

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Colostomy closure: how to avoid complications. (3/26)

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Review of abdominal damage control and open abdomens: focus on gastrointestinal complications. (4/26)

Massive trauma and abdominal catastrophes carry high morbidity and mortality. In addition to the primary pathologic process, a secondary systemic injury, characterized by inflammatory mediator release, contributes to subsequent cellular, end-organ, and systemic dysfunction. These processes, in conjunction with large-volume resuscitations and tissue hypoperfusion, lead to acidosis, coagulopathy, and hypothermia. This "lethal triad" synergistically contributes to further physiologic derangements and, if uncorrected, may result in patient death. One manifestation of the associated clinical syndrome is the development of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and the abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). The development of ACS is insidious. If not recognized and treated promptly, ACS leads to multi-system organ failure (MSOF) and mortality. Improved understanding of IAH and ACS led to the development of damage control (DC)/open abdomen (OA) as surgical decompressive strategy. The DC/OA approach consists of three basic management steps. During the initial step the abdomen is opened, hemorrhage/abdominal contamination are controlled, and temporary abdominal closure is performed (Stage I). The patient then enters Stage II - physiologic restoration with core rewarming, correction of coagulopathy and completion of acute resuscitation. After physiologic normalization, definitive management of injuries and eventual abdominal closure (Stage III) are achieved. The authors will provide an overview of the DC/OA approach, as well as the clinical diagnosis of ACS, followed by a discussion of DC/OA-associated complications, with focus on digestive system-specific complaints.  (+info)

Macroscopic changes during negative pressure wound therapy of the open abdomen using conventional negative pressure wound therapy and NPWT with a protective disc over the intestines. (5/26)

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Does staged closure have a worse prognosis in gastroschisis? (6/26)

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Delayed primary closure of the septic open abdomen with a dynamic closure system. (7/26)

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Evaluation of the safety and efficacy of MonoMax(R) suture material for abdominal wall closure after primary midline laparotomy-a controlled prospective multicentre trial: ISSAAC [NCT005725079]. (8/26)

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Abdominal wound closure techniques refer to the methods used to close and repair surgical incisions in the abdomen. The goal of these techniques is to restore the integrity of the abdominal wall, minimize the risk of infection or dehiscence (wound separation), and promote optimal healing. Several abdominal wound closure techniques are available, and the choice of which one to use depends on various factors such as the size and location of the incision, the patient's individual needs and medical history, and the surgeon's preference. Here are some commonly used abdominal wound closure techniques:

1. Continuous running suture: This technique involves using a continuous strand of suture material to close the wound in a single pass. The suture is inserted through the full thickness of the abdominal wall, including the fascia (the strong connective tissue that surrounds the muscles), and then passed continuously along the length of the incision, pulling the edges of the wound together as it goes. This technique can be faster and more efficient than other methods, but it may increase the risk of infection or wound breakdown if not done properly.
2. Interrupted suture: In this technique, the surgeon uses individual stitches placed at regular intervals along the incision to close the wound. Each stitch is tied separately, which can make the closure more secure and reduce the risk of infection or wound breakdown. However, interrupted sutures can be more time-consuming than continuous running sutures.
3. Mass closure: This technique involves using a large, continuous suture to close the entire length of the incision in one pass. The suture is inserted through the full thickness of the abdominal wall and tied at both ends, pulling the edges of the wound together. Mass closure can be faster and more efficient than other methods, but it may increase the risk of infection or wound breakdown if not done properly.
4. Retention sutures: These are additional sutures that are placed deep within the abdominal wall to provide extra support and strength to the closure. They are often used in high-tension areas or in patients who are at increased risk of wound dehiscence, such as those with obesity or diabetes.
5. Layered closure: In this technique, the surgeon closes the incision in multiple layers, starting with the deepest layer of muscle and fascia and working outward to the skin. Each layer is closed separately using either interrupted or continuous sutures. Layered closure can provide added strength and stability to the closure, but it can be more time-consuming than other methods.
6. Skin closure: The final step in wound closure is to close the skin, which can be done using a variety of techniques, including staples, sutures, or surgical glue. The choice of closure method depends on several factors, including the size and location of the incision, the patient's individual needs and preferences, and the surgeon's experience and expertise.

Overall, the choice of wound closure technique depends on several factors, including the size and location of the incision, the patient's individual needs and preferences, and the surgeon's experience and expertise. The goal is to provide a strong, secure, and cosmetically appealing closure that minimizes the risk of infection, wound breakdown, or other complications.

Polydioxanone (PDO) is a synthetic, absorbable monofilament suture material that is commonly used in surgical procedures. It is made from a polymer of polydioxanone and has a variety of medical uses, including soft tissue approximation and ligation. PDO sutures are known for their high tensile strength and slow absorption rate, which can make them ideal for use in surgeries where long-term support is needed before the suture is fully absorbed by the body. The absorbable nature of PDO sutures also eliminates the need for a second surgical procedure to remove them.

In summary, Polydioxanone (PDO) is a synthetic, absorbable monofilament suture material that is commonly used in surgical procedures due to its high tensile strength and slow absorption rate.

Wound closure techniques are methods used to bring the edges of a wound together, allowing for proper healing and minimizing the scar formation. The goal is to approximate the wound edges accurately while providing strength and support to the healing tissues. Several techniques can be employed depending on the type, location, and size of the wound. Some common wound closure techniques include:

1. Sutures (Stitches): A surgical thread is passed through the skin on either side of the wound and tied together to hold the edges in place. Sutures can be absorbable or non-absorbable, and various materials and needle types are used depending on the specific application.
2. Staples: Similar to sutures, staples are used to bring the wound edges together. They are typically faster to apply and remove than sutures, making them suitable for certain types of wounds, such as those on the scalp or torso.
3. Adhesive strips (Steri-Strips): These are thin adhesive bandages applied across the wound to keep the edges approximated. They are often used in conjunction with other closure techniques or for superficial wounds that do not require extensive support.
4. Tissue adhesives (Glues): A liquid adhesive is applied to the wound edges, which then hardens and forms a bond between them. This technique is typically used for minor wounds and can be less invasive than sutures or staples.
5. Skin closure tapes: These are specialized tapes that provide support to the healing wound while also protecting it from external factors. They can be used in combination with other closure techniques or on their own for superficial wounds.
6. Surgical sealants: These are medical-grade materials that create a barrier over the wound, helping to prevent infection and maintain moisture at the wound site. They can be used alongside other closure methods or as an alternative for certain types of wounds.

The choice of wound closure technique depends on various factors, including the location, size, and depth of the wound, patient preferences, and the healthcare provider's expertise. Proper wound care and follow-up are essential to ensure optimal healing and minimize scarring.

In medical terms, sutures are specialized surgical threads made from various materials such as absorbable synthetic or natural fibers, or non-absorbable materials like nylon or silk. They are used to approximate and hold together the edges of a wound or incision in the skin or other tissues during the healing process. Sutures come in different sizes, types, and shapes, each designed for specific uses and techniques depending on the location and type of tissue being sutured. Properly placed sutures help to promote optimal healing, minimize scarring, and reduce the risk of infection or other complications.

Surgical wound dehiscence is a medical condition that refers to the partial or complete separation of layers of a surgical incision after a surgical procedure, leading to the disruption of the wound closure. This can occur due to various factors such as infection, poor nutrition, increased tension on the sutures, hematoma or seroma formation, and patient's underlying health conditions like diabetes or immunodeficiency. Dehiscence may result in the exposure of internal tissues and organs, potentially causing severe complications such as infection, bleeding, or organ dysfunction. Immediate medical attention is required to manage this condition and prevent further complications.

Suture techniques refer to the various methods used by surgeons to sew or stitch together tissues in the body after an injury, trauma, or surgical incision. The main goal of suturing is to approximate and hold the edges of the wound together, allowing for proper healing and minimizing scar formation.

There are several types of suture techniques, including:

1. Simple Interrupted Suture: This is one of the most basic suture techniques where the needle is passed through the tissue at a right angle, creating a loop that is then tightened to approximate the wound edges. Multiple stitches are placed along the length of the incision or wound.
2. Continuous Locking Suture: In this technique, the needle is passed continuously through the tissue in a zigzag pattern, with each stitch locking into the previous one. This creates a continuous line of sutures that provides strong tension and support to the wound edges.
3. Running Suture: Similar to the continuous locking suture, this technique involves passing the needle continuously through the tissue in a straight line. However, instead of locking each stitch, the needle is simply passed through the previous loop before being tightened. This creates a smooth and uninterrupted line of sutures that can be easily removed after healing.
4. Horizontal Mattress Suture: In this technique, two parallel stitches are placed horizontally across the wound edges, creating a "mattress" effect that provides additional support and tension to the wound. This is particularly useful in deep or irregularly shaped wounds.
5. Vertical Mattress Suture: Similar to the horizontal mattress suture, this technique involves placing two parallel stitches vertically across the wound edges. This creates a more pronounced "mattress" effect that can help reduce tension and minimize scarring.
6. Subcuticular Suture: In this technique, the needle is passed just below the surface of the skin, creating a smooth and barely visible line of sutures. This is particularly useful in cosmetic surgery or areas where minimizing scarring is important.

The choice of suture technique depends on various factors such as the location and size of the wound, the type of tissue involved, and the patient's individual needs and preferences. Proper suture placement and tension are crucial for optimal healing and aesthetic outcomes.

Wound healing is a complex and dynamic process that occurs after tissue injury, aiming to restore the integrity and functionality of the damaged tissue. It involves a series of overlapping phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling.

1. Hemostasis: This initial phase begins immediately after injury and involves the activation of the coagulation cascade to form a clot, which stabilizes the wound and prevents excessive blood loss.
2. Inflammation: Activated inflammatory cells, such as neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages, infiltrate the wound site to eliminate pathogens, remove debris, and release growth factors that promote healing. This phase typically lasts for 2-5 days post-injury.
3. Proliferation: In this phase, various cell types, including fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and keratinocytes, proliferate and migrate to the wound site to synthesize extracellular matrix (ECM) components, form new blood vessels (angiogenesis), and re-epithelialize the wounded area. This phase can last up to several weeks depending on the size and severity of the wound.
4. Remodeling: The final phase of wound healing involves the maturation and realignment of collagen fibers, leading to the restoration of tensile strength in the healed tissue. This process can continue for months to years after injury, although the tissue may never fully regain its original structure and function.

It is important to note that wound healing can be compromised by several factors, including age, nutrition, comorbidities (e.g., diabetes, vascular disease), and infection, which can result in delayed healing or non-healing chronic wounds.

Durable Medical Equipment (DME) is defined in the medical field as medical equipment that is:

1. Durable: able to withstand repeated use.
2. Primarily and customarily used for a medical purpose: intended to be used for a medical reason and not for comfort or convenience.
3. Generally not useful to a person in the absence of an illness or injury: not typically used by people who are healthy.
4. Prescribed by a physician: recommended by a doctor to treat a specific medical condition or illness.

Examples of DME include wheelchairs, hospital beds, walkers, and oxygen concentrators. These items are designed to assist individuals with injuries or chronic conditions in performing activities of daily living and improving their quality of life. DME is typically covered by health insurance plans, including Medicare and Medicaid, with a doctor's prescription.

Colpotomy is a surgical procedure that involves making an incision into the vaginal wall. This procedure is often performed to drain abscesses or hematomas in the pelvic area, or to obtain tissue samples for biopsy. It may also be used in the treatment of certain gynecological conditions such as endometriosis or uterine prolapse. As with any surgical procedure, colpotomy carries a risk of complications, including infection, bleeding, and damage to surrounding tissues. Therefore, it should only be performed by a qualified medical professional in a sterile surgical setting.

The sternum, also known as the breastbone, is a long, flat bone located in the central part of the chest. It serves as the attachment point for several muscles and tendons, including those involved in breathing. The sternum has three main parts: the manubrium at the top, the body in the middle, and the xiphoid process at the bottom. The upper seven pairs of ribs connect to the sternum via costal cartilages.

A surgical wound infection, also known as a surgical site infection (SSI), is defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as an infection that occurs within 30 days after surgery (or within one year if an implant is left in place) and involves either:

1. Purulent drainage from the incision;
2. Organisms isolated from an aseptically obtained culture of fluid or tissue from the incision;
3. At least one of the following signs or symptoms of infection: pain or tenderness, localized swelling, redness, or heat; and
4. Diagnosis of surgical site infection by the surgeon or attending physician.

SSIs can be classified as superficial incisional, deep incisional, or organ/space infections, depending on the depth and extent of tissue involvement. They are a common healthcare-associated infection and can lead to increased morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs.

The abdomen refers to the portion of the body that lies between the thorax (chest) and the pelvis. It is a musculo-fascial cavity containing the digestive, urinary, and reproductive organs. The abdominal cavity is divided into several regions and quadrants for medical description and examination purposes. These include the upper and lower abdomen, as well as nine quadrants formed by the intersection of the midline and a horizontal line drawn at the level of the umbilicus (navel).

The major organs located within the abdominal cavity include:

1. Stomach - muscular organ responsible for initial digestion of food
2. Small intestine - long, coiled tube where most nutrient absorption occurs
3. Large intestine - consists of the colon and rectum; absorbs water and stores waste products
4. Liver - largest internal organ, involved in protein synthesis, detoxification, and metabolism
5. Pancreas - secretes digestive enzymes and hormones such as insulin
6. Spleen - filters blood and removes old red blood cells
7. Kidneys - pair of organs responsible for filtering waste products from the blood and producing urine
8. Adrenal glands - sit atop each kidney, produce hormones that regulate metabolism, immune response, and stress response

The abdomen is an essential part of the human body, playing a crucial role in digestion, absorption, and elimination of food and waste materials, as well as various metabolic processes.

Surgical stapling is a medical technique that uses specialized staplers to place linear staple lines to close surgical incisions, connect or remove organs and tissues during surgical procedures. Surgical staples are made of titanium or stainless steel and can be absorbable or non-absorbable. They provide secure, fast, and accurate wound closure, reducing the risk of infection and promoting faster healing compared to traditional suturing methods.

The surgical stapler consists of a handle, an anvil, and a cartridge containing multiple staples. The device is loaded with staple cartridges and used to approximate tissue edges before deploying the staples. Once the staples are placed, the stapler is removed, leaving the staple line in place.

Surgical stapling has various applications, including gastrointestinal anastomosis, lung resection, vascular anastomosis, and skin closure. It is widely used in different types of surgeries, such as open, laparoscopic, and robotic-assisted procedures. The use of surgical stapling requires proper training and expertise to ensure optimal patient outcomes.

A laparotomy is a surgical procedure that involves making an incision in the abdominal wall to gain access to the abdominal cavity. This procedure is typically performed to diagnose and treat various conditions such as abdominal trauma, tumors, infections, or inflammatory diseases. The size of the incision can vary depending on the reason for the surgery and the extent of the condition being treated. Once the procedure is complete, the incision is closed with sutures or staples.

The term "laparotomy" comes from the Greek words "lapara," which means "flank" or "side," and "tome," which means "to cut." Together, they describe the surgical procedure that involves cutting into the abdomen to examine its contents.

Abdominal injuries refer to damages or traumas that occur in the abdomen, an area of the body that is located between the chest and the pelvis. This region contains several vital organs such as the stomach, liver, spleen, pancreas, small intestine, large intestine, kidneys, and reproductive organs. Abdominal injuries can range from minor bruises and cuts to severe internal bleeding and organ damage, depending on the cause and severity of the trauma.

Common causes of abdominal injuries include:

* Blunt force trauma, such as that caused by car accidents, falls, or physical assaults
* Penetrating trauma, such as that caused by gunshot wounds or stabbing
* Deceleration injuries, which occur when the body is moving at a high speed and suddenly stops, causing internal organs to continue moving and collide with each other or the abdominal wall

Symptoms of abdominal injuries may include:

* Pain or tenderness in the abdomen
* Swelling or bruising in the abdomen
* Nausea or vomiting
* Dizziness or lightheadedness
* Blood in the urine or stool
* Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
* Rapid heartbeat or low blood pressure

Abdominal injuries can be life-threatening if left untreated, and immediate medical attention is necessary to prevent complications such as infection, internal bleeding, organ failure, or even death. Treatment may include surgery, medication, or other interventions depending on the severity and location of the injury.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Nylons" is a common term for a type of synthetic fiber often used in clothing, hosiery, and other textile applications. It is not a medical term or concept. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to try and help clarify!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Polypropylenes" does not have a medical definition as it is not a medical term. Polypropylene is a type of plastic that is used in various medical and non-medical applications. It is a thermoplastic polymer resin that is produced by the polymerization of propylene.

In the medical field, polypropylene is sometimes used to make single-use surgical instruments, sutures, and medical devices due to its resistance to heat, chemicals, and electricity. It is also biocompatible, meaning it can be safely used in the body without causing adverse reactions. However, "Polypropylenes" as a medical term is not recognized or used in the medical community.

The abdominal wall refers to the group of muscles, fascia (sheaths of connective tissue), and skin that make up the front and sides of the abdomen, extending from the thorax (chest) to the pelvis. It provides protection to the abdominal organs, supports the trunk, and allows for movement of the torso.

The main muscles of the anterior abdominal wall include:

1. Rectus sheaths (Rectus Abdominis): paired vertical muscles running from the pubic symphysis to the xiphoid process and costal cartilages of ribs 5-7.
2. External obliques: thin, irregular muscles that lie over the lower part of the abdomen and run diagonally downward and forward from the lower ribs to the iliac crest (pelvic bone) and pubic tubercle.
3. Internal obliques: thicker muscles that lie under the external obliques, running diagonally upward and forward from the iliac crest to the lower ribs.
4. Transverse abdominis: deepest of the abdominal muscles, lying horizontally across the abdomen, attaching from the lower ribs to the pelvis.

These muscles are interconnected by various layers of fascia and aponeuroses (flat, broad tendons), forming a complex structure that allows for both stability and mobility. The linea alba, a fibrous band, runs down the midline of the anterior abdominal wall, connecting the rectus sheaths.

Damage to the abdominal wall can occur due to trauma, surgery, or various medical conditions, which may require surgical intervention for repair.

The abdominal muscles, also known as the abdominals or abs, are a group of muscles in the anterior (front) wall of the abdominopelvic cavity. They play a crucial role in maintaining posture, supporting the trunk, and facilitating movement of the torso. The main abdominal muscles include:

1. Rectus Abdominis: These are the pair of long, flat muscles that run vertically along the middle of the anterior abdominal wall. They are often referred to as the "six-pack" muscles due to their visible, segmented appearance in well-trained individuals. The primary function of the rectus abdominis is to flex the spine, allowing for actions such as sitting up from a lying down position or performing a crunch exercise.

2. External Obliques: These are the largest and most superficial of the oblique muscles, located on the lateral (side) aspects of the abdominal wall. They run diagonally downward and forward from the lower ribs to the iliac crest (the upper part of the pelvis) and the pubic tubercle (a bony prominence at the front of the pelvis). The external obliques help rotate and flex the trunk, as well as assist in side-bending and exhalation.

3. Internal Obliques: These muscles lie deep to the external obliques and run diagonally downward and backward from the lower ribs to the iliac crest, pubic tubercle, and linea alba (the strong band of connective tissue that runs vertically along the midline of the abdomen). The internal obliques help rotate and flex the trunk, as well as assist in forced exhalation and increasing intra-abdominal pressure during actions such as coughing or lifting heavy objects.

4. Transversus Abdominis: This is the deepest of the abdominal muscles, located inner to both the internal obliques and the rectus sheath (a strong, fibrous covering that surrounds the rectus abdominis). The transversus abdominis runs horizontally around the abdomen, attaching to the lower six ribs, the thoracolumbar fascia (a broad sheet of connective tissue spanning from the lower back to the pelvis), and the pubic crest (the front part of the pelvic bone). The transversus abdominis helps maintain core stability by compressing the abdominal contents and increasing intra-abdominal pressure.

Together, these muscles form the muscular "corset" of the abdomen, providing support, stability, and flexibility to the trunk. They also play a crucial role in respiration, posture, and various movements such as bending, twisting, and lifting.

A ventral hernia is a type of hernia that occurs in the abdominal wall, specifically in the anterior (front) aspect. It can occur due to a weakness or defect in the abdominal wall muscles and fascia, which allows the internal organs or tissues to push through and create a bulge or swelling.

Ventral hernias can be classified into several types based on their location, size, and cause. Some of the common types include:

1. Incisional Hernia - occurs at the site of a previous surgical incision, where the abdominal wall has not healed properly or has become weakened over time.
2. Epigastric Hernia - located in the upper middle part of the abdomen, between the breastbone and the navel.
3. Umbilical Hernia - occurs around the belly button, most commonly seen in infants but can also affect adults.
4. Spigelian Hernia - a rare type of hernia that occurs lateral to the rectus sheath, usually at the level of the semilunar line.
5. Diastasis Recti - a separation of the abdominal muscles in the midline, which can lead to a ventral hernia if not treated.

Symptoms of a ventral hernia may include pain or discomfort, especially when lifting heavy objects, straining, coughing, or during physical activity. In some cases, a hernia may become incarcerated or strangulated, which requires immediate medical attention. Treatment options for ventral hernias typically involve surgical repair, either through open surgery or laparoscopic techniques.

A wound infection is defined as the invasion and multiplication of microorganisms in a part of the body tissue, which has been damaged by a cut, blow, or other trauma, leading to inflammation, purulent discharge, and sometimes systemic toxicity. The symptoms may include redness, swelling, pain, warmth, and fever. Treatment typically involves the use of antibiotics and proper wound care. It's important to note that not all wounds will become infected, but those that are contaminated with bacteria, dirt, or other foreign substances, or those in which the skin's natural barrier has been significantly compromised, are at a higher risk for infection.

Intestinal perforation is a medical condition that refers to a hole or tear in the lining of the intestine. This can occur anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract, including the small intestine, large intestine (colon), or stomach. Intestinal perforation allows the contents of the intestines, such as digestive enzymes and bacteria, to leak into the abdominal cavity, which can lead to a serious inflammatory response known as peritonitis.

Intestinal perforation can be caused by various factors, including:

* Mechanical trauma (e.g., gunshot wounds, stab wounds)
* Inflammatory bowel disease (e.g., Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis)
* Diverticulitis
* Appendicitis
* Intestinal obstruction
* Infections (e.g., typhoid fever, tuberculosis)
* Certain medications (e.g., nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids)
* Radiation therapy
* Ischemic bowel disease (lack of blood flow to the intestines)

Symptoms of intestinal perforation may include sudden abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, and decreased bowel movements. Treatment typically involves surgery to repair the perforation and remove any damaged tissue. Antibiotics are also administered to prevent infection. In severe cases, a temporary or permanent colostomy or ileostomy may be necessary.

Emergency treatment refers to the urgent medical interventions and care provided to individuals who are experiencing a severe injury, illness, or life-threatening condition. The primary aim of emergency treatment is to stabilize the patient's condition, prevent further harm, and provide immediate medical attention to save the patient's life or limb.

Emergency treatment may include various medical procedures, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), airway management, administering medications, controlling bleeding, treating burns, immobilizing fractures, and providing pain relief. The specific emergency treatment provided will depend on the nature and severity of the patient's condition.

Emergency treatment is typically delivered in an emergency department (ED) or a similar setting, such as an urgent care center, ambulance, or helicopter transport. Healthcare professionals who provide emergency treatment include emergency physicians, nurses, paramedics, and other specialists trained in emergency medicine.

It's important to note that emergency treatment is different from routine medical care, which is usually provided on a scheduled basis and focuses on preventing, diagnosing, and managing chronic or ongoing health conditions. Emergency treatment, on the other hand, is provided in response to an acute event or crisis that requires immediate attention and action.

A wound is a type of injury that occurs when the skin or other tissues are cut, pierced, torn, or otherwise broken. Wounds can be caused by a variety of factors, including accidents, violence, surgery, or certain medical conditions. There are several different types of wounds, including:

* Incisions: These are cuts that are made deliberately, often during surgery. They are usually straight and clean.
* Lacerations: These are tears in the skin or other tissues. They can be irregular and jagged.
* Abrasions: These occur when the top layer of skin is scraped off. They may look like a bruise or a scab.
* Punctures: These are wounds that are caused by sharp objects, such as needles or knives. They are usually small and deep.
* Avulsions: These occur when tissue is forcibly torn away from the body. They can be very serious and require immediate medical attention.

Injuries refer to any harm or damage to the body, including wounds. Injuries can range from minor scrapes and bruises to more severe injuries such as fractures, dislocations, and head trauma. It is important to seek medical attention for any injury that is causing significant pain, swelling, or bleeding, or if there is a suspected bone fracture or head injury.

In general, wounds and injuries should be cleaned and covered with a sterile bandage to prevent infection. Depending on the severity of the wound or injury, additional medical treatment may be necessary. This may include stitches for deep cuts, immobilization for broken bones, or surgery for more serious injuries. It is important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully to ensure proper healing and to prevent complications.

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These temporary abdominal closure techniques are most commonly used in cases of abdominal compartment syndrome in which ... negative pressure wound therapy and dynamic closure systems. These techniques are characterized by a tension-free closure. In ... A Bogota bag is a sterile plastic bag used for closure of abdominal wounds. It is generally a sterilized 3-liter (0.66 imp gal ... The Bogota bag is used to postpone definite closure until the underlying cause of the elevated intra-abdominal pressure can be ...
Hernias develop when the fascia of the abdominal cavity separates after the surgical closure. This may be due to suture failure ... Traumatic injuries, whether blunt force such as car accidents or penetrating wounds such as gunshot wounds, or stabbings, may ... However, it is believed that most leaks are caused by poor healing, not surgical technique. Risk factors for poor healing of ... poor wound healing. Other risk factors include obesity and smoking. Smaller closure stitches and the use of mesh when closing ...
... should be selected from donors of lighter weight than the proposed recipients to ensure simple closure of the abdominal wound. ... Once donor preparation is accomplished, procurement can begin by utilizing the same standard techniques for all abdominal organ ... As the abdominal organs are cooled in situ, the surrounding tissue is dissected so that they may be quickly extracted. In the ... A gastronomy or jejunostomy feeding tube may be placed before the abdominal wall is closed. When a liver is being transplanted ...
It is part of the reconstructive ladder, a stepwise approach to wound closure. The first known reports of surgical flaps ... or need tissue and bulk for successful closure. Common uses: Abdominal wall reconstruction Breast reconstruction Hand ... Flap surgery is a technique essential to plastic and reconstructive surgery. A flap is defined as a tissue that can be moved to ... As with healing of any wound, healing of a flap maintains the same process wound healing. There are four stages to wound ...
... changes and is followed by one of the temporary abdominal closure techniques in order to prevent secondary intra-abdominal ... and vacuum devices using negative pressure wound therapy). Cheatham, Michael Lee (April 2009). "Abdominal compartment syndrome ... Specific cause of abdominal compartment syndrome is not known, although some causes can be sepsis and severe abdominal trauma. ... Abdominal compartment syndrome is defined as an intra-abdominal pressure above 20 mmHg with evidence of organ failure. ...
... (NPWT), also known as a vacuum assisted closure (VAC), is a therapeutic technique using a ... closed surgical wounds, open abdominal wounds, open fractures, pressure injuries or pressure ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers, ... Cochrane Wounds Group) (April 2022). "Negative pressure wound therapy for surgical wounds healing by primary closure". The ... The use of this technique in wound management started in the 1990s and this technique is often recommended for treatment of a ...
"Experience with Vacuum-Pack Temporary Abdominal Wound Closure in 258 Trauma and General and Vascular Surgical Patients". ... A number of different techniques can be employed such as using staplers to come across the bowel, or primary suture closure in ... Numerous methods of temporary closure exist, with the most common technique being a negative-vacuum type device. Regardless of ... The first is controlling hemorrhage followed by contamination control, abdominal packing, and placement of a temporary closure ...
Abdominal Fascia Prosthesis, Temporary Abdominal Fascia Prosthesis, Artificial Bur, Bur Patch, Abdominal Bur Closure (ABC-Patch ... Boele Van Hensbroek, P; Wind, J; Dijkgraaf, MG; Busch, OR; Carel Goslings, J (2009). "Temporary closure of the open abdomen: a ... Wittman, D. H. (2000). "Staged abdominal repair: Development and current practice of an advanced operative technique for ... increased rate of delayed primary fascial closure after temporary abdominal closure when compared with a vacuum only closure or ...
The abdomen is checked for bleeding and then closed with a three-layer closure. The linea alba and then the subcutaneous layer ... The surgeon finds the ovary with the instrument and uses it to suspend the ovary from a needle placed through the abdominal ... The benefits of laparoscopic surgery are less pain, faster recovery, and smaller wounds to heal. A study has shown that ... "Gomerization" is breeders' informal term for surgical techniques by which male livestock, such as bulls, retain their full ...
Some surgeons suggest wound closure should be done seven days after fasciotomy. Multiple techniques exist for closure of the ... Abdominal compartment syndrome occurs when the intra-abdominal pressure exceeds 20 mmHg and abdominal perfusion pressure is ... "Wound closure of leg fasciotomy: comparison of vacuum-assisted closure versus shoelace technique. A randomised study". Injury. ... Both techniques are acceptable methods for closure, but the vacuum-assisted technique has led to longer hospitalization time. A ...
Abdominal, wound and back pain can continue for months after a caesarean section. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can be ... Dodd JM, Anderson ER, Gates S, Grivell RM (July 2014). "Surgical techniques for uterine incision and uterine closure at the ... Single layer closure compared with double layer closure has been observed to result in reduced blood loss during the surgery. ... For the abdominal incision he used the modified Joel Cohen incision and compared the longitudinal abdominal structures to ...
Primary wound closure is used if all remaining tissue is healthy and free of contamination. Small puncture wounds may be left ... Different techniques are used depending on the type of animal, including ligation of the spermatic cord with suture material, ... In a cat, this is accomplished either by a ventral midline abdominal incision, or by a flank incision (more common in the UK). ... Bite wounds from other animals (and rarely humans) are a common occurrence. Wounds from objects that the animal may step on or ...
... or evisceration Acute abdomen with evidence of inflammation of the abdominal lining or the abdominal organs, gastrointestinal ... Exploratory laparotomy originated as a technique for the treatment of acute trauma. In 1881, Dr. George E. Goodfellow performed ... "primary closure") or one or more tissue layers may be left open ("open abdomen") to facilitate further non-surgical ... and reopening of the wound due to a failure to heal properly. A minority of patients will require reoperation for complications ...
Hallock G, YoungSang Y (2020). "Left Mastectomy Wound Closure with Left Latissimus Dorsi Musculocutaneous Local Flap". Journal ... Atisha D, Alderman AK (August 2009). "A systematic review of abdominal wall function following abdominal flaps for ... The sub-pectoral technique described above is now preferred because it provides an additional muscular layer between the skin ... There are several techniques for breast reconstruction. These options are broadly categorized into two different groups: This ...
Dodd JM, Anderson ER, Gates S, Grivell RM (July 2014). "Surgical techniques for uterine incision and uterine closure at the ... During pregnancy, the pregnant uterus may compress the inferior vena cava and abdominal aorta, causing reduced blood flow to ... wound infection, fertility problems, premature labor, postoperative pain, and many others. In addition, a rare form of ectopic ... Babu K, Magon N (August 2012). "Uterine closure in cesarean delivery: a new technique". North American Journal of Medical ...
Repair may involve closure of the bladder, closure of the anterior abdominal wall, colostomy (temporary or permanent) with ... Techniques and procedure have evolved over the last 60 years. Some of the different techniques have been devised to reduce ... or reduce urinary tract infections or obstruction to reduce risk of cancer in gonads with high risk levels to close open wounds ... closure of the penile shaft and mobilisation of the corpora. Urogenital closure closure of any midline opening at the base of ...
The most common complications for both techniques are superficial wound infections and recurrence of the hernia and some people ... Usually hernia has content of bowel, abdominal fat or omentum, tissue that normally would reside inside the abdominal cavity if ... Operation and closure of the defect is required only if the hernia persists after the age of 3 years or if the child has an ... Symptoms may develop when the contracting abdominal wall causes pressure on the hernia contents. This results in abdominal pain ...
"Granzyme B degrades extracellular matrix and contributes to delayed wound closure in apolipoprotein E knockout mice". Cell ... Granzyme secretion can be detected and measured using Western Blot or ELISA techniques. Granzyme secreting cells can be ... February 2010). "Perforin-independent extracellular granzyme B activity contributes to abdominal aortic aneurysm". The American ... 2014). "Serpina3n accelerates tissue repair in a diabetic mouse model of delayed wound healing". Cell Death & Disease. 5 (10): ...
... a temporary abdominal closure device that facilitates planned relaparotomies or Staged Abdominal Repairs (STAR or Stage Injury ... Staged abdominal Repair: Development and Current Practice of an Advanced Operative Technique for Diffuse Suppurative ... Use and abuse of antibiotics worldwide: summary report from the WHO working group on prophylaxis of postoperative wound ... abdominal compartment syndrome abdominal compartment syndrome and staged abdominal repair STAR. Besides introducing the concept ...
The straight blades are used for cutting tissue near wounds, and curves are used for cutting thick tissue. Metzenbaum scissors ... In the 19th century, Doyen abdominal retractors were invented by French surgeon Eugène-Louis Doyen. The doyen retractors are ... William Stewart Halsted was the pioneer of the technique, which later was called Diathermy. In 1900, physician Joseph Rivière ... In 1867, Eugene Koeberle, who accidentally found arterial forceps with a catch closure came away spontaneously without the need ...
For over 150 years, Surgeons had known that mechanical wound closure might provide reduced operating times, less tissue ... blend of laparoscopic techniques and three-dimensional drawings explaining these techniques. Steichen authored or co-authored ... In 2001, he co-edited, and translated a large portion of, Minimally-Invasive Abdominal Surgery, a surgical textbook and atlas ... to the technological vanguard in wound closure. Steichen finished his period at Albert Einstein with a Sabbatical year in ...
With both castration techniques, the wound should be kept clean and allowed to drain freely to reduce the risk of hematoma ... Sedrish, Steven A. MS, DVM, Diplomate ACVS, and Leonard, John M. VMD (2001). "How to Perform a Primary Closure Castration Using ... The complication usually resolves quickly after this.[citation needed] Peritonitis from bacteria entering the abdominal cavity ... Each technique has advantages and disadvantages. Standing castration is a technique where a horse is sedated and local ...
... and the margins of the wound may be easily matched from one side of the wound to the other for the purposes of closure. ... Many bleeding control techniques are taught as part of first aid throughout the world, though some more advanced techniques ... may affect the orbit of the eye or the abdominal cavity, exposing the internal viscera. Avulsions are difficult to repair, and ... The type of wound (incision, laceration, puncture, etc.) has a major effect on the way a wound is managed, as does the area of ...
Swelling of the abdominal area or abdominal pain are signs of complications during recovery. Some common complications that ... The preferred technique is ablation vaginectomy with simultaneous scrotoplasty, which will close the labia majora along the ... In addition to a greater degree of tissue removal, total vaginectomy also involves a more complete closure of the space in the ... For example, for people with diabetes mellitus, potential contraindications for vaginectomy include wound-healing difficulty; ...
"Absorbable metal clips as substitutes for ligatures and deep sutures in wound closure", Journal of the American Medical ... Administering hypodermoclysis at two sites for faster fluid uptake is a technique still in use today. Kane had some novel ideas ... Kane says it was particularly useful for illuminating the abdominal cavity. Kane advocated, and practiced, tattooing newborn ... In 1924, Kane proposed the use of mica to repair head wounds that had exposed and damaged the brain. He cited among the ...
The suturing technique is the same as for the end-to-side anastomosis. In technically difficult duodenal stump closures, ... When the abdominal organs are exposed, thorough exploration is undertaken to assess the extent of disease and, in the case of ... Penetrative wounds in the duodenum, stomach, or pancreas: The removal of devitalized tissue by antrectomy could prevent ... In the subsequent decades, antrectomy continued to evolve with advancements in surgical techniques. The 1950s marked the ...
... significantly decreases wound complication rate and may refer as first choice for treatment of postoperative abdominal hernias ... laparostomy and mesh closure surgery, advanced laparoscopic operations such as, common bile duct exploration and resection, ... operating techniques and test questions, started using multimedia tools, organized interactive morning lessons and concerts, ... 2 in Tartar region and treated of numerous wounded soldiers. He also took an active part in the training, organization and ...
... and wound healing complications. If removable skin closures are used, they are removed after 7 to 10 days post-operatively, or ... A surgical procedure cutting through the abdominal wall to gain access to the abdominal cavity is a laparotomy. Minimally ... Pasteur's conclusions with his own experiments and decided to use his findings to develop antiseptic techniques for wounds. As ... a procedure is considered surgical when it involves cutting of a person's tissues or closure of a previously sustained wound. ...
Reduction of infection rates in abdominal incisions by delayed wound closure techniques. Am J Surg 1979;138:22-8. * ... Clean Wounds. Clean-Contaminated Wounds. Contaminated Wounds. Dirty or Infected Wounds. CONTROL MEASURES. RECOMMENDATIONS. ... Until wound edges are sealed and the wound is healing (about 24 hours after the operation for most wounds), wounds are covered ... delaying wound closure is preferable to inserting a drain which increases the risk of infection (39); delayed wound closure is ...
... and rectum caused by bullet wounds; exploratory laparotomy scar, cystostomy, colostomy, and abdominal fistula wounds; closure ... Wounds of the Extremities; Eight different wound cases shown to demonstrate techniques of cleaning wounds and removing ... technique used to effect repair (15 min; color). PMF 5005 (1947) - Simple Closure of an Abdominal Colostomy, incomplete ... Initial Surgery of Abdominal Wounds; Recommended surgical techniques used under combat conditions in Korea in the initial ...
The instructor lectures all over the country on wound care,and has lots of credentials.Any way,she said wound care does ... ... However,we were changing a VAC dressing (vacuum assisted closure) of a HUGE abdominal wound. This wound was GIGANTIC and DEEP. ... wound/ostomy/skin care RN.She told me that only clean technique is needed with most wounds. She is very up to date in her ... I was also taught to use sterile technique when performing wound care....especially deep wound care. Interesting??? :) ...
One study found a significantly shorter length of hospital stay (laparoscopic, 3.4 d; open, 5.5 d) and a higher wound closure ... Abdominal Pain in the Female Patient: Always Consider Your Differentials * Isolated Ocular Mpox Without Skin Lesions, United ... The two techniques have been found to be similar with respect to the negative appendectomy rate (laparoscopic, 14.4%; open, ... Acute Abdominal Pain Study Group. World J Surg. 1999 Feb. 23 (2):141-6. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. ...
There was no statistical difference in incidence between Hughes closure and mass closure at 1 or 2 years. Registration number ... Incisional hernia following colorectal cancer surgery according to suture technique: Hughes Abdominal Repair Randomized Trial ( ... HART (Hughes Abdominal Repair Trial) assessed the effect of an alternative suture method on the incidence of incisional hernia ... Results Between August 2014 and February 2018, 802 patients were randomized to either Hughes closure (401) or the standard mass ...
... stagedabdominal repair and other complex abdominal pathologies can be managed with a noveltechnique of Vacuum Assisted Closure ... VACUUM ASSISTED CLOSURE OF LAPAROSTOMY WOUNDS "A NOVEL TECHNIQUE" Authors. * Syed Imran Hussain Andrabi ... A brief outline of the working of Vacuum Assisted Closuredressing is also presented.Keywords: Vacuum assisted closure, dressing ... Management of a laparostomy wound is contentious. Specific pathologies like severe intraabdominal sepsis, trauma requiring ...
CONCLUSION: Abdominal wound closure technique and SSI prevention strategies vary widely between surgeons. There is little ... An international assessment of surgeon practices in abdominal wound closure and surgical site infection prevention by the ... pressurised wound irrigation, Triclosan-coated sutures for skin closure, and negative pressure wound therapy. Many other widely ... evidence of a risk-stratified approach to wound closure materials or techniques, with most surgeons using the same strategy for ...
... performed through an abdominal incision depends on careful selection of the incision site and proper closure of the wound. The ... surgeon needs to consider multiple factors before making an abdominal incision. ... Wound strength in abdominal incisions: a comparison of two continuous mass closure techniques in rats. Am J Obstet Gynecol. ... Abdominal wound closure using a nonabsorbable single-layer technique. Obstet Gynecol. 1983 Feb. 61(2):248-52. [QxMD MEDLINE ...
Decreasing intra-abdominal pressure will allow subclinical hemorrhage to become visible prior to abdominal closure, as the ... and some laparoscopic techniques have been done with mini-approaches or specialized entry systems such as wound retraction or ... The techniques may be done with mini-approaches, laparoscopy, or laparoscopic-assistance. Some laparoscopic-assisted techniques ... both should be treated prior to abdominal desufflation and closure of the port sites. ...
keywords = "Abdominal Wound Closure Techniques/adverse effects, Adult, Age Factors, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Cohort Studies, ... Surgical Wound Dehiscence/epidemiology, Survival Rate, Suture Techniques, Sutures, Treatment Outcome, Wound Healing/physiology ... Tolstrup M-B, Watt SK, Gögenur I. Reduced Rate of Dehiscence After Implementation of a Standardized Fascial Closure Technique ... Dyk ned i forskningsemnerne om Reduced Rate of Dehiscence After Implementation of a Standardized Fascial Closure Technique in ...
This study will investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of prone position ventilation techniques in children who develop ... Patients with delayed chest closure and wound infection requiring immobilization. Intervention strategies. * 1. The family ... Spinal injuries and untreated unstable fractures, orthopedic surgery or recent abdominal surgery ... et al. Feasibility and effectiveness of prone position ventilation technique for postoperative acute lung injury in infants ...
... a simple and effective alternative to the traditional surgical management of complex or multiple injuries in critically wounded ... include avoidance of irreversible physiologic insult and inability to obtain direct hemostasis or formal abdominal closure. The ... Various techniques are used to obtain rapid temporary control of bleeding and hollow visceral spillage. Hypothermia, ... a simple and effective alternative to the traditional surgical management of complex or multiple injuries in critically wounded ...
He had a history of stung injury in his back 5 years ago and he underwent only closure of the primary wound without further ... The key of this procedure is a suturing technique in narrow area and vertical situation. We present the video of this procedure ... Abdominal CT scan showed prolapsed intestine and spleen to the thoracic cavity through the diaphragmatic defect. ... Five trocars were placed in the upper abdomen, and we explored the abdominal cavity with 30-degree laparoscope. Prolapsed small ...
There is no standard technique on the method of closure following cesarean delivery. It is unclear as which technique and ... will review closure of each step post cesarean section and provide evidence-based recommendations for closure technique. ... analyze the available resources and evaluate the evidence for closure of each layer post cesarean section. The following ... suture material should be used for closure of cesarean section in order to get the best results with minimal complications. The ...
... early primary abdominal closure failed due to severe peritonitis. After negative pressure wound therapy for several months, an ... it should only be considered as a definitive closure technique; it destabilizes the outer layer of the abdominal wall, allowing ... source control of abdominal infection, and (3) delayed abdominal closure [3]. Thus, a severe abdominal infection may extend the ... Primary fascia closure is an ideal solution to restore abdominal closure; however, it is difficult to perform in an OA with ...
... and techniques to control seroma and other wound complications. In the setting of contamination, a delayed primary closure of ... Operatively, component separation techniques are performed on complex hernias in order to medialize the rectus fascia and ... Abstract and Other Interventional Techniques Background Although laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair was described about 30 ... achieve a tension-free closure. Other important principles of hernia repair include complete reduction of the hernia sac, wide ...
Abdominal wound dehiscence, hernia, polydioxanone, wound closure techniques. Introduction. Wound dehiscence after abdominal ... The technique used in an ideal abdominal closure should offer the strength to prevent wound dehiscence and the adaptability to ... Influence of abdominal-wound closure technique on complications after surgery: a randomized study. Lancet 1999; 353: 1563-1567. ... Abdominal wound evisceration. Curr Surg 1983; 40: 432-434.. *Dubay DA, Franz M. Acute wound healing: the biology of acute wound ...
Tim Crowe outlines three practical surgical techniques that are effective in managing traumatic or surgical wounds. ... After several hundred abdominal fascial continuous closures without complications, I expanded its use to the stomach, intestine ... The interrupted suture closure took on average 90 seconds, the continuous closure 50 seconds and the staple closure 12 seconds ... The definition of wound dead space is a space where, after its closure, air is present. According to surgical research ...
1 randomisation into either abdominal wall closure with a continuous slowly absorbable suture in small-stitch technique without ... Secondary endpoints will be the frequency of surgical site occurrences (including surgical site infections, wound seromas and ... or abdominal wall closure with an additional reinforcement with a retromuscular non-absorbable, macro-pore (pore size ≥ 1000 μm ... The P.E.L.I.O.N. trial will evaluate the efficacy of prophylactic mesh reinforcement after loop ileostomy closure in decreasing ...
SURGICAL PROCEDURES: Minor Surgical Procedures - Procedures such as wound exploratory, wound/laceration closure, abscess ... ADVANCED DIAGNOSTICS: Abdominal Ultrasound is an active imaging technique using the same technology that is used on pregnant ... Many wounds are able to be cleaned and closed initially, but others may require prolonged bandaging and wound care. At times ... SURGICAL PROCEDURES: Abdominal Exploratory - There are several reasons to recommend an abdominal exploratory in dogs and cats. ...
Mesh infections tend to be resistant to wound care techniques and antibiotics, and are generally removed upon discovery. ... Surgical mesh can be used in many different surgical procedures to provide wound closure or support for internal body parts. ... Intra-abdominal Pressure- The pressure present in the abdominal cavity that affects the pressure on the diaphragm and the ... Hernias used to be commonly repaired using sutures and other types of tension-based tissue closure techniques. However, sutures ...
Key Words: Intestinal fistula; Abdominal wound closure techniques; Abdominoplasty; Megacolon; Case reports ... Historically, temporary abdominal closure techniques have included the Bogota bag and the static traction closure Wittmann ... A case series of successful abdominal closure utilizing a novel technique combining a mechanical closure system with a biologic ... Use of dynamic wound closure system in conjunction with vacuum-assisted closure therapy in delayed closure of open abdomen. ...
Abdominal Closure Technique use Abdominal Wound Closure Techniques Abdominal Closure Techniques use Abdominal Wound Closure ... Abdominal Wound Closure use Abdominal Wound Closure Techniques Abdominal Wound Closure Techniques ... Abdominal Compartment Syndrome use Intra-Abdominal Hypertension Abdominal Compartment Syndromes use Intra-Abdominal ... Abdominal Wound Closures use Abdominal Wound Closure Techniques Abdominal, Transverse use Abdominal Muscles ...
Wireless smart bandage promotes faster closure of wounds, enhances skin recovery Some wounds just wont heal. Infections, ... Microscopy technique enables visualization of unseen nanostructures within cells and tissues Inside a living cell, proteins and ... Age-related accumulation of abdominal fat associated with lower muscle density A new study published in the Journal of Clinical ... Stanford researchers create new technique for controlling protein production Thanks to new RNA vaccines, we humans have been ...
... technique, which is a minimally invasive surgical procedure used to repair various types of ... ... The TAPP technique involves accessing the hernia through small incisions in the abdominal wall. A laparoscope, a thin tube with ... Pain management, wound care, and instructions for postoperative recovery are provided to the patient.. It is important to note ... Closure and removal of instruments: Once the mesh is in place, the surgeon ensures proper positioning and fixation. The ...
Designed for teaching and training with vacuum assisted closure and negative pressure wound the ... diabetic wounds, abdominal wounds, trauma wounds, flaps and grafts. Compact and weighting only 2 lbs., this model is easily ... Designed for teaching and training with vacuum assisted closure and negative pressure wound therapy devices, this model ... A great tool for training, competency testing, skills assessment, dressing techniques and use of negative pressure wound ...
  • This study will investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of prone position ventilation techniques in children who develop postoperative acute lung injury after surgery for congenital heart disease. (springer.com)
  • Hypothermia, coagulopathy, and the abdominal compartment syndrome are major postoperative concerns. (nih.gov)
  • In the setting of contamination, a delayed primary closure of the skin and subcutaneous tissues should be considered to minimize the chance of postoperative wound complications. (acohcostarica.com)
  • Postoperative disrupted abdominal wall management by a new tissue expansion technique. (who.int)
  • Secondary endpoints will be the frequency of surgical site occurrences (including surgical site infections, wound seromas and hematomas, and enterocutaneous fistulas), postoperative pain, the number of revision surgeries and health-related quality of life. (biomedcentral.com)
  • However, these complications are relatively rare and can be minimized with proper patient selection, skilled surgical technique, and postoperative care. (laparoscopyhospital.com)
  • However, while ERCP has been widely applied in the outpatient setting due to physicians' proficiency in this technique, the incidence of postoperative complications remains high. (oncotarget.com)
  • On postoperative day 9, dehiscence of the wound and respiratory distress prompt admission to the intensive care unit. (contemporaryobgyn.net)
  • Methods A pragmatic multicentre single-blind RCT allocated patients undergoing midline incision for colorectal cancer to either Hughes closure (double far-near-near-far sutures of 1 nylon suture at 2-cm intervals along the fascia combined with conventional mass closure) or the surgeon's standard closure. (plymouth.ac.uk)
  • Plus Sutures remained cost-saving in all subgroup analyses with cost-savings ranging between £11 (clean wounds) and £140 (non-clean wounds). (bvsalud.org)
  • This article reviews pertinent abdominal wall anatomy, discusses various options for abdominal incisions, and examines various sutures available to surgeons. (medscape.com)
  • There are multiple sutures and suturing techniques practiced worldwide for the closure of abdominal layers following cesarean section. (intechopen.com)
  • For this purpose, early and late term results of patients who underwent application of polydioxanone (PDS) and additional retention sutures for abdominal closure were retrospectively evaluated. (turkjsurg.com)
  • Other reasons are listed as wound infection (9%), broken sutures (8%), fascia necrosis (6%) and loose knots (4%) ( 5 , 6 ). (turkjsurg.com)
  • Abdominal closure using retention sutures for reinforcement is a conventional surgical method that has been discussed for long years in medical literature in various aspects, and is still being performed by using new and more superior materials offered by the contemporary industrial developments. (turkjsurg.com)
  • In our study, patients diagnosed with gastrointestinal system (GIS) malignancy and abdomen closure by using only PDS® and patients who received PDS® as well as reinforcement with retention sutures were compared in terms of early and late post-operative complications. (turkjsurg.com)
  • Sutures hold flesh together through the tension they create by pulling tissues together to close a wound. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Patients in which surgical mesh has been used may resume activity much sooner after the surgical procedure than is usually seen with tension repair techniques such as sutures. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Hernias used to be commonly repaired using sutures and other types of tension-based tissue closure techniques. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Sutures also create a higher post-operative intra-abdominal pressure and consequent breathing problems than mesh. (encyclopedia.com)
  • METHODS: A systematic search of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases was performed to identify literature examining anastomotic leak as the primary outcome to compare studies of laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer using the double-stapling anastomosis technique with or without intraoperative anastomotic reinforcement with sutures. (bvsalud.org)
  • The surgeon tries to tighten the skin by cutting out too much skin and then closes the superficial layers of the wound with sutures under too much tension (too tightly). (cosmeticsurg.net)
  • This refers to the closure of the incision with sutures. (cosmeticsurg.net)
  • Wound temporization with traction-assisted internal negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT), using bridging retention sutures, can minimize the effects of edema and elastic recoil that contribute to progressive tissue retraction over time. (medscape.com)
  • A randomised prospective study was undertaken with 60 patients of secondary peritonitis regardless of causative etiology and divided into two equally compatible groups, Group A with open laparostomy and Group B who underwent staged closure with Dynamic Retention sutures. (ijsurgery.com)
  • The monitoring of post- operative IAP is important in deciding the need for any intervention in open laprostomy as well as Dynamic Retention Sutures with modified Bagota techniques. (ijsurgery.com)
  • Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES). (lookformedical.com)
  • The success of a gynecologic procedure performed through an abdominal incision depends on careful selection of the incision site and proper closure of the wound. (medscape.com)
  • The surgeon needs to consider multiple factors before making an abdominal incision. (medscape.com)
  • A thorough understanding of abdominal wall anatomy is essential for choosing and making the proper surgical incision. (medscape.com)
  • Standard technique for abdominal wall closure should be practiced considering the need to provide good support, prevent infections, sinus formation, and incision pain and scar dehiscence. (intechopen.com)
  • The simple running suturing technique involves using a continuous suture to close a wound or incision. (mediarchitect.net)
  • Two novel ways of the abdominal access route, the single-port/incision laparoscopic appendectomy (SPILA) technique and NOTES (natural orifice transluminal surgery), have emerged in recent years. (bcl2signaling.com)
  • Incisional hernias are hernias that occur anywhere in the abdomen wall in an area of a prior surgical incision (wound). (drmatthewlublin.com)
  • When an incision is made through the abdominal wall for a surgery, that area is inherently weaker than other areas of the abdominal wall. (drmatthewlublin.com)
  • Incisional hernias usually may result from 1) poor wound healing whether from infection, obesity, poor nutrition, or certain medications (most commonly steroids), and 2) repeated wear and tear to the surgical incision. (drmatthewlublin.com)
  • Most any prior abdominal operation or incision can develop into an incisional hernia. (drmatthewlublin.com)
  • In other words, if a hernia developed after a simple suture repair of the wound (closing the incision with a stitch or suture only), then the hernia should be closed another way. (drmatthewlublin.com)
  • Her cesarean delivery is performed without incident, and the decision is made to empirically place a Prevena closed incision wound VAC. (contemporaryobgyn.net)
  • We aimed to investigate whether this technique would reduce the rate of dehiscence. (regionh.dk)
  • CONCLUSION: The standardized procedure of closing the midline laparotomy by using a "small steps" technique of continuous suturing with a slowly absorbable (polydioxanone) suture material reduces the rate of fascial dehiscence. (regionh.dk)
  • Tolstrup, M-B , Watt, SK & Gögenur, I 2017, ' Reduced Rate of Dehiscence After Implementation of a Standardized Fascial Closure Technique in Patients Undergoing Emergency Laparotomy ', Annals of Surgery , bind 265, nr. 4, s. 821-826. (regionh.dk)
  • Wound dehiscence after abdominal operations is a multi-factorial problem in which local and systemic factors are involved. (turkjsurg.com)
  • Wound dehiscence may also develop secondary to hematoma causing suture loosening, increased intra-abdominal pressure due to post-operative persistent cough or vomiting ( 3 , 4 ). (turkjsurg.com)
  • It is used to relieve tension on the edges of the wound and prevent wound dehiscence following laparotomy as a retention reinforcement. (turkjsurg.com)
  • It is used for patients with a high potential for wound dehiscence (emergency laparotomies, revision laparotomies, peritonitis/ileus, elderly patients, bronchopulmonary infections, malignancy operations, operations that last long, coagulation abnormalities). (turkjsurg.com)
  • Sixteen patients (ten with one or more intestinal fistula) developed abdominal wall dehiscence were included in this study. (who.int)
  • [ 9 ] Over time, direct primary closure becomes difficult, if not impossible, and is often plagued by high rates of dehiscence and early complications. (medscape.com)
  • Surgical wound dehiscence. (lookformedical.com)
  • Obviously, if it's a clean wound with no signs of infection, we don't culture, but we always culture everything if we suspect the patient has an infection somewhere. (allnurses.com)
  • wound infection. (edu.pk)
  • Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTI), selected Surgical Site Infections (following colon (COLO) and abdominal hysterectomy (HYST) procedures), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Bacteremia LabID Event, Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) LabID Event, and Ventilator-Associated Event (VAE). (cdc.gov)
  • In this case, we performed abdominal wall restoration using an acellular dermal matrix (ADM) and skin grafts in a patient under long-term OA treatment due to intestinal perforation accompanied by open pelvic fractures and wound infection. (jtraumainj.org)
  • ABSTRACT To determine the microbiology of wound infection following caesarean section and to evaluate the use of Gram stain for the predicton of subsequent microbiological culture results, 1319 surgical wounds were followed up. (who.int)
  • Organisms seen by Gram stain yielded a sensitivity of 96.6%, specificity of 88.9%, positive predictive value of 97.7% and negative predictive value of 84.2% when used to predict positive culture results for bacterial wound infection. (who.int)
  • Blood, chocolate (Diagnolab, We conducted this study to define the Barcelona, Spain) and MacConkey (MAST prevalence of pathogenic organisms in Diagnostics, Merseyside, United Kingdom) post-caesarean wound infection in our hos- agars were used to isolate Gram-positive pital and to evaluate the use of Gram stain and Gram-negative aerobic microorgan- to predict subsequent microbiological cul- isms. (who.int)
  • Evisceration and post-operative wound infection were significantly lower in Group 2 as compared to Group 1 (p=0.008 and p=0.002). (turkjsurg.com)
  • Since I am not in favor of burying suture of any kind in traumatic wounds because it enhances the chance for infection to develop, I have used the polybutester a great deal for this type of closure. (dvm360.com)
  • Research has shown that even having one buried suture in a clean-contaminated wound increases the likelihood of infection occurring by 200 percent. (dvm360.com)
  • This equates to a more economical way to close traumatic and intentional surgical wounds, less wound infection and less overall complications. (dvm360.com)
  • RESULTS: All animals survived, and no leakage, intestinal obstruction, or wound infection was observed during the experiment. (bvsalud.org)
  • Because SSIs are primarily acquired during the surgical procedure while the wound is open, a number of infection control practices merit scrutiny in the operating room (OR). (isid.org)
  • Moshe S. Surgical Management of intra- abdominal infection: is there any evidence? (ijsurgery.com)
  • Her previous cesarean delivery was notable for a 6-month recovery secondary to a wound infection requiring surgical debridement, prolonged use of wound vacuum-assisted closure (VAC), and multiple courses of antibiotics. (contemporaryobgyn.net)
  • 1 It is commonly mistaken for infection because of the impressive wounds and marked purulence. (contemporaryobgyn.net)
  • Abdominal CT scan showed prolapsed intestine and spleen to the thoracic cavity through the diaphragmatic defect. (sages.org)
  • Five trocars were placed in the upper abdomen, and we explored the abdominal cavity with 30-degree laparoscope. (sages.org)
  • Carbon dioxide gas is introduced into the abdominal cavity to create a pneumoperitoneum, which lifts the abdominal wall away from the organs, providing space for the surgical instruments and clear visualization. (laparoscopyhospital.com)
  • Trocars, specialized instruments with valves, are inserted through the small incisions to access the abdominal cavity. (laparoscopyhospital.com)
  • [ 10 , 11 ] Modifications of this technology (including incisional internal vacuum-assisted therapy, which utilizes a partially buried sponge and closed suction drainage through a small skin opening) have been shown to expedite cavity collapse and facilitate delayed primary closure of large and/or contaminated wounds. (medscape.com)
  • When a person has an incisional hernia, abdominal organs, most commonly the small intestine or omentum (a layer of abdominal fat that coats the abdominal cavity), may protrude through this hole and create a visible lump or bulge. (drmatthewlublin.com)
  • An open technique (mini-laparotomy) in which the operator dissects into the abdominal cavity to directly visualize the peritoneum and incise it to insert the catheter in a more directed fashion is less often done and is not discussed here. (msdmanuals.com)
  • HART (Hughes Abdominal Repair Trial) assessed the effect of an alternative suture method on the incidence of incisional hernia following colorectal cancer surgery. (plymouth.ac.uk)
  • Although OA is a helpful method in the early stages of treatment for patients with trauma, it may result in delayed morbidity from conditions such as incisional hernia, abdominal abscess, and enteroatmospheric fistula (EAF). (jtraumainj.org)
  • Prolonged hospital stay, increased incisional hernia incidence and the consequent required revision surgeries may provide an idea about the extent to which wound recovery deteriorates post-operative comfort ( 1 , 2 ). (turkjsurg.com)
  • The P.E.L.I.O.N. trial will evaluate the efficacy of prophylactic mesh reinforcement after loop ileostomy closure in decreasing the rate of incisional hernia versus standard closure alone. (biomedcentral.com)
  • P rophylactic E ffect of retromuscular mesh during L oop I leostomy closure O n incisional her N ia incidence - a multicentre randomized patient- and observer-blind trial (P.E.L.I.O.N Trial). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Therefore, achieving early primary fascial closure after repair of incisional hernia with LOD is very important for patient's long-term quality of life. (jwmr.org)
  • Incisional hernia represents a common and potentially serious complication of open abdominal surgery, with up to 20% of all patients undergoing laparotomy subsequently developing an incisional hernia. (researchgate.net)
  • Peritoneal stretching may be more responsible for shoulder pain but has less effect on intensity of abdominal pain or incisional pain. (ancasta.pl)
  • Incisional hernias may cause discomfort or pain near or around the belly button, when abdominal contents get caught in the hole. (drmatthewlublin.com)
  • If an incisional hernia develops, it should not be repaired by using the same techniques used at the original operation. (drmatthewlublin.com)
  • The above video demonstrates the technique of laparoscopic repair of an incisional hernia. (drmatthewlublin.com)
  • It is unclear as which technique and suture material should be used for closure of cesarean section in order to get the best results with minimal complications. (intechopen.com)
  • Other important principles of hernia repair include complete reduction of the hernia sac, wide mesh overlap, and techniques to control seroma and other wound complications. (acohcostarica.com)
  • Complications associated with wound healing after abdominal tumor operations continue to be a significant problem. (turkjsurg.com)
  • After several hundred abdominal fascial continuous closures without complications, I expanded its use to the stomach, intestine, esophagus, blood vessels, other fascia and the skin. (dvm360.com)
  • As with any surgical procedure, there are potential risks and complications associated with laparoscopic hernia repair with the large sac TAPP technique. (laparoscopyhospital.com)
  • As if this were not enough, the Lockwood technique also has fewer complications than the traditional method. (cosmeticsurg.net)
  • PurposeTo assess 7-year outcomes after complex ventral hernia (CVH) repair using pre-operative Botulinum toxin A (BTA) injection and the Macquarie System of management.Methods Clinical examination and functional non-contrast abdominal CT scans were used to assess complications and recurrences encountered in a prospective series of 88 consecutive CV. (researchgate.net)
  • They play a crucial position in wound closing, ensuring correct healing and reducing the risk of complications. (love4allnations.org)
  • Specific pathologies like severe intraabdominal sepsis, trauma requiring damage control, abdominal compartment syndrome, stagedabdominal repair and other complex abdominal pathologies can be managed with a noveltechnique of Vacuum Assisted Closure dressing. (edu.pk)
  • Open abdomen (OA) management is a life-saving strategy for patients with trauma who requires damage control surgery for a severe abdomen injury, such as compartment syndrome, uncontrolled abdominal contamination, and abdominal wall tissue loss [ 1 ]. (jtraumainj.org)
  • Prospective study of the incidence and outcome of intra-abdominal hypertension and the abdominal compartment syndrome. (ijsurgery.com)
  • Kaam PC, Gulsah S, Gurhan S. Abdominal compartment syndrome: current problems and new strategies. (ijsurgery.com)
  • Lawrence D, Porter John M, Simon RJ, Ivatury Rao R. Intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome. (ijsurgery.com)
  • OBJECTIVE: In elective surgery, it is well documented that a midline laparotomy should be closed with a slowly absorbable monofilament suture material in a continuous technique, in a ratio of at least 4 : 1. (regionh.dk)
  • METHODS: A standardized procedure of closing the midline laparotomy by using a "small steps" technique of continuous suturing with a slowly absorbable (polydioxanone) suture material in a wound-suture ratio of minimum 1 : 4 was introduced in June 2014. (regionh.dk)
  • Objectives During temporary abdominal closure (TAC) with damage control laparotomy (DCL), infusion volume and negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) output volume are associated with the success and prognosis of primary fascial closure. (highwire.org)
  • Abdominal Closing: Ethibond stitches are suited to abdominal closing in procedures like laparotomy or hernia repair. (love4allnations.org)
  • Diagnostic peritoneal lavage (DPL) is an invasive emergency procedure used to detect hemoperitoneum and help determine the need for laparotomy following abdominal trauma. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Les micro-organismes mis en évidence par coloration de Gram ont donné une sensibilité de 96,6 %, une spécificité de 88,9 %, une valeur prédictive positive de 97,7 % et une valeur prédictive négative de 84,2 % lorsqu'ils étaient utilisés pour prévoir les résultats de culture positifs pour les infections bactériennes des plaies. (who.int)
  • Aspirates were obtained by from post-caesarean wound infections has preparing the wound area with alcohol, in- also been reported, however pathogenicity serting a sterile needle through the healing in this setting was not precisely known. (who.int)
  • The quilting suture technique, in which the skin flaps are sutured to the pectoralis muscle, leads to a significant reduction of seroma with a decrease in the number of aspirations and surgical site infections. (bvsalud.org)
  • Assessing the severity of intra-abdominal Infections: the value of APACHE II Scoring System. (ijsurgery.com)
  • I'll use clean gloves for superficial wounds, incisions, etc., but for anything deeper than an abrasion, I use sterile technique! (allnurses.com)
  • The TAPP technique involves accessing the hernia through small incisions in the abdominal wall. (laparoscopyhospital.com)
  • The surgeon makes several small incisions in the abdominal wall, typically ranging from 5 to 10 mm in size. (laparoscopyhospital.com)
  • Skin closure: The simple running technique is often employed to close surgical incisions or lacerations on the skin surface. (mediarchitect.net)
  • Gastrointestinal surgeries: In procedures such as appendectomy, cholecystectomy, or bowel resection, the simple running technique may be used to close the abdominal wall or intestinal incisions. (mediarchitect.net)
  • Obstetric and gynecological surgeries: During cesarean section deliveries or gynecological procedures like hysterectomy, the simple running technique can be employed for closing uterine or abdominal incisions. (mediarchitect.net)
  • Orthopedic surgeries: In certain orthopedic procedures, such as tendon repairs or closure of muscle incisions, the simple running technique may be used to secure the tissues. (mediarchitect.net)
  • Methods This single-center retrospective analysis targeted patients managed with TAC during emergency surgery for trauma or intra-abdominal sepsis between January 2011 and December 2019. (highwire.org)
  • Prognostic scoring systems to predict outcome in peritonitis and intra-abdominal sepsis. (ijsurgery.com)
  • Preopera- tive adjuncts such as the injection of botulinum toxin and progressive preoperative pneumoperitoneum are proven to help achieve fascial closure in patients with hernia defects and/or loss of domain. (acohcostarica.com)
  • Temporary closure of the open abdomen: a systematic review on delayed primary fascial closure in patients witn an open abdomen. (ijsurgery.com)
  • The authors review the physiologic basis, indications, techniques, and results of the planned reoperation approach to severe trauma. (nih.gov)
  • The skills that healthcare professionals learn with this model can be used to obtain positive outcomes with a variety of chronic and acute wound types, such as other pressure ulcers, diabetic wounds, abdominal wounds, trauma wounds, flaps and grafts. (cpr-savers.com)
  • With the upcoming idea of Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES) in the recent years and noticing the lack of feasibility of the, Background: Modifications to conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy (CLC) are aimed at decreasing abdominal wall trauma and improving cosmetic outcome. (ancasta.pl)
  • Collect full thickness samples of the tract as with open surgery, suture the defects, test the closure, and perform local lavage prior to replacement in the abdomen. (vin.com)
  • Laparoscopic hernia repair with the large sac TAPP technique offers several advantages over open surgery. (laparoscopyhospital.com)
  • Performing surgery for Laparoscopic Hernia Repair with Large Sac using the TAPP technique requires specialized skills and training. (laparoscopyhospital.com)
  • He is board certified and recertified in both general and plastic surgery, he is renowned for his expertise in reconstructive surgery, particularly with hernia and abdominal wall reconstructions and in oncoplastic breast reconstruction. (mdanderson.org)
  • On occasion, abdominal surgery can sometimes lead to chronic abdominal nerve pain or chronic pelvic nerve pain. (ancasta.pl)
  • Intensity of abdominal and shoulder pain were assessed 0, 1, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours after surgery and recorded on a visual analog scale (VAS) and verbal rating scale (VRS). (ancasta.pl)
  • A hernia of this type usually presents with a bulge at or near the area of the prior surgery (a surgical wound). (drmatthewlublin.com)
  • Initially, a video camera is inserted in between the layers of the abdominal wall in order to provide visualization of the surgery. (drmatthewlublin.com)
  • Wounds were checked the day after intervention (C1), on patient discharge (third day after c-section, C3), ten days after surgery (C10) and twenty days after surgery (C20) by an external physician. (gynaecologyjournal.com)
  • An exploratory abdominal open surgery is performed when a foreign object has obstructed the gastrointestinal tract. (timetobuybc.ca)
  • enhance healing and care of soft tissue wounds. (edu.pk)
  • A new technique has been presented that results in an acceleration of delayed primary healing with full thickness skin and subcutaneous tissue coverage. (who.int)
  • Rather the mesh itself fills the wound and allows tissue to grow into and around it. (encyclopedia.com)
  • A mesh sling may be used and attached to the abdominal wall, where the body tissue will grow around and into it to provide strength and support. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The multimodal approach included botulinum toxin A (BTA) injections to the abdominal wall flat muscles (external oblique, internal oblique, and transverse abdominus), installation of an abdominal reapproximation anchor (ABRA) dynamic tissue system (DTS), and porcine urinary bladder matrix (PUBM) xenografts. (jwmr.org)
  • The abdominal reapproximation anchor (ABRA, Canica Design Inc.) dynamic tissue system (DTS) allows for successful closure of the catastrophic open abdomen, largely by acting as a "faux linea alba" and can be used in conjunction with the above tools to achieve primary fascial closure. (jwmr.org)
  • The advent of microsurgical techniques has allowed this versatile flap to be transposed to repair soft tissue defects of the head and neck. (medscape.com)
  • Rectus abdominis free tissue transfer allows for transfer of a large vascularized segment of skin and muscle from the abdominal wall to its intended recipient site. (medscape.com)
  • Designed for teaching and training with vacuum assisted closure and negative pressure wound therapy devices, this model features a large sacral Stage IV pressure ulcer* (NPUAP 2007 Pressure Ulcer Staging Guidelines), with eschar, subcutaneous fat, undermining, tunneling, slough, eschar and exposed bone (with osteomyelitis) and a Stage III pressure ulcer with subcutaneous fat and granulation tissue. (cpr-savers.com)
  • You can see that the Lockwood technique has much less dissection of the tissue. (cosmeticsurg.net)
  • When suturing the wound closed, the technique puts the most tension on the Scarpa's fascia, which is the deeper layer of the tissue. (cosmeticsurg.net)
  • [ 2-4 ] Pending negative cultures and final tissue pathology also influence the timing of definitive closure in patients undergoing staged replacement of infected total joints and oncologic reconstruction, respectively. (medscape.com)
  • When used as an adjunct in wound reconstruction, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) potentiates healing through increased local blood flow and granulation, reduced tissue edema, and controlled bacterial proliferation. (medscape.com)
  • These techniques remove only a small amount of skin tissue if any at all. (timetobuybc.ca)
  • It is possible to find different techniques using physical barriers 2-7 and the characteristics of the biomaterial and the design of the membrane used in guided tissue regeneration play an important role in obtaining good results 8 . (bvsalud.org)
  • This technique is based on Melcher's 10 (1970) observation that the type of tissue formed in a given area depends on the type of cells populating that area. (bvsalud.org)
  • In addition, Dr. Butler is an active clinical and basic science researcher and mentor with an interest in post-oncologic and torso reconstruction, including the abdominal wall, breast, chest wall, pelvis, perineum and spine. (mdanderson.org)
  • Plastic and reconstructive surgeries: The simple running technique can be applied in plastic surgeries for wound closure, skin graft fixation, or flap reconstruction. (mediarchitect.net)
  • Traction-assisted internal NPWT provides a safe and effective alternative to reduce wound burden and facilitate definitive closure in cases where delayed reconstruction of high-tension wounds is planned. (medscape.com)
  • [ 1 ] This situation is frequently encountered during closure of prior fasciotomies or delayed reconstruction of traumatic/contaminated abdominal wall defects. (medscape.com)
  • Our preliminary results show that this skin closure system has a potential application for abdominal wall closure in case of C-section. (gynaecologyjournal.com)
  • Because it has a superior stretch quality, the polybutester is used as a continuous, interrupted, near-far-far-near (NFFN) and either interrupted or continuous vertical mattress suture for fascial and skin closures. (dvm360.com)
  • In these situations, incorporation of continuous dermatotraction can expedite wound reapposition by capitalizing on the viscoelastic properties of skin to induce mechanical creep. (medscape.com)
  • The external oblique muscle is the largest and most superficial of the flat muscles of the abdominal wall. (medscape.com)
  • Two important surgical landmarks are formed by the aponeuroses of the abdominal wall muscles. (medscape.com)
  • Botulinum toxin A (BTA) injections can be used concurrently with AbThera to relax the abdominal flat muscles. (jwmr.org)
  • This aids in myofascial closure by providing dynamic tension that gradually facilitates relaxation of the rectus myofascial units, allowing the myofascial gap (MFG), defined as distance between the medial edges of the rectus muscles, to decrease over time [ 2 , 5 , 9 ]. (jwmr.org)
  • The problem is that a lot of the blood supply coming from the abdominal muscles is cut. (cosmeticsurg.net)
  • Muscles forming the ABDOMINAL WALL including RECTUS ABDOMINIS, external and internal oblique muscles, transversus abdominis, and quadratus abdominis. (lookformedical.com)
  • Abdominal muscles and intestines are moved aside. (seattleneuro.com)
  • This report was followed by a few other studies that evaluated the applicability and feasibility of ERAS in emergency surgical settings ranging from simple closure of a perforated peptic ulcer to major abdominal operations. (medscape.com)
  • Surgical mesh can be used in many different surgical procedures to provide wound closure or support for internal body parts. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The mesh is placed underneath the defect or hole (the hernia) in the abdominal wall. (drmatthewlublin.com)
  • Prior to using the technique of mesh closure, the hernia was closed by sewing the edges of the hole (the hernia) together. (drmatthewlublin.com)
  • Various techniques are used to obtain rapid temporary control of bleeding and hollow visceral spillage. (nih.gov)
  • Historically, temporary abdominal closure techniques have included the Bogota bag and the static traction closure Wittmann Patch [ 3 , 4 , 7 , 8 ]. (jwmr.org)
  • This research investigates the need to restrict infusion corresponding to delayed anastomosis by evaluating whether the difference between early anastomosis and delayed anastomosis in temporary abdominal closure management using negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is associated with infusion volume and NPWT output volume. (highwire.org)
  • The techniques may be done with mini-approaches, laparoscopy, or laparoscopic-assistance. (vin.com)
  • Some laparoscopic-assisted techniques have progressed to completely laparoscopic, and some laparoscopic techniques have been done with mini-approaches or specialized entry systems such as wound retraction or SILS TM access (introduction of multiple instruments through a single laparoscope port). (vin.com)
  • Gastrointestinal biopsy often is accompanied by regional lymph node biopsy, which may be done with an open technique using laparoscopic assistance. (vin.com)
  • This video is about laparoscopic hernia repair with the large sac transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) technique, which is a minimally invasive surgical procedure used to repair various types of hernias. (laparoscopyhospital.com)
  • In this essay, we will explore the key aspects and benefits of laparoscopic hernia repair using the large sac TAPP technique. (laparoscopyhospital.com)
  • One of the primary advantages of laparoscopic hernia repair with the large sac TAPP technique is the ability to thoroughly examine the hernia sac and surrounding tissues. (laparoscopyhospital.com)
  • Laparoscopic hernia repair with the large sac TAPP technique is an advanced and effective approach for the treatment of hernias with larger sacs. (laparoscopyhospital.com)
  • The problems of the learning curve have passed for laparoscopic cholecystectomy, but the rigors of mastering the techniques and technologies necessary for so-called "advanced" procedures remain for the majority of surgeons. (sls.org)
  • Effects of Intraperitoneal Lidocaine on Abdominal and Shoulder Pain after a Laparoscopic Cholecystec. (ancasta.pl)
  • DPL is invasive and risks iatrogenic damage to abdominal organs during the procedure. (msdmanuals.com)
  • After negative pressure wound therapy for several months, an acellular dermal matrix graft followed by a skin graft were successfully used as treatments. (jtraumainj.org)
  • A combination of acellular dermal matrix graft, negative pressure wound therapy, and skin graft techniques is a considerable management sequence for patients subjected to delayed OA treatment. (jtraumainj.org)
  • The large size and depth of the Stage IV pressure ulcer, as well as the undermining and tunneling, make it ideal for practicing the proper dressing and preparation of a large wound for use with a negative pressure wound therapy device. (cpr-savers.com)
  • A great tool for training, competency testing, skills assessment, dressing techniques and use of negative pressure wound therapy devices! (cpr-savers.com)
  • The simple running suturing technique is commonly used in various surgical procedures, particularly in surgeries involving superficial or easily approximated wounds. (mediarchitect.net)
  • Caesarean Section is one of the commonest abdominal surgeries performed worldwide. (gynaecologyjournal.com)
  • Because Fournier gangrene is predominately an infectious process of the superficial and deep fascial planes, understanding the anatomic relationship of the skin and subcutaneous structures of the perineum and abdominal wall is important. (medscape.com)
  • In these patients, the abdomen closure has been an important issue whereby it can be managed either by primary closure or any techniques of laparostomy. (ijsurgery.com)
  • The most common pattern used is the NFFN with the far bites providing closure of the deep subcutaneous tissues and the near bites apposing the skin. (dvm360.com)
  • After reposition of the abdominal organ, we repaired the diaphragmatic defect with interrupted suture. (sages.org)
  • Seventeen wounds (94%) were closed directly, whereas the remaining defect required coverage with a local muscle flap and skin graft. (medscape.com)
  • In dentistry, GBR is commonly understood as a surgical technique to improve bone defect in a particular region through new bone formation. (bvsalud.org)
  • however, early primary abdominal closure failed due to severe peritonitis. (jtraumainj.org)
  • Delayed closure of an open abdomen (OA) is a clinically challenging task despite its various modalities. (jtraumainj.org)
  • Operatively, component separation techniques are performed on complex hernias in order to medialize the rectus fascia and achieve a tension-free closure. (acohcostarica.com)
  • In the large sac TAPP technique, the surgeon specifically addresses hernias with larger sacs, which may contain a significant portion of the abdominal contents. (laparoscopyhospital.com)
  • The purpose of this illustrative pictorial series is to demonstrate the value of an image technique known as 3D Volume Rendering (3DVR) for the pre‐operative visualization and assessment of complex abdominal hernias. (researchgate.net)
  • Any way,she said wound care does not require sterile tecnique,its a clean procedure. (allnurses.com)
  • I was taught to use sterlie tecnique for wounds.All the texts also say to use sterile gloves. (allnurses.com)
  • i do homecare and sterile wound care is a rarity. (allnurses.com)
  • WE use clean gloves for all wound care and sterile for central lines. (allnurses.com)
  • Our hospital is changing policy to require sterile technique for all wound care. (allnurses.com)
  • The wound is not clean so there is no need for sterile gloves. (allnurses.com)
  • I was also taught to use sterile technique when performing wound care. (allnurses.com)
  • I too was taught to use sterile technique with all wound care. (allnurses.com)
  • The intestines and other blood vessels are put back in place, and the wound area is washed out with sterile antibiotics. (seattleneuro.com)
  • Prepare the skin using sterile technique with a povidone-iodine solution (eg, Betadine) and sterile gauze. (medscape.com)
  • Using sterile technique, palpate the superior orbital ridge and locate the supraorbital foramen again. (medscape.com)
  • A small subset of complex abdominal hernia cases were selected from our early clinical experience with 3DVR to illustrate the value o. (researchgate.net)
  • After the index operation, during which a large abdominal exposure is necessary for appropriate management of these pathologies, definitive closure of the abdomen may not be possible due to patient instability [ 2 , 3 ]. (jwmr.org)
  • Results Between August 2014 and February 2018, 802 patients were randomized to either Hughes closure (401) or the standard mass closure group (401). (plymouth.ac.uk)
  • closure: a 7-year experience with 112 patients. (edu.pk)
  • Planned reoperation offers a simple and effective alternative to the traditional surgical management of complex or multiple injuries in critically wounded patients. (nih.gov)
  • In the presence of co-morbid factors that disrupt wound healing in surgical patients with gastrointestinal malignancy, retention suture can be safely used as a supplement for optimal wound care. (turkjsurg.com)
  • L'objectif de notre étude était d'évaluer la qualité de sa prise en charge chez les patients adultes hospitalisés au CNHUHKM de Cotonou. (bvsalud.org)
  • En dépit de la forte prévalence et de la sévérité de la douleur, près de 2 sur 3 patients (70,1%) d'entre eux étaient au moins modérément satisfaits du traitement antalgique. (bvsalud.org)
  • On analysis of both groups, the patients undergoing modified bagota also had better outcomes in terms of significantly lower value on pain scale and lesser duration of hospital stay, early resumption of activities however, in failed cases of group A these advantages were outweighed by conversion to open laparostomy hence this calls for appropriate selection of closure technique at the very outset. (ijsurgery.com)
  • Koniaris Leonidas G, George D, Peter A. Dynamic retention: a technique for closure of the complex abdomen in critically III patients. (ijsurgery.com)
  • [ 8 ] In a retrospective cohort of 370 patients undergoing emergency major abdominal procedures, Wisely et al reported shorter hospital stays and better outcomes in the ERAS group. (medscape.com)
  • We introduced the management of a patient who had a delayed OA treatment spanning approximately 3 months due to severe abdominal contamination. (jtraumainj.org)
  • Exogenous contamination of wounds is also important in the pathophysiology of SSIs, particularly for clean surgical procedures. (isid.org)
  • wound/ostomy/skin care RN .She told me that only clean technique is needed with most wounds. (allnurses.com)
  • I began using the material first for routine fascia and skin closure in 1985 because it had properties that were similar to polypropylene, being non-reactive and with an excellent track record for superiority in strength and knot security. (dvm360.com)
  • The use of skin staples saves significant amounts of surgical closure time when compared to standard suture closure. (dvm360.com)
  • The 'traditional tummy tuck' surgical technique is to lift up (dissect) all the skin of your abdomen up to the rib margins and stretch it down to your pubis. (cosmeticsurg.net)
  • Notice that the Lockwood technique lifts only the skin along a central tunnel in the middle of the abdomen. (cosmeticsurg.net)
  • By having less dissection of the tissues with the Lockwood technique, the skin flap preserves most of its blood supply. (cosmeticsurg.net)
  • Four items have been found to have an impact on this problem: skin disinfection, antibiotic prophylaxis, placental manual extraction and skin closure technique. (gynaecologyjournal.com)
  • To reduce variability all the skin closures were performed by the same surgeon (ADP), an experienced obstetrician. (gynaecologyjournal.com)
  • It is possible to have a surgical closure with or without a drain (the drain stops the build-up of fluid beneath the skin). (timetobuybc.ca)
  • Today, it is a suture I reach for when faced with closures that are prone to significant tension and edema. (dvm360.com)
  • Loss of domain often complicates attempts at delayed wound closure in regions of high tension. (medscape.com)
  • Loss of domain is a common problem associated with large open wounds in areas of increased tension. (medscape.com)
  • This feature is specially beneficial in areas with increased tension or strain, wherever reliable wound closing is essential. (love4allnations.org)
  • However,we were changing a VAC dressing (vacuum assisted closure) of a HUGE abdominal wound. (allnurses.com)
  • Collier M. Know-how: vacuum-assisted closure (VAC). (edu.pk)
  • The application of a vacuum across the surface of a wound through a foam dressing cut to fit the wound. (lookformedical.com)
  • Aggressive surgical debridement results in pathergy and a paradoxical worsening of the wound. (contemporaryobgyn.net)
  • Along with debridement, surgical procedures may include complex closure, suprapubic tube placement, and fecal diversion. (medscape.com)
  • Despite improvements in anaesthetic and surgical techniques, severe pain is reported in as many as 25-50% of children. (bvsalud.org)
  • The key of this procedure is a suturing technique in narrow area and vertical situation. (sages.org)
  • The scar from the tummy tuck procedure is a function of the surgical technique used. (cosmeticsurg.net)
  • I have written about the use of the Lockwood technique in the Body lift procedure previously. (cosmeticsurg.net)
  • It's important to note that the choice of suturing technique may vary depending on the surgeon's preference, the nature of the wound, and the specific requirements of the surgical procedure. (mediarchitect.net)
  • Most SSIs arise from the patient's endogenous flora, which contaminates the wound by direct contact during the procedure. (isid.org)
  • Definitive closure of this class 4 wound was facilitated by the antimicrobial and accelerated wound healing properties of PUBM as well as a unique multimodal approach to achieve exemplary results in a patient with multiple complex surgical issues. (jwmr.org)
  • Negative pressure therapy (NPWT) systems, such as AbThera (KCI USA), are a recent addition to the surgeon's toolbox that should only be used as a bridge to definitive closure. (jwmr.org)
  • Therapy continued for 3 to 8 days (mean, 4.3 days), resulting in an average wound surface area reduction of 78% (149 cm 2 vs. 33 cm 2 ) at definitive closure. (medscape.com)
  • The simple running suturing technique is one of the most commonly used methods in various surgical procedures. (mediarchitect.net)
  • There is no standard technique on the method of closure following cesarean delivery. (intechopen.com)
  • This work was presented as a poster presentation at the 2022 Symposium on Advanced Wound Care (SAWC) on October 13, 2022, in Las Vegas, NV, USA. (jwmr.org)
  • Indications for planned reoperation include avoidance of irreversible physiologic insult and inability to obtain direct hemostasis or formal abdominal closure. (nih.gov)
  • Katzenell U, Halperin D. Subtotal petrosectomy with blind sac closure of the external auditory canal-indications and results. (jamanetwork.com)
  • Pre-operative diagnostics should be that expected for the patient with hepatic disease and may include CBC, biochemical profile, bile acids, coagulation profile, and abdominal radiographs and ultrasound. (vin.com)
  • ADVANCED DIAGNOSTICS: Abdominal Ultrasound is an active imaging technique using the same technology that is used on pregnant women. (animalmedicalspecialists.com)